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dabvu2498
10-09-2006, 10:57 AM
From yesterday's DDN:


COMMENTARY

It's time for the Reds to trade Dunn
By Hal McCoy

Staff Writer

Sunday, October 08, 2006

It was written in this space exactly a year ago that it was time for the Cincinnati Reds to trade Wily Mo Pena and Austin Kearns. Somebody was listening, right?

Pena was traded during spring training for pitcher Bronson Arroyo. How did that work? Kearns and shortstop Felipe Lopez were traded July 13 in an eight-player deal that, so far, hasn't done that much for the Reds.

Now, what for 2007? Drum roll, please. Three things the Reds need to do:


1. Is it time to trade Adam Dunn? Probably. Houston salivates over the thought of having the hometown guy on their roster. The Chicago Cubs and L.A. Dodgers have shown interest in the past.

This is a tough one because it isn't easy to find guys who hit 40 home runs every year, walk 100 times, score 100 and drive in close to 100. But can the team stand 180 strikeouts nearly every year, a batting average that dwindles every year .266, .247 and .233 the past three seasons? And Dunn has yet to meet an easy fly ball.

As a person, there is none better. As a teammate, there is none better. As a guy who recognized his shortcomings, there is none better. But because he is only 26, he might be a piece the Reds could dangle for a starting pitcher, which bring us to No. 2.


2. As one reader suggested, the line on the Reds' starting pitching staff is, "Harang and Arroyo and oh-boy-oh-boy-o." True. Aaron Harang and Arroyo are as solid as a Ford commercial, but what follows is a mish-mash of mystery.

Who knows about Eric Milton's starts. Depends on the angle of the sun or something. Brandon Claussen (remember him) was a disaster before his surgery. Who knows about the inconsistent Kyle Lohse. The fifth spot was a vast wasteland, a spot that always seemed to be under audition. Maybe Matt Belisle can fill it, maybe not. Is Homer Bailey ready? He probably needs a month or two in Triple-A to start 2007.

That means General Manager Wayne Krivsky must work his magic to land a starting pitcher who is either on the same level as Harang or Arroyo, or better, whether it be through a trade (Dunn?) or free agency.


3. Pick up Rich Aurilia's option, put him at second base and move Brandon Phillips to shortstop. Aurilia was the team's only .300 hitter this year, its only consistent clutch hitter, its best veteran presence. He started at all four infield positions 39 times at third base, 37 at first base, 25 at shortstop, four at second base.

Even though he is willing to play anywhere at any time "except the day I see my name as the catcher" wouldn't he be even better if he had a permanent location?

Phillips signed as a shortstop and was a minor-league marvel. The Reds played him there for the Hall of Fame exhibition game in July, but it was rained out in the second inning. Manager Jerry Narron put him there for two games in September, with thoughts of looking at him the rest of the season, but the Cardinals kept inviting the Reds to catch them, so Narron put him back at second base "because we got back in the race."

Narron said Phillips is good at second base: "A future Gold Glove with a chance to be one of baseball's best second basemen." But isn't shortstop more important than second base? What's to prevent him from winning Gold Gloves and becoming one of baseball's best shortstops?

The only way is if he isn't put there.


Contact this reporter by e-mail at

hmccoy@DaytonDailyNews.com.

Find this article at:
http://www.daytondailynews.com/s/content/oh/story/sports/pro/reds/2006/10/08/ddn100806mccoy.html



THREE UP, THREE DOWN

Reds in review: Good acquisitions offset by injuries, bad trip
By Hal McCoy

Staff Writer

Sunday, October 08, 2006

Over the course of a 162-game season the Cincinnati Reds never play more than 162 because more bad things than good things seem to happen to exclude them from the postseason well, stuff happens.

A look at the good and the bad, taking the positive first:


GOOD Hello, Mr. Arroyo

The Cincinnati Reds' spring training clubhouse was buzzing with positive vibes. Players were smiling as they chatted amongst themselves. Manager Jerry Narron had just told them, "General Manager Wayne Krivsky just traded Wily Mo Pena for pitcher Bronson Arroyo."

Knowing that Arroyo, an accomplished singer/guitarist, had a No. 1 best-selling CD in New England the year before, pitcher Kent Mercker said, "All right, our karaoke team just got a whole lot better."

The Dayton Daily News beat writer felt better, too, because he had just written, "Wily Mo Pena couldn't get his glove through an airport metal detector," and wondered if the behemoth Pena would pinch his neck off.

Not only did the karaoke team improve, the pitching staff improved by Superman leaps and bounds. Despite one spell during which Arroyo tried unsuccessfully 11 times to get his 10th win, he went 14-11 with a 3.29 ERA.

Wily Mo? Who?


GOOD Grabbing three good players, cheaply

In addition to getting Bronson Arroyo, Krivsky made three other early acquisitions that vastly improved the outlook first baseman Scott Hatteberg, second baseman Brandon Phillips and catcher David Ross.

"I couldn't believe that Hatteberg was still out there and available in February," said manager Jerry Narron.

Hatteberg was a free agent. Phillips and Ross were trades that cost the Reds some prospects/suspects. Phillips was available because he wasn't working out in Cleveland and was considered a problem child. Ross hadn't shown much in his short career, mostly because he had never played much.

All three were huge contributors to the team's early and midseason success, and Phillips was no problem, although he has enough hot dog in him to require a dash of mustard.

GOOD The Krivsky and Castellini show

Bob Castellini bought the team and claimed an office in Great American Ball Park, something previous owner Carl Lindner didn't do. Clearly, this guy is hands-on. Then he hired Krivsky as GM, the guy who should have been hired when the Reds hired his predecessor, Dan O'Brien. Krivsky was runner-up.

Said Castellini, "If Krivsky had been hired in the first place, I probably wouldn't have bought the team because it already would have been going in the right direction."

It was fortuitous for the team. Castellini is dedicated to building a winner, as is Krivsky. Throughout the year, Castellini approved move after move as Krivsky kept tinkering, especially with the pitching staff, trying to win this year.

They came close and neither gave up to the very end.

BAD The Reds' hopes go south out West

The Reds began a 10-game West Coast trip with a win in San Francisco, putting them percentage points behind St. Louis for the National League Central lead. They had a five-game lead in the wild card.

They lost eight of the next nine, batting below .100 with runners in scoring position and leaving enough runners on base to turn Springboro into a major metropolis. The big crippler was a 16-inning loss to Los Angeles. Of the regulars, only Rich Aurilia hit above .225 on the trip.

They fell five games out of first place, slid to third in the wild card and, although they stayed in the NL Central race until the final weekend, that trip was the end-all.

BAD Bullpen, aka Elbow Surgeries R Us

Tommy John hasn't played baseball since 1989, but his name had a lot to do with the Reds' misfortune. John was the first pitcher to have successful elbow ligament transplant surgery and the procedure is now called Tommy John surgery.

The Reds were hit twice. Krivsky acquired left-handed closer Eddie Guardado from Seattle on July 6 for nothing more than minor-league pitcher Travis Chick. And they got cash, too, to offset Guardado's salary. He solidified the bullpen, enabling Narron to line it up, giving pitchers specific roles.

Guardado quickly saved eight games, but his elbow hurt. In early September shortly after the 2-8 road trip on which he was unable to pitch he had Tommy John surgery.

Mercker's elbow hurt, too. All year. But he pitched on and was effective as a guy to get out specific left-handed hitters and as a set-up man. He made 37 mostly effective relief appearances before Tommy John intervened, taking away another important bullpen piece in late August, before the ill-fated West Coast journey.


BAD Griffey's toe woes

On Sept. 4, Reds center fielder Ken Griffey, Jr. tried to climb the Great American Ball Park outfield wall to snag a Barry Bonds home run. His foot caught, and he dislocated the second toe on his right foot. He didn't play in the field after that and made only two pinch-hitting appearances in the team's last 24 games, one of them producing a game-winning home run.

While the team obviously lost an offensive weapon, Adam Dunn lost protection in the lineup. Dunn hit 40 home runs this season, but only two of those came in September, when he batted .161 with five RBIs.

"Losing Griffey was huge," said Reds manager Jerry Narron. "Not only did we lose our top clutch hitter, it changed the way they pitched to Dunn."

Find this article at:
http://www.daytondailynews.com/s/content/oh/story/sports/pro/reds/2006/10/08/ddn100806reds.html



McCoy's 2006 memories: In clubhouse or taxi cab, he's a 'credit' to the game
By Hal McCoy

Staff Writer

Sunday, October 08, 2006

We asked Hal McCoy, the Dayton Daily News' hall-of-fame baseball writer, to give us three memorable moments from the 2006 season. Here's what he came up with:


1 It was a Saturday afternoon in Cleveland. In that morning's paper I had written, "The Cincinnati Reds don't have a bullpen, they have a pigpen."

Bullpenner or pigpenner David Weathers walked into the clubhouse that day and shouted, "So, now we're a pigpen!" If looks could turn humans into animals, I would have had a round snout, pointy ears, a squiggly tail and I would have been standing hoof-deep in muck eating corn cobs.

Mr. Weathers was in hurricane mode. One of his best friends and fellow bullpenners, Kent Mercker, was standing right next to me and he said, "Read the stats, Stormy. We are a pigpen. All I ask is that they call me the head hog."

Later in the year, Mercker was asking Weathers goofy and silly questions for a scoreboard video and spotted a group of writers watching.

"Anybody in the media at whom you would like to throw a poison dart?"

"Yeah," said Weathers. "Hal McCoy."


2 They do have more than one taxicab in Houston, right? I'm sure they do.

On a trip in early June, I walked out of the hotel at 4:30 a.m., looking for a cab for the long trip to Bush Intercontinental airport. None in sight for about 15 minutes, until a black with red and gold trim taxi pulled up. Unusual. Most cabs in Houston are yellow.

Turns out the cabbie is a huge baseball fan and we chatted amiably the entire trip.

Fast forward to late July. Houston again. Another early-morning flight, another 4:30 a.m. departure from the hotel, another search for a cab. After a short wait, a black cab with red and gold trim pulled up.

When I jumped in, the cabbie said, "I thought you might be looking for a cab right about now." Same guy.

Are cabbies stalkers? I'm not that big of a tipper.


3 The lunch was delicious at the Mexican restaurant on Second Avenue in New York City three enchiladas, black bean soup, a taco. It was siesta time when I paid with an American Express Card and left.

A day later, I pulled out my wallet to pay for something on Fifth Avenue. No American Express Card. Where did I lose it? Visions of somebody going on a shopping spree at Macy's or Cartier's swept my brain.

I quickly remembered where I last used it and, hoping I hadn't dropped it in the street, I hoofed it to the restaurant. I told the hostess my dilemma and showed her where I sat. She said she didn't remember anybody turning in a credit card, but she would check the office.

After several minutes, she came back carrying the precious little piece of plastic. As she handed it to me, she said, "The bartender who found it quit yesterday and is in the Bahamas right now."

Seeing my face turn purple, she said, "I'm kidding, I'm kidding."

Find this article at:
http://www.daytondailynews.com/s/content/oh/story/sports/pro/reds/2006/10/08/ddn100806memories.html

PuffyPig
10-09-2006, 12:09 PM
Hal, it's a mutual option on Aurilia. It's likley a zero chance that Aurilia can't get more than $2M.

Rotater Cuff
10-09-2006, 12:51 PM
Hal gets a lot of heat on redszone, but, honestly, is their anyone better in town with his phrasing of a sentence?

edabbs44
10-09-2006, 12:51 PM
"Losing Griffey was huge," said Reds manager Jerry Narron. "Not only did we lose our top clutch hitter, it changed the way they pitched to Dunn."

That kills me.

Highlifeman21
10-09-2006, 02:45 PM
Hal gets a lot of heat on redszone, but, honestly, is their anyone better in town with his phrasing of a sentence?

Hal's way past his prime. And as for phrasing a sentence better, Paul D does a mighty fine job.

WMR
10-09-2006, 03:09 PM
What good is the ability to craft a sentence if you're unable/unwilling to fact check it?

Johnny Footstool
10-09-2006, 03:52 PM
Nice of Hal to give Krivsky a pass for the Great Train Wreck of '06 (AKA the Kearns/Lopez deal). I wonder why that didn't show up in the "Good/Bad" column?

WMR
10-09-2006, 04:01 PM
The Cincinnati media is so lame.

TeamBoone
10-09-2006, 11:48 PM
The Cincinnati media is so lame.

Is that a disease that quarantines only the media in Cincinnati?

johngalt
10-10-2006, 12:07 AM
While the team obviously lost an offensive weapon, Adam Dunn lost protection in the lineup. Dunn hit 40 home runs this season, but only two of those came in September, when he batted .161 with five RBIs.

"Losing Griffey was huge," said Reds manager Jerry Narron. "Not only did we lose our top clutch hitter, it changed the way they pitched to Dunn."

Here's what amazes me about this sentence:

Narron acknowledges that Dunn has been better when hitting IN FRONT of Griffey in the lineup.

Narron acknowledges that pitchers approach Dunn differently when he has a Hall of Famer behind him rather than Scott Hatteberg or Brandon Phillips.

But yet when Dunn and Griffey were both healthy and in the lineup, what did Narron do the majority of the time?

Right - he hit Griffey third and Dunn fourth or fifth. Dunn only had 123 at-bats in the two spot. Unbelievable.

mbgrayson
10-10-2006, 01:12 AM
I enjoy reading Hal McCoy. He writes well, and even if he is a little loose with checking facts, I think he generally gets things right.

jmcclain19
10-10-2006, 01:37 AM
I enjoy reading Hal McCoy. He writes well, and even if he is a little loose with checking facts, I think he generally gets things right.

Maybe it's the profession I'm in, but the loose and quick with the false facts is exactly why I can't stand Hal.

When you doing an analysis, like Hal is with this piece, if you can't take the simple time to make sure your small details are correct, how can the whole finished product of your presentation be considered anything but questionable?

That's always been my biggest problem with McCoy, his loosey goosey gray area when it comes to facts and the truth.

I'm not saying McCoy has to know the intricate details of contracts of players on the Reds (although, as the Reds beat reporter, it wouldn't hurt to have a working knowledge). But it would take all of 2 minutes on the web or asking people in his department if they knew the correct answer about Aurilia's contract.

In my line of work, if you present an analysis, and it's riddled with small fact errors, you'll get your rear handed to you in no short order, because the continual small errors compromise the integrity of your work as a whole.

Yet McCoy routinely misses contract facts, I've seen him place runners in wrong positions on the field when a big hit took place, put players on the wrong teams, etc etc.

So based on that line of thinking - when I continually see things like this, it calls into question all of his work.

Who is to say that his last Adam Dunn hit piece, wasn't in the same vein? Maybe Adam always has his clubs in the clubhouse and takes them out after the game? We'll never know, because whoever his editor is at the Dayton Daily News obviously doesn't have the cajones to his job correctly, and Hal certainly isn't doing it.

If no one bothers to fact check him on the small stuff, they sure as hell aren't fact checking him on the big stuff either.

Am I making a mountain out of a molehill? After all, isn't he just being old colorful Hal who's been around forever?

Well, Mitch Albom is getting his rear handed to him over at the Detroit Free Press (http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4196/is_20050501/ai_n14608382) over playing fast and loose with the truth. And he's a columnist, not a reporter, who's job it is to report on the basic facts of Reds baseball.

RedsBaron
10-10-2006, 06:59 AM
McCoy writes that "it isn't easy to find guys who hit 40 home runs every year, walk 100 times, score 100 and drive in close to 100." No kidding. The Reds have had one such player since 1869, and it is Dunn.
I find columns saying the Reds should trade Dunn or anyone else to be rather pointless unless who the Reds are getting in return is specified. For the right return, any player should be traded, and no one is untouchable, but what is the return? Otherwise you are just advocating trading Dunn and "hope to get value." If you are not getting enough "value" don't make the trade!

RedFanAlways1966
10-10-2006, 07:52 AM
McCoy writes that "it isn't easy to find guys who hit 40 home runs every year, walk 100 times, score 100 and drive in close to 100." No kidding. The Reds have had one such player since 1869, and it is Dunn.

:clap:

A fact easily forgotten by many. Pretty productive IMO.

Redsland
10-10-2006, 09:45 AM
Hal, it's a mutual option on Aurilia. It's likley a zero chance that Aurilia can't get more than $2M.
Richie didn't get so much as a phone call last year as a free agent coming off a decent campaign. Now he's a year older. Two mill might look pretty enticing under the circumstances.

westofyou
10-10-2006, 12:15 PM
I'm not saying McCoy has to know the intricate details of contracts of players on the Reds (although, as the Reds beat reporter, it wouldn't hurt to have a working knowledge). But it would take all of 2 minutes on the web or asking people in his department if they knew the correct answer about Aurilia's contract.

Dear Hal,

Bookmark this:

http://mlbcontracts.blogspot.com/

dabvu2498
10-10-2006, 12:18 PM
Dear Hal,

Bookmark this:

http://mlbcontracts.blogspot.com/

Dear westofyou,

What's a bookmark???

Regards, Hal

flyer85
10-10-2006, 12:21 PM
They are short of both offense and pitching and have almost nothing to trade(certainly not from an area of strength) to make them better unless they are willing to mortgage the future.

WK is an a world of crap.

Rotater Cuff
10-10-2006, 12:43 PM
Yet McCoy routinely misses contract facts, I've seen him place runners in wrong positions on the field when a big hit took place, put players on the wrong teams, etc etc.


Maybe it's because he's legally blind? I know he's not allowed to drive any longer.

TeamBoone
10-10-2006, 02:33 PM
Maybe it's because he's legally blind? I know he's not allowed to drive any longer.

Then perhaps he should quit. I honestly don't know what that has to do with reporting things correctly though. If you don't know the fact is a fact, then don't include it in your story.

I totally agree with jmcclain (excellent post) and no, IMHO, you were not making a mountain out of a molehill. I agree with everything. I would never have gotten away with that in my profession either. Of course, in my job those reports were used as a basis in future decision making, as well as to report outcomes... but either way, they'd damned well better be accurate!

Credibility is tough to attain and even tougher to maintain, though once it's been attained many don't give it their all anymore... some apparently don't care and neither do their bosses or they wouldn't allow it to continue. Perhaps the complaining emails should be sent to Hal's boss, rather than to Hal himself.

jimbo
10-10-2006, 09:42 PM
Then perhaps he should quit. I honestly don't know what that has to do with reporting things correctly though. If you don't know the fact is a fact, then don't include it in your story.


It amazes me how critical this board can be at times. McCoy has won the highest award given by the Baseball Writers Association of America and is considered by many as one the best writers in the game. He's also had a stroke that left him partially blind. Given everything there is to be considered, the man has earned the right to make a mistake once in a while.

TeamBoone
10-10-2006, 10:24 PM
It amazes me how critical this board can be at times. McCoy has won the highest award given by the Baseball Writers Association of America and is considered by many as one the best writers in the game. He's also had a stroke that left him partially blind. Given everything there is to be considered, the man has earned the right to make a mistake once in a while.

Don't get me wrong because I like the guy (I've met him on more than one occasion), and I empathize with his medical problems. But unfortunately it doesn't give him a free pass. If the calibre of his work suffers because of it, he shouldn't be doing it anymore.... just like I'd have to do if the shoe was on my foot.

And regarding the award, I'm sure he deserved it but that's history. If he wrote shoddy, unfactual articles previously (like he does now), there would have been no award.

jimbo
10-10-2006, 10:37 PM
Don't get me wrong because I like the guy (I've met him on more than one occasion), and I empathize with his medical problems. But unfortunately it doesn't give him a free pass. If the calibre of his work suffers because of it, he shouldn't be doing it anymore.... just like I'd have to do if the shoe was on my foot.

And regarding the award, I'm sure he deserved it but that's history. If he wrote shoddy, unfactual articles previously (like he does now), there would have been no award.

I understand what you are saying, and I would agree if we are talking about a writer who is just getting his start. But in my opinion, what McCoy has accomplished over his career does give him a free pass from making an error from time to time, he is still only human and he is still a great writer. For many years now, my first priority of every morning during baseball season has been a cup of coffee and the DDN which immediately gets turned to whatever page Hal McCoy is on. I enjoy his writing today, if not more, than I ever have.

I just seriously question the criticism that his work is suffering.

Ron Madden
10-11-2006, 03:56 AM
I understand what you are saying, and I would agree if we are talking about a writer who is just getting his start. But in my opinion, what McCoy has accomplished over his career does give him a free pass from making an error from time to time, he is still only human and he is still a great writer. For many years now, my first priority of every morning during baseball season has been a cup of coffee and the DDN which immediately gets turned to whatever page Hal McCoy is on. I enjoy his writing today, if not more, than I ever have.

I just seriously question the criticism that his work is suffering.


Hal McCoy is a nice guy. He is and always was more of a gossip reporter than a baseball beat writer. Most of his work has always been more fluff than stuff.

Sometimes awards are rewarded to folks for nothing more than years of service, never mind the quality of service provided.

Ltlabner
10-11-2006, 07:24 AM
From what I've gathered over the past 6 months is that none of the Reds baseball beat writers are worth a plug nickle. We all know the general opinion of George Grande and Redreads favorite radio announcer, Marty B.

It seems Paul D, as an opinionist, has a level of credibility which I find interesting. WOY showed reciently that Paulie is just as bandwagon as joe sports fan so I'm not sure I understand the admiration for him.

So I guess my question is, since all the local (I'll throw Hal in this group) media apparently are sloppy, know-nothings with zero understanding of the game, is there anybody within a 100 miles of GABP that people actually like?

RedFanAlways1966
10-11-2006, 08:15 AM
So I guess my question is, since all the local (I'll throw Hal in this group) media apparently are sloppy, know-nothings with zero understanding of the game, is there anybody within a 100 miles of GABP that people actually like?

And other questions like yours, Ltlabner...
(1) Is Jimmy Hoffa alive?
(2) Is Elvis alive and eating BK?
(3) Is Hitler alive and living in Cuba?
(4) Is Paul McCartney really dead (Turn me on, Dead Man)?

Simple "yes or no" questions ... all of them. Do we have a "yes" out there... well, do we?!? ;)

Strikes Out Looking
10-11-2006, 08:18 AM
While not usually a big fan of Hal, I enjoyed these articles.

What I'd really like to read about from one of the writers is 1.) what really happened on the west coast trip? 2.) why did it take/does it take Jr. so long to recover from injuries the team originally calls day to day? (I don't think they are lying at the outset, I just think Jr. either takes forever to heal or won't play until he's close to 100%).

dabvu2498
10-11-2006, 08:23 AM
Don't get me wrong because I like the guy (I've met him on more than one occasion), and I empathize with his medical problems. But unfortunately it doesn't give him a free pass. If the calibre of his work suffers because of it, he shouldn't be doing it anymore.... just like I'd have to do if the shoe was on my foot.

Were you talking about McCoy or Griffey???

jimbo
10-11-2006, 12:14 PM
So I guess my question is, since all the local (I'll throw Hal in this group) media apparently are sloppy, know-nothings with zero understanding of the game, is there anybody within a 100 miles of GABP that people actually like?

Highly doubtful, not when it comes to Redszone at least.

westofyou
10-11-2006, 12:21 PM
So I guess my question is, since all the local (I'll throw Hal in this group) media apparently are sloppy, know-nothings with zero understanding of the game, is there anybody within a 100 miles of GABP that people actually like?

Almost everyone loved Jeff Horrigan, he seems to be the true champion of all the Reds sports writers in recent memory. I also like Marc Lancaster as well.

Highlifeman21
10-11-2006, 07:19 PM
My question is how much of Hal's errors fall completely on his shoulders, and how much of his errors should be corrected by an editor with 1/2 a brain? I can understand stepping on Hal's ego if you're an editor and you have to correct his work, but as an editor that's in the job description.

I've read Hal's work ad nauseum, and I think his award was really a lifetime achievement award given to him while he was still alive, and had nothing to do with his work in recent past.

Hal makes errors, and Joe Nuxhall sounded/sounds drunk most of the time when on 700 WLW, so I chalk it up to eccentric old farts. At least they have character.

Ron Madden
10-13-2006, 03:40 AM
From what I've gathered over the past 6 months is that none of the Reds baseball beat writers are worth a plug nickle. We all know the general opinion of George Grande and Redreads favorite radio announcer, Marty B.

It seems Paul D, as an opinionist, has a level of credibility which I find interesting. WOY showed reciently that Paulie is just as bandwagon as joe sports fan so I'm not sure I understand the admiration for him.

So I guess my question is, since all the local (I'll throw Hal in this group) media apparently are sloppy, know-nothings with zero understanding of the game, is there anybody within a 100 miles of GABP that people actually like?

I believe the first obligation of any Beat Writer is to report factual information to the Fanbase.

I sometimes enjoy reading articles from Hal, Marc, and John. Too often though it's like reading the Reds.com Fan Forum. If pressed I'd say at this time Lancaster is my favorite. Just like local sports talk radio though they only parrot Marty Brennamens opinions.

I'm sad to say this but I'm afraid the over all knowledge of the Reds Broadcasters, Beat Writers and the Fanbase is at an all time low.

That's what happens when we put all of our faith into one mans opinion and stop thinking for ourselves.










.

Ltlabner
10-13-2006, 07:21 AM
http://www.shalfleet.net/newtown/images/newtown%20pied%20piper.jpg

Yes, yes...Marty B the evil, three horned, lieing, pied piper who acording to various sources has a legon of beatwriters and an entire city of radio listeners at his comand. This small, evil, little man dervies his power from his great shock of poofy hair.

His evil scheems know no bounds.

While he wears a lot of pastels do not underestimate him.

Ron Madden
10-14-2006, 02:03 AM
I rest my case.