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savafan
11-06-2006, 10:32 PM
http://www.kcbs.com/pages/121049.php?contentType=4&contentId=236382

OAKLAND, Calif. (KCBS) -- KCBS has learned that the Oakland Athletics will soon announce plans to move the club to Fremont, and build a new stadium complex there.

KCBS sports anchor Steve Bitker broke the story Monday morning, learning via a source, that Major League Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig is expected to come to the Bay Area next Tuesday, November 14, and is expected to make the announcement along with A's owner Lew Wolfe, Fremont city officials, and executives from Cisco Systems, which will lease the land for the complex.

The A's have not yet commented, except to say that they hope to make an official major announcement soon. The commissioner's office has not yet commented, either, but may comment shortly, according to Bitker.

The team has long worked for a new stadium deal, and KCBS's Bitker reports that the Fremont pact is expected to involve a 40,000 seat ballpark and surrounding residential and retail village.

M2
11-06-2006, 10:49 PM
Brilliant move as it puts them right on the doorstep of Santa Clara County. Basically it's as close as you can come to it without being there.

cincinnati chili
11-06-2006, 10:57 PM
Anyone know if this violates the Giants' territorial rights? I don't know Cali. geography well at all, but looking at Google maps, this pretty much seems to be the South Bay, which I equate with Silicon Valley. Is that accurate?

Is there viable public transit for those traveling down from Oakland:

Google map for idiots like me (http://www.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&q=fremont,+ca&ie=UTF8&z=9&ll=37.71859,-121.970215&spn=0.862512,1.661682&om=1)

Joseph
11-06-2006, 11:04 PM
Will they still be Oakland?

westofyou
11-06-2006, 11:28 PM
Anyone know if this violates the Giants' territorial rights? I don't know Cali. geography well at all, but looking at Google maps, this pretty much seems to be the South Bay, which I equate with Silicon Valley. Is that accurate?

Is there viable public transit for those traveling down from Oakland:

Google map for idiots like me (http://www.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&q=fremont,+ca&ie=UTF8&z=9&ll=37.71859,-121.970215&spn=0.862512,1.661682&om=1)

No Fremont belongs to the A's, Giants have the other side of the Bay.

Fremont is about 30 miles south, it is Oakland as far as I'm concerned.

BART goes to Fremont. Where it will also be warmer.

smith288
11-06-2006, 11:30 PM
Isnt this the propsed stadium? I find it facinating and cozy.

http://www.ballparks.com/baseball/american/oakbpk02.jpg

M2
11-06-2006, 11:30 PM
Anyone know if this violates the Giants' territorial rights? I don't know Cali. geography well at all, but looking at Google maps, this pretty much seems to be the South Bay, which I equate with Silicon Valley. Is that accurate?

Is there viable public transit for those traveling down from Oakland:

Google map for idiots like me (http://www.google.com/maps?f=q&hl=en&q=fremont,+ca&ie=UTF8&z=9&ll=37.71859,-121.970215&spn=0.862512,1.661682&om=1)

My guess, and this is just a guess, is that the Giants claim Santa Clara County. Fremont is in Alameda County, same as Oakland. I'm sure the Giants will fume over this, but they've relied on the letter of the law to protect the Silicon Valley territory and it looks like the A's might be turning the tables on them. Fine, they won't move into Santa Clara, but they'll own it just the same.

The BART train runs from Oakland to Fremont. Takes about 35 minutes.

M2
11-06-2006, 11:32 PM
BART goes to Fremont. Where it will also be warmer.

Hadn't thought of that. Heat could be a major coup.

Falls City Beer
11-06-2006, 11:35 PM
Baseball's white flight? I kid, of course. Sort of.

Shaknb8k
11-06-2006, 11:48 PM
Will they still be Oakland?

I just got on an A's message board and they seem to think it could be something like the Silicon Valley A's. Because for some reason they already "own" the rights to Silicon Valley A's.....i personally know nothing about the area. Im sure many of you all do though....is Fremont in Silicon Valley?

Tony Cloninger
11-07-2006, 12:23 AM
Good for the A's.

They do a great job of developing their own players....and now with this stadium, so help in keeping them.

If the Giants had a problem with it....i doubt this proposal would have gotten very far.
And even if they do complain about it.....who cares.....they have it good enough. Let them have their cheese and wine.

westofyou
11-07-2006, 12:32 AM
I just got on an A's message board and they seem to think it could be something like the Silicon Valley A's. Because for some reason they already "own" the rights to Silicon Valley A's.....i personally know nothing about the area. Im sure many of you all do though....is Fremont in Silicon Valley?

Think of San Jose as the bottom of the letter V, if you go up the right side you go San Jose - Fremont - Hayward - San Leandro - Oakland

Up the left it's San Jose - Santa Clara - Palo Alto - Redwood City and on and on and on...

In 1992 the Giants explored moving to the Santa Clara County side of the valley, they had a levy vote and all that rot (I worked on some film shoots for the county concerning the vote) At the time they received the rights to that side of the Bay, but the fact is below San Jose and down through the Salinas Valley their is still room to grow, so the A's will tap the market south of the new site in Fremont, the folks crying about the A's moving had their chance to change the scene before the city begged to get Al Davis back (and thus ruin the park for baseball) I lived in Santa Cruz and went to the city every weekend for years, driving to get what you want is a big part of that area, they'll learn to deal with it.

Heath
11-07-2006, 12:39 AM
Golden State Athletics.

California Athletics.

Or, just remember - the New York Giants and Jets play in New Jersey - Oakland Athletics aren't too far off.

Rojo
11-07-2006, 01:12 AM
One less season to go see the A's.

Actually if they were really smart they'd move east toward Pleasanton (and closer to Sacto). That's where the action is. The Silicone Valley is waaaaay 90's, most of its packed up and moved to Bangalore.

mth123
11-07-2006, 07:13 AM
Golden State Athletics.

California Athletics.

Or, just remember - the New York Giants and Jets play in New Jersey - Oakland Athletics aren't too far off.

Oakland Athletics of Fremont. California teams in the AL need to be named this way now.

RedsBaron
11-07-2006, 08:18 AM
Oakland Athletics of Fremont. California teams in the AL need to be named this way now.

How about the Philadelphia-Kansas City-Oakland Athletics of Fremont?;)

Number_Fourteen
11-07-2006, 09:42 AM
A visual aid below depicts Fremont roughly 10-15 miles north of San Jose. However, Fremont is virtually next door to North San Jose (next to Milpitas), and is home to Cisco Systems and several other heavy hitters in the tech world.

Most important here is that Fremont can be accessed across the bay to the SF side of the Peninsula by Highway 237 (from Milpitas to Mountain View) and to the north at 84, the Dumbarton Bridge (from Fremont/Newark to Palo Alto). Both 237 & 84 are a very short distance across, and will allow great access to A's baseball for the extremely wealthy of towns like Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Hillsborough and all else south of these cities.

Believe me, these towns are stinking well-off. In fact, the median per home in some of these cities is over 1.2 million. Best part is, It's far easier in traffic to get from Palo Alto or Sunnyvale areas to Fremont than to take the murderous drive up 101 northbound to see the Giants in SF. The difference is not even debatable!

This is a brilliant move by the Athletics if it comes to pass.

http://mclabs.com/images/facilities/maps/San%20Jose_city.gif

remdog
11-07-2006, 09:43 AM
Glad to see the A's get out of the Coliseum---no matter where they go. Fremont is a good spot. San Jose will be disappointed but the A's will be closer to that market than they were.

With some good planning this should make it easier for fans to get to games not to mention a better neighborhood for after the game activities.

Rem

macro
11-07-2006, 10:14 AM
Glad to see the A's get out of the Coliseum---no matter where they go.

That is what I was thinking. They absolutely ruined that place when they put that big wall of seats in the outfield to please Al Davis. I never thought that stadium was much to look at, but it's hideously ugly now. The A's deserve better.

cincinnati chili
11-07-2006, 11:27 PM
A different perspective written by a Bay-area resident:

http://www.deadspin.com/sports/baseball/the-bay-area-athletics-of-fremont-212965.php

As a former Oakland resident, this makes me very sad. Yes, the Oakland Coliseum is kind of a pit, and is perched in the vaguely Mad Max-esque industrial wasteland out by the airport, but at least Oakland is a real place with a real identity. Fremont is essentially five separate towns that were amalgamated into one municipality in the 50s; it's endless soulless exurban sprawl-a-rama, and the ONLY thing it has going for it is that its the one corner of Silicon Valley that isn't in Santa Clara or San Mateo counties (which MLB has handed over to the Giants as their fiefdom)...

This can wind up being a Pirates situation where the new ballpark doesn't do much for the team in terms of attendance OR as I think it will probably go, a new ballpark is a drawing card for Californians. Californians are a different breed. While many of us here on AN live and die with every single move our A's make, the majority of those who follow baseball casually in the Bay Area probably don't realize Macha has been fired and Ron Washington is now the manager of a rival team. In order to fill a stadium regularly, you need to get those people there. And I'm sorry, but the Coliseum was woefully inadequate on nights when it was full. I remember going to the ALCS game and not being able to move in the walkways just to go get a freaking soda. It would take 20 minutes to a half an hour just to get to the front of a line and order a Mountain Dew.

westofyou
11-08-2006, 12:07 AM
Fremont is essentially five separate towns that were amalgamated into one municipality in the 50s; it's endless soulless exurban sprawl-a-rama, and the ONLY thing it has going for it is....

Sounds exactly like the California I lived in.


vaguely Mad Max-esque industrial wasteland out by the airport

Nothing vague about it at all, it's the pits, it's South Side Chicago, it's downtown Gary, Indiana.

GoGoWhiteSox
11-08-2006, 02:41 AM
A different perspective written by a Bay-area resident:

http://www.deadspin.com/sports/baseball/the-bay-area-athletics-of-fremont-212965.php

As a former Oakland resident, this makes me very sad. Yes, the Oakland Coliseum is kind of a pit, and is perched in the vaguely Mad Max-esque industrial wasteland out by the airport, but at least Oakland is a real place with a real identity. Fremont is essentially five separate towns that were amalgamated into one municipality in the 50s; it's endless soulless exurban sprawl-a-rama, and the ONLY thing it has going for it is that its the one corner of Silicon Valley that isn't in Santa Clara or San Mateo counties (which MLB has handed over to the Giants as their fiefdom)...

This can wind up being a Pirates situation where the new ballpark doesn't do much for the team in terms of attendance OR as I think it will probably go, a new ballpark is a drawing card for Californians.
Umm a Pirates situation? You're comparing apples and oranges there...you're comparing the A's (who have been one of the most successful teams in this decade so far), to the Pirates (who haven't had a winning season since 1992). Nobody can really compare to their situation except for Milwaukee, who had trouble drawing fans to their new ballpark after its first year. They're also going to be drawing from their Oakland fan base, as well as more of the San Jose fan base. Good move by the A's.

If you want proof that a ballpark can survive in the suburbs, look no further than the Ballpark in Arlington.

M2
11-08-2006, 11:32 PM
Sure Fremont's a soulless exurban sprawl-a-rama. So's the whole Silicon Valley. Yet millions of folks live and work there. If there's parking, Californians will surely go.

The Ballpark at Arlington is a perfect parallel.

oneupper
11-09-2006, 09:55 AM
A's to Freemont. 49ers to Santa Clara.

This is called "Follow the Money". It makes sense.

Rojo
11-09-2006, 04:41 PM
Sure Fremont's a soulless exurban sprawl-a-rama. So's the whole Silicon Valley. Yet millions of folks live and work there. If there's parking, Californians will surely go.

The Ballpark at Arlington is a perfect parallel.

If it were the Ft. Worth Rangers and Dallas had a team that captured the hearts and wallets of most of the area, then it might be a perfect parallel.

I dated a woman from Fremont and her whole circle of family and friends were Giants fans. The South Bay doesn't just belong to the Giants because of some territorial rights, the people down there just choose the Giants. A's fans extend east from Oakland, so the team is now moving to the edge of their fan shed and away from the center.

Of course Fremont is a lot easier to get to than Walnut Creek/Pleasanton. The best scenario would've been to build a downtown Oakland park or just skipped out to Sacramento. This feels like a hedge.

Nit to pick: Fremont is either urban or suburban but is in no way exurban.

cincinnati chili
11-11-2006, 07:14 PM
A's to Freemont. 49ers to Santa Clara.

This is called "Follow the Money". It makes sense.

I see your point. But isn't there plenty of money in San Francisco?

If I recall correctly, it's the most expensive major city to live in in the Western Hemisphere. Significantly more expensive than New York City and Boston.

I hear that SF's Olympic bid is now toast, since the team stopped negotiating over a new stadium.

westofyou
11-11-2006, 07:24 PM
But isn't there plenty of money in San Francisco?

But no land.

cincinnati chili
11-11-2006, 07:51 PM
But no land.

Details. Details.

How about a virtual stadium?

KronoRed
11-11-2006, 09:59 PM
Details. Details.

How about a virtual stadium?

Dude...build it on a barge

:D

Rojo
11-11-2006, 10:20 PM
But no land.


Oh there's land. The problem is that San Francisco voters have signalled their opposition to subsidizing fat cat owners with publicly-financed ball parks.

Good damn riddance.

remdog
11-15-2006, 07:22 AM
Press Release Source: Cisco Systems


VIDEO UPDATE: Cisco and Athletics Announce Cisco Field
Tuesday November 14, 8:10 pm ET


State-of-the-Art Technology to Take Fan Experience to New Level

Strategic Business Arrangement to Include Comprehensive Technology Solutions Deal, Rights to Fremont Land, and "Cisco Field" Naming Rights


SAN JOSE, CA--(MARKET WIRE)--Nov 14, 2006 -- Please note that a video has been uploaded to supplement this release. The video can be found here:
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-181538760300646774

Cisco® (NASDAQ:CSCO - News), the worldwide leader in networking that transforms how people connect, communicate and collaborate, today announced a broad business, marketing and technology agreement in principle with the Oakland Athletics (A's). As a part of the deal, the A's intend to build the world's most technologically sophisticated baseball park in Fremont, Calif. to serve as the new home of the A's. The development is set to include a state-of-the-art baseball-only stadium to be named "Cisco Field," and will feature a Baseball Village complete with residential housing, restaurants, retail shops and other community attractions.

Source: Cisco Systems




As part of this expected agreement:

-- Cisco will purchase the naming rights to the ballpark. This 30-year deal is valued at $4 million annually, with the potential for annual increases based on inflation. This naming rights agreement is transferable at any time. As a part of the naming rights deal, Cisco will be granted an undisclosed amount of guaranteed print, radio and television exposure.

-- Separate to this agreement, Cisco will sell its 143-acre parcel of land in Fremont to the A's. The land is intended to become the future site of Cisco Field and a surrounding Baseball Village development. The terms of this land transaction are not being publicly disclosed, as the deal is still subject to final negotiation.

-- Cisco will become the "Official Technology Partner of the A's and Cisco Field."

-- The A's will purchase Cisco technology to build and support the converged network of Cisco Field that will support data, voice, video and wireless services.

-- Cisco will create a Cisco Customer Solutions Center inside the ballpark to showcase how Cisco networking technology is an essential part of 21st century and other public venue operations.

-- Cisco will also have rights to utilize Cisco Field for corporate, partner and community events.

"The A's are more than just a great baseball team, they are a symbol of the Bay Area, and Cisco is proud to play a role in ensuring they continue to call it home," said Cisco President and CEO John Chambers. "Technology is changing every aspect of our life experiences and for Cisco, this is an opportunity to harness the power of our own innovative technologies to create a truly unique experience that transcends sports, connects communities and takes the fan experience to a whole new level."

This project underscores the A's commitment to creating a new standard for sports venues. As the official technology partner of the A's, Cisco will provide networking and communication products and services to transform the way that the A's team and ballpark operations will be managed. Cisco Field, when completed, will be a state-of-the-art technology showcase featuring an integrated IP network built on Cisco technology, and will be the platform for a multitude of applications that will take the fans' experience to the next level. For example, digital signs could ensure "smart" traffic flow; fans could purchase merchandise or concessions while in their seat by ordering from a mobile device, as well as onsite ticket kiosks to enable fans to upgrade seats in real-time. Luxury suites will have the opportunity to include multi-media amenities for premium video content, and Cisco TelePresence technology may even enable new forms of player-to-fan communications.

"Today marks the beginning of a new era in A's baseball in the Bay Area," said Lew Wolff, Owner and Managing Partner, Oakland Athletics. "Cisco Field will become a destination attraction that will be enjoyed by baseball fans throughout the Bay Area and beyond for generations to come. The location of the ballpark will enable us to significantly expand our market place while giving our fans a unique fan experience at what promises to be one of the most exciting venues in the country. We thank Cisco for the will and ability to make this new standard in fan and sponsor experience a reality. We have a number of rivers to cross, but once the value of what Cisco and the A's are committed to accomplish is clear to the citizens of Fremont and Alameda County, we are confident our plans will add to the economic, social and community base of the region we serve."

"This announcement of a new ball park for the Oakland Athletics ensures the long-term stability of the club in the Bay Area," said Baseball Commissioner Allan H. (Bud) Selig. "I congratulate Lew Wolff of the Athletics and John Chambers of Cisco for developing a partnership that will benefit the community as well as the A's and Cisco. As the landscape of baseball economics has changed dramatically in recent years, the importance of new ballparks that maximize the fan experience and expand club revenues, enabling the home team to remain competitive, cannot be understated."

The transaction is subject to final negotiation of terms and conditions, and will be subject to a variety of closing conditions, including governmental approvals, site surveys and environmental reviews.

About Cisco Field

Cisco Field will be located on the west side of Interstate 880 in Fremont off of the Automall Parkway. The ballpark and village will be privately funded and will be built without the use of public funds.

The A's and Cisco intend to explore, with the city of Fremont, other ways that the ballpark village can be developed, including sports-themed attractions that reflect the diversity and interests of the Bay Area.

"Cisco intends to be aggressive in ensuring that the entire Bay Area community, particularly younger fans, have the opportunity to enjoy the A's experience. We have a vision for how to make Cisco Field the model for all sports stadiums," added Chambers.

Rem

westofyou
11-15-2006, 11:58 AM
http://www.baseballprospectus.com/article.php?articleid=5707

After nearly an hour of happy talk, Wolff came out with this:


"I just feel staying in Alameda County and not bothering my commissioner about other cities in the country--because that's our only option. Our only option after this is to move out of California."

Because nothing says "customer-oriented" like a little blackmail.

Heath
11-15-2006, 01:14 PM
http://www.baseballprospectus.com/article.php?articleid=5707

After nearly an hour of happy talk, Wolff came out with this:



Because nothing says "customer-oriented" like a little blackmail.

Yep, wasn't for Fremont, there might have been the Portland A's.

:D

pedro
11-15-2006, 02:33 PM
I vote for "East Bay A's" for the new name.

M2
11-15-2006, 02:37 PM
Because nothing says "customer-oriented" like a little blackmail.

Yeah, it's not like California's got a big population. I figure a team could move quite comfortably into the Inland Empire or Sacramento areas if the Silicon Valley fell through.

westofyou
11-15-2006, 02:38 PM
Yeah, it's not like California's got a big population. I figure a team could move quite comfortably into the Inland Empire or Sacramento areas if the Silicon Valley fell through.

My thoughts exactly, I take the parting statement as BP being dramatic.

One things for sure, the Mariners won't let them up here.

Unassisted
11-26-2006, 10:58 AM
Sounds like the place will have some cool features.

http://www.mysanantonio.com/business/stories/MYSA112606.3R.ciscoathletics.15eb579.html


The stadium of the future

Jordan Robertson
associated press

SAN JOSE, Calif. — Cisco Systems Inc.'s partnership with the Oakland Athletics baseball team to build a new ballpark is more than just a naming-rights deal.

The San Jose-based networking equipment maker is banking that the agreement, announced Tuesday, will provide the ultimate consumer showcase for its products and drive higher sales as demand skyrockets for integrated data, voice and video capabilities over the Web.

The pact calls for Cisco to pay $4 million annually over 30 years to brand a new A's stadium in Fremont as Cisco Field. The company is selling 143 acres of Cisco-controlled land to the A's for an undisclosed amount, and the A's will be shouldering up to $500 million in stadium construction costs with a combination of public and private financing.

But Cisco Chief Executive Officer John Chambers said the company's exclusive technology deal for the stadium makes the arrangement more than a branding exercise.

"What's in it for Cisco is that this could be the next inflection point for literally how you load networks," Chambers said. "This, to me, is not only tremendously exciting — making a difference, having the A's stay in our community — but it also really is the future of sports and the future of how technology will be enabled for the fan experience, for the benefit of the revenues and for the benefit of the community."

The company will be the park's official technology partner, meaning the A's will outfit it with Cisco gear to build a converged network that will support data, voice, video and wireless services.

Cisco is touting the ballpark as the stadium of the future, with technology enabling fans to buy souvenirs and concessions from their seats with mobile devices, watch instant replays on laptop computers and select different ballpark cameras remotely to watch the game.

Though it makes most of its money from corporate clients, Cisco is trying to shed its image as solely a maker of networking infrastructure gear, hoping to capitalize on products and services that utilize the network. One example is TelePresence, a technology similar to video conferencing that delivers a three-dimensional feeling that the participants are all in the same room.

"Cisco is making a brand move to the consumer and the smaller and medium businesses, so that in and of itself would support (the deal)," Chambers said. "But the real play here is this is how technology will enable personalization. This is where the future of technology is going, both in the business world and your home."

A's owner Lew Wolff, who tried unsuccessfully for years to find a suitable site in Oakland for a new stadium, said the Fremont ballpark could have as few as 30,000 seats, making it one of professional baseball's smallest. Wolff said the partnership with Cisco will enable the team to drive higher ticket sales and attract new fans by creating a more intimate fan experience and tapping into the Cisco brand name.

"We're in a world of technological change," Wolff said. "But when I got to Cisco and saw all of the things that could go into a ballpark, (I saw that) it will enhance the fan experience without distracting the fan from what's happening on the field."

But some financial analysts said Cisco could damage its brand if fans experience problems with the technology in such a high-profile setting.

"It's clearly edgy on Cisco's part — more risk, more reward," said Sam Wilson, a communications equipment analyst with JMP Securities LLC. "If the ballpark's phenomenal and the team's a winner, and the technology works, it's a home run for Cisco. But if the team's a loser and the technology doesn't work, it's going to be a strikeout — and Cisco will have egg on its face."

Stadium naming deals also have had a checkered past, with some high-flying companies like Enron and Adelphia going belly-up after buying naming rights and stadiums feeling burned after the dot-com collapse by companies that weren't financially solvent.

Companies also have struggled to measure the return on their investment for such deals.

But William Chipps, a senior editor with IEG Sponsorship Report, which tracks and analyzes corporate sponsorships, said Cisco could directly measure its profits from the deal if clients bought more Cisco products after a visit to the park.

"The fact that Cisco isn't just slapping their name on the venue, they're going beyond that, they're using this is as a product showcase, I see this as making sense," he said.

MartyFan
11-26-2006, 01:27 PM
I was talking to gentleman who is an advisor for the city of Oakland and he was telling me that this thing is not as cut and dry as it appears to be. The A's leaving Oakland is not for sure either.

Maybe he is just spinning but that was from a person who is supposed to be "In the know".

VR
11-26-2006, 01:38 PM
I worked for Lew Wolffe in the early 90's, who owned most of downtown San Jose at the time (now he just owns most of the South Bay). He is a savvy real estate guy who knows where the money is. While he is an avid A's fan, he didn't buy them as a hobby, he bought them to leverage a stadium/ land deal.

And yes, not-so-subtle blackmail may be an angle.

Unassisted
11-26-2006, 01:49 PM
I was talking to gentleman who is an advisor for the city of Oakland and he was telling me that this thing is not as cut and dry as it appears to be. The A's leaving Oakland is not for sure either.

Oakland will need a benefactor with deep pockets to match the offer that's on the table. Unless they plan to drag this situation into the courts. I doubt that MLB lets that happen without bringing in some legal eagles of its own. If that happens, my guess is MLB guarantees them a ml club for the current stadium and sends the city a few $M to fund youth baseball.

Chip R
11-26-2006, 02:02 PM
The pact calls for Cisco to pay $4 million annually over 30 years to brand a new A's stadium in Fremont as Cisco Field. The company is selling 143 acres of Cisco-controlled land to the A's for an undisclosed amount, and the A's will be shouldering up to $500 million in stadium construction costs with a combination of public and private financing.

A's owner Lew Wolff, who tried unsuccessfully for years to find a suitable site in Oakland for a new stadium, said the Fremont ballpark could have as few as 30,000 seats, making it one of professional baseball's smallest. Wolff said the partnership with Cisco will enable the team to drive higher ticket sales and attract new fans by creating a more intimate fan experience and tapping into the Cisco brand name.


I may be thinking small here but that's a lot of money the supposedly cash poor As are shelling out for this place. They bought the land from Cisco and are paying up to $500M for stadium construction costs. and are only getting $120M back in naming rights over 30 years.

Plus if they are going to have only a 30K seat stadium, the most they can draw in a year is 2.4M. I see where they are going to raise ticket prices to offset that but OAK has historically had problems drawing fans when the team was bad - and even when they were good. Billy Beane may not be there forever so you would think that they will eventually have a few lean seasons. I'm not sure what their TV deal is but I can't think it would offset a poor season in attendence.

Heath
11-27-2006, 03:34 PM
There are 38,000+ employees at Cisco according to Hoovers'.

New rules state that to keep their job, employees have to buy one season ticket a year.

It's called a "Payroll deduction". :D

Rojo
11-28-2006, 06:07 PM
Does this Cisco deal feel kinda 90ish to anyone else? Dot.bomb 2.0