PDA

View Full Version : Any Twilight Zone fans?



Cedric
08-24-2006, 01:56 AM
I've been obsessed since I was VERY young. My dad used to watch reruns with me all the time and I'm still amazed by Rod Serling.

I'm a night owl with school so I watch them every night on the sci fi channel from 1:00-2:00.

Just amazing stuff.

My favorite episode is the Howling Man and the Silence.

REDREAD
08-24-2006, 05:53 AM
I always liked the show, but it's been so long, I really don't remember many of the episodes.

MrCinatit
08-24-2006, 07:15 AM
I had not watched them for ages upon ages, until recently when I bought the full collection on DVD. Definetely a show which was way ahead of its time.
The Silence did make a rather good impression - I was actually somewhat surprised at the ending, which is a feat for me.
I don't know the name of the episode, but it contains one of my favorite all-time actors, Buster Keaton, as an unwilling time travellor who is transported from a silent era to the noisier "modern" era (aka, 1959).
What is fascinating with the program is seeing many of the "before they were stars" actors, such as Falk, Redford, Shatner, Nimoy, Takai, Savalas, Coburn...the list goes on. We even have a young Billy Mumy before his "Fish Heads" days. An amazing amount of talent was packed into those episodes.

RANDY IN INDY
08-24-2006, 08:35 AM
"My name is talking Tina............................"

Great show!

minus5
08-24-2006, 09:02 AM
I get addicted to every Twilight Zone marathon that the Sci Fi Channel shows. Seems like they do them on New Years Day or so. Love the show. I just got the first season of Rod Serling's The Night Gallery on DVD as well. I liked that one too. Not as good as Twilight Zone but still some cool stuff.

The episode, The Masks was pretty good. One of my favs.

Roy Tucker
08-24-2006, 09:14 AM
"It's a cook book!!!"

Chip R
08-24-2006, 09:30 AM
Great show. I really liked "All The Time In the World" where Burgess Meredith worked in a bank but would much rather be by himself and read. One day he goes down in the vault to eat lunch and read and the bomb hits. He's the only survivor and finds a bombed out library with a ton of books. He's just giddy with delight since he's the only person around and has all these books. But he accidentally breaks his glasses and is unable to read.

macro
08-24-2006, 01:23 PM
Love it! My favorite is called "Eye of the Beholder", the one where the woman is undergoing surgery for the final time in attempt to escape being "ugly" and being sent to a concentration camp of some sort. Very dramatic leadup to the removal of the bandages, and a very good moral to the story!

919191
08-24-2006, 04:06 PM
Love it! My favorite is called "Eye of the Beholder", the one where the woman is undergoing surgery for the final time in attempt to escape being "ugly" and being sent to a concentration camp of some sort. Very dramatic leadup to the removal of the bandages, and a very good moral to the story!


You beat me to it.

Chip R
08-24-2006, 04:39 PM
Love it! My favorite is called "Eye of the Beholder", the one where the woman is undergoing surgery for the final time in attempt to escape being "ugly" and being sent to a concentration camp of some sort. Very dramatic leadup to the removal of the bandages, and a very good moral to the story!

I was gonna pick that one too. Loved how they used shadows and camera angles so as to not show the doctors' and nurses' faces until they unwrapped her bandages.

RFS62
08-24-2006, 04:41 PM
"Nightmare at 20,000 feet" with Captain Kirk.

RFS62
08-24-2006, 04:43 PM
"It's a cook book!!!"


Yeah, that was great. Wasn't the title of that episode "To Serve Man"?

redsfanmia
08-24-2006, 05:42 PM
I like the one where the concentration camp gaurd goes back to the camp 20 years later for old time sakes and is stalked and tried in a court by the people he mistreated and killed. He went crazy from the whole thing. Wonderful show.

Redlegman
08-24-2006, 05:43 PM
I like the old man and the hunting dog. They went out and they both drown. Next morning he went home and find out that he is dead. He then went down a road where he meet a man. The man told him that if he goes through his gate that he will be in heaven. But the dog started to growl and the old man would not go through without his dog. The man at the gate told the old man that he can't bring his dog. So the old man said that if his dog can't go then he won't go. So he went down the road and meet another guy. The guy said that both can go through his gate. The guy said this is Heaven. The man said that the other guy was the devil and he don't let dogs in. He try to trick him and the dog knew who he was. Great story.

UKFlounder
08-24-2006, 07:55 PM
Great show. I really liked "All The Time In the World" where Burgess Meredith worked in a bank but would much rather be by himself and read. One day he goes down in the vault to eat lunch and read and the bomb hits. He's the only survivor and finds a bombed out library with a ton of books. He's just giddy with delight since he's the only person around and has all these books. But he accidentally breaks his glasses and is unable to read.

That one drives me nuts. I love to read, and don't mind being by myself, and when he realizes his glasses are broke, I just feel so bad for him. I know it's just a TV show, but that ending just gets to me every time, and I remember how shocked I was the first time I saw it. A great episode.

I don't know the name of the episode, but it's one of the non-science fiction ones, where 2 spies are in one hotel room and their target is in another, but they tell him some common object will make the room explode. It ends up being the telephone when it rings and the receiver is picked up, but the show ends with the target getting away. The "bad guys" did enter his room, and he calls his room when the one of the two who had not planned just picks up the phone out of habit. I'm sure that's a poorly worded description, but I liked that episode.

There are several others I enjoy too, but what annoys me is that they did another marathon over the 4th of July weekend, but I didn't realize it until it was more than half over. I saw some good stuff, but missed quite a few too.

Oh well - that is one good thing about New Year's and I hope they do another marathon then.

KittyDuran
08-25-2006, 10:23 AM
Saw this one a few weeks ago with a young James Daly::thumbup:

A Stop at Willoughby

Gart Williams is an advertising executive who has grown exasperated with the stress of the business life and constantly dreams of a peaceful place called Willoughby during his commute by train. After he finally snaps at his workplace, he exits the train while in his dream so he can live in Willoughby. In reality, he jumped off the train to his death. His body is eventually loaded into a hearse owned by Willoughby & Son Funeral Home.

macro
08-25-2006, 10:33 AM
I seem to recall one I saw several years, but have missed it on the July 4 marathon every year since. Some space travelers (astronauts, I guess) had arrived on a planet that seemed just like earth, but everyone and everything seemed to be motionless. They finally found a man who was moving and talking, and he explained that everything was moving, but it was moving so slowly that they couldn't detect the movement (like the hands on a clock). He went on to explain that the astronauts movements were so fast to these people, that they couldn't see them (like we can't see a bullett when fired) and that they had no idea they were even there.

Does anyone remember this one?

I loved it, because it got me to thinking how time is so relative. Why should we assume that the speed at which we perceive time is the only perception of time that is possible?

Roy Tucker
08-25-2006, 10:59 AM
Saw this one a few weeks ago with a young James Daly::thumbup:

A Stop at Willoughby

Gart Williams is an advertising executive who has grown exasperated with the stress of the business life and constantly dreams of a peaceful place called Willoughby during his commute by train. After he finally snaps at his workplace, he exits the train while in his dream so he can live in Willoughby. In reality, he jumped off the train to his death. His body is eventually loaded into a hearse owned by Willoughby & Son Funeral Home.


That's one of my favorites too Kitty. The final scene is loading the guy's body into the hearse and they close the backdoor and they do a slow zoom on the door's logo "Willoughby & Son Funeral Home" and you just go whoa.

Chip R
08-25-2006, 11:20 AM
That one drives me nuts. I love to read, and don't mind being by myself, and when he realizes his glasses are broke, I just feel so bad for him. I know it's just a TV show, but that ending just gets to me every time, and I remember how shocked I was the first time I saw it. A great episode.


I got to thinking about that one after I posted it. IIRC, Burgess Meredith's glasses were very thick - Coke Bottle lenses, if you will. That usually indicates nearsightedness. So even without the glasses, he should still be able to read. :)

One of the other ones I really like is the one where this gangster dies and he's confronted by Sebastian Cabot dressed all in white and he's basically there to give the gangster whatever he wants. Babes, booze, winning at gambling, whatever. The gangster eventually gets tired of it and wonders what kind of heaven that is. Cabot tells him it isn't heaven.

Cedric
08-25-2006, 11:21 AM
I seem to recall one I saw several years, but have missed it on the July 4 marathon every year since. Some space travelers (astronauts, I guess) had arrived on a planet that seemed just like earth, but everyone and everything seemed to be motionless. They finally found a man who was moving and talking, and he explained that everything was moving, but it was moving so slowly that they couldn't detect the movement (like the hands on a clock). He went on to explain that the astronauts movements were so fast to these people, that they couldn't see them (like we can't see a bullett when fired) and that they had no idea they were even there.

Does anyone remember this one?

I loved it, because it got me to thinking how time is so relative. Why should we assume that the speed at which we perceive time is the only perception of time that is possible?

Elegy is the name of the episode. From season one.

Redlegman
08-25-2006, 06:34 PM
Another one that still gives me the creeps is "Talking Tina". Telly Salvalas (Kojak) plays a step-father whos wife gives her girl a doll against his wishes. He is mean to both of them. When he is ready to throw away the doll, she "tells" him that she will kill him. Every time he throw the doll away, she shows back up and tells him that she is going to kill him. At the end she trips him down a flight of stairs and he dies. Then the woman picks her up and the doll saids that she better be nice to her. GREAT.

redsfanmia
08-25-2006, 08:16 PM
I would assume that there will be yet another marathon on Labor day weekend.

IowaRed
08-25-2006, 10:02 PM
some of my faves that haven't been mentioned:

It's a Good Life:
In a small town, a boy monster holds control of the entire town, for he can read thoughts and do things with his mind. At a birthday party one night, he turns the guest of honor into a jack-in-the-box because he sang Perry Como too loud. Then he makes it snow, which will kill off most the crops.

The Hitch-Hiker:
A woman driving cross-country suffers a blowout in Pittsburgh and afterwards is menaced by a hitch-hiker. After calling home, she realizes that she actually died in the blowout and that the hitch-hiker is death.

The Silence:
A exclusive club member tires of listening to another and bets him half a million dollars to stay quiet for one year. Despite his best efforts to make him talk, he stays quiet for one year while staying in the club basement. However, he is unable to collect on the bet because his rival went bankrupt years before. It is revealed that to ensure winning the bet, the winner had his vocal chords severed before the bet began.

Will the Real Martian Please Stand Up:
Two troopers discover that a Martian has taken refuge in a roadside diner. Trying to figure out which of the eight people it might be is the problem. After the bridge is declared safe to drive across, the troopers are forced to give up their chase. Later, the Martian reveals it was a trick and everyone else has died. He is then surprised to run across a Venusian.

You Drive:
A hit-and-run driver tries to keep his crime a secret, but his car tries to tell the secret. It drives itself to the crime scene, it honks its horn late at night, and after chasing him down it drives him to the police department.

Hap
08-26-2006, 10:35 AM
I custom-made some DVDs of episodes that I recorded off television. I would like to take this opportunity to show off the labels.

UKFlounder
08-26-2006, 10:53 AM
Roadside Diner is a good one, and another one I like is where the father is about to die and invites his kids & a grandson, and makes them all wear masks. At the end their faces end up in the grotesque shapes of the masks, which are shaped according to their personalities.

Tony Cloninger
08-26-2006, 07:14 PM
"NIghtmare on Maple Street".......where everyone reveals their prejudices and paranoias. The Martians....after being able to turn all these neighboors on each other.....leave while repeating the words "One right after the other.....one right after the other."

Dennis Hopper plays a wanna be new edition of Hitler.....not a great one....but i get a kick out of seeing a young Dennis Hopper.


Bernard Herrman did the score at the end of the shows for season 1 or 2 i think....but the SCI-FI channel....always interrupts it....for the same preview of the same show every single time....maddening.

Cedric
08-27-2006, 09:33 PM
"NIghtmare on Maple Street".......where everyone reveals their prejudices and paranoias. The Martians....after being able to turn all these neighboors on each other.....leave while repeating the words "One right after the other.....one right after the other."

Dennis Hopper plays a wanna be new edition of Hitler.....not a great one....but i get a kick out of seeing a young Dennis Hopper.


Bernard Herrman did the score at the end of the shows for season 1 or 2 i think....but the SCI-FI channel....always interrupts it....for the same preview of the same show every single time....maddening.

I think "Nightmare on Maple Street" and "Eye of the Beholder" are the two most loved shows. Just an opinion from talking to others.

Another thing that makes The Twilight Zone very cool are the ties with Rod Serling and 700 WLW.

UKFlounder
12-31-2006, 09:36 AM
This year's marathon on Sci-Fi has started and I've started recording it again.
Hopefully I'll be able to get some of the better ones, though I don't know what I missed before waking up.

Tom Servo
12-31-2006, 09:48 AM
I'm a HUGE Twilight Zone fan, I'm watching the marathon right now myself. I have seasons 1-3 on DVD (you can get them cheap buying them 'used' on Amazon, where most of them are still factory sealed).


Some of my favorites are "Will the Real Martian Please Stand Up", "The Obsolete Man", "People are A Like All Over", "The Dummy", and "The Howling Man".

UKFlounder
12-31-2008, 06:03 PM
I no longer have cable so cannot see the marathons if they are running them, but did get the DVD collection of the show for Christmas. I've already watched disc 1 of season 1 and will start the second one tonight. It's just good stuff.

TeamCasey
12-31-2008, 06:22 PM
My favorite is the guy that wants peace and quiet to read books then breaks his glasses.

Tom Servo
12-31-2008, 09:04 PM
Since I posted in this thread I became an even bigger TZ fan, despite describing myself as a HUGE fan in my last post. I got the last 2 seasons on DVD and in August 2007 I even attented the Twilight Zone Convention, if only because for whatever reason it was in my hometown of Hasbrouck Heights, New Jersey and only 5 minutes away from my house.

http://photos-g.ll.facebook.com/photos-ll-sf2p/v183/83/102/597785241/n597785241_584494_2402.jpg
Me with Suzanne Gordon (daughter of producer/director Bert I. Gordon) and star of the episode "The Fugutive"
http://photos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-sf2p/v116/83/102/597785241/n597785241_197986_1765.jpg
And with George Clayton Johnson, writer of episodes A Game of Pool and Kick the Can (among others) and a really cool guy.

RichRed
01-01-2009, 03:13 PM
Great pics, Tom. I'm DVRing the New Year's marathon as we speak.

Roy Tucker
01-01-2009, 03:31 PM
Watched "Little Girl Lost" last night late. I remember when I first saw it in 1962 (yes, I'm old), it freaked me out to no end when the dad went into the 4th dimension to find the little girl.

Watching it last night, I think I know where the movie "Poltergeist" got its idea from.

Spitball
01-01-2009, 06:13 PM
In the early 1960s, I watched the Twilight Zone every Friday niight with my sister. It was our favorite show. Today, I have most of the episodes on VHS tape but need to get the DVD sets.

I loved the social commentary aspect of the stories. The Maple Street episode was actually "The Monsters Are Due on Maple Street" and the monsters, as was mentioned, were the suspicions and prejudices of the people living there. I believe it was inspired by the McCarthy trials.

I loved most episodes, but my favorites were and are:

"Time Enough at Last" -This one has been mentioned

"The Hitch-Hiker" -Inger Stevens keeps passing a hitch-hiker who turns out to be death.

"A Stop at Willoughby" -Been mentioned

"A Most Unusual Camera" -Camera takes pictures of the future

"Back There"-Guy travels back in time to stop John Wilkes Boothe

"A Penny for Your Thoughts"-Guy can read minds after a coin donation stands on end in offering pan

"Long Distance Call"-Kid talks to dead Grandma ontoy phone

"Will the Real Martian Please Stand Up?"-Bus crashes with unknown alien aboard. Great surprise ending.

"Nothing in the Dark"-Robert Redford plays grim reaper disguised as a dying policeman outside an old woman's apartment.

"The Hunt"-Guy goes hunting and finds Heaven

"Little Girl Lost" and "Stopover in a Quiet Town"-Both mentioned earlier

"A Kind of a Stopwatch"-One of my very favorites. Man acquires a watch that can make time stand still. Among other adventures, he attends a baseball game and stops time while moves the bag to keep a player from being tagged out. Eventually, he stops time while he robs a bank. Unfortunately, the watch slips off the pile of money and breaks as he wheels it out of the bank, leaving him in a world frozen in time.

Also, I remember one about an old man with a cruel, young wife named Mary Ann. She keeps running off to the carnival with a young boyfriend leaving him at home in his wheel chair. He has a big glass jar he somehow got at the carnival and it is crammed full of odd things . All his neighbors come over and reveal their various guilts as they try to conclude the contents of the jar.

Eventually, the cruel Mary Ann comes home from the carnival (with a hair ribbon sporting her name) and opens the jar. She reveals it is a fake, merely containing wads of cotton, a doll's eye, and various other items. In the end, the old guy is once again sitting in his wheelchair next to the intact jar as the neighbors sit around trying to guess the contents. As the camera pans around the jar, we see it now contains a hair ribbon with "Mary Ann" written on it.

Does anyone else remember this episode or did I dream it? It isn't on my recordings.

Bob Borkowski
01-01-2009, 07:22 PM
Spitball,

I have been a Twilight Zone fan from the very beginning in 1959.

I cannot remember the Mary Ann episode that you mention. Actually, it sounds more like something from Serling's Night Gallery. Could that be where you saw it?

Spitball
01-02-2009, 03:08 PM
Bob, I'm pretty certain I saw the program earlier than The Night Gallery series which I believe ran in the earlier 1970s. I not certain that the name was Mary Ann. It is also possible, if not probable, that it was another similar program such as Alfred Hitchcock Presents. I have gone years thinking it was an episode from Twilight Zone, but now I have serious doubts.

Roy Tucker
01-02-2009, 03:56 PM
There was an episode from "The Alfred Hitchcock Hour" called "The Jar" that sounds similar.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0394054/

Spitball
01-02-2009, 05:05 PM
There was an episode from "The Alfred Hitchcock Hour" called "The Jar" that sounds similar.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0394054/

Great detective work, Roy! That is the correct show and episode. I was off on several details, but you still nailed it.

The writer here did leave out the ending.


"The Alfred Hitchcock Hour" The Jar (1964)

A carnival barker sells a jar containing a mysterious, hairy, octopus-like mass to Charlie Hill of Wilder's Hollow for $12.25. He shows it to his wife Thedy, who hates it. Soon everyone from miles around comes to look at the jar and wonder what is inside. Trudy and her paramour, Tom Carmody, conspire with Jahdoo, paying him $1 to steal the jar and shatter it at Heron Swamp. Charlie hurries to the swamp, but gets trapped in quicksand. Jahdoo speculates on the contents of the jar before rescuing Charlie and returning the jar. When Charlie gets home, Thedy tries to break the jar with a spoon. Charlie grabs the spoon and nearly attacks Thedy with it, so she runs away. When she comes back, she says that she visited the carnival, and the carny boss told her the jar is full of junk--wire, clay, paper, cotton, yarn, inner tube, doll's eyes, and silk. Thedy says she will tell everyone, but Charlie likes his new popularity. Written by Lewis O. Amack

The Alfred Hitchcock Hour was also a great show in the Twilight Zone mold. There was another great episode about an old house on the ocean (maybe in Maine) and a ghost who appears to the new owners in mirrors. As the host, Alfred Hitchcock warned the viewers about reflections in the TV screen. I was just a kid and it scared the crapola outa' me. I believe Steven King mentioned the episode in an article he wrote for The TV Guide in about 1981.

RFS62
01-02-2009, 08:00 PM
The Alfred Hitchcock Hour was also a great show in the Twilight Zone mold. There was another great episode about an old house on the ocean (maybe in Maine) and a ghost who appears to the new owners in mirrors. As the host, Alfred Hitchcock warned the viewers about reflections in the TV screen. I was just a kid and it scared the crapola outa' me. I believe Steven King mentioned the episode in an article he wrote for The TV Guide in about 1981.


I remember that one too. "The Bloodthirsty Mirror", I believe was the title. That episode scared me half to death.

GAC
01-03-2009, 03:30 AM
"Nightmare at 20,000 feet" with Captain Kirk.

So.... every time you fly, do you look out that window seat to check if anything is on the wing? ;)

http://www.scaredstiffreviews.com/images/news/nightmare%20at%2020000%20feet_header.jpg

I don't remember the name of the episode, but it was the one with a woman as the central character and where the earth was slowly moving closer to the sun and going to burn up. Only to find out in the end that it was a fever induced dream, and the earth was moving away from the sun.

The Baumer
01-03-2009, 06:37 AM
I saw a cool "wing monster" 12" collectible doll at a nearby costume/toy shop. Spent a few minutes oogling it.

Spitball
01-03-2009, 08:07 AM
I don't remember the name of the episode, but it was the one with a woman as the central character and where the earth was slowly moving closer to the sun and going to burn up. Only to find out in the end that it was a fever induced dream, and the earth was moving away from the sun.

I remember that one very well. It caused me (a stupid kid) to start questioning reality. It would be a hot summer day and I'd be wondering...

That reminds me of the one about the Civil War soldier who is about to be hanged from a bridge by his captors. He escapes and swims down the river to his wife. He runs to her and as he is about to embrace her---What the???- He is suddenly hanging from the bridge!!!

As a kid, that episode really messed me up and had me questioning reality. I'd be having a great time and suddenly start worrying it was all in my head and suddenly I would be hanging from a bridge.

GAC
01-03-2009, 08:28 AM
I remember that one very well. It caused me (a stupid kid) to start questioning reality. It would be a hot summer day and I'd be wondering...

That reminds me of the one about the Civil War soldier who is about to be hanged from a bridge by his captors. He escapes and swims down the river to his wife. He runs to her and as he is about to embrace her---What the???- He is suddenly hanging from the bridge!!!

As a kid, that episode really messed me up and had me questioning reality. I'd be having a great time and suddenly start worrying it was all in my head and suddenly I would be hanging from a bridge.

Rod Sterling was a college professor up here locally at Antioch in Yellow Springs. I think his widow still resides there.

And if anyone has ever been to the 'burg of Yellow Springs they can understand where Rod probably got a lot of his ideas for episodes. It's trapped in the Twilight Zone.

Whenever we drive through I start singing the beginning..... do do do do, do do do do! :lol:

Spitball
01-03-2009, 01:03 PM
Rod Sterling was a college professor up here locally at Antioch in Yellow Springs. I think his widow still resides there.

And if anyone has ever been to the 'burg of Yellow Springs they can understand where Rod probably got a lot of his ideas for episodes. It's trapped in the Twilight Zone.

Whenever we drive through I start singing the beginning..... do do do do, do do do do! :lol:

I believe he lived in Cincinnati in his early career and worked at WLW.

The Baumer
01-03-2009, 07:24 PM
That episode was called An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge, or at least the short story it was based off is named that. I remember reading the story and watching the episode in an old high school english class.

Kingspoint
01-03-2009, 07:32 PM
Talking Tina is the scariest of them all.

Spitball
01-03-2009, 09:02 PM
That episode was called An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge, or at least the short story it was based off is named that. I remember reading the story and watching the episode in an old high school english class.

You are correct about the name of the episode...and I'm sure also about your high school English class. :D I believe it is from a famous short story written by some French guy.

RBA
01-04-2009, 01:40 AM
After reading this thread, I have my DVR set to automatically record all Twi-Light Zone episodes. I look forward to watching them again.

GAC
01-04-2009, 03:45 AM
I believe he lived in Cincinnati in his early career and worked at WLW.

Yep. For years I always believed Rod was a professor at Antioch, and that it was prior to Twilight Zone. I accepted that and never really researched it. I also knew he spent his early days at WLW too. But upon further scrutiny I discover he graduated from Antioch (1950), and then returned on occasion to his old alma mater to teach a writing class.

I also found this very interesting concerning his military service....

Rod Serling served as a US Army paratrooper and demolition specialist with the 511th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 11th Airborne Division in the Pacific Theater in WW2 from January 1943 to January 1945. He was seriously wounded in the wrist and knee during combat and was awarded the Purple Heart and Bronze Star. Serling's military service deeply affected the rest of his life and influenced much of his writing. Due to his wartime experiences, Serling suffered from nightmares and flashbacks. During his service in World War II, he watched as his best friend was crushed to death by a heavy supply crate dropped by a parachute onto the field. Serling was rather short (5'4") and slight. He was a noted boxer during his military days.


Another one of my favorite TZ's was with Billy Mumy in "It's A Good Life"...


"Tonight's story on The Twilight Zone is somewhat unique and calls for a different kind of introduction. This, as you may recognize, is a map of the United States, and there's a little town there called Peaksville. On a given morning not too long ago, the rest of the world disappeared and Peaksville was left all alone. Its inhabitants were never sure whether the world was destroyed and only Peaksville left untouched or whether the village had somehow been taken away. They were, on the other hand, sure of one thing: the cause. A monster had arrived in the village. Just by using his mind, he took away the automobiles, the electricity, the machines - because they displeased him - and he moved an entire community back into the dark ages - just by using his mind."

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/8/87/It%27s_A_Good_Life.JPG/200px-It%27s_A_Good_Life.JPG

UKFlounder
01-04-2009, 09:16 AM
You are correct about the name of the episode...and I'm sure also about your high school English class. :D I believe it is from a famous short story written by some French guy.

I believe it was written by Ambrose Bierce who had served in the Civil War and wrote several stories based on his experiences there.