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Eric_Davis
08-02-2006, 09:46 PM
When a single is all it takes to knock in a run or two when there are runners in scoring position, keep a rally going, and put pressure on the opposing team, the Cincinnati REDS' .248 batting average puts them next to last in the National League in that category.

Who's first?

The LA Dodgers and their .287 team average.

The Cardinals are second at .283.

Here are the REDS:


Ray Olmedo .....................667
Eric Milton .......................333
Edwin Encarnacion ............319
Scott Hatteberg ...............306
David Ross .......................294
Brandon Phillips .................292
Rich Aurilia .......................274
Adam Dunn .......................264
Chris Denorfia ...................250
Ken Griffey Jr. ...................233
Juan Castro ......................214
Ryan Freel .......................208
Javier Valentin ...................178
Royce Clayton ...................158
Quinton McCracken .............111

These numbers include players totals for the year that have played for other teams (like Clayton).

Spitball
08-03-2006, 12:12 PM
Interesting post.

texasdave
08-03-2006, 05:55 PM
When a single is all it takes to knock in a run or two when there are runners in scoring position, keep a rally going, and put pressure on the opposing team, the Cincinnati REDS' .248 batting average puts them next to last in the National League in that category.

Who's first?

The LA Dodgers and their .287 team average.

The Cardinals are second at .283.

Here are the REDS:


Ray Olmedo .....................667
Eric Milton .......................333
Edwin Encarnacion ............319
Scott Hatteberg ...............306
David Ross .......................294
Brandon Phillips .................292
Rich Aurilia .......................274
Adam Dunn .......................264
Chris Denorfia ...................250
Ken Griffey Jr. ...................233
Juan Castro ......................214
Ryan Freel .......................208
Javier Valentin ...................178
Royce Clayton ...................158
Quinton McCracken .............111

These numbers include players totals for the year that have played for other teams (like Clayton).

which could very well explain that although the reds rank 2nd in OBP, tied for 2nd in SLg and lead the NL in OPS they rank 6th in runs scored.

Johnny Footstool
08-03-2006, 06:06 PM
What's their OPB in that situation?

RichRed
08-03-2006, 06:10 PM
And what were Lopez's & Kearns' numbers?

Redsland
08-03-2006, 07:21 PM
What about when a triple is all you need? How do they stack up then?

M2
08-03-2006, 07:28 PM
The Reds are 10th in the NL with RISP, 9th in SLG, 9th in OPS and 8th in runs scored.

Guys dragging down the OB include Aurilia (.317), Valentin (.291), Jr. (.289) and Clayton (.273). Guys dragging down the SLG include Valentin (.267), Freel (.259), LaRue (.224) and Clayton (.211). Kearns and Lopez had been tough outs w/RISP, but both were swinging spaghetti sticks.

Obviously it doesn't help when your 3-4 hitters are relatively easy outs in key situations.

The team's best hitter w/RISP, and 2nd place isn't all that close, is Adam Dunn .261/.422/.670, leads the team both in RBIs and runs scored (which means Mr. Dunn creates a lot of big innings) w/RISP.

Handofdeath
08-03-2006, 07:44 PM
which could very well explain that although the reds rank 2nd in OBP, tied for 2nd in SLg and lead the NL in OPS they rank 6th in runs scored.

Exactly what I have been trying to point out on other posts. The OPS categories are very important but sabremetrics is an inexact science. That's why it drives me so crazy when people treat it as if it came from the burning bush. I respect other peoples opinion though.

M2
08-03-2006, 08:02 PM
Exactly what I have been trying to point out on other posts. The OPS categories are very important but sabremetrics is an inexact science. That's why it drives me so crazy when people treat it as if it came from the burning bush. I respect other peoples opinion though.

Except you're just scratching surface. For instance, is the team's lack of performance w/RISP hurting the runs scored totals? Yet bet. And if you'll read above you'll see the main offenders in those situations listed.

You may have noticed there's a bunch of people calling for a certain younger fellow to get back into the lineup on a regular basis. Guess what his stat line looks like w/ RISP? .306/.405/.548

Attached to that, the Reds have been playing a guy with a .670 OPS against RHPs in the cleanup spot on a regular basis against RHPs. Now what do you think that might be doing to the overall runs scored totals?

I could go on, but you've hit on a nugget here. It is fairly scandalous that the Reds aren't getting as much out of their OPS as they should be and BA w/RISP is a snipe hunt for why. Why revolves around a manager who's been putting the wrong players in the wrong situations all year long and now the impact of that is really starting to take its toll. I don't hate Jerry Narron and I think he brings some assets to the table in terms of keeping the team mentally ready to play on a daily basis, but he's put an anchor on the offense.

fisch11
08-03-2006, 08:29 PM
These teams are exact polar opposites. Reds 1st in in homers, Dodgers last. Dodgers 1st with RISP, Reds nearly last. Yet, LA comes into town and plays small ball for the most part, we hit 3 HRs in one game and we have to fight to avoid the sweep tonight. I guess it just shows that timely hitting is always more valuable than HR power.