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RedFanAlways1966
09-25-2006, 09:04 AM
Got a DUI last night after (per WLW) the Bengals returned from Pittsburgh. And guess who was a passenger in the car? Yep... Chris Henry.

Way to go, Odell. Perhaps you will try to tell us that you just forgot to blow in the breathalizer and were really innocent (like you forgot to take your pee test and are not a drug-user).

Odell... grow up. And quit hangin' with Chris Henry.

Odell Thurman is facing charges for driving under the influence
By 700 WLW News

The message from Bengals Head Coach Marvin Lewis after Sundays' win over Pittsburgh to his players was "stay classy" in victory. That message never got to suspended linebacker Odell Thurman who has been arrested for operating a motor vehicle under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Thurman was driving another players car when he was stopped early Monday morning in the East End. Reports say other players were in the SUV with Thurman including wide receiver Chris Henry but he is not facing any charges at this time.

traderumor
09-25-2006, 09:41 AM
Yea, this was wonderful news to wake up to. Went to read the story on the game and see this. Thurman may have just bought at least four more games. I'll be surprised if he ever sees the field this year.

cincy09
09-25-2006, 11:11 AM
Some things never change. Really a disappointing situation. I too would be surprized to see Odell back this year. Cant figure this looks too good for Henry and the new comish either.

Reds Fanatic
09-25-2006, 11:22 AM
Here is an article from the Enquirer on the arrest.

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060925/NEWS01/309250010


Bengals linebacker Odell Thurman was arrested at 3:05 a.m. today and charged with driving under the influence of alcohol.

Thurman was arrested in the 3800 block of Kellogg Avenue in the East End. He was brought to a checkpoint operated by the Cincinnati Police and Ohio State Patrol and submitted to a breath test.

Thurman registered a .17, which is considered a high-tier reading, said Officer Stephen Lawson of the Cincinnati Police Traffic Section.


Under Ohio law, a person is presumed intoxicated at .08 percent blood alcohol content.

Thurman was released to a sober driver, Lawson said.

Thurman was one of several Bengals players in Thurman’s 2007 Chevrolet Tahoe.

The identification of other Bengals players riding in the vehicle was not immediately available, Lawson said.

Thurman, 23, was the only occupant charged with DUI, the officer said.

Thurman is currently serving a four-game suspension for a second violation of the NFL substance abuse policy, stemming from a failed test, which was believed to be a missed test.

He is eligible to come off the suspended list and return to practice Oct. 2, one week from today.

The Bengals played their third game Sunday, a 28-20 victory at Pittsburgh, to improve to 3-0.

Thurman, under terms of his suspension, is not allowed to be in the stadium on game day. The team flew home on a charter flight immediately after the game, and Thurman was believed to have hooked up with some teammates to celebrate the victory.

The Bengals’ standing policy is to not comment on players’ legal issues until they are resolved in the court system.

If convicted, Thurman would be subject to additional NFL discipline, including a fine or longer suspension.

Blimpie
09-25-2006, 11:36 AM
What, no guns in the vehicle?

Roy Tucker
09-25-2006, 12:15 PM
.17 blood alcohol is seriously buzzed.

It's not just a hair over the line "shouldn't have had that extra beer" drunk. It's falling down, staggering, passing out, shouldn't be anywhere close to the steering wheel drunk.

Redsland
09-25-2006, 12:28 PM
And the hits keep coming as Peter King reports in today's "Monday Morning Quarterback" column in Sports Illustrated that this past Wednesday, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell addressed the Bengals on the subject of (drumroll please), "the responsbility of NFL players to be good citizens."

Stay hot, Odell.

Reds Fanatic
09-25-2006, 05:08 PM
Marvin Lewis had his weekly press conference today and basically said Odell does not understand what a priviledge it is to play in the NFL and expects him to be dealt with severely by the organization and the league. He basically said he expects he will be suspended for the year. I have a feeling we will not see him back with the Bengals.

WMR
09-25-2006, 05:14 PM
Who'd have thought the Pollack/Thurman draft would end up like this...

man. :(

WMR
09-25-2006, 05:29 PM
Lewis expects Thurman gone for year

By GEOFF HOBSON
September 25, 2006

Expressing disappointment at the club's off-field issues, Bengals head coach Marvin Lewis said Monday he expects Odell Thurman to be suspended by the NFL for the rest of the season.

Thurman, already under a four-game suspension for drug problems, was arrested early Monday for driving while impaired.

Lewis wasted no time taking away Thurman's locker, and replacing him with guard Kyle Takavitz.

Lewis also said that center Rich Braham (knee) will be out some games beyond the Oct. 8 bye, and that safety Dexter Jackson (ankle) has a chance to return to play against his old mates in Tampa Bay Oct. 15. Also out for the Patriots game this Sunday is wide receiver Tab Perry (hip), but Lewis hopes to have a better handle on his situation after the bye.

Lewis also had encouraging news on running back Chris Perry (ankle), eligible to return to practice after the Tampa game. Lewis said it looks like Perry won't need to be shelved long before he gets into a game.

"It's disappointing for me, it's disappointing for our program, all of our fans," Lewis said of Thurman. "He just obviously doesn't understand the privilege and the right to play in the National Football League. He will be dealt with very severely."

According to Fox 19, Thurman, 23, failed a breathalyzer at a checkpoint on Kellogg Avenue in Cincinnati and had a "high-tier" reading that is described as at least .17, or twice the legal limit..

Since Thurman is currently under a four-game suspension, he is in stage two of the substance abuse program, according to the league's policy. It's not known what the requirements of his treatment program are but any violation moves him to stage three and eligible for a one-year suspension that Lewis referenced.

But since there has been only an arrest and not a decision by a court, any resolution may have to wait. But Lewis made it clear he's moving on beyond Thurman. At least for this season

"No," when asked if he had talked to Thurman or planned to talk to him.

Danny Serafini
09-25-2006, 05:47 PM
That Odell Thurman jersey doesn't seem like a real solid purchase right now. :redface:

Red Leader
09-25-2006, 05:50 PM
This, from Rotoworld:

Chris Henry was in Odell Thurman's car when the linebacker got a DUI, and threw up out the window of the vehicle.

Another classy moment in Henry's career. Thurman, whose locker has already been taken down with the Bengals, said he was only driving because Henry and Reggie McNeal, the car's owner, had more to drink than him.

RedFanAlways1966
09-25-2006, 06:04 PM
Thurman, whose locker has already been taken down with the Bengals, said he was only driving because Henry and Reggie McNeal, the car's owner, had more to drink than him.

Yep. It is s real shame that Cincinnati got rid of taxis many years ago. ;)

I think it is a conspiracy by the police to get more DUI offenders.

vaticanplum
09-25-2006, 06:21 PM
Allow me to be all conservative and 75 years old for a moment:

what the hell is WRONG with these people?!?

Red Leader
09-25-2006, 06:27 PM
Allow me to be all conservative and 75 years old for a moment:

what the hell is WRONG with these people?!?


:laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:



They (well 2 of them, the other one was suspended and didn't play) won a football game in the NFL :dunno: ;)

WVRed
09-25-2006, 06:36 PM
All the elation and joy I just felt from the win over the Steelers is pretty much gone.:bang:

I feel like reinstalling Photoshop and making a Jackass movie poster with Odell and Henry in the buggy.

vaticanplum
09-25-2006, 06:37 PM
They (well 2 of them, the other one was suspended and didn't play) won a football game in the NFL :dunno: ;)

It just baffles me that people, when they've got so much going for them, to let this happen...and it's just happening over and over with this team. You guys can pay for a freaking car service, for crying out loud. I'm all for celebration, but the driving? Sheesh. Kids today.

Reading the article more thoroughly, I see that he was arrested pretty close to where I live. Good times all around.

Cyclone792
09-25-2006, 06:52 PM
This, from Rotoworld:

Chris Henry was in Odell Thurman's car when the linebacker got a DUI, and threw up out the window of the vehicle.

Another classy moment in Henry's career. Thurman, whose locker has already been taken down with the Bengals, said he was only driving because Henry and Reggie McNeal, the car's owner, had more to drink than him.

Hmmm ... I remember reading this article from the earlier Henry thread ...

http://www.redszone.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1157529&postcount=48


Henry resolves gun charge
By GEOFF HOBSON
September 12, 2006

Bengals wide receiver Chris Henry pleaded guilty Tuesday to possession of a concealed firearm in Orlando, Fla., and after serving a day in the Orange County Jail it looks like he may not face an NFL suspension in the gray area of league policy. But if he violates any of the terms of the probation, he’ll go to jail.

Since the NFL treats alcohol and drug matters differently than personal conduct, the weapons plea isn’t treated in the same category as the guilty plea he had earlier this year for marijuana possession.

According to papers from the Ninth Judicial Circuit in Orange County, Henry has been sentenced to a two-year probation period in which he can’t consume alcohol while completing 10 hours per month of community service adding up to 100 hours. He may travel to games, but must first get approval.

The official sentenciong is adjudication of the third-degree felony, which means if he completes the probabtion the guilty plea will be expunged from his record.

When asked if the club had a response to Tuesday’s events in Orlando, Bengals public relations director Jack Brennan said, “The Bengals respect the decision of the court. Chris has admitted his mistake and has pledged his resolve to learn from it.”

Henry, 23, arrested four times since Dec. 15, was booked on three felonies after waving a Luger at a group of people in a late-night incident in Orlando. He was later charged with one possession of a concealed firearm.

There is gray area because of the NFL's two different policies governing drug and alcohol and player conduct. The player conduct policy says if a player admits guilt to two criminal violations, he'll be suspended without pay. If he admits guilt in a pending DUI case, set to be heard Oct. 19, in Clermont County, he’s likely looking at what has traditionally been a fine

According to an Associated Press story, Henry said outside the court, "I'd like to say I know I made a mistake, but I'm just trying to, you know what I'm saying, turn all of this into a positive. I just want to get back to playing football. It's what I do."

Henry started last Sunday in place of injured T.J. Houshmandzadeh and had one catch for minus-five yards.

Let's see here ... Henry was in a car at 3am that was being driven by a drunk Odell Thurman. Something tells me that Henry wasn't throwing up because he had the flu, food poisoning or something along those lines. No, the Rotoworld article doesn't straight out say that Henry was drunk, and there is a chance that it may be incorrect, but common sense leads me to believe he most likely was drinking last night.

Two weeks later, and Henry has already likely violated part of the terms of his probation in which he couldn't consume alcohol for two years. I'm sure he actually violated it earlier than last night for the first time, but it's also just as shocking that it took him only two weeks to get caught.

Then again, maybe it isn't shocking.

Way to be, Chris.

Reds Freak
09-25-2006, 07:34 PM
Ever since the Bengals franchise has existed, every positive step has been followed by at least one negative. Now I don't remember much past the 88 Super Bowl, but let's see: Reach the Superbowl, Wilson gets caught with drugs, lose the Superbowl, 15 years of futility. Make the playoffs in 05, Palmer gets hurt, guys get arrested in the offseason. Start 06 3-0 beating the Steelers at Pittsburgh, Odell wants to drive around slammed. What else is there? Krumrie getting hurt, Greg Cook getting hurt...the list goes on and on. For once could they get on a positive roll without all this other bs? Oh well, like Marvin said, they are doing fine without him.

tomred
09-25-2006, 07:49 PM
I just do not understand how players have so much in front of them make more money then most of us in a lifetime in 1 year and just piss all away it does not make me angry just sad for they are the losers not us as fans

Chip R
09-25-2006, 07:56 PM
And the hits keep coming as Peter King reports in today's "Monday Morning Quarterback" column in Sports Illustrated that this past Wednesday, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell addressed the Bengals on the subject of (drumroll please), "the responsbility of NFL players to be good citizens."

Stay hot, Odell.

Not that I'm a Bengals fan but they aren't the only team that needs to be lectured about that. One thing to take into account is the stuff we don't hear about because it is taken care of behind the scenes or a cop doesn't want a big time player to get into trouble.

That's interesting, Cyclone. Chris Henry seems to live a charmed life. He gets in trouble at West Virginia and still manages to make it in the NFL. He gets into some kind of incident where he almost gets his head blown off by a cop and he pretty much skates. No suspension or anything. Perhaps the terms of his probation are that he cannot drink in the state of Florida. Or if they do revoke his probation and he ges to jail, it will be after the season.

RedFanAlways1966
09-25-2006, 10:27 PM
Chris Henry seems to live a charmed life. He gets in trouble at West Virginia and still manages to make it in the NFL. He gets into some kind of incident where he almost gets his head blown off by a cop and he pretty much skates. No suspension or anything.

As long as he can get open, catch the ball and score TDs. Those are the important things, I guess!??! Lets hope it doesn't end up costing him or someone else their life. :help:

traderumor
09-25-2006, 10:31 PM
I find the sanctimonious attitude of the NFL a bit much. Preach all they want about "the privilege of playing in the NFL," but the money they generate from the very substance that they are damning players to hell with helps fill the coffers of all those wagging their fingers, which in turn they use to make young, immature, spoiled men rich. Hypocrisy is putrid even if it is sitting in the owner's box in thousand dollar suits (well, except for Mike Brown, who likely is buying at S&K like me). The help they give? Don't drink or do drugs or you're suspended. Do it again while you're suspended and you're suspended for a year. But where's the reform? And why wasn't Brett Favre suspended for publicly admitting being addicted to pain killers? Odell, Henry and all the other foolish behavior is not excused, but the NFL seems to go far on the punitive side while only giving lip service to the reform side. And punishment without attempting to reform is a shame. Now, of course I have not reviewed the program that the guilty must go through, but I don't recall a player saying "the NFL rehab program saved my career."

Yachtzee
09-26-2006, 12:12 AM
Would it kill them to go out and rent a limo when they want to tie one on?

GAC
09-26-2006, 07:31 AM
As long as he can get open, catch the ball and score TDs. Those are the important things, I guess!??! Lets hope it doesn't end up costing him or someone else their life. :help:

Not if Paul Brown were the coach. I'm just finishing up reading a book on him. He had zero tolerance for any type pf misbehavior. Any player, regardless of who they were, was gone after the first incident that brought embarassment to the team/organization. Released the captain of his team once for drinking and back talking a police officer. The next day, Paul confronted him and asked him if it were true, and he said yes. Paul told him to clean out his locker.

But the point was - Paul wanted the other players on the team to see it and get the "message". Especially when it involved the CAPTAIN of their team. He ruled and ran a taut ship, and didn't have troubles overall.

The game has changed. Which is why a guy like Paul Brown wouldn't make it today. The NFL Players Union would be all over him.

I like Marvin Lewis; but he seems to put team discipline down on the list. But then, alot of today's NFL coaches do too. Players make too much money, and it's too risky to discipline/bench players you rely on weekly to win.

GAC
09-26-2006, 07:57 AM
I find the sanctimonious attitude of the NFL a bit much. Preach all they want about "the privilege of playing in the NFL," but the money they generate from the very substance that they are damning players to hell with helps fill the coffers of all those wagging their fingers, which in turn they use to make young, immature, spoiled men rich. Hypocrisy is putrid even if it is sitting in the owner's box in thousand dollar suits (well, except for Mike Brown, who likely is buying at S&K like me). The help they give? Don't drink or do drugs or you're suspended. Do it again while you're suspended and you're suspended for a year. But where's the reform? And why wasn't Brett Favre suspended for publicly admitting being addicted to pain killers? Odell, Henry and all the other foolish behavior is not excused, but the NFL seems to go far on the punitive side while only giving lip service to the reform side. And punishment without attempting to reform is a shame. Now, of course I have not reviewed the program that the guilty must go through, but I don't recall a player saying "the NFL rehab program saved my career."

I personally think alot of these players brought the problems with them when they came to the NFL. Sure, the big money and the fame may have exasperated the situation; but joining the NFL isn't what forced these guys to carry guns, hang out in their old neighborhoods where gangs, crime, and drugs, are still a huge problem.

IMO, it's a maturity issue, and the lack thereof. Something they never possessed maybe?

I just find it interesting that you hear how poor people, espeically blacks, are basically "trapped" in dire economic situation with little or no hope out of it - and yes, there is truth there - but when these guys are given that opportunity, they somehow can't see the light and escape it. They are still having a hard time "righting" their lives and are drawn back to it.

And I don't believe it is because they are stupid, or due to their ethnicity.

I believe it is a far deeper socio-economic problem, that has behavioral habits engrained in these young men lonnng before they entered the NFL.

And yet we expect the NFL to solve/correct the problem that we as a society as a whole have not been able to do?

And can we as a society do it? It can't simply be a matter of economics alone (making more money), because these guys are making more money then you and I will see in five lifetimes.

This, in and of itself, could be a solely different discussion. But IMHO, we, as a society, don't stress personal responsibility and accountability like it needs to be. It's always someone elses fault.

And yes, I am going to throw it out there because I think it is a huge factor - the breakdown of family, and alot of fatherless children.

traderumor
09-26-2006, 09:03 AM
I personally think alot of these players brought the problems with them when they came to the NFL. Sure, the big money and the fame may have exasperated the situation; but joining the NFL isn't what forced these guys to carry guns, hang out in their old neighborhoods where gangs, crime, and drugs, are still a huge problem.

IMO, it's a maturity issue, and the lack thereof. Something they never possessed maybe?

I just find it interesting that you hear how poor people, espeically blacks, are basically "trapped" in dire economic situation with little or no hope out of it - and yes, there is truth there - but when these guys are given that opportunity, they somehow can't see the light and escape it. They are still having a hard time "righting" their lives and are drawn back to it.

And I don't believe it is because they are stupid, or due to their ethnicity.

I believe it is a far deeper socio-economic problem, that has behavioral habits engrained in these young men lonnng before they entered the NFL.

And yet we expect the NFL to solve/correct the problem that we as a society as a whole have not been able to do?

And can we as a society do it? It can't simply be a matter of economics alone (making more money), because these guys are making more money then you and I will see in five lifetimes.

This, in and of itself, could be a solely different discussion. But IMHO, we, as a society, don't stress personal responsibility and accountability like it needs to be. It's always someone elses fault.

And yes, I am going to throw it out there because I think it is a huge factor - the breakdown of family, and alot of fatherless children.
I guess what I was saying more than anything is that if the NFL wants to send something other than a message of hypocrisy, quit filling the league coffers with money derived from the primary sponsors, who are sellers of alcoholic beverages. It is about like telling the workers at an Anheuser Busch plant not to abuse alcohol.

SunDeck
09-26-2006, 09:42 AM
Where is this man's entourage?! Isn't that what they are for, to find him attractive women, access to liquor, drugs....and a ride home?

Very dissappointed.

GAC
09-26-2006, 04:36 PM
I guess what I was saying more than anything is that if the NFL wants to send something other than a message of hypocrisy, quit filling the league coffers with money derived from the primary sponsors, who are sellers of alcoholic beverages. It is about like telling the workers at an Anheuser Busch plant not to abuse alcohol.

I'd just settle if they'd cut down on the NFL sponsored Peyton Manning commercials every Sunday. I'm tired of seeing his mug every 15 mintues! :lol:

But it's the society we live in tr.

Smirnoff creates a commercial pushing their product showing people partying their brains out, getting wild, and then at the end adds a disclaimer telling people to drink responsibly. They covered their butts. ;)

Not too many youths, whom these adds target primarily, ever drink responsibly.

traderumor
09-26-2006, 04:49 PM
I'd just settle if they'd cut down on the NFL sponsored Peyton Manning commercials every Sunday. I'm tired of seeing his mug every 15 mintues! :lol:

But it's the society we live in tr.

Smirnoff creates a commercial pushing their product showing people partying their brains out, getting wild, and then at the end adds a disclaimer telling people to drink responsibly. They covered their butts. ;)

Not too many youths, whom these adds target primarily, ever drink responsibly.

When the beer ads start running commercials like showing someone with their head in the toilet, then on the side of the toilet, quickly followed by head in the toilet again, then they might be onto something. Or maybe one with the guy who finds himself going up the hill on the side of the road to take a whiz who is unable to stop himself going back down the hill. Or the guy waking up next to the girl he doesn't know :laugh: I just imagine those wouldn't be quite as good for business.

Chip R
09-26-2006, 05:27 PM
I guess what I was saying more than anything is that if the NFL wants to send something other than a message of hypocrisy, quit filling the league coffers with money derived from the primary sponsors, who are sellers of alcoholic beverages. It is about like telling the workers at an Anheuser Busch plant not to abuse alcohol.

Hypocrisy rules in the NFL. Players are penalized and/or suspended for late or extraordinary hard hits yet in their video games, the same hits are a selling point. Same thing for celebrations and taunting. Excessively celebrate or taunt another player on the field and it's a penalty. But it's a staple in the video games.

Hoosier Red
09-26-2006, 05:30 PM
When the beer ads start running commercials like showing someone with their head in the toilet, then on the side of the toilet, quickly followed by head in the toilet again, then they might be onto something. Or maybe one with the guy who finds himself going up the hill on the side of the road to take a whiz who is unable to stop himself going back down the hill. Or the guy waking up next to the girl he doesn't know :laugh: I just imagine those wouldn't be quite as good for business.


Would the waking up to a girl he doesn't know be considered good or bad?

Redlegs23
09-26-2006, 11:28 PM
http://news.cincinnati.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060926/VIDEO/60926002/-1/CINCI

The alphabet part is rather humorous. Hopefully he can get his life together.

gonelong
09-27-2006, 12:34 AM
I can't quite reconcile how you can read someone their rights, and then ask them if the understand them ... when you know darn well they are drunk.

You are arresting them for being impaired.

GL

Chip R
09-27-2006, 01:50 AM
I can't quite reconcile how you can read someone their rights, and then ask them if the understand them ... when you know darn well they are drunk.

You are arresting them for being impaired.

GL

Good point. :lol:

Razor Shines
09-27-2006, 02:08 AM
I guess what I was saying more than anything is that if the NFL wants to send something other than a message of hypocrisy, quit filling the league coffers with money derived from the primary sponsors, who are sellers of alcoholic beverages. It is about like telling the workers at an Anheuser Busch plant not to abuse alcohol.

So they can't keep from drinking and driving because the NFL makes money off of alcohol? And anyone who works at the Anheuser Busch plant has trouble not abusing alcohol? Are you saying that all of these players and workers are children who aren't capable of making decisions based on right and wrong? I really don't see what one thing has to do with the other. When I lived in Alaska before I went to college I worked at a pharmaceutical warehouse and somehow at the age of 18 I resisted the urge to become addicted to drugs.

GAC
09-27-2006, 07:21 AM
Would the waking up to a girl he doesn't know be considered good or bad?

Only if she wasn't as good looking as she was the night before after that 12 pack. ;)

GAC
09-27-2006, 07:26 AM
http://news.cincinnati.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20060926/VIDEO/60926002/-1/CINCI

The alphabet part is rather humorous. Hopefully he can get his life together.

Don't you just love those pat answers people always give when pulled over and asked by the police how much you had to drink tonight?

"I had a couple beers"

Everyone says that! :lol:

Ltlabner
09-27-2006, 07:32 AM
I guess what I was saying more than anything is that if the NFL wants to send something other than a message of hypocrisy, quit filling the league coffers with money derived from the primary sponsors, who are sellers of alcoholic beverages. It is about like telling the workers at an Anheuser Busch plant not to abuse alcohol.

So if the NFL had no income from any sponsor of alcoholic beverages these guys wouldn't have chosen to drive impared? I serriously doubt these guys would have ever thought to themselves, "we can't go party wildly the NFL doesn't sponsor booze!".

There's nothing wrong with the NFL taking sponsership revenue from the alcoholic bevergage companies because it is legal to consume alcohol (above 21 of course). There is nothing wrong with Chris Henry and company having a few beers because it's legal to consume alcohol.

The problem starts when OT chooses to gets behind the wheel and drives impared which is not legal. It's a choice he made and whether or not the NFL sponsors Budwiser is pretty irrlevant.

You know, if NFL doesn't allow booze sponsorships there is still the problem that it's available in stores. If OT stumbles into a BP gas station and sees a point of purchase display of Coors Lite he may lose all controll and go on a 3 day bender. [end sarcasim]

GAC
09-27-2006, 07:37 AM
I agree Abner. Why is it the NFL's responsibility to teach these ADULTS responsibility?

My job has a employee handbook on employee behavior and conduct, and it's my job to know and follow it. It also lists the possible consequences if I violate any of them.

They also have an Associate Assistance Program to help those associates who have personal problems like drugs and alcohol and various other situations. But it's VOLUNTARY and must be employee initiated. It's there for the employee; but they can't force you to go.

It's not your employers job to "hold your hand".

Reds Fanatic
09-27-2006, 04:31 PM
Thurman was offically suspended for the year by the NFL today.

http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=2605039

traderumor
09-28-2006, 12:00 PM
So if the NFL had no income from any sponsor of alcoholic beverages these guys wouldn't have chosen to drive impared? I serriously doubt these guys would have ever thought to themselves, "we can't go party wildly the NFL doesn't sponsor booze!".

There's nothing wrong with the NFL taking sponsership revenue from the alcoholic bevergage companies because it is legal to consume alcohol (above 21 of course). There is nothing wrong with Chris Henry and company having a few beers because it's legal to consume alcohol.

The problem starts when OT chooses to gets behind the wheel and drives impared which is not legal. It's a choice he made and whether or not the NFL sponsors Budwiser is pretty irrlevant.

You know, if NFL doesn't allow booze sponsorships there is still the problem that it's available in stores. If OT stumbles into a BP gas station and sees a point of purchase display of Coors Lite he may lose all controll and go on a 3 day bender. [end sarcasim]

You have missed the point. Sure, the individual is responsible as I stated

Odell, Henry and all the other foolish behavior is not excused

The hypocrisy is that the NFL is heavily funded by companies that rely on the abuse of alcohol to make millions of dollars in profits, yet they get all indignant when their employees abuse alcohol. Further, there are the indignant fans whereby some of them will be slobbering drunk themselves, drive home impaired after the game, some could probably blow a .17, and yet they are screaming for Odell's head. In other words, fine if you want promote "responsible drinking," but don't send a confusing message by being so dependant on those selling the products that you are trying to control the use of. Basic conflict of interest logic. The NFL has one here.