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View Full Version : FIFA Report: 58% of all "injuries" during World Cup games were fake



jmcclain19
10-25-2006, 02:23 AM
http://soccernet.espn.go.com/news/story?id=387417&cc=5901


FIFA have revealed that more than half of the players treated on the pitch during this summer's World Cup were not actually injured.

The world body's chief medical officer, Professor Jiri Dvorak, presented his findings to the FIFA referees committee today and they showed a cheating culture at the highest level of the game.

According to Professor Dvorak, there were too many players feigning injury in Germany, with tactical reasons presented as the most likely cause of their action.

Where injuries were confirmed, the number per match was down to 2.3 per match, from 2.7 at the 2002 World Cup.

That amounted to a total of 145 injuries in 64 matches at the 2006 tournament, among them the cruciate knee injury which may mean Newcastle and England striker Michael Owen does not play again until next season.

'Fifty-eight per cent of the players who were treated on the pitch during the 2006 World Cup eventually turned out not to be injured,' confirmed FIFA in a statement.

Referees were praised for keeping the number of injuries down, by protecting players and ensuring elbowing offences were properly punished.

The meeting was chaired by Spanish FA chief Angel Marma Villar Llona, a vice-president of the FIFA executive committee.

He said: 'The referees and assistant referees fulfilled the high expectations placed on them and complied with the instructions to protect players and thus the game better. The preparation period of almost four years for the World Cup in Germany paid off.'

FIFA president Sepp Blatter added: 'I am very satisfied with the referees' performances at the 2006 World Cup. They achieved more than their counterparts in Korea/Japan in 2002.'

WMR
10-25-2006, 04:31 AM
Sounds a little low coming from someone who either taped or watched live EVERY SINGLE MATCH of the 2006 World Cup....

The flopping was often quite disgusting we should all watch and clamor for FIFA to adopt what is currrently being done in the Premiershiep THIS season. The rule is that will teams will play on despite all "INJURIES" and will stop the run of play only if the ref determines that the injury IS sincere and is also serious enough to merit the immediate stoppage of play to allow medical personnell onto the field.


MUCH MUCH MUCH smaterter policy and FIFA had better adopt it as their own for the European Championships coming up in a couple years as well as subsequent World Cups. This will move a L O N G way towards stamping out the play-acting injuries that oft-time sully an otherwise joyous performance of football. :)

::Yes, Christiano Ronaldo and Mikael Essien... I am looking DIRECTLY at you, and with a disapproving grimace on my face::

Johnny Footstool
10-25-2006, 10:34 AM
This is precisely the reason soccer will never be popular in America -- too many players carrying on and crying like babies when a 5'8", 150 lb. defender bumps into them.

OldRightHander
10-25-2006, 11:46 AM
This is precisely the reason soccer will never be popular in America -- too many players carrying on and crying like babies when a 5'8", 150 lb. defender bumps into them.

A lot of that depends on where it's being played. I've seen a lot of that in Italian matches I've watched, but haven't seen as much in England. Then again, the EPL frowns on that sort of thing more than other leagues. It could also be the reason the Americans don't draw as many cards as other teams do because the American players buy into the American tough guy idea and don't go flopping every time they're hit. Remember McBride's bloody face against Italy? He didn't even go down after that elbow and went about his business like he wasn't even hurt. You hit an Italian player half as hard and he's down on the pitch crying for an ambulance.

westofyou
10-25-2006, 11:49 AM
This is precisely the reason soccer will never be popular in America -- too many players carrying on and crying like babies when a 5'8", 150 lb. defender bumps into them.

It's popular now, but soccer doesn't have to be NFL Football to be popular in many soccer fans eyes, and to echo the above the EPL ain't like that at all.

OldRightHander
10-25-2006, 11:50 AM
It's popular now, but soccer doesn't have to be NFL Football to be popular in many soccer fans eyes, and to echo the above the EPL ain't like that at all.

Which is why the EPL is about the only league I watch much of these days.

WMR
10-25-2006, 11:52 AM
Which is why the EPL is about the only league I watch much of these days.

Except for chelsea.

Chip R
10-25-2006, 01:34 PM
I am shocked, shocked that soccer players were faking injuries.

Johnny Footstool
10-25-2006, 02:03 PM
It's popular now, but soccer doesn't have to be NFL Football to be popular in many soccer fans eyes, and to echo the above the EPL ain't like that at all.

I guess it depends on how you define "popular". In terms of media exposure, I think it ranks somewhere between the WNBA and pro paintball. Seriously, I see more paintball on ESPN than soccer. That's not a good thing.

westofyou
10-25-2006, 02:07 PM
I guess it depends on how you define "popular". In terms of media exposure, I think it ranks somewhere between the WNBA and pro paintball. Seriously, I see more paintball on ESPN than soccer. That's not a good thing.

I see more people playing soccer on TV and in real life then paintball every weekend, but then again I don't limit my exposure to sports to ESPN. I think you underestimate the interest in the game on the coasts.

TeamSelig
10-25-2006, 02:17 PM
ESPN needs to make a channel for uninteresting sports

Billiards, poker, soccer, hockey, WNBA, paintball, and golf.

Boooring.

westofyou
10-25-2006, 02:22 PM
ESPN needs to make a channel for uninteresting sports

Billiards, poker, soccer, hockey, WNBA, paintball, and golf.

Boooring.

You forgot one... Football.

WMR
10-25-2006, 02:36 PM
99% of people who find soccer "boring" don't appreciate and/or understand the intricacies of the game.

Some of the best games end up without a single goal scored. Many Americans can't understand that.

NJReds
10-25-2006, 03:39 PM
ESPN needs to make a channel for uninteresting sports

Billiards, poker, soccer, hockey, WNBA, paintball, and golf.

Boooring.

Acutally, if you combined golf and paintball it'd probably be quite entertaining.

NJReds
10-25-2006, 03:42 PM
I see more people playing soccer on TV and in real life then paintball every weekend, but then again I don't limit my exposure to sports to ESPN. I think you underestimate the interest in the game on the coasts.


Just to add to your thought, my cable system has two channels dedicated to soccer: Fox Soccer Channel and Gol. There is also the spanish version of the Fox Soccer Channel that shows different games from the English-language channel.

Johnny Footstool
10-25-2006, 03:57 PM
I see more people playing soccer on TV and in real life then paintball every weekend, but then again I don't limit my exposure to sports to ESPN. I think you underestimate the interest in the game on the coasts.

I see it in real life, but the only games on TV are on Univision or premium ticket channels. And KC has its own MLS soccer team.

ESPN or some other channel would run soccer if there was an audience for it.

NJReds
10-25-2006, 04:01 PM
I see it in real life, but the only games on TV are on Univision or premium ticket channels. And KC has its own MLS soccer team.

ESPN or some other channel would run soccer if there was an audience for it.


On my cable system ESPN and Fox Soccer Channel are both on the same level of service.

ESPN does show the champions league and a handful of MLS games. It's not baseball, football or basketball...but it's ahead of hockey from the perspective of TV coverage.

westofyou
10-25-2006, 04:02 PM
ESPN or some other channel would run soccer if there was an audience for it.Fox Soccer Channel covers that, great channel.

IslandRed
10-25-2006, 04:13 PM
99% of people who find soccer "boring" don't appreciate and/or understand the intricacies of the game.

Ah yes, the old "you just don't understand it" put-down. :p:

There are two problems with that. First, the same argument can be used for practically any endeavor on earth; whether it's soccer or football or chess or sci-fi or whatever, the people who are into it don't get why everyone else isn't. Which brings up the second problem: No one goes through the trouble of learning the intricacies of anything unless they like it in the first place. That goes for just about everything. You don't learn all about something and then decide if you like it; you like it and it makes you want to learn more.

I like soccer in that casual, watch the World Cup and not much else way. But I have a full plate of rooting interests and am under no obligation to learn about or like soccer. If soccer wants to succeed in America, it's soccer's job to be interesting enough to catch the attention of guys like me and make us want to be fans. If it doesn't, not my problem.

WMR
10-25-2006, 04:22 PM
Ah yes, the old "you just don't understand it" put-down. :p:

There are two problems with that. First, the same argument can be used for practically any endeavor on earth; whether it's soccer or football or chess or sci-fi or whatever, the people who are into it don't get why everyone else isn't. Which brings up the second problem: No one goes through the trouble of learning the intricacies of anything unless they like it in the first place. That goes for just about everything. You don't learn all about something and then decide if you like it; you like it and it makes you want to learn more.

I like soccer in that casual, watch the World Cup and not much else way. But I have a full plate of rooting interests and am under no obligation to learn about or like soccer. If soccer wants to succeed in America, it's soccer's job to be interesting enough to catch the attention of guys like me and make us want to be fans. If it doesn't, not my problem.

I'm not putting anyone down... they were just--generally--never exposed to soccer, usually at a young age, where you learn to see and appreciate the skills and abilities beyond the scored goal. A perfectly executed through pass, the perfect tackle, dictating the flow of the game through possession...

In American sports, 'successes' are much more pronounced and happen much more often: a dunk, a 3-point shot over intense pressure, an eagle, a home-run... these are all things that casual fans can easily appreciate. The 'more hardcore' baseball fan might take great pleasure out of a perfectly executed hit and run... but the homeruns and slam dunks of each respective sport still happen fast and furious and make for easy viewing.

Soccer has far fewer 'casual fan-grabbing-moments' than just about any other sport. That's why it's such a tough sell to many Americans.

Chip R
10-25-2006, 04:46 PM
ESPN needs to make a channel for uninteresting sports

Billiards, poker, soccer, hockey, WNBA, paintball, and golf.

Boooring.


Isn't that what ESPN8 is for? ;)

ochre
10-25-2006, 05:09 PM
Soccer has far fewer 'casual fan-grabbing-moments' than just about any other sport. That's why it's such a tough sell to many Americans.
I really think it has more to do with flopping. It's seen as very "unmanly" (or at least bad sportsmanship), probably, at least, by that same 99% you referenced. :)

NJReds
10-25-2006, 05:18 PM
I really think it has more to do with flopping. It's seen as very "unmanly" (or at least bad sportsmanship), probably, at least, by that same 99% you referenced. :)


I see it in hockey and basketball, too. (Not quite as much as soccer, but it's there).

Except for Edmonds "flair for the dramatic" baseball gets a pass.

In football, players used to fake injury to stop the clock on late drives, but I think that there's some sort of rule against that now.

WMR
10-25-2006, 05:44 PM
I really think it has more to do with flopping. It's seen as very "unmanly" (or at least bad sportsmanship), probably, at least, by that same 99% you referenced. :)

That's one reason why I think the new rules against diving/simulating injuries are excellent moves forward by the FA.

Hopefully their next move will be video review and retroactive cards for dives that the referee misses.

registerthis
10-25-2006, 06:06 PM
99% of people who find soccer "boring" don't appreciate and/or understand the intricacies of the game.

Some of the best games end up without a single goal scored. Many Americans can't understand that.

I really, really loathe this type of thinking--that if I don't like something, I'm either missing something or simply "not getting it." I get soccer just fine. I've been to a fair share of Crew matches, and a couple of United games. I've watched plenty of soccer on TV, and my bro is as big a soccer fan as one is likely to find. I even played it for a couple of years in youth leagues.

And I'm just not a big fan of the game.

I don't like watching contests that end in nil-nil ties. I don't know what else to say--I just don't. I certainly get the tremendous skill and athleticism that goes into playing the game. I can appreciate a well-played game. But soccer will never be one of my favorite sports, because the action and offense--or lack thereof--are not what typically attracts me to a sport.

I liken it to golf--I understand golf, I respect the skill that it takes to play the game, but watching it on TV bores me out of my mind. It's not for a lack of understanding, I'm just not particularly interested in it. Soccer is exactly the same.

registerthis
10-25-2006, 06:09 PM
I'm not putting anyone down... they were just--generally--never exposed to soccer, usually at a young age, where you learn to see and appreciate the skills and abilities beyond the scored goal. A perfectly executed through pass, the perfect tackle, dictating the flow of the game through possession...

See, I don't necessarily agree with this. At the youth level, soccer is about as popular as any sport out there. There's probably more children playing soccer than little league baseball--or it's very close. I don't think a lack of exposure at an early age is inhibiting soccer's popularity in this country.

WMR
10-25-2006, 07:02 PM
See, I don't necessarily agree with this. At the youth level, soccer is about as popular as any sport out there. There's probably more children playing soccer than little league baseball--or it's very close. I don't think a lack of exposure at an early age is inhibiting soccer's popularity in this country.

That's why I think interest in soccer in the USA is at an all-time high and also why the majority of most people who would consider themselves "big" soccer fans--from my firsthand knowledge--are under 30 years old.

MOST people who deride soccer either a) missed the 'soccer boom' at the grassroots level due to the simple fact that it wasn't around during their youth OR 2) Never played/played for a couple years and didn't get into it (and didn't get into for the reasons enumerated in my previous post... LOL many of which you cited whilst describing why soccer isn't your cup of tea)

And no, playing soccer for a couple years isn't necessarily going to make you a soccer fan for life... as Michael Jordan said, "Love early, learn late."

registerthis
10-25-2006, 07:16 PM
MOST people who deride soccer either a) missed the 'soccer boom' at the grassroots level due to the simple fact that it wasn't around during their youth OR 2) Never played/played for a couple years and didn't get into it (and didn't get into for the reasons enumerated in my previous post... LOL many of which you cited whilst describing why soccer isn't your cup of tea)

Perhaps, but it doesn't mean that I "don't get" the sport. I get it--it's just not my thing.

Yachtzee
10-26-2006, 12:26 AM
I think that Americans would understand the excitement of soccer better if they spent some time in Europe watching the game, or even heading down to the local pub where they have the games on. For Americans who have lacked the constant exposure of top-flight soccer, it's difficult to understand the flow and momentum of the game. When you're around a group of other people who do understand, you get a sense of that flow of the match that brings excitement to watching it. A 0-0 tie may seem like a boring game, but if it's an underdog who comes away with a 0-0 tie on the home pitch of one of the league's juggernauts, that's a big deal. Likewise if one of the top teams fails to get a win against a weaker team, that can mean the difference between 1st and 4th place in some years. Soccer is more than just wins and losses. Points and goal differential can mean a lot in determining who wins a championship or plays on in international competition and who goes home and for lower levels, who gets promoted up to the big leagues or gets relegated down to the lower league.

On the other hand there are people like registerthis who "get it" and just don't care for the sport. For me, I "get" the NBA but I have no desire to watch it. I find the college game much more interesting to watch. I would like to get into hockey, but other than the Olympics, I've just never found an NHL team compelling enough to follow, with no "home" team for me to root for.

Betterread
10-26-2006, 01:23 AM
First of all: simulating being fouled, and worse, simulating injury is bad for football/soccer. FIFA needs to address data like this with some rule changes. I vote for using post-match replays to reveal deception. When video shows conclusive probative evidence of deception, ban the player for a game or more. The simulation will quickly dissipate.
Second of all: I enjoy participating and viewing many sports and games. Football is the beautiful game and there is no equal to it. But Football games that end in 0-0 ties are seldom pleasing.

WMR
10-26-2006, 01:26 AM
First of all: simulating being fouled, and worse, simulating injury is bad for football/soccer. FIFA needs to address data like this with some rule changes. I vote for using post-match replays to reveal deception. When video shows conclusive probative evidence of deception, ban the player for a game or more. The simulation will quickly dissipate.
Second of all: I enjoy participating and viewing many sports and games. Football is the beautiful game and there is no equal to it. But Football games that end in 0-0 ties are seldom pleasing.

When you're playing Chelsea and your squad is hovering above the relegation zone, I can't imagine many sights sweeter than the 90 minute mark and the anticipation of the referee's whistle!!

Betterread
10-26-2006, 09:41 AM
When you're playing Chelsea and your squad is hovering above the relegation zone, I can't imagine many sights sweeter than the 90 minute mark and the anticipation of the referee's whistle!!

But if you're near relegation - wouldn't you hope to take 3 points from a match when you are playing well at the end of 90 minutes? Of course there are situtations when the goal is to not give up any goals, even if that means you minimize your chances at scoring them yourself. If the result is a 0-0 tie, you have achieved your goal, and a feeling of satisfaction.

registerthis
10-26-2006, 10:47 AM
But Football games that end in 0-0 ties are seldom pleasing.

I'm of the belief that ties in ANY sport are rarely pleasing. I disliked them when they were possible in college football, I disliked them when they were a part of hockey. I can't imagine a baseball game ending in a tie. Perhaps I'm simply too "American", but I prefer my contests to end with a clear winner and loser. Perhaps the Jackets tying the Red Wings before a packed house in Detroit was satisfying to some, but not for me.

WMR
10-26-2006, 12:01 PM
But if you're near relegation - wouldn't you hope to take 3 points from a match when you are playing well at the end of 90 minutes? Of course there are situtations when the goal is to not give up any goals, even if that means you minimize your chances at scoring them yourself. If the result is a 0-0 tie, you have achieved your goal, and a feeling of satisfaction.

Most certainly. But if you're playing a team like Chelsea and have been under constant pressure the entire match and have had a defense bend but not break... a nil-nil draw can be just as exciting and entertaining, IMO.

ochre
10-26-2006, 11:37 PM
See that's the other problem. Average Americans are more likely to hear "Chelsea" and see http://i.cnn.net/cnn/2003/US/Northeast/03/08/chelsea.clinton.ap/story.clinton.ap.file.jpg

As long as the "best" American players are internationally mediocre and have to travel to foreign countries to "achieve", I don't think Americans will view soccer, nationally, as a viable high level sport. Our national zeitgeist is such that, perhaps as a relic of the pan-generational cold war competition with the soviets, in which our very system of life was on trial in every international competition, we have to be the best.

Americans can't/won't do second fiddle.

WMR
10-26-2006, 11:48 PM
See that's the other problem. Average Americans are more likely to hear "Chelsea" and see http://i.cnn.net/cnn/2003/US/Northeast/03/08/chelsea.clinton.ap/story.clinton.ap.file.jpg

As long as the "best" American players are internationally mediocre and have to travel to foreign countries to "achieve", I don't think Americans will view soccer, nationally, as a viable high level sport. Our national zeitgeist is such that, perhaps as a relic of the pan-generational cold war competition with the soviets, in which our very system of life was on trial in every international competition, we have to be the best.

Americans can't/won't do second fiddle.

LOL, and if we can't produce 'em, we'll import 'em!! :) :laugh:

http://www.mlsnet.com/mls/imgs/auctions/2005/hurricane_relief/freddy_adu.jpg

Freddy Adu, Ghanian-born

He has matured incredibly this past year. At 17, he is maybe the most technically gifted player in MLS.

I think you're right, Ochre. I don't think soccer will become a mainstream professional sport in America; at least not in our lifetimes.

The required upward mobility of American talent to Europe is so important and set in stone to progress ones career both from a skill and economic viewpoint... it is next to impossible to expect anything different for a long time.

registerthis
10-27-2006, 09:12 AM
See that's the other problem. Average Americans are more likely to hear "Chelsea" and see http://i.cnn.net/cnn/2003/US/Northeast/03/08/chelsea.clinton.ap/story.clinton.ap.file.jpg

As long as the "best" American players are internationally mediocre and have to travel to foreign countries to "achieve", I don't think Americans will view soccer, nationally, as a viable high level sport. Our national zeitgeist is such that, perhaps as a relic of the pan-generational cold war competition with the soviets, in which our very system of life was on trial in every international competition, we have to be the best.

Americans can't/won't do second fiddle.

The vast majority of hockey players don't come from the U.S.

NJReds
10-27-2006, 10:11 AM
LOL, and if we can't produce 'em, we'll import 'em!! :) :laugh:

Freddy Adu, Ghanian-born

He has matured incredibly this past year. At 17, he is maybe the most technically gifted player in MLS.

I think you're right, Ochre. I don't think soccer will become a mainstream professional sport in America; at least not in our lifetimes.

The required upward mobility of American talent to Europe is so important and set in stone to progress ones career both from a skill and economic viewpoint... it is next to impossible to expect anything different for a long time.


You mean like France:


On the 2006 French national soccer team, 17 of the 23 players were members of racial minorities, including many of the most prominent players. The team features players from the overseas departments and players who are themselves immigrants or the children of immigrants from former French colonial possessions. Among them, Zinédine Zidane, William Gallas, Nicolas Anelka and Franck Ribéry are Muslims; Zidane is the child of immigrants from Algeria; Lilian Thuram, William Gallas and Thierry Henry are all of Antillean origin, the first two coming from the overseas department of Guadeloupe and Henry the child of parents born in Guadeloupe and Martinique; Anelka's parents originate from Martinique; Florent Malouda was born in French Guiana; Patrick Vieira immigrated as a child from Senegal.

M2
10-27-2006, 02:04 PM
Random thoughts here:

Hey, if you're an import society, then import some sporting talent along the way. It's not like the sport of baseball wasn't built on the backs of players straight out of the immigration pool.

Flopping sucks and FIFA ought to get tougher on it. Perhaps they could take the penalty box concept from hockey and send anyone who takes an egregious flop into it for five minutes of game time.

In addition to the EPL, the flopping isn't so bad in La Liga (Spain), Ligue 1 (France) or Der Bundesliga (Germany) either. Italy, Portugal and Holland seem to be the homes of fall down football these days. I'm partial to La Liga -- did anyone catch that Real Madrid-Barcelona contest last weekend? That was some serious beautiful game.

Until they start making golf a timed event with penalty laps for bogeys and time bonues for coming in under par, it won't be a sport.

Soccer's kind of sneaking into our cultural landscape. Note the "Jose, Jose, Jose" chants of Mets fans and the drum section at A's games. My guess is in the coming years savvy sports franchises are going to encourage their fans to adopt the high energy fanaticism of soccer fans.

MLS has become a decent league, but it's no longer the bargain it used to be in my neck of the woods. That's too bad because it affects the "bring your kids" market that the league should be courting.

My guess is the next breakthrough moment for soccer in the U.S. will be when a U.S. player goes overseas and stars there. Thanks to Fox Soccer Channel and other channels like it, a lot of folks back here will get to see it. Maybe it will be Freddy Adu or Lee Nguyen or Clint Dempsey. It's too bad goal keepers don't grab more attention because Everton, Reading and Blackburn are all having solid seasons in the EPL in no small part thanks to American keepers. How's that for irony? The least subtle nation on the planet and the first impact players we produce in soccer play in the net. Though Bobby Convey, Brian McBride and Carlos Bocanegra are all playing well in the EPL too.

ochre
10-27-2006, 02:30 PM
The vast majority of hockey players don't come from the U.S.
But they come to the US to play...

That was part of what I was getting at too, but in re-reading I obviously didn't state it explicitly. Every successful major professional sport that "works" in America crowns it's champion "World Champion". And even though there is a plurality of non-US players in Hockey, some of the very good ones are. Again, I don't think that could be said for soccer at this point. McBride, Reyna and a couple of Goalies are the only ones I can think of as having recently been affective in top tier oversees professional play.

Chip R
10-27-2006, 02:52 PM
Flopping sucks and FIFA ought to get tougher on it. Perhaps they could take the penalty box concept from hockey and send anyone who takes an egregious flop into it for five minutes of game time.


Good idea but it seems to me after watching the World Cup, that being a man down isn't that much of a disadvantage. Perhaps making the flopper and one other teammate sit in a penalty box for 5 minutes would work better.

M2
10-27-2006, 03:13 PM
Good idea but it seems to me after watching the World Cup, that being a man down isn't that much of a disadvantage. Perhaps making the flopper and one other teammate sit in a penalty box for 5 minutes would work better.

Fair point. Now that I think more about it could also give the offending team what amounts to a fresh man coming off a five-minute rest.

Though it would force a team into a defensive shell for five minutes and football don't lack for ego, they want to be on the pitch. I'm guessing having to watch the game for a spell would drive most guys crazy.

NJReds
10-27-2006, 03:51 PM
If a player goes down, and a trainer comes on the pitch, they are supposed to be taken off by stretcher and administered to on the sidelines while the game gets restarted. They can not enter the game again until the official allows them back...which is usually the first stoppage.

But for some reason this rule stopped being enforced, and the "flopper" gets to walk of his "injury" on the field.

Chip R
10-27-2006, 05:01 PM
Fair point. Now that I think more about it could also give the offending team what amounts to a fresh man coming off a five-minute rest.

Though it would force a team into a defensive shell for five minutes and football don't lack for ego, they want to be on the pitch. I'm guessing having to watch the game for a spell would drive most guys crazy.

Now I know when there is a foul in the penalty area, the team who is fouled gets a one on one penalty kick. And when it's outside the penalty area, they get an obstructed kick where 4-5 guys stand in front of the ball with their hands protecting their family jewels. I would think the former would be too severe a penalty for flopping but what about the latter? Or what about a corner kick for the other team if you are too worried about it turning into a penalty shot contest?

FoReel
11-01-2006, 04:29 PM
I guess it depends on how you define "popular". In terms of media exposure, I think it ranks somewhere between the WNBA and pro paintball. Seriously, I see more paintball on ESPN than soccer. That's not a good thing.
There is a reason why paintball on TV.... Its because last time i checked there were 7 million people playing paintball in 2000. Thats 6 years ago!! You might not like paintball for various reason but paintball is one of the fastest growing sports.

Johnny Footstool
11-01-2006, 04:51 PM
There is a reason why paintball on TV.... Its because last time i checked there were 7 million people playing paintball in 2000. Thats 6 years ago!! You might not like paintball for various reason but paintball is one of the fastest growing sports.

I like playing paintball. I like playing darts, Texas Hold'Em, and Playstation, too. That doesn't mean I want to sit and watch them on TV, though.

RFS62
11-01-2006, 06:17 PM
Good idea but it seems to me after watching the World Cup, that being a man down isn't that much of a disadvantage. Perhaps making the flopper and one other teammate sit in a penalty box for 5 minutes would work better.

Make them both wear a dress while in the penalty box. That will end flopping forever.

M2
11-01-2006, 06:38 PM
Make them both wear a dress while in the penalty box. That will end flopping forever.

Or cause Italian players to abandon soccer for an extended game of grab ass.

NJReds
11-02-2006, 03:24 PM
There was more flopping in the Knicks-Memphis game last night then a whole season of Serie A games. Every time a Knicks player moved on offense, a Memphis defender was dropping to the floor. The refs bought the act too, most of the time.

FoReel
11-04-2006, 04:48 PM
I like playing paintball. I like playing darts, Texas Hold'Em, and Playstation, too. That doesn't mean I want to sit and watch them on TV, though.
I feel the same way as you, at first i thought you were dogging on paintball. I play one level below the guys you see on tv, and some of them are my friends but when I try to watch it on TV, it bored me. I dont think ESPN looks at the entertainment enjoyment but rather at the numbers.