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Scrap Irony
07-13-2006, 12:34 AM
Summer school money is burning a hole in my pocket and I'd like to grab a big screen. Problem is, I haven't bought a new television since Reagan was in the White House. (I didn't even buy that one, as my great-grandmother passed it on when she did.)

I'd like to keep the spending down to $2,500 or so and am completely clueless as to what to purchase. Family has told me (repeatedly) to ignore outlet stores and buy from smaller companies with repair people I trust. But that's looking like an extra $500 or so just on the off chance it'd break down.

I need some help, people. My weeknight entertainment is depending on you!

Cedric
07-13-2006, 12:49 AM
I researched for about a year and I came up with this tv. Hitachi is what I would consider as the best brand.

Stay away from Samsung or Toshiba. Their prices are enticing but their quality is horrible.

http://www.hitachi.us/tv/browse/plasma/plasma/plasma.shtml

macro
07-13-2006, 01:10 AM
Scrap, we had a conversation about this beginning last summer and continuing until this past January. You might want to check it out:

http://www.redszone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=42392

I'm still interested in this subject, as well, but am not going to act too quickly. As of right now, too much of the programming is in the old square format, so you either have a distorted picture or black bars on the sides of the screen. I may wait until most or all programming is in widescreen format.

Jpup
07-13-2006, 01:59 AM
Summer school money is burning a hole in my pocket and I'd like to grab a big screen. Problem is, I haven't bought a new television since Reagan was in the White House. (I didn't even buy that one, as my great-grandmother passed it on when she did.)

I'd like to keep the spending down to $2,500 or so and am completely clueless as to what to purchase. Family has told me (repeatedly) to ignore outlet stores and buy from smaller companies with repair people I trust. But that's looking like an extra $500 or so just on the off chance it'd break down.

I need some help, people. My weeknight entertainment is depending on you!

go to avsforum.com and do some research.

you need to buy based on the size of your room. How far are you going to sit from it?

vanns.com is a good place to purchase TVs online. free shipping and zero tax. they also have lower prices than most places. I have read a lot of good things about them.

I've been trying to decide for months now. I know what I want, but I don't want to let the money go. give me some more info and I'll try to help you.

GAC
07-13-2006, 05:08 AM
Summer school money is burning a hole in my pocket and I'd like to grab a big screen. Problem is, I haven't bought a new television since Reagan was in the White House. (I didn't even buy that one, as my great-grandmother passed it on when she did.)

I'd like to keep the spending down to $2,500 or so and am completely clueless as to what to purchase. Family has told me (repeatedly) to ignore outlet stores and buy from smaller companies with repair people I trust. But that's looking like an extra $500 or so just on the off chance it'd break down.

I need some help, people. My weeknight entertainment is depending on you!

I just bought a Sony HD LCD TV for the new house last week.

Here's a link to the one I just bought. I shopped around a bit, and bought mine at Rex.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?A=details&kw=SOKDFE55A20&is=REG&Q=&O=productlist&sku=379052

Here are some reviews on it....

http://www.epinions.com/Sony_KDF_E55A20_Television/display_~reviews

Do your research Scrap. And when you go into the store play hardball and barter with them. Let them know you have been shopping around. There is steep competition, and right now everyone is coming out with new models, so you can get last year's models cheaper.

beb30
07-13-2006, 11:20 AM
Stay away from Samsung or Toshiba. Their prices are enticing but their quality is horrible.



I'd disagree with this my dad owns a Samsung 50' DLP HDTV and its absolutely amazing and what i consider to be a front runner for me to buy here in the next couple of months.

A little background:

CRT

These are the TVs we all grew up with. As a technology that has been used for over a century, the cathode ray tube has evolved enough to offer outstanding image quality at a relative low price. But eventually these bulky, heavy TVs will be phased out and replaced by flat panel displays.

The CRT is a specialized vacuum tube that has a positive terminal (anode) and a negative terminal (cathode). There are electrons zipping across this tube from the anode to the cathode and by magnetism the flow of electrons can be directed anywhere against a screen. This flow of electrons is called electron beam, which on each pass hits a special phosphor coated screen. Why phosphor? Because it's a material that when exposed to some types of radiation can emit visible light.

In a color CRT TV, the screen is coated with Red, Green and Blue phosphors arranged in dots or stripes and there are three electron beams that moves simultaneously; one for the Red color, one for the Green color and one for the Blue color. This is the so-called RGB model of displays. (To read more about why this model uses the primary colors and the principles that make possible TV, check our TV: The Basics editorial from 2001.)

It is worth mentioning that for a CRT, the absence of the electron beam will result in a complete, slick-as-oil black.

What you need to know about CRT TVs

These dinosaurs are a species destined for extinction, but that doesn’t mean they are not a good choice now. No other existing technology offers a better image quality than a cathode ray tube TV and the reason they are being replaced by flat panel displays is because CRT can’t reach screen sizes bigger than 40’. With plasmas starting at 42” and all modern flat panel displays reaching maximum screen sizes above 50” and up to 100”, consumers prefer flat panel displays over cathode ray tube TVs, even if the former doesn’t offer an image quality as good as the older tube technology.

Advantages:
Still the best image quality
Relatively inexpensive
Excellent blacks

Disadvantages:
Screen sizes will never surpass 40”
Bulky and heavy
Always flicker, even with static images


LCD

Liquid Crystal Display TVs use a fluorescent backlight to send white light through two layers of polarized glass that sandwich a deposit of liquid crystals. By changing voltages these crystals can adopt different positions and that way allow or block the passage of the back white light. These deposits of liquid crystals are arranged in rows across the screen.

For color LCD displays, such as those used in notebook monitors and HDTVs, each pixel is made up of three liquid crystal deposits or cells that act as red, blue, and green filters, following the same RGB model found in cathode ray tubes.


Although LCD displays use a matrix of wires (thus having a discrete arrange of pixels), LCD displays are still analog.

Modern LCD TVs accept and process digital signals but, in order to display the image, they always need to convert signals to analog in the final step.

What you need to know about LCD TVs

The reason why everyone wants an LCD TV is because they take up such little space when compared to traditional tube TVs, while offering bigger screens.

Because of the nature of the technology, LCD suffers from some major drawbacks. First, these tiny crystals take some time to rearrange their position which results in some delay at the moment of setting up a pixel bright and color value. This can create a ghost image when the video source has fast moving visuals, such as those found in video games and action movies.

The time it takes a pixel to change from black to white (rise) and then go back to black (fall) is called response time, which is measured in milliseconds. A few years ago these response times were in the order of the 20 to 30 ms, and lately they have been reduced to 16, 12 and 8 ms. The lower the response time, the faster these crystals can reorder and therefore the better the LCD. If one could compare the response times of a LCD with a CRT, we could say that a cathode ray tube has a response time lower than 1ms.

Unfortunately, there is no standard method to measure the response times and that let manufacturers cheat in their measurement procedures by choosing different methods, creating even a gray-to-gray method that allows them to report lower response times. This method is the one used to market these new monitors from ViewSonic and Samsung as 2ms response time LCDs.

The other major drawbacks of LCD technology are that the backlight will eventually diminish and that LCD panels have a fixed pixel structure (also known as native resolution) whether they are on or off, meaning that any video signal with a resolution different than the one of the LCD panel, will have to be scaled up or down to be displayed on the screen, affecting the quality of the image. This can be easily noticed when you watch a DVD movie (480p) in a high resolution LCD. By being up-scaled to a higher resolution, the image looks pixilated or blocky.

Finally, we’d say that because the backlight is always turned on, LCD TVs have a problem drawing black pixels as these crystals don’t entirely block the back white light. In a cathode ray tube, the electron beam simply doesn’t impact on that pixel when a black pixel has to be drawn; that would be equal to turn off the backlight on a LCD to make a real black. This explains why CRTs still have the best blacks.

Advantages:
Large screen sizes
Compact and light
Doesn’t flicker with static images
Higher resolution than plasma at 42”
No burn-in risk (but has image persistence!)

Disadvantages:
Expensive (in large screen sizes)
Blacks not quite as deep as CRT
Ghosting depending on response times
Image quality is not as good as a CRT

Plasma

You could think of plasma as a combination of LCD and CRT. The plasma display technology is similar to LCD because instead of cells of liquid crystals it uses plasma-filled chambers. When electrical energy reaches these chambers, the plasma (a gas that can emit light) inside them glows like the phosphor coated CRT screens.

What you need to know about Plasma TVs

Because each pixel is lit individually, plasma produces very bright images which immediately catch the eye of consumers. But unfortunately, Plasma biggest drawbacks lie behind its bright images.

Once again, the nature of the technology is the responsible for both its advantages and disadvantages. First, being that the gas found inside these chambers can’t stop emitting light immediately, plasma cannot produce deep blacks as those seen in cathode ray tube screens.

But the biggest drawback found in plasma is the image burn-in. After an extended period of time, static images left on the screen (such as a network logo or a game menu) can produce a ghost or shadow that remains permanently on the screen. This forces you to avoid watching TV channels with station logos or pause video games and DVD movies for long periods of time.

Also, the gas inside the chambers (usually argon, neon or xenon) will eventually fade away, resulting in a typical life span for plasma TVs of 30,000 to 40,000 hours, which means six to ten years of normal TV viewing.

Finally, it is worth mentioning that plasmas have EDTV resolutions in most of the cases and only 50”+ have been able to go beyond a 1366x768 native resolution. Plasmas are also heavier than LCD displays and consume much more power.

Advantages:
Large screen sizes
Better contrast ratios than CRT
Excellent image quality
Good viewing angle

Disadvantages:
Expensive
Burn-in risk
Lower resolutions than LCD and DLP
Blacks not quite as deep as CRT
Consume lot of power
Heavier than LCD displays of same size

DLP

Invented by Texas Instruments, Digital Light Processing is basically a precise, state-of-the-art light switch. DLP is based on an optical semiconductor known as the Digital Micromirror Device, which was invented in 1987 by Dr. Larry Hornbeck of Texas Instruments.

This Digital Micromirror Device, aka DLP chip, is made of a rectangular array of up to 2 million microscopic mirrors that can tilt back and forth in response to on and off signals, reflecting the light coming from a light source.

After reading how the other technologies work you can guess how each pixel will be drawn on the screen.



Coordinated with a digital signal, a lamp and projection lens, these mirrors can reproduce images by tilting toward the light source, thereby reflecting a white pixel onto screen. Titled away from the light source, the correspondent pixel on the screen will remain dark.

With these elements, DLP would only be able to reproduce grayscale images so, in order to add color, most DLP systems introduce a color wheel between the light source (lamp) and the DMD mirror panel. As the color wheel spins, it allows red, green, and blue light to fall onto the mirrors that coordinated with the on and off states of these mirrors can produce more than 16 million of colors.

There are already several DLP chips powering a vast range of rear projection HDTVs and projectors, ranging from 720p DMDs (like the HD2), passing through the HD2+, and up to the latest HD3 and xHD3 chips capable of 1080p visuals. A three-chip DLP system is the one used for digital cinema.

What you need to know about DLP TVs

DLP is the world's only all-digital display technology, from start to finish. That means when you have a DLP TV with a DVI or HDMI input, the video signal will remain digital all the way until it is displayed on the screen, contrary to LCD and Plasma displays in which a digital signal will be transformed to analog in the last step.

Unfortunately no technology is free of problems and DLP is no exception. First, rear projection DLP HDTVs require a lamp, which requires a minimum depth of 12” for the whole system to work and must be replaced every 3,000 hours. Each lamp costs $200+. Also, this lamp takes up to one minute to warm up.

Also, as a consequence of the coloring system, DLP can produce a so called “rainbow effect”, a visual artifact that appears on screen as flashes of red, green, and blue shadows at the edges of the viewer’s peripheral vision. There is consistency with this artifact, but it appears to be more prominent on slow speed color wheels and single-chip systems. Over the last couple of years, televisions manufacturers have developed higher wheel speeds and added two sequences of red, green, and blue on a single wheel, reducing the chances that this artifact will appear, but there are still some instances where the color breakout (produced by the spinning wheel) can be noticed. Thee-chip DLP systems, such as those used in digital cinema, seem to completely eliminate the rainbow effect, but unfortunately a three-chip system is still expensive for the living room.

Advantages:
Large screen sizes
All-digital display technology
Excellent image quality
Good viewing angle
No burn-in

Disadvantages:
Lamp has to be replaced
Rainbow effect
Deeper than LCD and plasma


Personal reccomendation and reccomendation based off Advantages to Disadvantages - DLP

vaticanplum
07-13-2006, 11:28 AM
Oh my lord...i seriously had no idea TVs were so expensive. I thought the high-end ones were at most $500.

What world do I live in? A world where I've lucked into TVs, I guess.

ochre
07-13-2006, 12:01 PM
I picked up one of the sanyo 32" CRT TVs with the built in HDTV tuner and HDMI and all that junk for under $800 a couple of years ago. It's been great. I think that line has been discontinued in favor of their plasma and LCD options. I really like CRT quality better. The OTA tuner does really well and the component video looks pretty good too. I haven't tried HDMI on it yet, but I might, as my dvd player has an HDMI interface as well. I really can't say enough good things about this TV, particularly at the price I paid for it.

beb30
07-13-2006, 12:14 PM
I was just at best buy the other day and they still are selling pretty big CRT HDTV's

Johnny Footstool
07-13-2006, 01:20 PM
Oh my lord...i seriously had no idea TVs were so expensive. I thought the high-end ones were at most $500.

What world do I live in? A world where I've lucked into TVs, I guess.

You must live in a wonderful world of gaslights, buggy whips, and five-cent picture shows.

vaticanplum
07-13-2006, 01:26 PM
You must live in a wonderful world of gaslights, buggy whips, and five-cent picture shows.

That would be nice (for about five minutes). Really I just live in a world of generous hand-me-downs. I am lucky...I didn't realize til this thread how lucky.

GAC
07-13-2006, 01:35 PM
I was just at best buy the other day and they still are selling pretty big CRT HDTV's

The CRTs are still out there, but are gradually being phased out for the newer technology... LCD and DLP.

You can get a CRT for under $1000 pretty much anywhere. But if I'm gonna spend that much, then I'd seriously consider either saving or buying either of the above two.

Also....

And Sanyo, which years ago weren't that well respected in the field, have vastly improved. They ALL are pretty much getting their technology (parts, etc) from the same sources. In fact, alot of these TVs are being built by the same companies (overseas), and then they put their labels on them.

Just do your research before buying.

You can't go wrong IMO with Sony. They have an EXB model that is pretty good and is top of the line (as far as resolution), and runs between 3000-3500. rfs has one and really likes it alot.

flyer85
07-13-2006, 03:51 PM
If you belong to Costco they generally have competetive prices and have the best return policy. You can return it anytime for any reason, period.

KronoRed
07-13-2006, 03:52 PM
You must live in a wonderful world of gaslights, buggy whips, and five-cent picture shows.
25C baseball tickets :D

Rob Dicken
07-13-2006, 11:13 PM
Okay....I work with Electronics daily, as I am a salesperson for Dell, Inc.

This is what you want to do:

STAY AWAY from Sony!! Sony has become rather chalky lately with TVs, and signification of that would have been them TOTALLY dropping out of the Plasma TV market a little over a 1 1/2 years ago. Have you heard that Plasmas will burn out or pool up after a few years? Thank Sony for that!

Fortunately, not all manufacturers are like that.

These are who you want to look into:

Dell
Panasonic
Hitatchi

Stay away from any others! Speaking indicidually and not as a sales person of Dell, they make some of the best TVs I have personally seen. They are cost effective, and have been ranked just under Panasonic in quality from consumer reports. Panasonic has been ranked number 1 for quite sometime. HOWEVER, Panasonic is VERY, VERY expensive. They will usually run anywhere from $500-750 MORE than their competitors.

Right now, Dell has some good deals going on:

42" Plasma Television, HD Built-IN : $1999 + tax
37" LCD Television, HD Built-IN : $1799 + tax
32" LCD Television, HD Built-IN : $1599 + tax

And I can personally vouch for ALL of those TVs, and the 32" especially, since I own one myself.

Heath
07-13-2006, 11:37 PM
I just bought a big 32' TV a couple of years ago. It was $259 at Best Buy.

It has a funny shape in the back for a picture tube. Also, it has a channel up and a channel down key.

I get Reds games - and the Reds are actually the color red!

Electronic stores hate my opinion. Buy the biggest TV you can find cheap. In 5-8 years when your other TV dies, there will be new technology all over the place.

GIK
07-14-2006, 01:00 AM
I spent about $1k on my CRT HD 16:9 Sony. Great picture; recommended.

beb30
07-14-2006, 09:34 AM
Okay....I work with Electronics daily, as I am a salesperson for Dell, Inc.

This is what you want to do:

STAY AWAY from Sony!! Sony has become rather chalky lately with TVs, and signification of that would have been them TOTALLY dropping out of the Plasma TV market a little over a 1 1/2 years ago. Have you heard that Plasmas will burn out or pool up after a few years? Thank Sony for that!

Fortunately, not all manufacturers are like that.

These are who you want to look into:

Dell
Panasonic
Hitatchi

Stay away from any others! Speaking indicidually and not as a sales person of Dell, they make some of the best TVs I have personally seen. They are cost effective, and have been ranked just under Panasonic in quality from consumer reports. Panasonic has been ranked number 1 for quite sometime. HOWEVER, Panasonic is VERY, VERY expensive. They will usually run anywhere from $500-750 MORE than their competitors.

Right now, Dell has some good deals going on:

42" Plasma Television, HD Built-IN : $1999 + tax
37" LCD Television, HD Built-IN : $1799 + tax
32" LCD Television, HD Built-IN : $1599 + tax

And I can personally vouch for ALL of those TVs, and the 32" especially, since I own one myself.


somebody is biased :D

RFS62
07-14-2006, 10:51 AM
I've got a Sony 60" xbr. Best picture I've ever seen.

Go to CNet and read their review.

The 50" is just as good. Make sure the initials xbr are in the model number on any Sony, and it's the top of the line of that model.

Jpup
07-14-2006, 10:59 AM
I've got a Sony 60" xbr. Best picture I've ever seen.

Go to CNet and read their review.

The 50" is just as good. Make sure the initials xbr are in the model number on any Sony, and it's the top of the line of that model.

probably the best TV out there right now. I have been considering the 50" model for several months, but I can't let the money go.

The new models are also about to be released without the "dumbo" ears.

Rob Dicken
07-14-2006, 12:00 PM
somebody is biased :D

It's an opinion. And I mentioned 2 other manufacturers to look into, so no, it's not biased.

I gave information on the televisions I am more familiar with, and that is Dell.

beb30
07-14-2006, 12:26 PM
Understandable, as I was playing around before incase you couldn't see the smiley....

Rob Dicken
07-14-2006, 02:44 PM
Understandable, as I was playing around before incase you couldn't see the smiley....

Okay, sorry about that.

Buckeye33
07-14-2006, 04:43 PM
And what is everyones thoughts on the warranties all these comapnies want you to get with these TVs. I am eventually going to be getting a 50" TV of some sort, is teh warranty worth it?

That 50" XBR Sony does look nice. There just so many damn TVs out now.

beb30
07-14-2006, 05:34 PM
Hmmm when my dad got his 50" Samsung DLP he got a warranty on his and normally he isn't a warranty type of guy so It may be worth it especially when your spending a good amount of money...

Reds Fanatic
07-14-2006, 05:48 PM
And what is everyones thoughts on the warranties all these comapnies want you to get with these TVs. I am eventually going to be getting a 50" TV of some sort, is teh warranty worth it?

That 50" XBR Sony does look nice. There just so many damn TVs out now.
The warranty is definitely worth it on these TV's. Depending on what kind of TV you get these TV's will probably require some maintenance at some time. For example I have 42" Sony rear projection LCD HDTV. It is a very nice tv with a great picture. These projection TVs have a small bulb in them that requires them to be changed about every 8000 hours of use. I have a 4 year service agreement and if the bulb goes out they will come to my house and replace it. So for all these new TVs service agreements are a good idea.

GAC
07-14-2006, 06:19 PM
And what is everyones thoughts on the warranties all these comapnies want you to get with these TVs. I am eventually going to be getting a 50" TV of some sort, is teh warranty worth it?

Most offer a 3 or 4 year warranty for around $400. And with the LCD/DLP it could help defer the cost of the bulb (not like an old fashioned picture tube) if and when it goes out. Those bulbs run around $250-$350.


That 50" XBR Sony does look nice. There just so many damn TVs out now.

The XBR is considered one of Sony's top line brands. rfs62 has one of those and really lkes it.

Krawhitham
07-14-2006, 07:56 PM
probably the best TV out there right now. I have been considering the 50" model for several months, but I can't let the money go.

The new models are also about to be released without the "dumbo" ears.

I have the 50" model, It is unreal. You will not be sorry if you pick one up. Plus playing MVP baseball 2005 in widescreen is very sweet

Rob Dicken
07-14-2006, 09:24 PM
The warranty is definitely worth it on these TV's. Depending on what kind of TV you get these TV's will probably require some maintenance at some time. For example I have 42" Sony rear projection LCD HDTV. It is a very nice tv with a great picture. These projection TVs have a small bulb in them that requires them to be changed about every 8000 hours of use. I have a 4 year service agreement and if the bulb goes out they will come to my house and replace it. So for all these new TVs service agreements are a good idea.

Definitely. Warranties are worthit. Just a type of insurance, is all it is. Just like you would purchase insurance for a car. Works along the same lines, just no deductible.

Neo
07-15-2006, 08:35 PM
I didn't read through all this, but if you have any questions at all, I am a home theater specialist at Best Buy and I would be more than happy to give you any pointers and get you in the right direction.

Neo
07-15-2006, 08:45 PM
Beb, your Dad is a smart guy, when looking at any DLP or LCD Projection, it is recommended that they get serviced every six months. Not only is it a routine cleaning, but for example with the DLPs, they have a small chip in them with millions to billions of mirrors in it. If that chip cannot fluctuate, you would be looking at a screen that is way out of proportion, with red lines going through it. With most extended warranty's or service plans, your looking at getting routine maintenance every year and possibly getting that initial light bulb being replaced in that 4-5 year plan. Not only do those plans cover maintenance but like most have said it also acts as an insurance policy. Most plans cost $400 - $500, that's nothing compared to having to pay a possible $650 - $800 on service alone in a DLP's initial 4 year's.

Nugget
07-16-2006, 09:34 PM
If you can wait for about a year there is a new technology which is essentially CRT so you get the picture quality with big screen. Its Toshiba and Canon I think who are about to release SDT which is instead of going the plasma and LCD route of individual pixels what SDT it is millions of tiny CRT tubes which gives you the contrast and picture quality with the big flat screen.

As for Sony they gave up on plasma years ago so any Sony plasmas out there are really old stock. Also their low end LCD, like their DVDs have been outsourced to Samsung for production. So essentially you are buying a Samsung for about 1.5 times the price.

If you can wait - also one thing against buying your traditional CRT is that in about 5 years it will be obsolete as many countries will go to full digital transmission.

macro
07-17-2006, 12:04 AM
If you can wait for about a year there is a new technology which is essentially CRT so you get the picture quality with big screen. Its Toshiba and Canon I think who are about to release SDT which is instead of going the plasma and LCD route of individual pixels what SDT it is millions of tiny CRT tubes which gives you the contrast and picture quality with the big flat screen.

Where can I find out more about this? My google searches that include "sdt" are turning up nothing at all.


If you can wait - also one thing against buying your traditional CRT is that in about 5 years it will be obsolete as many countries will go to full digital transmission.

That doesn't mean that CRTs won't still display an outstanding picture for years to come. As long as it's a 16:9 widescreen model, it should hold its own for years to come. I agree that the old 4:3 models will be obsolete.

Unassisted
07-17-2006, 12:09 AM
You must live in a wonderful world of gaslights, buggy whips, and five-cent picture shows.Don't forget smallpox and yellow fever. Those were quite the rage back in those days.

I know that my little kid psyche was scarred indelibly by the "Little House on the Prairie" episode with the typhus epidemic. :eek:

To bring things full circle and back on topic, I guess if one were quarantined at home due to typhus or yellow fever, one would have plenty of time to watch a plasma screen. :cool: ;)

BTW, I'm waiting to buy mine. An HD tuner on my 10 year-old SD set has opened up plenty of new options.

Nugget
07-17-2006, 12:45 AM
Where can I find out more about this? My google searches that include "sdt" are turning up nothing at all.



That doesn't mean that CRTs won't still display an outstanding picture for years to come. As long as it's a 16:9 widescreen model, it should hold its own for years to come. I agree that the old 4:3 models will be obsolete.

My bad - its SED - link to some info here
http://www.hdtvsolutions.com/sed_tvs.htm

They showed it at a tech fair in the SD at the end of last year and it had rave reviews.

Yep widescreens will still show the picture and many of them have built in tuners too. Its just the traditional CRTs that will be relegated to spare room VCR monitor.

macro
07-17-2006, 01:32 AM
I just realized that I ended two straight sentences with the same phrase.
:redface:



My bad - its SED - link to some info here
http://www.hdtvsolutions.com/sed_tvs.htm

They showed it at a tech fair in the SD at the end of last year and it had rave reviews.
Oh, okay, thanks! There appears to be no shortage of people on the Web that think this may the real wave of the future. I respect Crutchfield, and they are among those who think so:


http://www.crutchfieldadvisor.com/ISEO-rgbtcspd/reviews/20050119/ces_TV.html

The American debut of Toshiba/Canon's SED display technology generated serious buzz and was one of the most difficult demos to get into. SED stands for Surface-conduction Electron-emitter Display. It is a revolutionary flat-panel design, which combines the best aspects of LCD (easy-to-manage size and weight, and low power consumption), with the picture quality advantages of a top-notch tube (CRT) TV: excellent response time, natural color, and deep, rich blacks. In fact, the SED panel almost looked like someone had taken a top-quality tube TV and flush-mounted it so that only the screen and bezel were visible.

The prototype we saw was a 36" widescreen set with 720p resolution. Production models (which should begin appearing in very limited numbers by the end of this year) will be in the 50"-55" range, with resolution of 1080p. SED contrast ratio is rated at a mind-boggling 8600:1. The technology is similar to having 2 million tiny picture tubes. An array of electron emitters (one for each pixel) creates images by firing electrons at the phosphor-coated screen.

For the picture quality comparisons, the SED was flanked on the left by a similar-sized plasma panel, and on the right by an LCD. Video material consisted of a series of high-definition clips fed from a prototype HD DVD player. SED's superior color and black level were immediately apparent. Probably the most striking feature was SED's amazing pixel response time (how fast each pixel can switch on and off). When strings of alphabet letters scrolled quickly across the screens, individual letters remained clear and distinct on the SED, while some blurring was visible on both the plasma and LCD. With an incredibly quick claimed response time of 1 millisecond, SED can keep up with sports and other fast-action video, creating a smoother, more natural look.

Toshiba and Canon are positioning SED as the new "high-end" flat-panel TV technology. Based on this demo, it appears to be the real deal!

beb30
07-17-2006, 09:24 AM
I just got a 50" Samsung yesterday and its awesome.....

bengalsown
07-17-2006, 10:57 AM
I've had my 42" Phillips Plasma since February, and haven't had a single problem with it. It's probably on an average of 3 hours everynight.

Catch22
07-19-2006, 01:36 AM
Just to further muddy the waters. Have you considered a projector? I just set one up in my basement and I can get HDTV on a 95 inch screen. I have it mounted in my ceiling and I don't have a bulky TV taking up space in my room. Right now I am throwing the picture onto a brown wall and it still looks great - although you can buy screens or special paint that makes the picture jump even more.

There are plenty of options to choose from for under $2500. The only downside to projectors are the bulbs IMO, however the newer models can get up to 4000 hours out of a bulb and many vendors are offering a free extra bulb with purchase. 4000 hours would last a heavy TV watcher at least a couple years, throw in the extra bulb and you shouln't need to replace the bulb for at least 4 years. Then you can shell out the $200 for a new bulb - or look at upgrading to newer technology.

gonelong
07-19-2006, 09:16 PM
Just to further muddy the waters. Have you considered a projector? I just set one up in my basement and I can get HDTV on a 95 inch screen. I have it mounted in my ceiling and I don't have a bulky TV taking up space in my room. Right now I am throwing the picture onto a brown wall and it still looks great - although you can buy screens or special paint that makes the picture jump even more.

I love my projector. A word of caution though, they are a better option for those that can control the amount of light in a room.

Catch, there are many inexpensive DIY options for projector screens that will blow away your brown wall. I put up a screen for $60, including ambient lighting. My neighbor swears my 96" image is every bit as good (if not betther) than his 50".

PM me an I'll give you a full run-down on it. You can put one up in an afternoon. It looks nice even when nothing is being shown on it. The ambient light behind it is just a rope light, but it enhanced the (perceived?) contrast as well as makes the picture "easier" to watch for long periods of time.

http://s46.photobucket.com/albums/f110/gonelong/?action=view&current=DSCN2759.jpg&refPage=&imgAnch=imgAnch10

Baseball and football in HD at 96" is breath-taking.



There are plenty of options to choose from for under $2500. The only downside to projectors are the bulbs IMO, however the newer models can get up to 4000 hours out of a bulb and many vendors are offering a free extra bulb with purchase. 4000 hours would last a heavy TV watcher at least a couple years, throw in the extra bulb and you shouln't need to replace the bulb for at least 4 years. Then you can shell out the $200 for a new bulb - or look at upgrading to newer technology.

I picked up my projector for $850 net (new). In Focus 4805. Love it. It is one of the lower end projectors that you can buy, but it gets great ratings and I couldn't beat it for a dollar/capabiltiy ratio. At $850 I figure I can replace it in 2-3 years and buy something else once HD becomes a bit more standardized.

I can always use the projector as a backup or experiment with outdoor movies/sporting events displays for the neighbors. I am actually toying with that idea as fall approaches.

GL

Catch22
07-19-2006, 10:20 PM
Hey GL,

Good point about the light. Mine is in my basement and I can shutter the windows so light isn't an issue for me - but it could be an issue if you wanted to use it in a bright room. You can get some projectors with pretty high lumen output to counter that problem - you'll just pay a bit more for them.

I was very close to buying the In Focus X3 (cousin to the 4805), but in the end settled on the Sanyo PLV-Z4. It was pretty much double the price of the X3, but it had a few more bells and whistles that I was looking for.

I'm looking into some special paint (ScreenGoo) for the screen, but I'm perfectly happy with the picture as it is now on my brown wall - I'm actually suprised at the quality.

If you've never watched HD baseball on a 100" screen, you've never lived :)

gonelong
07-20-2006, 03:10 PM
Hey GL,
I was very close to buying the In Focus X3 (cousin to the 4805), but in the end settled on the Sanyo PLV-Z4. It was pretty much double the price of the X3, but it had a few more bells and whistles that I was looking for.

I have heard really good things about the Sanyo. If I had known anyone with a projector I doubt I would have went with the 4805 ... it was dipping a toe in the water (not that I am disappointed with it).



I'm looking into some special paint (ScreenGoo) for the screen, but I'm perfectly happy with the picture as it is now on my brown wall - I'm actually suprised at the quality.

You have to be careful with ScreenGoo. Make sure you read quite a bit about applying it before you do so. I have heard some horror stories about applying it, but I hear the results can be fantastic.

GL

GIK
12-01-2006, 10:08 AM
Has anyone been keeping up with the latest and greatest in HDTV? I'm itching to buy a larger 16:9 set, most likely 1080p.

I'm looking at, mostly, DLP but am open to any format really. I'd also like to keep the purchase at $2k - or close.

The three I have my eyes on right now are the Samsung HL-S5087W (50" DLP, 1080p, $1699), the Mitsubishi WD-52631 (52" DLP, 1080p, $1799) and the Sony SXRD KDS50A2000 (50" LCOS, 1080p, $2049).

If there are any others I'd love to hear about them. Also, this set will be hooked up to my XBOX360 - I've read the Samsung works very well with it (it's the only one that can do 1080p through component, I believe).

beb30
12-01-2006, 11:34 AM
I have a 50" Samsung DLP and absolutely love it, It also gets most of its use from xbox 360 and its absolutely amazing on there. HIGHLY RECOMMEND

Red Leader
12-01-2006, 12:20 PM
the Sony SXRD KDS50A2000 (50" LCOS, 1080p, $2049).


One of my friends just bought this exact same model. Found it at Morris for $1859.00 on sale. He absolutely loves it. This is the model I've been keeping my eye on. I've heard nothing but absolute great reviews on this model. I was hoping to get it for under $1800.00 in the spring. He said that he paid an extra $349.00 for the 4 year warranty through Morris that includes 2 bulb changes. Like I said, I haven't heard a bad word about this TV. 10,000:1 contrast ratio. 1080p.

paintmered
12-01-2006, 12:22 PM
One of my friends just bought this exact same model. Found it at Morris for $1859.00 on sale. He absolutely loves it. This is the model I've been keeping my eye on. I've heard nothing but absolute great reviews on this model. I was hoping to get it for under $1800.00 in the spring. He said that he paid an extra $349.00 for the 4 year warranty through Morris that includes 2 bulb changes. Like I said, I haven't heard a bad word about this TV. 10,000:1 contrast ratio. 1080p.

My parents have the same TV. The model has been out for over six months and I've yet to see another product that rivals its picture quality.

Word of advice, be sure to pick up the extended warranty and the bulb changes. It will pay for itself with the bulb changes alone.

Red Leader
12-01-2006, 12:22 PM
I've read a lot about people not liking the "rainbow effect" on DLP sets. Apparently, if you view a DLP set at an angle (closest to TV on right or left side of the screen) you get a "rainbow effect" where the image is distorted by bowing out. I personally haven't viewed a DLP set so I really can't describe it any better, but a lot of complaints I've read from owners of DLP sets have mentioned this.

YMMV

GIK
12-01-2006, 01:43 PM
I've heard this too, RL, and it's definitely something to think about. The Sony, however, is not DLP. I have heard of some sets getting a green 'glob' on them from burn-in of the black bars that are on the sides of the screen when viewing standard-def 4:3 for extended periods of time. That's the only thing that worries me about the Sony.

LoganBuck
12-01-2006, 01:52 PM
My wife and I bought a bedroom suite for our bedroom last spring, it included an armoire, that we intended to put our TV in. Our crappy 20" Apex bedroom TV doesn't fit in it. I am looking at getting something new for in there for Christmas. Problem is the TV cannot be deeper than 16 inches and wider than 32 inches. My options seem to be limited to LCD or a slim fit CRT product (Samsung has one). I would prefer to get into a 26-32" screen. I have Dishnetwork, my other TV's are not HDTV, so I don't really want to pony up for HD service. What kind of lower cost (under $700) options should I be looking at. I am thinking Olevia or Samsung at the moment. Any and all comment or suggestions would be appreciated.

Red Leader
12-01-2006, 01:57 PM
I've heard this too, RL, and it's definitely something to think about. The Sony, however, is not DLP. I have heard of some sets getting a green 'glob' on them from burn-in of the black bars that are on the sides of the screen when viewing standard-def 4:3 for extended periods of time. That's the only thing that worries me about the Sony.

Sorry, I should have specified that post was independant of my post on the Sony, which, as you said, is not DLP. I was just making a statement in general on DLP's.

and GIK, I had the same fear as well on the Sony about burn-in, but from everything I've read "burn in" only occurs on Plasmas (which the Sony also is not). My friend that just bought this Sony said that the SXRD chip that is in the Sony dimishes the "screen door" effect dramatically (which is one of the compaints on LCD's - like a black grid on the screen - whjch takes away some of the "realness" - nice Pres Bush word there :) ).

NJReds
12-01-2006, 02:13 PM
I researched this forever and a day. I had it narrowed to Toshiba and Sony, I ended up w/a 42" Toshiba Plasma that has been great.

GIK
12-01-2006, 02:20 PM
Sorry, I should have specified that post was independant of my post on the Sony, which, as you said, is not DLP. I was just making a statement in general on DLP's.

and GIK, I had the same fear as well on the Sony about burn-in, but from everything I've read "burn in" only occurs on Plasmas (which the Sony also is not). My friend that just bought this Sony said that the SXRD chip that is in the Sony dimishes the "screen door" effect dramatically (which is one of the compaints on LCD's - like a black grid on the screen - whjch takes away some of the "realness" - nice Pres Bush word there :) ).

This is what I'm talking about re: the "green blob" issue on the SXRD:
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=636342

38% of pollers voted that they have the problem.

Red Leader
12-01-2006, 02:45 PM
This is what I'm talking about re: the "green blob" issue on the SXRD:
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=636342

38% of pollers voted that they have the problem.

I'm reading it now. Interesting stuff. Never heard this before.

Johnny Footstool
12-01-2006, 03:00 PM
I'm getting an Optoma 72HD projector to go in my Reds room in the basement. It will be sweeeeet!


I've read a lot about people not liking the "rainbow effect" on DLP sets. Apparently, if you view a DLP set at an angle (closest to TV on right or left side of the screen) you get a "rainbow effect" where the image is distorted by bowing out. I personally haven't viewed a DLP set so I really can't describe it any better, but a lot of complaints I've read from owners of DLP sets have mentioned this.

YMMV

I heard that this only affects about 15-20% of the population. Go to a store and watch a DLP TV. If you don't see the rainbow effect there, don't worry about it showing up later.

Red Leader
12-01-2006, 03:48 PM
I just talked to my buddy about the "green blob" problem that was mentioned with the Sony SXRD's. He said that he did a lot of research on that before he bought his and that all of the "green blob" problems appear to be on the XBR models. The model# of the TV he bought is KDS50A2000. He said that he has not heard any reports of problems with the green blob on the KDS models, only the XBR models. The ironic thing is that the XBR models are supposed to be Sony's highest end models. Those are the ones that have the green blob problems. So, his advice was that if you are going to buy a Sony SXRD, buy this year's KDS model and DON'T buy last year's XBR model and you will still have the same great picture, but won't have the problems of last year's model*.

* I'm not sure if they make a 50" SXRD XBR model this year. I'm pretty sure they still carry a 60 and 70" XBR model this year, but I'm not sure on the 50".

GIK
12-01-2006, 11:44 PM
Well, I bought the Sony SXRD 50" 1080p. :) I have a Sony now and just like their picture the best, I guess. Also, Circuit City still had it marked at its Thanksgiving price of $1899 and they honored it. :beerme: Still, now that it's done, I can't believe I spent this much on a TV. LOL. Oh well.

Virginia Beach Reds
12-02-2006, 12:18 AM
I just bought a 42" LG plasma. Incredible TV and I got it after 4 price matches from CC for 1199. Can't beat that. I'm a techy, researcher type, and you can't go wrong with a Panasonic (seems to be the gold standard) or a majority of the other brands out there. Mine has a 2 year warranty, but if it breaks down, it's an excuse to upgrade to the newest technology.

3 years ago, I bought a Sony projection HD TV. I have not had one problem with it (knock on wood). It has moved with me on a semi from Virg Beach to Cincy this spring and no problems. I would not suggest any extended warranties on TV's. Chances are, if problems, they are w/in the manufacturers warranty period. If not, upgrade and chose a different brand.

HotCorner
12-02-2006, 12:28 AM
I bought this Samsung 46" DLP TV tonight from Best Buy. Got them to price match Vanns.com's price of $1299 even though they are a Montana chain (they are the supplier for Amazon.com).

Then I bought the HD Receiver and got another $200 off the TV to drop it to $1099. I can live with that! ;)

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/olspage.jsp?skuId=7997858&type=product&productCategoryId=pcmcat95100050039&id=1155071784564

GIK
12-02-2006, 12:33 AM
Nice TV and nice price, HC! I was looking at the 50" 1080p version tonight and almost went for it...but the Sony just did it for me.

Looks like a lot of us have upgraded recently. :thumbup:

gonelong
12-02-2006, 05:27 PM
I'm getting an Optoma 72HD projector to go in my Reds room in the basement. It will be sweeeeet!


I have an IF SP 4805 and absolutely love it.

Check out the DIY Screen section at AVS Forums ...
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/forumdisplay.php?f=110

GL

GIK
12-02-2006, 06:51 PM
Well, I bought the Sony SXRD 50" 1080p.

Update: I returned the Sony rear-projection for a 42" Samsung plasma. The Sony was nice, but the room we're using this for is just too small and my wife did not like the picture once it was in the room.

Dom Heffner
12-02-2006, 07:46 PM
I have a Samsung 62" DLP and a Hitachi 42". Both are pretty cool.

GIK
12-02-2006, 11:31 PM
Err, update #3. I took the plasma back. Wow. LCD/DLP/Plasma looks horrible for standard-def. My HD CRT tube does a fantastic job with it, and therefore, I'm not going to replace it just yet. It's unfortunate that I'm stuck at a max of 34" in this segment.

Virginia Beach Reds
12-02-2006, 11:32 PM
Get the LG 42" Plasma or the panny 42" plasma. I've very impressed by both. I have the LG, but was contemplating....they both do a good job with SD signals.

GIK
12-02-2006, 11:39 PM
I'm going to hold off another year or two until all channels will be in HD (1st Q 2009 as of today). My Sony HD widescreen tube, while smaller than I'd like, has a picture equal to - if not better - than any 720p plasma I've seen.

paintmered
12-03-2006, 12:58 AM
Update: I returned the Sony rear-projection for a 42" Samsung plasma. The Sony was nice, but the room we're using this for is just too small and my wife did not like the picture once it was in the room.

Did you take the picture off of "vibrant" (i.e. "sell-me") mode?

That setting is horrid once you get it out of the showroom.

GIK
12-03-2006, 01:09 AM
Yup, I changed nearly - if not all - of the settings. I also ran it component and HDMI and setup my HD cable box to run at different settings. It wasn't bad - honestly it didn't bug me too much - but my wife thought the picture was horrible, and honestly it was (compared to the tube). Out of the few hundred channels we have probably 10% are HD. When that increases I'll decide to do this again.

macro
12-03-2006, 01:33 AM
GIK, who do you get your television service from? I'm with Directv. Will I have the same issues with standard definition if I upgrade to an LCD flat panel? I was looking at the 46" Sony Bravia LCD flat panel 720p tonight at Best Buy, and the sales guy said that I would like my SD picture from Directv.

I eliminated plasma from consideration pretty quickly, because we have windows and doors that we don't like to keep shut up all the time. The glare on the plasma screen would have been too much. I also toyed with the idea of LCD rear projection. But I think I have finally decided that the 46" Sony is the one I want. The issue now is waiting to get the $2500 or for the price to come down.

From what I have read, the only current source of 1080p signal is Blue Ray DVD. Is that correct? If so, why are folks rushing to buy 1080p TVs when they're considerably more expensive?

Playadlc
12-03-2006, 03:11 AM
From what I have read, the only current source of 1080p signal is Blue Ray DVD. Is that correct? If so, why are folks rushing to buy 1080p TVs when they're considerably more expensive?

Macro, I have been wondering the same thing. I am looking to get a Samsung 56" DLP. The HL-S5686W 720p set is going for $1,399. The HL-S5687W 1080p set is going for $1,799.

With nothing being broadcast in 1080p right now, and who knows when it will be, I don't understand the point of spending the extra money.

GIK
12-03-2006, 12:05 PM
macro, playadlc: We are not using a dish service, so I can't really comment on Dish or DirecTV.

Right now, CRT is still king. The problem is that CRT tubes and CRT rear projection sets are being phased out - probably because they're extremely heavy and not as "sexy" as the new technology.

My recommendation is to buy from a store like Circuit City, Best Buy, Costco, etc, that has a good return policy. Test it out for a day or two (or 20) and if you're not satisfied then take it back and try a new set.

As for 1080p, unless you have a PS3 or plan to purchase a BlueRay/HD-DVD player, I see no reason to invest in the technology at this point.

Cedric
12-03-2006, 12:09 PM
Samsung is always priced much cheaper than any other tv for a reason.

Jpup
12-03-2006, 02:03 PM
I have a Sony SXRD 55" Model: KDS-55A2000
http://images.bestbuy.com/BestBuy_US/images/products/7932/7932696_sa.jpg

It's a great TV. I highly recommend it.

bengalsown
12-03-2006, 04:39 PM
I've got a 42" Phillips plasma, and have had it for about 10 months. It has been absolutely perfect from the day I brought it home.

Make sure you get yourself a nice surround sound system to take advantage of the Dolby Digitial that most HiDef programs are broadcast in.

Buckeye33
12-04-2006, 10:13 PM
I have a Sony SXRD 55" Model: KDS-55A2000
http://images.bestbuy.com/BestBuy_US/images/products/7932/7932696_sa.jpg

It's a great TV. I highly recommend it.

I just got back from my first serious shopping trip for a new big screen TV. I thought that the Sony SXRD 50" and 55" models were the best TVs in the stores along with the Samsung 50" and 56" DLP 1080 models. I don't want to pay the extra money LCD costs, and plasma just seems to risky to me (high $$ fixes, burn-in, weight, etc)

I have pretty much narrowed it down to these 2 models and I have to decide on size. I am currently in a home that is simply to small for either of these sizes, but will be moving next spring/summer to a much bigger home that will have much more room. I am going to go ahead and get the big screen and deal with it being slightly to big for the room it will be in.

I have notcied that the Sony model has received great reviews in this thread and on other forums.

I have found the 50" Sony for $1800 delivered online. The 55" model can be found for $2000 delivered. I have a friend who worked for HHGregg and he gave me some tips that should allow me to get the TV at HHGregg for the same price as I can get online.

The more I've thought about it and more reviews I read I think I'm going to go with the Sony SXRD. Now I have to decide on 50" or 55".

Anyone had any bad issues with the SXRD Sony models? Not the XBR models? Also, what type of cables are "good enough" for these types of TVs? I know the guy at HHGregg will try to pawn off the $150 cables, but....

macro
12-04-2006, 11:54 PM
Jpup and Buckeye33: The Sony SXRD is a rear projection model, right? The guy at Best Buy told me Saturday that the disadvantage of rear projection was that the image deteriorated when viewed from the side. I checked that out on the rear projection models they had, and it was true, but the ones they had were the lower-end $1200-$1500 models. He also convinced me that LCD flat panel would give a better picture overall, but it was a smaller Best Buy, so they didn't have the one you're talking about in stock for me to see.

I guess what I'm saying is that you have reopened my mind. Did you compare this one to Sony's Bravia LCD flat panels? What argument would you make to counter someone who would claim that the flat panel is better?

Buckeye33
12-05-2006, 12:38 AM
I guess what I'm saying is that you have reopened my mind. Did you compare this one to Sony's Bravia LCD flat panels? What argument would you make to counter someone who would claim that the flat panel is better?

The flat panel LCD is a better picture than the DLP, however you have to pay significantly more money for a LCD over a DLP. A LCD TV has a 180 degree viewing angle. The ones I looked at tonight I could stand directly next to it and look down the TV and see everything perfectly. You can not do that with a DLP, but 95% of my and most people's TV watching is done from straight on. The only time I'll have to worry about the side angle of a DLP is when I have a bunch of people over for a football game, but even then you'd have to be at a really bad angle for it to make a gigiantic difference.

It seemed to me that if you wanted a good LCD TV you had to pay at least $1,000 more for the same size DLP or plasma. That simply isn't worth it to me since the biggest advantage of LCD over DLP is the side angle view and being able to mount a LCD.

Redsfaithful
12-05-2006, 02:32 AM
Not the XBR models? Also, what type of cables are "good enough" for these types of TVs? I know the guy at HHGregg will try to pawn off the $150 cables, but....

I just bought a 42 inch Panasonic plasma on Black Friday at Best Buy, and I bought my HDMI cables here:

http://monoprice.com/home/index.asp

That site was recommended here:

http://dethroner.com/index.php/2006/11/27/are-name-brand-home-theater-cables-worth-the-money/


Cables are the worst rip-off in the entire electronics industry. I recently looked into starting my own line of cables to sell in retail; the numbers were staggering. A standard-quality HDMI cable, the sort that connects your HDTV to a DVD player or other video output, sells for anywhere between $40 and $100 in stores like Best Buy and Circuit City. They cost about $3 to $6 to make—no joke.

So where to go for cables? Monoprice.com, the American online retail arm of a large Chinese cable manufacturer. A standard 28-gauge, six-foot HDMI cable—standard issue home theater interconnect—sells for $6.37 at Monoprice (less if you buy more than one). The low-end cable option at Best Buy—same wire thickness—costs $63.99. Even if you factored in overnight shipping from Monoprice (which is usually very reasonable) you’d come out way ahead.

But aren’t those brand name cables better, you ask? In a word: No. Longer cable lengths can benefit from a thicker gauge cable, the same sort that is also available at Monoprice. (And I’m talking real long here, like 25 feet or more.)

Buckeye33
12-05-2006, 02:33 AM
I should also add that the Sony SXRD is not a DLP TV. I am pretty sure that I looked from an angle on the Sony as well as the DLP. I can't actually remember though. Going back with the wife tomorrow anyways, I'll check it out.

919191
12-05-2006, 09:18 AM
I just bought a 42 inch Panasonic plasma on Black Friday at Best Buy, and I bought my HDMI cables here:

http://monoprice.com/home/index.asp

That site was recommended here:

http://dethroner.com/index.php/2006/11/27/are-name-brand-home-theater-cables-worth-the-money/

I bought my HDMI cable from monoprice. There were several available for different prices, and I goone that was about 20 bucks. It is well constructed with a tension relief style ends and doesn't look at all like it was made cheaply, and I like it. When I originally bought my HDTV I bought a set of Monster component cables. Never again. Yes, they are constructed well, but I spent alot of extra money on a name.

BuckWoody
12-05-2006, 09:43 AM
I just bought a 42 inch Panasonic plasma on Black Friday at Best Buy, and I bought my HDMI cables here:

http://monoprice.com/home/index.asp

That site was recommended here:

http://dethroner.com/index.php/2006/11/27/are-name-brand-home-theater-cables-worth-the-money/
Great site! Thanks for the heads up. I'm getting my dad an HD receiver for Christmas and need an HDMI cable for him. These are the best prices I've seen.

We recently bought a Sony SXRD for ourselves and we couldn't be happier. No green globs, no distortion when viewed from the side, just a clean crisp picture. The only small complaint is that the local channels, when not in HD, are not the best. That's a temporary problem, though. The other SD signals we get (we have DirecTV) look fine.

I have found myself watching quite a few shows on DiscoveryHD and they are really incredible. It really shows what these HDTVs are capable of. Sunrise Earth is especially addicting.

GIK
12-05-2006, 09:45 AM
Buck, congrats on the TV. I really did like the Sony, but I guess a happy wife wins this round. :)

I did, however, just order a new front projector to replace my Infocus X1 (got the Infocus IN72). I'm going to order another HD cable box and hook it up...guess I'll be spending more time in the media room now!

GIK
12-05-2006, 09:48 AM
Anyone had any bad issues with the SXRD Sony models? Not the XBR models?

Had the 50" version for a day. The HD picture was incredible and DVD playback outstanding. SD content suffers (but most big screen TV's have this problem). I'd go for it.

BuckWoody
12-05-2006, 10:04 AM
The more I've thought about it and more reviews I read I think I'm going to go with the Sony SXRD. Now I have to decide on 50" or 55".

Anyone had any bad issues with the SXRD Sony models? Not the XBR models? Also, what type of cables are "good enough" for these types of TVs? I know the guy at HHGregg will try to pawn off the $150 cables, but....

Had the 50" version for a day. The HD picture was incredible and DVD playback outstanding. SD content suffers (but most big screen TV's have this problem). I'd go for it.
I highly recommend the SXRD. Also, I've heard that the high-end HDMI cables are not worth the extra money. I spoke with the guys at Audio Etc. here in Dayton about it; it's a higher end shop and the guys have a lot better idea what they are talking about than the Best Buy or Circuit City guys. I'm going to go through the link that Redsfaithful posted for any new cables and wish that I'd known about it before we invested in our HDMI cables.

Buck, congrats on the TV. I really did like the Sony, but I guess a happy wife wins this round. :)
Thanks. It was Happy Birthday/Anniversary/Easter/Christmas/Arbor Day/etc. etc. for the next couple years. ;)

919191
12-05-2006, 10:04 AM
I have found myself watching quite a few shows on DiscoveryHD and they are really incredible. It really shows what these HDTVs are capable of. Sunrise Earth is especially addicting.

I watch that when I get home from work in the morning. I watched manatees today. My wife says it puts her to sleep, and I enjoy it after working all night.

macro
12-05-2006, 10:17 AM
Buckeye33, thanks for that elaboration. I'll reconsider my choices. And Redsfaithful, thanks for the info about the cables!

BuckWoody
12-05-2006, 10:33 AM
I watch that when I get home from work in the morning. I watched manatees today. My wife says it puts her to sleep, and I enjoy it after working all night.
If you ever used to watch CBS Sunday Morning with Charles Kuralt, they always ended the show with a simple natural scene as they rolled the credits. Sunrise Earth reminds me a lot of that...except it's an hour long and in HD. :)

It's hard not to like a show with titles like:
Bison before Breakfast
Edge of the Atlantic
Gator Hole
Glacier of Kenai Fjords
Homer Takeoff
Island First Light
Katmai Bears
Manatee Spring
Milk Cows in the Morning
Moose in the Morning
Ninagiak Island
San Francisco Tai Chi
Sea of Terns
Teton Beaver
Vermont Balloons
Volcano Lagoon
Wildflower Elk
Yellowstone Geysers

Red Leader
12-05-2006, 10:36 AM
Teton Beaver
Vermont Balloons


How could you not watch these two shows?

I think Puffy has Vermont Balloons 1, 2, 3, and 4. He asked for the 5th installment for Christmas.

gonelong
12-05-2006, 12:21 PM
I just bought a 42 inch Panasonic plasma on Black Friday at Best Buy, and I bought my HDMI cables here:

http://monoprice.com/home/index.asp

That site was recommended here:

http://dethroner.com/index.php/2006/11/27/are-name-brand-home-theater-cables-worth-the-money/

I'll vouch for Monoprice, bought my cables there, no issues.

GL

Jpup
12-06-2006, 03:08 AM
Jpup and Buckeye33: The Sony SXRD is a rear projection model, right? The guy at Best Buy told me Saturday that the disadvantage of rear projection was that the image deteriorated when viewed from the side. I checked that out on the rear projection models they had, and it was true, but the ones they had were the lower-end $1200-$1500 models. He also convinced me that LCD flat panel would give a better picture overall, but it was a smaller Best Buy, so they didn't have the one you're talking about in stock for me to see.

I guess what I'm saying is that you have reopened my mind. Did you compare this one to Sony's Bravia LCD flat panels? What argument would you make to counter someone who would claim that the flat panel is better?

Yeah, if you look from anything than a normal viewing angle it will be distorted. I can't see you having a problem with normal viewing conditions unless you like to watch your TV at a 90 degree angle. I sit at my desk, a lot, and watch TV from about 35 degrees and haven't had a problem.

It's a great TV. You can't go wrong, but I do advise you to buy a warranty, just in case. I haven't had a single glitch with my TV. HD Cable, especially the 1080i channels, are simply amazing. CBS football, being about the best. The 55" is what I have and I sit about 9.5' away. It probably is a little big, but after you get used to it, there is no going back. It would probably be more comfortable at 11'.

Heath
12-06-2006, 12:54 PM
If you ever used to watch CBS Sunday Morning with Charles Kuralt, they always ended the show with a simple natural scene as they rolled the credits. Sunrise Earth reminds me a lot of that...except it's an hour long and in HD. :)

It's hard not to like a show with titles like:
Bison before Breakfast
Edge of the Atlantic
Gator Hole
Glacier of Kenai Fjords
Homer Takeoff
Island First Light
Katmai Bears
Manatee Spring
Milk Cows in the Morning
Moose in the Morning
Ninagiak Island
San Francisco Tai Chi
Sea of Terns
Teton Beaver
Vermont Balloons
Volcano Lagoon
Wildflower Elk
Yellowstone Geysers

I'm pretty sure they used to play in the old Idaho-Wyoming League at the Turn of the Century. Some pitcher named Walter Johnson no-hit them.




:D

Johnny Footstool
12-06-2006, 12:59 PM
Questions for the A/V Club: I'm installing a projector in my basement. Currently, I'm just using a splitter to branch off from an existing cable outlet. Should I splurge and have the cable company install new cable outlets so I don't have to split, or could I just buy an amp of some sort to rev up the signal? Will I see a difference either way?


Also, will I see a difference in picture quality (especially HD picture) if I use high-end cables?

Buckeye33
12-06-2006, 04:45 PM
Well, went back with the wife today to show her the Sony SXRD 50" which is what I had begun to think was what I wanted to get. She said she liked the picture on it and what not but she is pretty anti big screen TV. She feels 50" is simply to much TV.

I then asked her to show me what TV she liked. Of course she pics out the LCD models that are much more expensive and are slightly smaller. So I began to look at the LCDs are little more and acutally found two that I liked quite a bit and that weren't that much more expensive.

I liked the Sony Bravia 46" KDL462010 LCD, but it only displayed in 720p. I know not much is in 1080 yet, but I think if you're going to spend 2k anyways, what's another 2-300 for 1080?

I also liked the Samsung 46" LN-S4695D LCD. It is a 1080p display and is quite impressive.

So of course now I am pretty much back to square one. I really like the SXRD 50" and think it is quite a nice TV and has received nothing but great reviews everywhere I've looked. However, the more I sat and looked at the LCD models the more I envisioned them mounted on the wall of our new living room (whenever that happens).

So right this second my dilemma is to decide between the Sony SXRD 50" or the Samsung 46" LCD. I would say that I should be able to get the 50" for about $1800-1900 and I think I could get the LCD for $2200.

Any thoughts or suggestions are much appreciated.

TRF
12-06-2006, 04:49 PM
Perhaps waiting a little longer might not be a bad idea.

Laser TV (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/03/business/03hdtv.html?ex=1301716800&en=00dcf2d24530e989&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss)

They are supposed to be up to 30% cheaper to make, and are sharper than any TV sold today.

BoydsOfSummer
12-06-2006, 04:58 PM
I have a 20" Apex. Cost me $120. It's pretty cool. Cable plugs right into the back of it.

gonelong
12-06-2006, 08:48 PM
Questions for the A/V Club: I'm installing a projector in my basement. Currently, I'm just using a splitter to branch off from an existing cable outlet. Should I splurge and have the cable company install new cable outlets so I don't have to split, or could I just buy an amp of some sort to rev up the signal? Will I see a difference either way?


Also, will I see a difference in picture quality (especially HD picture) if I use high-end cables?

IMO I'd get a dedicated cable run, thats what I did. I'd also get an amplifier. I couldn't believe the difference that made at my place, I'd never go without one again.

Opinions differ on "high-end" cables. I went with cheaper cables from monoprice and have excellentpicture quality.

I also went with a DIY screen and love it. Here is a poorly (notice how fuzzy the numbers are on the cable box) taken photo of my screen I put together for $75 or so. I'll try to get a better picture to show you how clear the picture is and get a better look at the screen.

http://i46.photobucket.com/albums/f110/gonelong/DSCN2758.jpg

GL

NoCalRed
12-06-2006, 10:16 PM
Questions for the A/V Club: I'm installing a projector in my basement. Currently, I'm just using a splitter to branch off from an existing cable outlet. Should I splurge and have the cable company install new cable outlets so I don't have to split, or could I just buy an amp of some sort to rev up the signal? Will I see a difference either way?


Also, will I see a difference in picture quality (especially HD picture) if I use high-end cables?

I guess I'm not really understanding the question here. Are you saying your just running a coax cable straight to the back of the projector? If yes then you will not get HD. If you are just running to the back of a digital converter then I guess its always nice just to have a dedicated outlet although I really don't think the picture quality would be much better if you did not. JMHO

GIK
12-07-2006, 12:16 AM
JF, it really depends upon how strong/weak the signal is in your area. If you're already using a splitter then you'll have to move to, at least, a 3-way splitter. You might still be fine, though. Go out and grab a 1ghz splitter for a few bucks, hook it up and give it a whirl. If the picture has been degraded then either amp it or have a direct line installed. BTW, I just got my new projector tonight (Infocus IN72, the replacement for the 4805, and it's great).

Front projectors rule. :)

Johnny Footstool
12-07-2006, 12:49 AM
Yeah, I do have a digital converter, so HD will be taken care of.

I'm currently using a 1 GHZ splitter on the cable outlet upstairs and running cable to a TV in the basement, but once I get the projector, I'll either need to use a second splitter or get a 3-way splitter and about 30 feet of additional cable.

I guess it won't hurt to just hook the thing up first and see what kind of picture I get.

I'm also going with a DIY screen -- an 8x4 sheet of plywood covered in curtain backing, with a nice black frame around it.

NoCalRed
12-07-2006, 01:40 AM
Yeah, I do have a digital converter, so HD will be taken care of.

I'm currently using a 1 GHZ splitter on the cable outlet upstairs and running cable to a TV in the basement, but once I get the projector, I'll either need to use a second splitter or get a 3-way splitter and about 30 feet of additional cable.

I guess it won't hurt to just hook the thing up first and see what kind of picture I get.

I'm also going with a DIY screen -- an 8x4 sheet of plywood covered in curtain backing, with a nice black frame around it.

I figured you had the digital portion taken care of, just didn't want to assume anything.

I would not use a split of a split so a three way spitter I think would be in order. You should not need an amplifier if it is not a great distance however you could just error on the safe side and get one. The good thing about digital signals is its either there or it isn't so its easy to tell either no picture or a frozen blocky type image.

I think I have posted this before if not here are some helpful sights.

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/index.php?

http://www.projectorcentral.com/

Very helpful websites indeed. Just out of curiosity what size image do you plan to have? I ask because if you are going to have a native 16:9 image and stretch it out to the full length of 8X4 plywood I do believe the vertical part of the image will be off the screen.

Playadlc
12-07-2006, 03:29 AM
GIK, or anyone, I am looking at a Sony KDF-50E2000 50-inch Grand WEGA 3LCD Rear Projection HDTV from onecall.com(because I have $1,000 in gift certificates at that site).

I really don't want to spend more than $500 of my own money on a TV, so with that budget, would that be about the best value I could get?

Here is a link...

http://www.onecall.com/ProductDetails.aspx?id=31659

SirFelixCat
12-07-2006, 08:05 AM
Plain and simple...


go to avsforum.com and learn. Other than that, it comes down to taste. A buddy of mine works for Mitsubishi and is getting me one heck of a sweetheart deal on a 65" DLP WD-65831. It retails for anywhere from $3500-$5000 depending on where you see it. I simply can not wait :)


But still, avsforum.com is THE best place on the net to read and learn for anything regarding TV's and DVD players and such. As well as home audio. Incredible amount of knowledge on that site.

GIK
12-07-2006, 11:59 AM
I guess it won't hurt to just hook the thing up first and see what kind of picture I get.

That's my recommendation. I'm currently using a 3-way splitter (2 TV, 1 Internet) and have no visible picture degradation. A 2-way splitter has 3.5db loss and a 3-way has a 5.7db loss. Again, if your signal is strong, you more than likely will not see a difference.

GIK
12-07-2006, 12:04 PM
GIK, or anyone, I am looking at a Sony KDF-50E2000 50-inch Grand WEGA 3LCD Rear Projection HDTV from onecall.com(because I have $1,000 in gift certificates at that site).

I really don't want to spend more than $500 of my own money on a TV, so with that budget, would that be about the best value I could get?

Here is a link...

http://www.onecall.com/ProductDetails.aspx?id=31659

Definitely, definitely spend a few hours at www.avsforum.com (it's a great resource).

A budget of $1500 will get you a lot...a 50-60" rear-projection TV, 42" plasma or a VERY nice front projector (two highly rated 720p units have just dropped under $1k - one from Mitsubishi and the other from Optoma). I'm not a fan of LCD flat panels, but that's me. It's all going to depend upon your viewing tastes and the room you'll be setting everything up in.

macro
12-07-2006, 02:44 PM
Definitely, definitely spend a few hours at www.avsforum.com (http://www.avsforum.com) (it's a great resource).

I'm not a fan of LCD flat panels, but that's me.

Why not, GIK? I'm still trying to decide, so I'm considering all viewpoints.

GIK
12-07-2006, 02:57 PM
For sports, to me, it's horrible. I can definitely see jagged movement in the panel. Everything has plusses and minuses, though. If your room isn't light controlled a plasma may not be the best choice, as LCD TV's handle glare a lot better. But I'd rather rearrange my room than buy one. Some people are bothered by 'rainbows' with DLP screens too. Not one setup is perfect...you just have to decide on what is best for you.

Jpup
12-07-2006, 03:32 PM
GIK, or anyone, I am looking at a Sony KDF-50E2000 50-inch Grand WEGA 3LCD Rear Projection HDTV from onecall.com(because I have $1,000 in gift certificates at that site).

I really don't want to spend more than $500 of my own money on a TV, so with that budget, would that be about the best value I could get?

Here is a link...

http://www.onecall.com/ProductDetails.aspx?id=31659

that TV has bad screen door effect. Not a good plan IMO.

Johnny Footstool
12-07-2006, 05:22 PM
Just out of curiosity what size image do you plan to have? I ask because if you are going to have a native 16:9 image and stretch it out to the full length of 8X4 plywood I do believe the vertical part of the image will be off the screen.

I borrowed a friend's projector and measured the picture size -- we can get a 90" picture on the wall. I'll probably have to add an additional strip of plywood to get the vertical size right.

GIK
12-07-2006, 05:45 PM
I'm projecting my image on a DIY screen (4x8' drywall, painted and trimmed) and, yes, if it's filled completely wide it'll go over the top. However, most widescreen movies (and some TV shows) are not filmed in the 1.78 aspect ratio. More often than not they are done 1.85:1 or 2.35:1. You will definitely be able to utilize the entire width while keeping your image on screen. In fact, I was watching 'Smallville' on DVD last night...the image was at full width and it didn't shoot over or below my screen.

OldRightHander
12-07-2006, 08:06 PM
I just bought a big 32' TV a couple of years ago. It was $259 at Best Buy.

Do you have a house, or a renovated theater building? One that size wouldn't even fit in my living room. ;)

NoCalRed
12-07-2006, 10:39 PM
I borrowed a friend's projector and measured the picture size -- we can get a 90" picture on the wall. I'll probably have to add an additional strip of plywood to get the vertical size right.

You might want to look at goo systems for do it yourself screens. Goo is only held back by the physical limitations of the room you plan on projeting the screen in.

http://www.goosystems.com/cgi-bin/ic/goosystems/screengoo?id=gUDbCMye

Also if you haven't bought a projector I would highly recommend going to the links I provided 1 is to the avs forum and the other is projector central. The specifications can at times be confusing and the manufacturers like to throw things out to grab the eye. My recomendation is if you are willing to spend the money then get something 720p it is true HD until they come out with 1080p at a reasonable price and thats native display not compatibility. With this you will spend a third of the money and get twice or more of the display of any hd, lcd, or plasma tv.

Johnny Footstool
12-08-2006, 10:39 AM
You might want to look at goo systems for do it yourself screens. Goo is only held back by the physical limitations of the room you plan on projeting the screen in.

http://www.goosystems.com/cgi-bin/ic/goosystems/screengoo?id=gUDbCMye

Also if you haven't bought a projector I would highly recommend going to the links I provided 1 is to the avs forum and the other is projector central. The specifications can at times be confusing and the manufacturers like to throw things out to grab the eye. My recomendation is if you are willing to spend the money then get something 720p it is true HD until they come out with 1080p at a reasonable price and thats native display not compatibility. With this you will spend a third of the money and get twice or more of the display of any hd, lcd, or plasma tv.

I looked at the goo, but it seemed a little expensive compared to other DIY screens. If I'm not satisfied with the screen I build, I'll try the goo system next.

Isn't the Optoma HD72 a 720p projector?

GIK
12-08-2006, 12:23 PM
Isn't the Optoma HD72 a 720p projector?

It is, but I'd suggest the HD70 (also a 720p unit) which is $600+ cheaper.

BuckeyeRedleg
12-08-2006, 01:54 PM
I'm about to pull the trigger on a Samsung 56" DLP (1080p). It's at Best Buy currently for $2100.

1. Anyone give me a report on this one. I have heard nothing but positives so far. Any weaknesses?

2. I can get this off Amazon for $1800 (no shipping charge). Would anyone recommend buying online?

3. Could the $2100 Best buy price go down, say a week after Christmas?

4. Lastly, would anyone recommend the service plan (I think around $300-$400).

Advice appreciated.

HotCorner
12-08-2006, 02:39 PM
I'm about to pull the trigger on a Samsung 56" DLP (1080p). It's at Best Buy currently for $2100.

1. Anyone give me a report on this one. I have heard nothing but positives so far. Any weaknesses?

2. I can get this off Amazon for $1800 (no shipping charge). Would anyone recommend buying online?

3. Could the $2100 Best buy price go down, say a week after Christmas?

4. Lastly, would anyone recommend the service plan (I think around $300-$400).

Advice appreciated.

1. I just bought the Samsung 46" DLP and no complaints from me. I haven't even gotten my HD service setup yet.

2. No because of #4.

3. It could but BB now price adjusts for 60 days after you buy. Most TV's go on sale in December and January (Super Bowl). I would also try to have BB match the Amazon price. When I bought mine last week, I found a cheaper price through Amazon ($100 cheaper.) They matched plus I got another $200 off the TV when I upgraded to an HD DirecTV receiver.

4. Yes I would recommend one. However I would not purchase one from an on-line merchant because service may not be as accessible than getting it from a store like Best Buy, Circuit City, HHGregg, etc.

gonelong
12-08-2006, 05:25 PM
I looked at the goo, but it seemed a little expensive compared to other DIY screens. If I'm not satisfied with the screen I build, I'll try the goo system next.

Isn't the Optoma HD72 a 720p projector?

Check out the DIY screen forum at AVS. All sorts of options for a DIY screen, some of them paint or paint mixes that can be found at your local Home Depot, others various types of panels or laminates. Lots of good comparisons, etc.

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/forumdisplay.php?f=110

Sounds like you are planning on going with a Black out Cloth screen?

GL

NoCalRed
12-08-2006, 08:21 PM
I looked at the goo, but it seemed a little expensive compared to other DIY screens. If I'm not satisfied with the screen I build, I'll try the goo system next.

Isn't the Optoma HD72 a 720p projector?

Yes it is a 720p, but I agree with GIK on this the upgrades from the 70 to 72 don't warrant the huge price increase in my opinion.

There are a number of things to consider, what may need serious consideration for some may be no big deal for others. For example in my home I have vaulted ceilings through out the house so ceiling mounting the device is a little more difficult. For this reason a physical lens shift was highly desired so I didn't necessarily have to mount the projector head on with screen and digital keystoning is not the way to go when doing this. Also LCD projectors have come a long way to compete with the lower end DLP models the latest Sanyo PLVZ-5 uses a dual iris system to boast an incredible 10000:1 contrast ratio. I was thinking of upgrading to this myself.

http://www.projectorcentral.com/Sanyo-PLV-Z5.htm

One of the dealers on this site can't remember who now, but they had a great deal going. It was the Sanyo PLV-Z4, very nice projector by the way almost got one until the Z5 came out, a 92" screen, free replacement bulb, and free shipping all for the cost of the projector which was about $1500. Not sure if they still have the deal or if these projectors are sold out now the point I guess I'm making is that there always great deals out there like this.

No matter what you get as long as it works in your home you are going to be pleased with it. Just do the research and try and get as much projector as you can for the amount of money you are willing to spend.

WMR
12-08-2006, 10:33 PM
I bought the HD-DVD Player accessory for the X-Box 360 last night... all I can say is: WOW. I've got the HD package on my cable system... but popping in a movie and watching it in high-definition is pretty sweet. Thumbs up from me and highly recommended to anyone else who owns a 360 and a high-definition television.

The features and picture of HD-DVD are simply incredible and must be seen to be believed.

bengalsown
12-09-2006, 08:32 AM
But still, avsforum.com is THE best place on the net to read and learn for anything regarding TV's and DVD players and such. As well as home audio. Incredible amount of knowledge on that site.

I definitely second this. I have spent many hours on that site. Be careful though, reading the site makes me want to constantly upgrade, which hurts the wallet ;)

bengalsown
12-09-2006, 08:34 AM
I bought the HD-DVD Player accessory for the X-Box 360 last night... all I can say is: WOW. I've got the HD package on my cable system... but popping in a movie and watching it in high-definition is pretty sweet. Thumbs up from me and highly recommended to anyone else who owns a 360 and a high-definition television.

The features and picture of HD-DVD are simply incredible and must be seen to be believed.

Thanks for the review. Hopefully I will have one shortly after Christmas...

gonelong
12-09-2006, 12:49 PM
I definitely second this. I have spent many hours on that site. Be careful though, reading the site makes me want to constantly upgrade, which hurts the wallet ;)

I third that. I have spent a plethora of time on that site, and well worth every minute.

GL

Jpup
12-09-2006, 05:11 PM
I bought the HD-DVD Player accessory for the X-Box 360 last night... all I can say is: WOW. I've got the HD package on my cable system... but popping in a movie and watching it in high-definition is pretty sweet. Thumbs up from me and highly recommended to anyone else who owns a 360 and a high-definition television.

The features and picture of HD-DVD are simply incredible and must be seen to be believed.

I keep debating on whether to get one. What movies have you watched?

SirFelixCat
12-10-2006, 03:57 AM
I'm about to pull the trigger on a Samsung 56" DLP (1080p). It's at Best Buy currently for $2100.

1. Anyone give me a report on this one. I have heard nothing but positives so far. Any weaknesses?

Can't comment, sorry.

2. I can get this off Amazon for $1800 (no shipping charge). Would anyone recommend buying online?

I have ZERO qualms buying from a reputable site online. The only drawback is if you have to return it, you can't drive down to your local store and do it. Other than that, no qualms.

3. Could the $2100 Best buy price go down, say a week after Christmas?

Always a chance, but BB price matches. You could always try to bargain for a better deal. Just print the ad that you find online from a reputable place and try. Worst case, they laugh and say no. Best case, you save a couple hundred $$$

4. Lastly, would anyone recommend the service plan (I think around $300-$400).

While I personally have never gotten one, yet, I would highly recommend RepairMaster. They come HIGHLY recommended from numerous respected posters on avsforum and, as far as DLP TV's go, the cost of a 5-yr warranty (that includes up to two bulb replacements), is equal to one bulb w/o the warranty. Normally, I think E.W.'s are a waste, but one a large purchase like this, the piece of mind is worth a couple hundred dollars, imo.

Advice appreciated.


Hope that helps!

LawFive
12-13-2006, 12:20 PM
Recently, I've had my eye on one of two Hitachi models...42HDT79 and 42HDS69. The 69 series is $200 cheaper, but they're both 42 inch Plasmas. Anyone have experience with either of these, or know why there's a difference in price?

WMR
12-13-2006, 07:47 PM
I keep debating on whether to get one. What movies have you watched?

Alright, I haven't watched all of these movies in full, but I've at least taken a look at each one:

Caddyshack
Full Metal Jacket
The Fugitive
Red Dragon
Superman Returns
The Dirty Dozen
Animal House
King Kong
Waterworld
Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines
Seabiscuit

Certain titles have a new, upgraded soundtrack called "Dolby TrueHD 5.1" and the difference in sound on a 5.1 speaker with optical-connect surround sound is unbelievable. T3 especially was so much fun to watch. I'm already thinking of what titles I can't wait to see in HD.

Truly wondrous how Microsoft is taking seriously their pledge to give consumers choices when deciding what services they wish rendered rather than going the Sony method and creating a system with significant production problems and pre-packaged hardware sold in large part to try and avoid another Betamax situation and assume next format ascendency through the Internet Explorer method.

WMR
12-13-2006, 07:51 PM
Check this out: www.thelookandsoundofperfect.com