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OnBaseMachine
10-28-2006, 08:48 AM
Give me Hickey first, Wallace second.

Reds zero in on new pitching coach
Former Red Sox, Astros coaches among candidates

BY JOHN FAY | ENQUIRER STAFF WRITER

The Reds might have a new pitching coach in place by the middle of next week.

"We hope to," Reds manager Jerry Narron said.

The club has interviewed three outside and two internal candidates. They are:

Dave Wallace, the outgoing Boston Red Sox pitching coach. Wallace had held the Boston job since 2003 but was fired after the season. He missed half of this season after developing an infection in his hip that required surgery. Wallace, 59, was on the staff when Narron was the Sox's bench coach.

Dick Pole, who was Dusty Baker's bench coach this season for the Chicago Cubs. Pole is a former big-league pitcher and coached for five different teams in the majors, mostly as pitching coach. Pole, 56, pitched for six years in the majors.

Jim Hickey, the outgoing Houston Astros pitching coach. Hickey took over on an interim basis July 14, 2004, and served as the club pitching coach in 2005 and 2006. He was fired after this season, despite the fact that the Astros finished second in the National League in ERA at 4.05. Earlier, he was pitching coach for Triple-A New Orleans, which won the International League ERA title his final two seasons.

Ted Power, the former Red who served last year as the pitching coach at Triple-A Louisville. Power, 51, was hired as the minor-league rehab coordinator but was moved to Louisville after Lee Tunnell went from Louisville's pitching coach to interim bullpen coach for the Reds.

Mike LaCoss, another former Red, is currently a roving instructor in the organization's minor leagues. LaCoss, 50, also served as a scout for the Reds.

"They were all outstanding," Narron said.

The pitching coach job opened when Vern Ruhle was re-assigned to a minor-league job. Ruhle missed virtually all of last season undergoing treatment for cancer. Tom Hume served as interim pitching coach but returns to his role as bullpen coach.

The Reds also have an opening for a hitting coach to replace Chris Chambliss, who was fired.

Narron confirmed the club has interviewed Butch Wynegar. Wynegar, 50, was fired as Milwaukee's hitting coach.

"He's very solid," Narron said. "He did a good job in Milwaukee. He's very good on mechanics."

Narron said the focus has been on getting a pitching coach hired, so the decision on a hitting coach could come later.

E-mail jfay@enquirer.com

http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061028/SPT04/610280388/1071

GAC
10-28-2006, 08:51 AM
Nothing like having fired coaches as options. :lol:

But of the lot I'd go with Hickey.

Raisor
10-28-2006, 08:57 AM
What's former M's pitching coach Bryan Price up to these days?

traderumor
10-28-2006, 11:24 AM
Maybe Wallace could bring a scoop of dirt in a jar from Fenway that Arroyo could put on his mantle to help his achy breaky heart from pining so bad for Boston.

Team Clark
10-28-2006, 11:33 AM
I'd go with Wallace as my first choice and Hickey as my second.

Power got an interview? Geez. Why not interview Soto? Soto is way better than Ted.

Cooper
10-28-2006, 11:35 AM
I'm gonna guess the job will go to the one who has the most "good ole boy" in him. Just a guess....nothing to base it on except to say they'll let Narron pick the guy he's most comfortable with.

vic715
10-28-2006, 12:48 PM
Nothing like having fired coaches as options. :lol:

But of the lot I'd go with Hickey.

Yeh I kinda agree with you on that one. But you have to look at a guy like Dick Pole who'se been hired by 5 different teams. He must be a pretty good coach for that many teams to hire him.But I guess on the other hand 5 teams have fired him too.
I'd take Wallace if he'd come aboard.

Matt700wlw
10-28-2006, 12:50 PM
Dick Pole


I would be angry with my parents....

Falls City Beer
10-28-2006, 12:52 PM
I'm gonna guess the job will go to the one who has the most "good ole boy" in him. Just a guess....nothing to base it on except to say they'll let Narron pick the guy he's most comfortable with.

It might be a "guess" but, IMO, an exceedingly EDUCATED guess.

Team Clark
10-28-2006, 02:09 PM
It might be a "guess" but, IMO, an exceedingly EDUCATED guess.

FCB... I might be wrong but the saying goes something like "Like Minds, Like Kinds..." Correct me on this if I am wrong.

marcshoe
10-28-2006, 02:53 PM
Why did Houston fire Hickey? He seems to have an excellent track record.

I'd love to see either him or Wallace (even if I do mostly think of him as a Dodger). Getting someone in who has a first-rate track record would say a lot, I think.

KronoRed
10-28-2006, 02:54 PM
It might be a "guess" but, IMO, an exceedingly EDUCATED guess.
Power of tradition.

Matt700wlw
10-28-2006, 03:00 PM
Power of tradition.

:)

vic715
10-28-2006, 03:32 PM
I would be angry with my parents....

He probably is lol.

Krusty
10-28-2006, 04:52 PM
Wallace or Hickey would be fine additions.

MartyFan
10-28-2006, 05:10 PM
Nothing like having fired coaches as options. :lol:

But of the lot I'd go with Hickey.

Was Pinella ever fired? How bout Sparky?

I'd say finding someone with any sort of success in the MLB is going to require talking to someone who has been fired at some point and time in their career.

MartyFan
10-28-2006, 05:12 PM
I'd go with Wallace as my first choice and Hickey as my second.

Power got an interview? Geez. Why not interview Soto? Soto is way better than Ted.


Does Soto have any interest? I thought he had to many obligations at home to think about being a MLB coach?

Az. Reds Fan
10-28-2006, 08:43 PM
What's former M's pitching coach Bryan Price up to these days?

D'backs pitching coach.

Team Clark
10-28-2006, 08:46 PM
Does Soto have any interest? I thought he had to many obligations at home to think about being a MLB coach?

Soto does have obligations but would have enough time to get them in order. Last season the AAA situation was thrust upon him due to the untimely circumstances of Vern Ruhle's condition. He stayed as long as he could.

SandyD
10-29-2006, 08:28 PM
Article about Hickey from last year during the NLCS.


Hickey is always ready to listen to Astros’ pitchers
By Kristie Rieken
AP sports writer
HOUSTON — Houston Astros pitching coach Jim Hickey doesn’t spend a lot of time reminding players of mechanics or how to correct mistakes. In charge of a pitching staff that includes Roger Clemens, Andy Pettitte and Roy Oswalt, he doesn’t have to. On this team, his role is mostly one of motivation and understanding.

“I’m just a sounding board,” said Hickey, who was the Zephyrs’ pitching coach
for seven seasons before joining the Astros in July of 2004. “Really, we don’t need pitching coaches, we need pitching psychologists.”

And in that regard, Pettitte is one of his best patients.
“A pitching coach needs to be a good pin cushion,” said Pettitte. “He’s somebody that will talk to you during the game and listen to you and (you can) throw stuff off of him.”

Hickey and the Astros are one win away from reaching their first World Series.
They’ll take a 3-2 lead in the NL Championship Series into St. Louis for Game 6tonight.
Hickey, 44, is constantly asked about how he handles conversations with Clemens, who is less than one year his junior. “You just do what needs to
be done and say what needs to be said for the most part,” said Hickey, who never pitched in the majors. “You don’t think about who it is that you are talking to or what they’ve accomplished.”

His advice varies more by situation than by player. For affable Hickey, knowing what to say isn’t that difficult, whether it’s Clemens or a rookie.
“Really deep down, just like everybody else, they’re looking for the same types of things, the positive reinforcement, the pointing out certain
things that maybe aren’t going right.”

Hickey, who pitched from 1983 to 1989 in the minors and has been a coach for 14 seasons, was promoted from Triple-A New Orleans last season after Astros manager Jimy Williams, pitching coach Burt Hooton and hitting coach Harry Spilman were fired.

Thrown into the job in midseason, he didn’t have time to be awe-struck by
Clemens or anyone else. He called a meeting when he first arrived to ask players what they needed and how he could help.

After Hickey came to Houston and Manager Phil Garner took over, the Astros
went 36-10 to claim a wildcard berth on the final day of the season.
Garner said Hickey sat back and got a feel for the different players before
jumping in and giving advice.

“You’re talking about a sixtime Cy Young winner (Clemens), you’re talking
about Andy Pettitte, who is one of the greatest postseason pitchers of all time, and Roy Oswalt, who has a lot of success,” Garner said.
“I don’t think these are guys that you walk in and say, ‘Hey, you need to start doing this now.’ He needed to be somewhat laid back. He did a good job in the learning process last year.”

It helped that Hickey worked with Oswalt and closer Brad Lidge with the Zephyrs. “Hickey’s awesome, ” Lidge said. “The best thing about Hickey is he keeps everything simple, doesn’t try to overcorrect things.”