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redsupport
08-04-2006, 02:08 PM
was it Clay Carroll or Mac Jones
Mike McQueen or Pete Smith
How about Ty Cline who got a big hit in game one vs. Pittsburgh in 1970
Of course my favorite was jay Ritchie superior hurler

crazybob60
08-04-2006, 02:13 PM
Based upon the names you just supplied, I would have to go with Clay Carroll, although I need to do a little more research on this subject to see just who all the Reds have acquired from the Braves first!

oregonred
08-04-2006, 02:28 PM
Rick "Night" Mahler...

westofyou
08-04-2006, 02:36 PM
Jim Turner

redsupport
08-04-2006, 02:39 PM
tony tarrasco merits some significant consideration

BuckWoody
08-04-2006, 02:40 PM
Does Ron Gant count?

cumberlandreds
08-04-2006, 02:44 PM
Didn't Joey Jay come from the Braves or was the other way around? He was before my time but he was a good pitcher for the Reds.

Joseph
08-04-2006, 02:44 PM
Deion Sanders?

I kid.

cincrazy
08-04-2006, 02:50 PM
Bubba Nelson anyone? And let's not forget Jung Keun Bong. :D

westofyou
08-04-2006, 02:52 PM
Didn't Joey Jay come from the Braves or was the other way around? He was before my time but he was a good pitcher for the Reds.
Yes, he did... best player that the Reds sent to the Braves has to be Joe Adcock... best Brave that was ever a Red is possibly Wally Berger.

redsupport
08-04-2006, 02:55 PM
Mike de la Hoz?
Woody Woodward
Tony Cloninger
Denis Menke(via Houston)

cumberlandreds
08-04-2006, 03:00 PM
Yes, he did... best player that the Reds sent to the Braves has to be Joe Adcock... best Brave that was ever a Red is possibly Wally Berger.

Thanks WOY. I knew you would know.:)

vic715
08-04-2006, 03:17 PM
Gotta be Joey Jay.In that trade in Dec of 1960 the Reds sent Roy McMillan to The Braves for Jay and Juan Pizzaro. The Reds then sent Pizzaro to the Chisox for Gene Freeze.Jay won 21 that year while Freeze hit .277 26 hrs and 87 RBI and played a solid 3rd base. The Reds won the pennent that year after finishing 67-87 the year before

Heath
08-04-2006, 03:19 PM
Jim Turner

The Colonel, I believe was a Boston Bee, not a Boston Brave. Techinically, Turner was never a Brave. He was, however, part of the timeline of the Boston-Milwaukee-Atlanta National League Club, which actually were Braves, then Bees, then back to Braves. (and Pilgrims and Rustlers and whatever what owner-of-the-day wanted to change the nickname.)

We might need a ruling.

Anyway, to un-hijack the thread, I voted for Juan Pizzaro just because it seems to be a silly answer. Then I think of Dolf Luque.

That's my final answer, Regis.

IowaRed
08-04-2006, 03:41 PM
Don't know if he's the best ever but the Reds acquired Hall of Famer Lloyd Waner from the Boston Braves in 1941

goreds2
08-04-2006, 03:45 PM
Dec. 12, 1975


We received Mike Lum for Darrel Chaney. ;)

REDREAD
08-04-2006, 03:48 PM
How come everyone is forgetting Neagle and Tucker?

westofyou
08-04-2006, 03:51 PM
The Colonel, I believe was a Boston Bee, not a Boston Brave. Techinically, Turner was never a Brave. He was, however, part of the timeline of the Boston-Milwaukee-Atlanta National League Club, which actually were Braves, then Bees, then back to Braves. (and Pilgrims and Rustlers and whatever what owner-of-the-day wanted to change the nickname.)

We might need a ruling.

Anyway, to un-hijack the thread, I voted for Juan Pizzaro just because it seems to be a silly answer. Then I think of Dolf Luque.

That's my final answer, Regis.

Pilgrims was a name used by *some* papers for the AL Boston team, but never officially.

I think you're looking for the "Doves" after owner Harry Dovey (IIRC) Personally I always liked Beaneaters myself.

BenHayes
08-04-2006, 04:52 PM
yea bb the two year wonder joey jay from milwaukee for roy mc millian

Spitball
08-04-2006, 06:09 PM
Didn't Joey Jay come from the Braves or was the other way around?


Yes, he did...

I guess "yes" does completely answer this question since the Reds acquired Joey Jay from the Braves and then traded him back to the Braves in 1966 for the not so memorable Hank Fischer.

Jay, by the way, was the first product of Little League to make the major leagues.

westofyou
08-04-2006, 06:25 PM
Jay, by the way, was the first product of Little League to make the major leagues.That's right, I had this kids book about little leguers who made MLB back in the early 70's.

Jay was the typical Reds pitcher of the early 60's (save O'Toole and Maloney) junk was the main course.

redsupport
08-04-2006, 06:25 PM
hank fischer was superior, he had great control unfortunately he won as many games for the Reds, as the Reds have won since last Friday

RFS62
08-04-2006, 09:05 PM
Wonder what made redsupport think of this question?


http://www.baseball-reference.com/d/dela_mi01.shtml

dougflynn23
08-04-2006, 10:39 PM
:) Not even close..."The Hawk" Clay Carroll wins it hands down. Reds HOF'er and a vital part of 4 playoff and 3 WS teams.

Hap
08-04-2006, 10:39 PM
http://i14.ebayimg.com/03/i/05/e5/07/ab_1_b.JPG

http://i9.ebayimg.com/02/i/07/6d/f9/3a_1_b.JPG

goreds2
08-04-2006, 10:42 PM
How come everyone is forgetting Neagle and Tucker?


Very good point. We finish in 3rd or 4th place without them. That was a VERY FUN season in 1999.

LINEDRIVER
08-04-2006, 11:04 PM
Why are we forgetting the left-handed hitting catcher who appeared in a total of 134 games as a Red in 1980 & 1981? Does the name 'Joe Nolan' ring a bell?

LINEDRIVER
08-04-2006, 11:59 PM
:) Not even close..."The Hawk" Clay Carroll wins it hands down. Reds HOF'er and a vital part of 4 playoff and 3 WS teams.

I'll agree with that. 'Hawk' was the man.

I didn’t realize that Clay Carroll was going to show up in Cincinnati as part of the festivities for Tom Browning's recent induction into the Reds' Hall of Fame. If I had known that "Hawk" was going to be there, I would of bought a ticket just so I could of shook his hand at the meet and greet.

When Sparky Anderson would summon Carroll from the bullpen, Sparky would often greet him at the mound and say, "Hawk, I need two innings of All-Star relief tonight". Carroll would reply, "You got it, Skip".

Another very good reliever that the Reds obtained from the Braves was the submarine-style right-hander Ted Abernathy. Abby pitched with the Chicago Cubs and then the Atlanta Braves in '66. The Braves tried to 'hide' him on the Richmond Braves (Triple A) roster in the off-season. The Reds drafted Abby from the Richmond Braves in November, 1966. He put up STELLAR seasons in 1967 & 1968 with the Reds before being traded to the Cubs in January, 1969.

Well, heck, why not let Abernathy help tell that story. Here's a portion of an interview that I had with Abernathy in 2000.

This interview originally appeared on the now defunct 'Baseball Pressbox' website that Team Clark and I owned and operated once upon a time.

LD: When I think of Ted Abernathy, I think of the submarine pitching delivery, but when you came to the big leagues you were pitching from what would be considered a typical overhand motion. So what happened that caused you to convert to a submarine reliever?

TA: I had shoulder surgery in 1959. The doctor said I would need three years to get back to the majors and I would be able to throw overhand or underhand, whatever I wanted to do. I figured the quickest way back to the big leagues was to be a relief pitcher or as a submariner. I guess it paid off.

LD: You worked your way back through the minors and made it back to the majors with Cleveland in 1963 where you finally had a good year in the big leagues at the age of 29. Two years in Cleveland and you were off to the Cubs. In 1965, you were the Fireman of the Year Award winner.

TA: Another thing that helped me as a pitcher was being a submariner. The starters would go 7 or 8 innings in those days and then I would come into the games and show the hitters a completely different motion and pitches. I pitched in 84 games for the Cubs in ’65, and I probably warmed up in about another 30 games.

LD: You had a bit of a rough start in ’66 with the Cubs and you went to the Atlanta Braves. Once you got in Atlanta, your pitching improved again.

TA: I finally got a chance to pitch regularly again. I had to have a lot of work to keep myself sharp.

LD: After the ’66 season, the Atlanta Braves tried to hide you by placing you on the Richmond Braves roster.

TA: Right. Dave Bristol, the Reds’ manager at the time, he’s also from North Carolina, called me and asked me what was the trouble. I said there wasn’t any trouble, I just needed a place to pitch.

LD: The Reds drafted you off the Richmond Braves roster and you went to Cincinnati to start the ’67 season. You threw 106 innings in 70 games and put up a 1.27 ERA. You won your second Fireman of the Year Award. You had another good year in 1968 for Cincinnati. A 2.47 ERA, 135 innings in 78 games. That’ getting it done! You went back to the Cubs for the ’69 season. That must of been a unique experience with Leo Durocher as your manager. The Cubbies were actually very good for most of that season with Williams, Banks, Santo, Hundley, Beckert, and Kessinger.

TA: Phil Regan, Hank Aguirre, and myself in the bullpen. That’s the year we should of won the pennant.

LD: Bill Hands, Ken Holtzman, and Fergie Jenkins burned up a total of about 900 innings as three of the starters. They burned out, didn’t they?

TA: Yes they did, and so did the regulars on the field. They were told they were paid to play and they had to play.

LD: So in the meantime, the Cubs blew a good size lead.

TA: Right. We had about a nine game lead with about a month to go. That was about as close as I got to a World Series.

LD: You pitched for the Cubs, Cardinals, and Royals in 1970. You pitched well with all three teams. You stayed in Kansas City for the ’71 and ’72 seasons. At the age of 39, you managed a 1.70 ERA in 45 games in 1972. You retired after the ‘72 season.

TA: Kansas City decided they were going to go with younger kids, and I can’t blame them for that. I enjoyed my career.

LD: I always thought you were a very good relief pitcher. When you got your health and control together your career did a turnaround. You had some remarkable ERA’s in those last 8 years of your career. I think you were much better than people gave you credit for. I ran some stats on some big name relievers to see what kind of ERA’s they had in the last eight years of their careers. I checked on Eckersley, Quisenberry, Tekulve, Sutter, Gossage, Reardon, Fingers, Wilhelm, Face, Perranoski, and Lee Smith. Hoyt Wilhelm had the lowest ERA of 2.11 and Ted Abernathy had the second lowest with a 2.61 ERA. That’s some mighty impressive company. I guess that proves that you can get better with age.

TA: Yep, that's the way I was.

*

LINEDRIVER
08-05-2006, 12:46 AM
hank fischer was superior, he had great control unfortunately he won as many games for the Reds, as the Reds have won since last Friday

Maybe you were meaning 'Bill' Fischer as the pitcher with great control?

In 1962, Bill Fischer threw a streak of 84 1/3 innings without walking a batter. His '62 season totals included just 8 walks in 127 2/3 innings. Years later, he would become a pitching coach for the Reds and Red Sox.

But I do get your point on Hank Fischer struggling as a Reds' pitcher. In 1966, Bill appeared in 11 games, made 9 starts, and posted a dismal 0-6 record before moving to the Red Sox that same season.

Here is a Bill Fischer/Mickey Mantle history tidbit. It's one of those things that you would pay $50 to watch if you knew it was gonna happen.

MAY 22, 1963 … Yankees’ star slugger Mickey Mantle, using a borrowed bat from friend Dale Long of the Cubs, crushes a tape measure solo HR off Athletics’ pitcher Bill Fischer to win the game in the eleventh-inning, 8-7. The monster shot is still rising when it strikes the top of the right field roof at Yankee Stadium. Another foot higher and the ball would of cleared the ballpark! A physicist figures the ball would of traveled 620 feet if it had not struck the façade. Mantle describes the launch as “the hardest ball I’ve ever hit.” Mantle later tells Dale Long, “That was the only homer I ever hit where the bat actually bent in my hands.”

On the previous pitch, Mantle was made to look silly while swinging and missing Bill Fischer's slow curveball. Remember Mr. Fischer, it's not nice to fool 'The Mick' on the baseball field. Paybacks are hell.

*

Newman4
08-05-2006, 01:15 AM
Rob Bell? Ewwwww.

LINEDRIVER
08-05-2006, 02:57 PM
Matt Belisle is a former Atlanta Braves farmhand.

redbrian
08-05-2006, 03:03 PM
denny neagle

The_jbh
08-05-2006, 03:18 PM
Rob Bell? Ewwwww.

Darn it u beat me to it...


what a bust robby was

Tony Cloninger
08-05-2006, 05:25 PM
OBVIOUSLY......it is I......the double threat on both the mound and plate.

My arm was loosely being held together by about 3 pieces of dental floss by 1969.



Brian L. Hunter

LINEDRIVER
08-05-2006, 11:01 PM
OBVIOUSLY......it is I......the double threat on both the mound and plate.

My arm was loosely being held together by about 3 pieces of dental floss by 1969.

Gee Tony, it must seem like yesterday........

JULY 3, 1966…Atlanta Braves’ pitcher Tony Cloninger becomes the first major league pitcher in history to clobber two grandslam HR’s in the same ballgame. The right-handed pitcher also knocks in a run with a single to give him 9 RBI’s in the 17-3 rout of the Giants in San Francisco. Cloninger has racked up 18 RBI’s in his last four games. On June 16th, he blasted two HR’s for 5 RBI’s against the Mets.

.

redsupport
08-05-2006, 11:38 PM
ty cline merits strong consideration, if he had not chopped that ball in front of Ken Burkhart the Reds might have ousted the Orioles in 1970

Phhhl
08-06-2006, 01:13 AM
How come everyone is forgetting Neagle and Tucker?

Good point. Maybe they are not the best two players, but they would seem to be in the discussion.

camisadelgolf
08-07-2006, 03:52 AM
Rob Bell? Ewwwww.
He's the reason Edwin Encarnacion is here, so I'm not complaining.

huber14
08-07-2006, 11:47 AM
it should have been john rocker