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Ltlabner
07-26-2006, 09:32 PM
...you could go back in time to see play live? Why?


I'd have to say Sandy Koufax. I'm not really sure why I'm so enamoured with him, but I am.

If not him, I'd say Christy Mathewson or Satchel Paige.

Cyclone792
07-26-2006, 09:58 PM
Every Hall of Famer.

That's cheating, I know, but it's true.

If you want to pin me down on somebody, it'd be a coin flip between Ty Cobb and Ted Williams.

PTI (pti)
07-26-2006, 09:58 PM
I'm gonna cheat and give you a few:

* Babe Ruth
* Ty Cobb
* Satchel Paige
* Josh Gibson
* Bob Gibson

Shaknb8k
07-26-2006, 10:11 PM
this is a no brainer for me. Ty Cobb. There has never been another player like him. We all have our arguments for who the best player of all time is and mine is Ty Cobb. No other player wanted to win like he did.

KySteveH
07-26-2006, 10:15 PM
Jose Rijo
Danny Jackson
Tom Browning
Rob Dibble
Randy Myers
Eric Davis
Paul O'Neill
Billy Hatcher
Chris Sabo
Barry Larkin
Hal Morris

IowaRed
07-26-2006, 10:22 PM
Ty Cobb
Walter Johnson
Josh Gibson
Roberto Clemente
Willie Mays
Sandy Koufax
Babe Ruth
Joe D.

kheidg-
07-26-2006, 10:31 PM
Ty Cobb

terminator
07-26-2006, 10:39 PM
Babe Ruth. As an added bonus you'd get to see Gehrig too.

A lot of other greats are modern era players or at least modern enough that I've see tape of them or know other who saw them. (I did run into a guy at a gas station years ago who had seen Ruth play in Yankee Stadium.) I doubt watching the old film does the Babe justice.

Also, then you would be an informed observer when proclaiming the 76 Reds as the greatest team of all time . . . :D

texasdave
07-26-2006, 10:59 PM
johnny vander meer if i could see his back-to-back no hitters. :beerme:

TOBTTReds
07-27-2006, 01:01 AM
Babe Ruth. No one has absolutely dominated their sport by that much like he did. I picked a random year, 1923 to compare some stats:

HR's:
1. 41 - Ruth
2. 29 - Ken Williams (-12)

Walks:
1. 170 - Ruth
2. 98 - Joe Sewell (-72)

Avg:
1. .403 - Harry Heilmann (+.010)
2. .393 - Ruth
3. .380 - Tris Speaker
4. .360 - Eddie Collins

OBP
1. .545 - Ruth
2. .481 - Heilmann (-.064)

RBI
1. 131 - Ruth
2. 130 - Speaker (-1)

Runs
1. 151 - Ruth
2. 133 - Speaker (-18)

Slugging
1. .764 - Ruth
2. .632 - Heilmann (-.132)

OPS
1. 1.309 - Ruth
2. 1.113 - Heilmann (-.196)

He led 8 of 16 major categories, and as you can see, by a wide margin. This guy was UNREAL for his time.


EDIT: I should have picked 1921, because he was even more dominant. Just one stat for you from that year, he led the league in HR's with 59, 2nd place had 24!!!

5DOLLAR-BLEACHERBUM
07-27-2006, 01:16 AM
Mordecai " Three Finger " Brown


Quote
"You haven't space enough to tell of all the grand deeds of Brownie on and off the field. Plenty of nerve, ability and willingness to work at all times under any conditions. The crowds never bothered him. There was never a finer character -- charitable and friendly to his foes and ever willing to help a youngster breaking in."
Johnny Evers

HumnHilghtFreel
07-27-2006, 01:22 AM
I'm gonna have to jump on the Ty Cobb bandwagon myself.

WMR
07-27-2006, 01:58 AM
Ty Cobb
Ted K.
1927 Yankees
Maris and Mantle
Bob Gibson
Johnny Bench

MrCinatit
07-27-2006, 07:28 AM
How great would have it been to see the original 1869 Redlegs take the field, folks?
It would have been a ball to see the likes of Paige, Josh Gibson and Cool Papa Bell take the field.
Seeing Ruth would have been great. Watching the Big Train would have bee great, as well.
I really wish I had been old enough to enjoy the likes of Aaron, Gibson and Mays, instead of being a wide-eyed tot.

RFS62
07-27-2006, 08:00 AM
Babe Ruth and Ted Williams

dabvu2498
07-27-2006, 08:03 AM
Babe Ruth, no question.

Gainesville Red
07-27-2006, 09:24 AM
The All-Star games when the players really cared.

Mays, Aaron, Gibson, Ruth, Clemente, Rose, Bench, Musial, Boyer (Ken), Brock.

I wish I would have been able to see Jim Abbott's no-hitter.

Disco Demolition night.

Barnstorming teams.

My Dad got to see Hank Aaron play in Jacksonville when he was a kid. I've always been jealous of that. He also said one day everyone heard that a young Nolan Ryan was going to pitch so they all went down to the stadium and watched him warm up. He said the sound of the ball hitting the mitt was like a cannon going off. He warmed up for a while, and developed a blister and couldn't pitch in the game.

Not baseball, but I'm so young I can't remember seeing Emmit Smith run for the Gators. I saw it, but I can't remember it.

flyer85
07-27-2006, 09:27 AM
I would like to see how good the great Negro League players were in their prime, mainly Gibson and Paige. I would have liked to see the offseason games between the major league stars and Negro League stars.

redsfan30
07-27-2006, 09:40 AM
Babe Ruth.

registerthis
07-27-2006, 10:16 AM
Satchel Paige.

westofyou
07-27-2006, 10:23 AM
I'd like to see the 1880's era Browns or White Stockings.

Different pitching approach, different game, same wrapper.

Red in Chicago
07-27-2006, 10:25 AM
the bambino and yankee clipper

HotCorner
07-27-2006, 10:29 AM
Rogers Hornsby
Sandy Koufax
Jackie Robinson
Roberto Clemente
Walter Johnson
Josh Gibson
Bob Gibson
Willie Mays

registerthis
07-27-2006, 10:35 AM
Rogers Hornsby
Sandy Koufax
Jackie Robinson
Roberto Clemente
Walter Johnson
Josh Gibson
Bob Gibson
Willie Mays

I'd like to see Walter Johnson in 1913. He may have done it against a bunch of ex plumbers and pipe fitters, but holey moley what a season.

Rob Dicken
07-27-2006, 10:40 AM
Who here forgets Brooks Robinson?

Probably one of, in not THE best 3rd baseman of all time.

westofyou
07-27-2006, 10:46 AM
Who here forgets Brooks Robinson?

Probably one of, in not THE best 3rd baseman of all time.
Seen him hundreds of times, he could pick it.

So could Aurlio Rodriguez.

ochre
07-27-2006, 10:46 AM
Oscar Charleston and/or Jimmie Foxx

I'm fond of the great players that history tends to forget.

Blimpie
07-27-2006, 10:50 AM
George Herman Ruth.

M2
07-27-2006, 10:51 AM
Oscar Charleston

He'd be my pick too. Though I'd like to see how fast Cool Papa Bell really was.

I'll toss King Kelly into the mix as well because I imagine he made for great theater.

Cyclone792
07-27-2006, 10:57 AM
I'll toss King Kelly into the mix as well because I imagine he made for great theater.

Rabbit Maranville would be another guy to see just because of his antics on the field. From everything I've read, he was an absolute riot.

cincrazy
07-27-2006, 12:24 PM
I would love to go back in time and watch the Big Red Machine.

westofyou
07-27-2006, 01:55 PM
I would love to go back in time and watch the Big Red Machine.
Nah... the struck out too much.

BRM
07-27-2006, 02:01 PM
Nah... the struck out too much.

The '76 Reds lead the NL in K's.

thatcoolguy_22
07-27-2006, 04:33 PM
the babe never faced a reliever or a slider in his career. he wouldn't make most D1 college teams nowadays... however i would love to watch satchel paige pitch while he was still in the negro leagues or cool papa bell. its said he got himself out on a ground ball to 2nd that he ran into while rounding 1st... take it for what its worth but i would have loved to check out some of the negro leagues. I'm a typical white guy but, it still would be cool. most of the guys never even got a shot...

dougdirt
07-27-2006, 04:36 PM
Josh Gibson.

There is so much question and intrigue as to how good he actually was, I would have loved to sat down and watched him play.

Puffy
07-27-2006, 04:37 PM
Shoeless Joe Jackson

westofyou
07-27-2006, 04:40 PM
the babe never faced a reliever or a slider in his career. he wouldn't make most D1 college teams nowadays...

That's too damn funny.

Puffy
07-27-2006, 04:44 PM
Babe Ruth and Ted Williams

Please - we all know you saw them play live. Who are you trying to fool? Put down your real answers - guys you've actually never seen. Like Hughie Jennings and Silver King.

KronoRed
07-27-2006, 04:46 PM
Hank Aaron

M2
07-27-2006, 04:50 PM
Hank Aaron

When I was a kid every other kid I knew revered Hank Aaron. When he or Muhammad Ali were on TV it counted as a quasi-religious event.

westofyou
07-27-2006, 04:54 PM
When I was a kid every other kid I knew revered Hank Aaron. When he or Muhammad Ali were on TV it counted as a quasi-religious event.
It's true, Mays had the same draw in baseball, but when Ali was on the tube it was a holiday.

Sham
07-27-2006, 04:55 PM
the babe never faced a reliever or a slider in his career. he wouldn't make most D1 college teams nowadays.

Wow. Just, wow.

Sham
07-27-2006, 04:58 PM
Roy Hobbs.

Hoosier Red
07-27-2006, 05:45 PM
[QUOTE=thatcoolguy_22]the babe never faced a reliever or a slider in his career. he wouldn't make most D1 college teams nowadays... /QUOTE]

Well it's true.

There's no way he would have been able to stay eligible, even TOSU has academic standards.

RANDY IN INDY
07-27-2006, 05:50 PM
Ted Williams and Sandy Koufax. They dominated. I'd also like to see some of the 1960's era players (would love to have seen highlights of players like Brooks Robinson) in the same way that we see the players of today, with ESPN, Fox Sports and such.

RANDY IN INDY
07-27-2006, 05:54 PM
the babe never faced a reliever or a slider in his career. he wouldn't make most D1 college teams nowadays... however i would love to watch satchel paige pitch while he was still in the negro leagues or cool papa bell. its said he got himself out on a ground ball to 2nd that he ran into while rounding 1st... take it for what its worth but i would have loved to check out some of the negro leagues. I'm a typical white guy but, it still would be cool. most of the guys never even got a shot...

:laugh: That's funny.

dman
07-27-2006, 05:55 PM
Mickey Mantle
Denny McClain (1968 Season), something intriguing about a 31-6 season
Bob Gibson
Sandy Koufax

RANDY IN INDY
07-27-2006, 06:02 PM
Would love to have seen Mantle when his wheels were great.

westofyou
07-27-2006, 06:18 PM
Would love to have seen Mantle when his wheels were great.
Or Pete Reiser in 1941

westofyou
07-27-2006, 06:19 PM
I'd like to see Big Ed Walsh square off against Terry Turner.

RFS62
07-27-2006, 06:33 PM
Or Pete Reiser in 1941



Durocher said he was the greatest player he ever saw before he got hurt.

RANDY IN INDY
07-27-2006, 07:17 PM
Or Pete Reiser in 1941

Absolutely!

Puffy
07-27-2006, 07:49 PM
Or Pete Reiser

I thought he was pretty good in "Mad About You"

minus5
07-27-2006, 09:32 PM
Louis Armstrong!

But in baseball...Ted Williams & Jimmy Fox & Joe Jackson (Is she really going out With Him) no not that one.

thatcoolguy_22
07-28-2006, 11:11 AM
Just look at track stars from the early 20th century and look at their times. Early 1900's its a big deal to run a sub 4 minute mile. World record stuff were talking about here... My highshool CROSS COUNTRY team (meaning that we trained for a 5K race not a 1 mile) had 6 runners who ran a sub 4:30 mile and 1 was sub 4. I went to a small high school and evidently we were all world class athletes! However only 2 of us received college scholarships for running. I'm just saying...

westofyou
07-28-2006, 11:12 AM
Just look at track stars from the early 20th century and look at their times. Early 1900's its a big deal to run a sub 4 minute mile. World record stuff were talking about here... My highshool CROSS COUNTRY team (meaning that we trained for a 5K race not a 1 mile) had 6 runners who ran a sub 4:30 mile and 1 was sub 4. I went to a small high school and evidently we were all world class athletes! However only 2 of us received college scholarships for running. I'm just saying...
Yes track and hitting a ball are very similar activities, as is swiming and snow skiing... but I digress.

gonelong
07-28-2006, 12:04 PM
Babe Ruth
Stan Musial
Jimmie Fox
Mickey Mantle
Walter Johnson
Rogers Hornsby
Willie Mays
Ernie Banks

and a few 1000 others.

GL

thatcoolguy_22
07-29-2006, 01:52 PM
Yes track and hitting a ball are very similar activities, as is swiming and snow skiing... but I digress.



You are being foolish if you think that players from 80+ years ago would compete on the same field as the players today! Track is the easiest example because the only opponent is the clock however the game changes accept it. How about football? or basketball?soccer? your telling me BASEBALL is the only sport that hasn't evolved in over 150 years of professional play? Ludacris

MaineRed
07-29-2006, 02:52 PM
Lou Gehrig's 184 RBI season.

westofyou
07-29-2006, 02:58 PM
You are being foolish if you think that players from 80+ years ago would compete on the same field as the players today!

That's me... foolish me.

MaineRed
07-29-2006, 03:11 PM
I'd take Lou Gehrig over Scott Hatteberg, I know that.

ochre
07-29-2006, 04:50 PM
Classics in the History of Psychology

An internet resource developed by
Christopher D. Green (christo@yorku.ca)
York University, Toronto, Ontario
(Return to Classics index (http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/index.htm))

Why Babe Ruth is Greatest Home-Run Hitter

Hugh S. Fullerton (1921)

Published in Popular Science Monthly, 99 (4), 19-21, 110.
[Classics Editor's note: This is not a well-known article now, but it is a prime example of the popularization of experimental psychology in the USA at the beginning of the 20th century. The story of its origin can be found in Alfred H. Fuchs' (1998) "Psychology and 'The Babe' (http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext?ID=32034&PLACEBO=IE.pdf)," Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences, 34, 153-165. (N.B. Access to Interscience and Adobe Acrobat Reader capability required to browse article.) -cdg-]

Popular Science Monthly tests in the laboratory his brain, eye, ear, and muscle -- and gets his secret
The game was over. Babe, who had made one of his famous drives that day, was tired and wanted to go home. "Not tonight, Babe," I said. "Tonight you go to college with me. You're going to take scientific tests which will reveal your secret."
"Who wants to know it?" asked Babe.
"I want to know it," I replied, "and so do several hundred thousand fans. We want to know why it is that one man has achieved a unique batting skill like yours -- just why you can slam the ball as nobody else in the world can."
So away we went. Babe in his baseball uniform, not home to his armchair, but out to Columbia University to take his first college examination.
Babe went at the test with the zeal of a schoolboy, and the tests revealed why his rise to fame followed suddenly after years of playing during which he was known as an erratic although a powerful hitter. How he abruptly gained his unparalleled skill has been one of baseball's mysteries.
Albert Johanson, M.A., and Joseph Holmes, M.A., of the research laboratory of Columbia University's psychological department, who, in all probability, never saw Ruth hit a baseball, and who neither know or care if his batting average is .007 or .450, are .500 hitters in the psychology game. They led Babe Ruth into the great laboratory of the university, figuratively took him apart, watched the wheels go round; analyzed his brain, his eye, his ear, his muscles; studied how these worked together; reassembled him, and announced the exact reasons for his supremacy as a batter and a ball-player.
http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/Fullerton/fig1.gif Baseball employs scores of scouts to explore the country and discover baseball talent. These scouts are known as "Ivory hunters," and if baseball-club owners take the hint from the Ruth experiments, they can organize a clinic, submit candidates to the comprehensive tests undergone by Ruth, and discover whether or not other Ruths exist. By these tests it would be possible for the club owners to discover -- during the winter, perhaps -- whether the ball-players are liable to be good, bad, or mediocre; and, to carry the [p. 20] practical results of the experiments to the limit, then may be able to eliminate the possibility, or probability, of some player "pulling a boner" in mid-season by discovering, before the season starts, how liable he is to do so.
The scientific ivory hunters of Columbia University discovered that the secret of Babe Ruth's batting, reduced to non-scientific terms, is that his eyes and ears function more rapidly than those of other players; that his brain records sensations more quickly and transmits its orders to the muscles much faster than does that of the average man. The tests proved that the coordination of eye, brain, nerve system, and muscle is practically perfect, and that the reason he did not acquire his great batting power before the sudden burst at the beginning of the baseball season of 1920, was because, prior to that time, pitching and studying batters disturbed his almost perfect coordination.


Ruth the Superman
The tests revealed the fact that Ruth is 90 per cent efficient compared with a human average of 60 per cent.
http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/Fullerton/fig2.gif That his eyes are about 12 per cent faster than those of the average human being.
That his ears function at least 10 per cent faster than those of the ordinary man. That his nerves are steadier than those of 499 out of 500 persons.
That in attention and quickness of perception he rated one and a half times above the human average.
That in intelligence, as demonstrated by the quickness and accuracy of understanding, he is approximately 10 per cent above normal.
It must not be forgotten that the night on which the tests were made was an extremely warm one, and that in the afternoon he had played a hard, exhausting game of baseball before a large crowd, in the course of which he had made one of those home-run hits which we at Columbia were so eager to understand and account for. Under such circumstances, one would think that some signs of nerve exhaustion would be revealed. The instigation lasted more than three hours, during which Ruth stood for most of the time, walked up and down stairs five times, and underwent the tests in a close warm room. At the end of that time I was tired and nervous, and, although Ruth showed no symptoms of weariness, it is probable that under more favorable conditions his showing would have been even better.
http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/Fullerton/fig3.gif The tests used were ones that primarily test motor functions and give a measure of the integrity of the psychophysical organism. Babe Ruth was posed first in an apparatus created to determine the strength, quickness, and approximate power of the swing of his bat against his ball. A plane covered with electrically charges wires, strung horizontally, was placed behind him and a ball was hung over the theoretical plate, so that it could be suspended at any desired height.
I learned something then which, perhaps, will interest the American League pitchers more than it will the scientists. This was that the ball Ruth likes best to hit, and can hit hardest, is a low ball pitched just above his knees on the outside corner of the plate. The scientists did not consider this of extreme importance in their calculations, but the pitchers will probably find it of great scientific interest.

Science Discovers the Secret
The ball was adjusted at the right height, and, taking up a bat that was electrically wired, Ruth was told to get into position and to swing his bat exactly as if striking the ball for a home run, to make the end of it touch one of the transverse wires on the plate behind him, then swing it through its natural arc and hit the ball lightly. The bat, weighing fifty-four ounces (exactly the weight of the bats Ruth uses on the diamond), was swung as directed, touched the ball, and the secret of his power -- or, rather, the amount of force with which the strikes the ball -- was calculated. At least, the basis of the problem was secured: The bat, weighing fifty-four ounces, swinging at a rate of 110 feet a second, hits a ball travelling at the rate of, say, sixty feet a second, the ball weighing four and a quarter ounces, and striking the bat at a point four inches from the end. How far will it travel? There are other elements [p. 21] entering into the problem, such as the resilience of the ball, the "English" placed on it by the pitcher's hand, and a few minor details. But the answer, as proved by the measurements, is somewhere between 450 and 500 feet. This problem cannot be worked down to exact figures because of the unknown quantities.
The experimenters, however, were not so much interested in the problem in physics as they were in the problems in psychology. The thing they wanted to know was what made Ruth superior to all other ball-players in hitting power, rather than to measure that power.

Babe Could Beat His own Record!
http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/Fullerton/fig4.gif Before proceeding to the psychological tests, however, we tried another in physics to satisfy my curiosity. A harness composed of rubber tubing was strapped around Ruth's chest and shoulders and attached by hollow tubes to a recording cylinder. By this means his breathing was recorded on a revolving disk. He was then placed in position to bat, an imaginary pitcher pitched an imaginary ball, and he went through the motions of hitting a home run. The test proved that, as a ball is pitched to him, Babe draws in his breath sharply as he makes the back-swing with his bat, and really "holds his breath" or suspends the operation of his breathing until after the ball is hit. But for that fact, he would hit the ball much harder and more effectively than he now does. It has been discovered that the act of drawing in the breath and holding it results in a sharp tension of the muscles and a consequent loss of striking power. If Ruth expelled his breath before striking the ball, the muscles would not become tense and his swing would have greater strength and rhythm.
The first test to discover the efficiency of his psychophysical organism was one designed to try his coordination; a simple little test. The scientists set up a triangular board, looking some thing like a ouija-board, with a small round hole at each angle. At the bottom of each hole was an electrified plate that registered every time it was touched. Ruth was presented with a little instrument that looked like a doll-sized curling iron, the end of which just fitted into the holes. Then he was told to take the instrument in his right hand and jab it into the holes successively, as often as he could in one minute, going around the board from left to right.
He grew interested at once. Here was something at which he could play. The professor "shushed" me, fearing that I would disturb Ruth or distract his attention as he started around the board, jabbing the curling-iron into the holes with great rapidity. He would put it into the holes twelve to sixteen times so perfectly that the instrument barely touched the sides. Then he would lose control and touch the sides, slowing down. Only twice did he pass the hole without getting the end of the iron into it. With his right hand he made a score of 122. Not unnaturally, his wrist was tired and Babe shook it and grinned ruefully.
Then he tried it with his left hand, scored 132 with it, proving himself a bit more left- than right-handed -- at least in some activities. The significance of the experiment, however, lies in the fact that the average of hundreds of persons who have taken that test is 82 to the minute, which shows how much swifter in the coordination of hand, brain, and eye Ruth is than the average.


Every Test but Another Triumph
In a sequel to this test that followed, Babe tapped an electrified plate with an electrically charged stylus with the speed of a drum-roll, scoring 193 taps per minute with his right hand and 176 with his left hand. The average score for right-handed persons undergoing this wrist-wracking experiment is 180, and, while there is no data covering right-handed persons using the left hand, it is certain that Ruth's record is much above the average, as he is highly efficient with the left hand.
http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/Fullerton/fig5.gif But steadiness must accompany speed and so they tested the home-run king for his steadiness of nerve and muscle by having [p. 110] him thrust the useful little curling-iron stylus in different-sized holes pierced through an electrified plate which registered contacts between the stylus and the side of the hole. These measured respectively sixteen, eleven, nine, eight, and seven sixty-fourths of an inch; small enough, but not too small for Babe, for he made a score that showed him better than 499 persons out of 500.
The tests that interested me most were those to determine how quickly Ruth's eye acts and how quickly its signals are flashed through the brain to the muscles. Showing an amazingly quick reaction time, they interpreted what happens on the ball-field when the stands rock under the cheering that greets another of Ruth's smashes to the fence, proved an eye so quick that it sees the ball make an erratic curve and guides the bat to follow.
The scientists discovered exactly how quickly Ruth's eye functions by placing him in a dark cabinet, setting into operation a series of rapidly flashing bulbs and listening to the tick of an electric key by which he acknowledged the flashes.
The average man responds to the stimulus of the light in 180 one thousandths of a second. Babe Ruth needs only 160 one thousandths of a second. There is the same significance in the fact that Babe's response to the stimulus of sound comes 140 one thousandths of a second as against the averages man's 150 thousandths.
Human beings differ very slightly in these sight and sound tests, or rather the fractions are so small that they seem inexpressive; yet a difference of 20 or 10 one thousandths of a second indicates a superiority of the highest importance.
Translate the findings of the sight test into baseball if you want to see what they mean in Babe Ruth's case. They mean that a pitcher must throw a ball 20 one thousandths of a second faster to "fool" Babe than to "fool" the average person.
If the results of these tests at Columbia are a revelation to us, who know Ruth as a fast thinking player, they must be infinitely more amazing to the person who only comes into contact with the big fellow off the diamond and finds him unresponsive and even slow when some non-professional topic in under discussion.
The scientific "ivory hunters" up at Columbia demonstrated that Babe Ruth would have been the "home-run king" in almost any line of activity he chose to follow; that his brain would have won equal success for him had he drilled it for as long a time on some line entirely foreign to the national game. They did it, just as they proved his speed and his steadiness -- by simple laboratory tests.
For instance, they had an apparatus with a sort of a camera shutter arrangement that opened, winked, and closed at any desired speed. Cards with letters of the alphabet on them were placed behind this shutter and exposed to view for one fifty-thousandth of a second. Ruth read them as they flashed into view, calling almost instantly the units of groups of three, four, five, and six letters. With eight shown he got the first six, and was uncertain of the others. The average person can see four and one half letters on the same test.
When cards marked with black dots were used, Ruth was even faster. He called up the number of dots on every card up to twelve without one mistake, The average person can see eight.
To test him for quickness of perception and understanding, he was given a card showing five different symbols -- a star, a cross, and three other shapes -- many times repeated, and was told to select a number -- one, two, three, four, or five -- for each symbol, then to mark the selected number under each one as rapidly as he could go over the card. He scored 103 hits on that test, which his the average of all who have tried it. But when given a card covered with printed matter and told to cross out all the a's, he made a score of sixty, which is one and a half times the average.
The secret of Babe Ruth's ability to hit is clearly revealed in these tests, His eye, his ear, his brain, his nerves all function more rapidly than do those of the average person. Further the coordination between eye, ear, brain, and muscle is much nearer perfection than that of the normal healthy man.
The scientific "ivory hunters" dissecting the "home-run king" discovered brain instead of bone, and showed how little mere luck, or even mere hitting strength, has to do with Ruth's phenomenal record.
http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/Fullerton/

Jpup
07-29-2006, 04:57 PM
Other than former Reds, I would have to go with Joltin' Joe DiMaggio.

Redsfan08
07-29-2006, 09:47 PM
Al Capone I mean Babe Ruth

bomarl1969
12-18-2006, 07:20 AM
I would pick a Yankees/Tigers game so I could see Ty Cobb and Babe Ruth

RANDY IN INDY
12-18-2006, 09:36 AM
I got to watch a few of these players when I was a kid, but I wish I could watch them with the appreciation for the game and their talents that I have now. A lot of these guys were great defensive players, which I have an affinity for. The way they played their positions was nothing short of amazing. The pitchers are mainly hard throwers. I would love to see their mechanics and how they generate their power. A couple of the others had unique pitches that were particularly good that I would love to study. I have watched video of Koufax, over and over and over and in slow motion. It is amazing. Would love to see the speed of a young Mantle and Mays, and the splendid swing of the "Splendid Splinter." And how did that Ruth guy swing such a heavy stick?

Ted Williams
Mickey Mantle
Willie Mays
Frank Robinson
Johnny Bench
Brooks Robinson
Babe Ruth
Joe Morgan
Dave Concepcion/Ozzie Smith
Keith Hernandez
Bill Mazeroski
Maury Wills (for his basestealing and sliding techniques-the hook slide is a lost art)
Sandy Koufax
Tom Seaver
Bob Gibson
Jim Maloney
Jim Palmer
Steve Carlton
Nolan Ryan
Bert Blylevan
Carl Hubbell
Warren Spahn

Ltlabner
12-18-2006, 09:41 AM
My father is in his mid 60's and has seen most of the greats from the "golden age" play. I get googlie eyed like FCB over a Billy Beer when he talks about it.

Dad, dad, what was it like? Sometimes I'll drool as he tells me the stories.

PuffyPig
12-18-2006, 10:01 AM
...you could go back in time to see play live? Why?


I'd have to say Sandy Koufax. I'm not really sure why I'm so enamoured with him, but I am.



No need to apologize. Koufax may have had the most dominate 5-6 year period of any pitcher in history.

RichRed
12-18-2006, 10:24 AM
Well, despite the fact that Babe Ruth would apparently get smoked in a 440 heat, he's still my choice. And while I'm being greedy, I'd like to see him pitch for the Red Sox and then hit for the Yankees.

The other is Willie Mays. He's listed at 5'11", 180 pounds, smaller than 90+% of today's players, yet he mashed 660 HRs. That combination of speed and power must have been something to behold in his prime.

Also, after reading Jim Brosnan's 'Pennant Race,' I would've liked nothing better than to be able to see that underdog 1961 Reds team, led by Hutch, play their way to the World Series.

Always Red
12-18-2006, 10:26 AM
Ruth changed the game and was larger than life; I'd have loved to have seen him.

Mickey Mantle is the most intruiging to me, and another guy I'd have loved to see. It's amazing how productive he was after blowing out his knee at the very beginning of his career. When you add to that all the abuse of his body that he caused (as has come out in the last few years) he may have been one of the most talented ballplayers of all time to put up the numbers he did while nursing a constant hangover.

Finally, I'd have loved to see Frank Robinson, in a Reds uniform, playing at Crosley Field in his prime. Or even better, if he'd have lasted in Cincinnati to the BRM days at Riverfront. I'm just a little too young (at 45, that's a good thing!!) but my dad raved about how good FRobby was his whole life.

chettt
12-18-2006, 10:58 AM
When I was a kid, I can barely remember Hoyt Wilhelm as a White Sox. I would have loved to see him in his prime. Also, Carl Erskine. I went to high school with Carl's two older sons. He is the #1 reason I went on to coach youth sports for 30 years. Carl is a great human being - just wished I could of seen him pitch.

redsupport
12-18-2006, 11:30 AM
I wish I could see Dom Zanni walk in from the bullpen again

RichRed
12-18-2006, 11:37 AM
I wish I could see Dom Zanni walk in from the bullpen again

I almost said that, but I didn't want Billy McCool to feel slighted.

maniem
12-18-2006, 12:00 PM
Finally, I'd have loved to see Frank Robinson, in a Reds uniform, playing at Crosley Field in his prime. Or even better, if he'd have lasted in Cincinnati to the BRM days at Riverfront. I'm just a little too young (at 45, that's a good thing!!) but my dad raved about how good FRobby was his whole life.

I would have to agree with this, he would have been a great one to see in his prime. My dad was at the game when Frank Robinson and Eddie Matthews of the Braves got into that infamous big fight at 3rd. Not really sure how it started, but apparently it struck a nerve with Robby, as he tore up the Braves the rest of the series. I believe it was from this fight that the slogan, "Don't Rile Robby" came about. Does anyone (WOY) have more information about this game?

westofyou
12-18-2006, 12:13 PM
I would have to agree with this, he would have been a great one to see in his prime. My dad was at the game when Frank Robinson and Eddie Matthews of the Braves got into that infamous big fight at 3rd. Not really sure how it started, but apparently it struck a nerve with Robby, as he tore up the Braves the rest of the series. I believe it was from this fight that the slogan, "Don't Rile Robby" came about. Does anyone Fight in game one, game two Robinson hits a HR and goes 2-2 with a couple of those (WOY) have more information about this game?

Game one Fight - Game Two Robby goes 2-2 with a HR and the "Mecca Move" TM was achieved twice by the "On base Obsessed" TM Robby who also walked twice.

http://www.deadballart.com/redszone/fight.gif


MIL N 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 - 3 9 0 (1)
CIN N 1 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 x - 5 4 0

BOX+PBP
WP: Maloney (1-3)
LP: Pizarro (6-5)
SV: Brosnan (9)
HRs: Covington (10), Post (15)


MIL N 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 - 0 11 0 (2)
CIN N 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 x - 4 8 0

BOX+PBP
WP: Purkey (12-7)
LP: Willey (5-7)
HRs: Robinson (23)

dougdirt
12-18-2006, 12:25 PM
Josh Gibson, and its not even a debate for me.

redsupport
12-18-2006, 12:58 PM
Carl Willey got the loss, how doleful!