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max venable
10-16-2006, 11:45 PM
My perfect baloney sandwich would be baloney, of course, on really, really fresh white bread, american cheese, mustard AND ketchup, with potato chips mashed in.

Yours?

Yachtzee
10-17-2006, 12:00 AM
I usually just go straight up bologna and mustard on wheat, but when I'm in the mood to do a little work, I'll fry up the bologna in a skillet and then serve it on wheat bread w/ (Cleveland) Stadium Mustard and a few banana pepper rings.

OldRightHander
10-17-2006, 12:01 AM
The perfect bologna sandwich is one that someone else is eating. I've never cared for the stuff.

max venable
10-17-2006, 12:08 AM
The perfect bologna sandwich is one that someone else is eating. I've never cared for the stuff.
I take it you've never tried my baloney sandwich recipe. :cool:

Coffeybro
10-17-2006, 12:27 AM
My wife likes her's fried on toasted white bread with mayonaise and tomato soup on the side. I don't like baloney at all myself.

WVJulz
10-17-2006, 12:41 AM
I usually just go straight up bologna and mustard on wheat, but when I'm in the mood to do a little work, I'll fry up the bologna in a skillet and then serve it on wheat bread w/ (Cleveland) Stadium Mustard and a few banana pepper rings.

Mmmmm........there is nothing like a fried bologna sandwich and while I love Stadium Mustard, I save it for my hot dogs along with sauerkraut. Isn't it weird the total difference in taste when you merely fry bologna? Now I have to have one!!! :thumbup:
Julz

Yachtzee
10-17-2006, 01:01 AM
Mmmmm........there is nothing like a fried bologna sandwich and while I love Stadium Mustard, I save it for my hot dogs along with sauerkraut. Isn't it weird the total difference in taste when you merely fry bologna? Now I have to have one!!! :thumbup:
Julz


When it comes to Stadium Mustard, I'm the opposite. I actually use it a lot instead of regular mustard. I've even used it to spice up other recipes, such as deviled eggs and potato salad.

As far as fried bologna sandwiches go, there's actually a place up here called Swenson's Drive In that serves up a mean fried bologna sandwich. Good Stuff.

HumnHilghtFreel
10-17-2006, 01:22 AM
Fried bologna, put swiss cheese on top with toasted bread and dijon mustard. I like the chips in the sandwich thing too though lol.

Highlifeman21
10-17-2006, 01:43 AM
Bologna, tons of miracle whip, american and cheddar cheeses, white bread.

Make it so.

guttle11
10-17-2006, 02:07 AM
Fried.

MrCinatit
10-17-2006, 08:23 AM
First, I take the bologna - then I replace it will grilled chicken, onions, a dab of hot sauce and swiss cheese, then put it on wheat.
I admit it is unusuall, but it works for me.

cumberlandreds
10-17-2006, 08:25 AM
I like putting a piece of baloney on a chicken salad sandwich. Gives it a little more substance I think.

RedFanAlways1966
10-17-2006, 08:40 AM
The perfect bologna sandwich is one that someone else is eating. I've never cared for the stuff.

I'm with ya. I probably have not had baloney in 20+ years.

TeamCasey
10-17-2006, 08:48 AM
Bologna, tons of miracle whip, american and cheddar cheeses, white bread.

Make it so.

I'm with you. Bologney is about the only sandwich where I like Miracle Whip.

RANDY IN INDY
10-17-2006, 09:15 AM
Mine would be bologna with a slice of American cheese, lettuce, fresh sliced homegrown tomato (sprinkled with pepper) off the vine, a little onion and a dab of Duke's mayonaise with an ice cold sweet tea. Now you're talkin'.

HotCorner
10-17-2006, 12:54 PM
Fried with mustard.

KittyDuran
10-17-2006, 01:14 PM
I ate bologna sandwiches all thru grade school and always the same. Bologna, mayo and white bread. Now I can't stand it that way...:p:

The way I like it now is bologna, swiss cheese, spicy mustard (any kind) on pumperknickle/dark rye with sides of potato salad and potato chips. :thumbup:

LoganBuck
10-17-2006, 01:41 PM
I like them 3 ways.

1. Cold on White Bread, American Cheese, Regular Mustard
2. Fried with Lettuce, on Lightly Toasted White Bread with a shot of Ranch dressing.
3. Fried with Onions and Peppers cooked in the same non stick pan. Then placed on toasted white bread.

Damn you all, now I have to go to the store.

KittyDuran
10-17-2006, 01:55 PM
Damn you all, now I have to go to the store.
Yeah, me too after work...:)

Chip R
10-17-2006, 02:20 PM
When I was a kid, I used to eat peanut butter, bologna and cheese sandwiches.

Spring~Fields
10-17-2006, 02:28 PM
Two slices Kahns bolognie topped with lettuce, garden fresh tomato, Helmans, quality dill pickle all on white of course, Coke to wash it all down and to add some bite.

TeamSelig
10-17-2006, 02:38 PM
colby cheese (or maybe colby-jack), mayo, lettice on white

pedro
10-17-2006, 04:23 PM
My perfect baloney sandwich wouldn't have baloney on it.

Scrap Irony
10-17-2006, 04:23 PM
Toasted wheat bread with a fresh tomato, crisp lettuce, Miracle Whip, dijon mustard, and fried bologna.

Yum

justincredible
10-17-2006, 04:28 PM
Fried, thick cut bologna, a slice of cheese, a slice of tomato, white bread. Delicious!

westofyou
10-17-2006, 04:43 PM
My bolagna has a first name it's CHEESE... seriously I didn't know people taller then 4 feet ate bolagna.

Chip R
10-17-2006, 04:58 PM
My bolagna has a first name it's CHEESE... seriously I didn't know people taller then 4 feet ate bolagna.

Sure. Fried bologna has been quite the food item in baseball stadiums for the past few years.

pedro
10-17-2006, 04:58 PM
when I was in grade school I walked home from school and had a bologna and mustard sandwich on white bread every day. sometimes I'd just skip the bread and spread mustard on the bologna and roll it up and eat it that way. I haven't eaten it in over 20 years.

westofyou
10-17-2006, 05:00 PM
sometimes I'd just skip the bread and spread mustard on the bologna and roll it up and eat it that way. I haven't eaten it in over 20 years.
Yep, we did that all the time.

GAC
10-17-2006, 05:06 PM
You first have to start out with fresh bread. None of that 25 cent loaf Aldi crap. I like Potato bread. But ya gotta have fresh bread! ;)

And I like old fashioned German bologna cut thick.

My perfect bologna sandwich is comprised of...

fresh bread, bologna, american cheese, peanut butter, potato chips.

I also like it fried, bread toasted, tomato and mayo.


Now how about SPAM? ;)

Matt700wlw
10-17-2006, 05:08 PM
I go mustard on one slice, mayo on the other (white bread is my preference), 2 pieces of Bologna and 2 pieces American cheese, in alternating fashion...

Chip R
10-17-2006, 05:19 PM
Now how about SPAM? ;)


http://opcug.ca/public/Reviews/Graphics/monty_python_spam.jpg

Roy Tucker
10-17-2006, 05:30 PM
I like my bologna sandwiches the way God intended: 2 slices of bologna with a slice of American "cheese" on white Wonder bread with French's yellow mustard and Miracle Whip.

The bologna goes on the mustard side and the cheese on the Miracle Whip side.

This is the only food that I like with Miracle Whip and white bread. Everything else is mayo and wheat breead.

max venable
10-17-2006, 05:34 PM
Am I the only one who likes ketchup on my baloney sandwiches?

Back me up on this...

Anyone?...

westofyou
10-17-2006, 05:39 PM
Am I the only one who likes ketchup on my baloney sandwiches? I did.. in the 60's

OldRightHander
10-17-2006, 09:02 PM
My perfect baloney sandwich wouldn't have baloney on it.

:thumbup:

Yachtzee
10-17-2006, 09:22 PM
Am I the only one who likes ketchup on my baloney sandwiches?

Back me up on this...

Anyone?...

Actually, when I was in Austria, I became quite attached to a little thing called "Schinkenkaesetoast." Sounds exotic, but it's really just a toasted ham and swiss cheese sandwich that the Austrians liked to serve up with a dollop of ketchup on the side to dip your sandwich in. Enjoy it with a half-liter of your favorite Austrian brew between classes (they have bars in the school buildings).

Falls City Beer
10-17-2006, 09:27 PM
Bopped.

traderumor
10-17-2006, 09:32 PM
Fresh White or Wheat Bread. Cold Bologna is best with mustard (yellow or spicy) and hamburger dill pickles, potato chips on the side. Fried Bologna, just mustard. Not real crazy about thick sliced bologna, but usually put two slices of regular thickness on a sandwich.

My mom will take a slice of bologna and roll it around a green onion and crunch away. You can smell her breath clear across the room after such episodes, especially after she lets out a big belch from the onion. She's the one who taught me all about class :evil:

cincinnati chili
10-17-2006, 10:15 PM
seriously I didn't know people taller then 4 feet ate bolagna.

me either. I eat some serious garbage food, but bologna has long since been off my radar.

Can't believe this thread went to page 2. Shows what I know.

Falls City Beer
10-17-2006, 10:19 PM
Didn't Frank Zappa survive on fried bologna sandwiches?

I hate bologna myself, but let's face it, processed meats are to the Midwest what seafood is to the Japanese.

vaticanplum
10-17-2006, 10:33 PM
You people FRY bologna?

Who in the world came up with that idea?

westofyou
10-17-2006, 10:35 PM
Who in the world came up with that idea?
People who had a nickle for it and a frying pan.

vaticanplum
10-17-2006, 10:37 PM
People who had a nickle for it and a frying pan.

Why didn't they just eat it plain?

I just am a little confused as to how "bologna" and "fry" go together. I'm not denying that it might taste good; I'm just baffled as to how it ever came about in the first place.

Is it a regional thing? it sounds almost Southern.

Falls City Beer
10-17-2006, 10:37 PM
Why didn't they just eat it plain?

I just am a little confused as to how "bologna" and "fry" go together. I'm not denying that it might taste good; I'm just baffled as to how it ever came about in the first place.

Is it a regional thing? it sounds almost Southern.

It's flat. It's meat. Fait accompli.

Oh, and the hot part? My Dad's generation--the Clean Plate Club Generation--never ate cold meals for supper. But then he referred to "lunch" as "dinner."

vaticanplum
10-17-2006, 10:42 PM
It's flat. It's meat. Fait accompli.

Oh, and the hot part? My Dad's generation--the Clean Plate Club Generation--never ate cold meals for supper. But then he referred to "lunch" as "dinner."

That kinda makes sense, I guess.

I was going to say "but who fries meat, ever?" but then I remembered how my mother used to fry up pepperoni, peppers, onions, and sliced potatoes with some garlic and spices and I looooooooved it. So we've come full circle.

I do hear lunch referred to as dinner here, and dinner as supper. Not as much as when I was a kid, but I still hear it.

LoganBuck
10-18-2006, 12:32 AM
When I say fry in reference to bologna, it means cooking it in a nonstick pan, until it has a medium dark singe. Not to be confused with deepfrying, or pan frying in oil.

Lunch to me is a hodgepodge of one or a combination of sandwiches, leftovers, salad or soup. Dinner is a more commonly defined meal with a meat, a carb, and a veggie, it can occur at any time of the day when it is intended to be the the main dining event of the day. For example, dinner can take place on Sunday afternoon in my household, as a family sit down meal. I dislike the word "supper" so I don't use it.

GAC
10-18-2006, 05:55 AM
That kinda makes sense, I guess.

I was going to say "but who fries meat, ever?" but then I remembered how my mother used to fry up pepperoni, peppers, onions, and sliced potatoes with some garlic and spices and I looooooooved it. So we've come full circle.

I do hear lunch referred to as dinner here, and dinner as supper. Not as much as when I was a kid, but I still hear it.

fried bologna is referred to around here as the po' boy's steak. :D

But you don't fry your bacon?

[there's a joke here somewhere]

Roy Tucker
10-18-2006, 08:18 AM
Do they still sell this at GABP?

http://www.enquirer.com/editions/2003/03/30/tem_taste30martin.html

Sunday, March 30, 2003
Food stuff
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ballpark's signature sandwich: Fried bologna

Back in January, I outlined my ideas on what concession foods the new Great American Ball Park should sell to distinguish it from other parks, to prove Cincinnati is not just another bland Midwestern town. I suggested concessionaires offer authentic Cincinnati treats - fried cod on rye, crispy-fried chicken legs with a side of sweet-and-sour German potato salad and spicy Vidalia onion sausage rolls.

Ambitious, clever ideas, I thought. Even Graeter's black raspberry chip ice cream sounded like a winner until several readers pointed out that Carl Lindner, who's majority owner of the Reds and whose brother owns United Dairy Farmers, probably wouldn't promote Graeter's.

Oh well, didn't matter. On opening day, fans will order from a new ballpark menu, conceived by the Reds' contract food service, Sportservice, that looks a lot like the old one, with every manner of hot dogs, smoked sausages, pizza and other tried-and-trues. Nothing too daring, except for something called "sub in a cup" and "peanut butter and jelly pretzels." Yum. And I'll stick my neck out and predict the weirdly trendy deep-fried Twinkies, which are so last year, won't survive until the All-Star break.

On the positive side, the ball park will debut a bone-in pork chop sandwich. This is encouraging not only because it's different and risky, but because a pork chop sandwich reflects Cincinnati's rich pork-producing heritage.

The humble fried bologna sandwich (most would properly call it "baloney") also jumps out as a bold new menu item. I'm guessing more people than would care to admit grew up eating this fried variety meat on bread. It's a fatty, salty chunk of childhood memories for some of us. And although we haven't seen FB sandwiches on local stadium menus, they have been popular for years at at least one other sports venue, the HSBC Arena in Buffalo, N.Y., home to the National Hockey League's Sabres.

In Buffalo, they fry thick cuts of bologna on a flat-top grill and serve the lunch meat on soft bread rolls with fried green bell peppers, tender onions and melted American cheese. (Obviously, if you're hankering for a baloney sandwich, health is not a priority.)

"The baloney should be a little crisp and brown on the edges," advises Pete Wierchowski, HSBC commissary manager. "The Canadians (fans) even like it burned a little."

Those wacky Canadians.

A few years ago, there was a legendary baloney sandwich-maker at the Buffalo arena named "Baloney Jim," who notched the edges of the meat so it turned up like helicopter rotor blades when it was fried. Fans flocked to the late Baloney Jim's concession stand just to buy his sandwiches, Wierchowski says.

At Great American Ball Park, they'll serve the fried baloney sandwiches (which cost $7 with fries, amazingly the same as pork chop, chicken and steak burger sandwiches) with grilled onions and choice of cheese on a kaiser roll. Doesn't sound bad.

Who knows. Maybe there's a sandwich-maker at the park with an adventurous spirit, one who aspires to Baloney Jim's prowess. Maybe he or she will add another creative touch and give Reds' fans a FB sandwich of their own.

If you couldn't get a ticket to Monday's game, you can stay at home and watch or listen to the game, and make your own fried baloney sandwich. (And save $7.)

Here's how: Coat a pan with vegetable oil spray (or, if your arteries are up to it, use melted margarine or vegetable oil). Fry a thick slice of bologna until crispy on both sides. Serve on bread of choice with mayonnaise, mustard or other condiment. Cheese is optional.

FB VARIATIONS
Here are some variations on the FB (fried bologna) sandwich, real and imagined:
West Virginia: bologna fried in margarine, served on untoasted white bread with Miracle Whip and sliced tomato.
Buffalo: melted American cheese, fried onions and green bell peppers on soft roll.
Cincinnati: limburger, sliced raw onion and spicy mustard on dark rye.
Reuben: sauerkraut, melted Swiss and thousand island dressing on rye.
Club: bacon, American cheese, tomato and lettuce on sourdough.
French: sauteed mushrooms, Gruyere and remoulade on baguette.
Soulful: smoked bologna with spicy barbecue sauce on cornbread bun.
Italian: garlic bologna with roasted red peppers, provolone, arugula and pesto on ciabatta
Tex-Mex: shredded iceberg lettuce, salsa, black beans and cheddar in tortilla.
Hippy Dippy: sprouts, sliced avocado and balsamic vinaigrette on whole wheat.
Kosher: beef bologna with horseradish sauce on onion roll.
Chef's salad: chunked bologna, lettuce, cucumber, radishes, Swiss and cheddar with ranch dressing in pita pocket.

E-mail cmartin@enquirer.com

pedro
10-18-2006, 12:30 PM
That kinda makes sense, I guess.

I was going to say "but who fries meat, ever?" but then I remembered how my mother used to fry up pepperoni, peppers, onions, and sliced potatoes with some garlic and spices and I looooooooved it. So we've come full circle.

I do hear lunch referred to as dinner here, and dinner as supper. Not as much as when I was a kid, but I still hear it.


Well, I guess it depends on the technique. Lot of people stir fry meat or deep fry fish and chicken.

and then, of course, there is this....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IVx2JKuZp04

vaticanplum
10-18-2006, 02:28 PM
I guess I was thinking of flat meats -- lunchmeats. It's not like people go around throwing pickleloaf in a frying pan (although I'm sure someone's tried). Flat sliced bologna is not exactly a chicken leg.

Pedro, that was disgusting. Touche.

Chip R
10-18-2006, 02:36 PM
I was going to say "but who fries meat, ever?" but then I remembered how my mother used to fry up pepperoni, peppers, onions, and sliced potatoes with some garlic and spices and I looooooooved it. So we've come full circle.



Stop it. You're making me hungry and i just ate.

There is a school of thought that says people will eat about anything if it's deep fried. Always makes me think of that one Beavis and Butthead episode where they were working at a fast food place and they started putting everything in the fryer like mice and worms and their own fingers and serving it to customers. :laugh:

The big thing now is deep frying whole turkeys. My family actually did that last Thanksgving and they said it turned out very good.

pedro
10-18-2006, 02:38 PM
I guess I was thinking of flat meats -- lunchmeats. It's not like people go around throwing pickleloaf in a frying pan (although I'm sure someone's tried). Flat sliced bologna is not exactly a chicken leg.

Pedro, that was disgusting. Touche.


mmmmm... flat meat.....

http://www.aqsu08.dsl.pipex.com/DIBB/homer-drool.gif

westofyou
10-18-2006, 02:40 PM
Potted meat and cheese puts me on my knees
Flat Meat and Bread goes straight to my head.

Roy Tucker
10-18-2006, 02:45 PM
http://v3.espacenet.com/textdoc?IDX=WO9931222

pedro
10-18-2006, 02:49 PM
http://v3.espacenet.com/textdoc?IDX=WO9931222

THAT is disgusting.

GAC
10-18-2006, 04:52 PM
The big thing now is deep frying whole turkeys. My family actually did that last Thanksgving and they said it turned out very good.

We're "flash cooking" ours over the lawnmower this year. :lol:

Chip R
10-18-2006, 05:03 PM
We're "flash cooking" cooking ours over the lawnmower this year. :lol:
Another one? :laugh:

rdiersin
10-18-2006, 05:14 PM
http://v3.espacenet.com/textdoc?IDX=WO9931222


The abstract has two sentences. Interesting.

As far as fried bologna, I remember having it as a kid, but I haven't had it for a long time. It can stick with the tuna casserole and not come back to my table.

westofyou
10-18-2006, 05:50 PM
The abstract has two sentences. Interesting.

As far as fried bologna, I remember having it as a kid, but I haven't had it for a long time. It can stick with the tuna casserole and not come back to my table.

My mother would never fry baloney... she's way to urbane, I had to find that dandy method myself.

rdiersin
10-18-2006, 05:52 PM
My mother would never fry baloney... she's way to urbane, I had to find that dandy method myself.


Oh, mine did. And Spam too.

TeamCasey
10-18-2006, 05:52 PM
I've "fried" sliced ham before. Other wise, lunch meat ham kind of grosses me out.

rdiersin
10-18-2006, 05:56 PM
My mother would never fry baloney... she's way to urbane, I had to find that dandy method myself.


I found out fried salami on my own though. Never saw that when I grew up, but here in Philly they use salami as a pizza topping. Same difference. With the cured lunchmeat family, any heat basically fries it, they have own built in frying oil.

westofyou
10-18-2006, 06:29 PM
Oh, mine did. And Spam too.

My mom did Spam, my father must have grown fond of it in the Marines.

pedro
10-18-2006, 06:31 PM
My mom did Spam, my father must have grown fond of it in the Marines.

noodles and tomatoes.

westofyou
10-18-2006, 06:32 PM
noodles and tomatoes.

Depression Food.

RANDY IN INDY
10-18-2006, 08:21 PM
Cornbread and buttermilk.

vaticanplum
10-18-2006, 08:35 PM
Cornbread and buttermilk.

With bologna?!

Dom Heffner
10-18-2006, 08:41 PM
Never mind- deleted out of ignorance or stupidity- whichever is worse. :)

Yachtzee
10-18-2006, 08:59 PM
Speaking of bologna, has anyone ever tried Leberkaese? Popular in Germany and Austria, the name literally means "liver cheese," but it's actually more like bologna in loaf form. It's best served hot with spicy German mustard on a crusty roll called a Semmel.

GAC
10-19-2006, 08:02 AM
Another one? :laugh:

I burned the first turkey. ;)

Ravenlord
10-19-2006, 08:07 AM
if you think fried lunch meat is odd, you should definetly avoid a dish like traditonal lutafjisk (its fermented cod).

RANDY IN INDY
10-19-2006, 08:10 AM
With bologna?!

My grandad had cornbread and buttermilk with just about everything. Depression food. He actually loved it. I'm told I would eat it as a small child, but not anymore. Love cornbread. Can't stand buttermilk.

GAC
10-19-2006, 08:28 AM
My grandad had cornbread and buttermilk with just about everything. Depression food. He actually loved it. I'm told I would eat it as a small child, but not anymore. Love cornbread. Can't stand buttermilk.

Same here. I love cornbread (especially w/ beans and a ham bone slow cooked). But buttermilk? No thanks. BUt all my uncles, who were farmers, would go down and get it straight from the cow.

Mush was another depression era food that my Mom and Dad said they lived on alot. And we ate it as a kid, and I still it.

And I'll put a hurtin' on grits made right. ;)

Roy Tucker
10-19-2006, 09:34 AM
My mom did Spam, my father must have grown fond of it in the Marines.

Same here and I think for the same reasons.

God help me, I liked Spam as a kid. I wasn't keen on the gelatinous stuff it came in, but I just scraped it off. Fried Spam sandwiches were a regular for Saturday lunches.

I made the mistake of telling my kids once I liked Spam when I was young. So now when we pass it on the grocery aisle, I hear the snickers and the whispers "can you believe Dad *liked* that stuff"...

westofyou
10-19-2006, 11:03 AM
I wasn't keen on the gelatinous stuff it came in,

I once had a friend say to me...

"Oh you COOK it?

No wonder it sucked so much."