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Handofdeath
11-08-2006, 06:48 PM
I work for a library and I'm wondering what everyone has been reading? Any recommendations?

TOBTTReds
11-08-2006, 06:51 PM
Mind Game - Book about how the Red Sox build/built there winning teams lately. Looks it from a statistical view and what Theo and co. were looking for in players. Examines why certain things happen throughout the season. Highly recommended by me for others here. Can help people understand a bit more about baseball. Great use of numbers that aren't hard to understand.

terminator
11-08-2006, 06:53 PM
I just finished reading "Baseball Between the Numbers." It seemed like a good general intro to sabermetrics.

RedsManRick
11-08-2006, 07:33 PM
I'm reading "Reds Legs and Black Sox" right now. It's the 1919 WS story from the perspective of an Edd Roush bio. So far, so good.

Degenerate39
11-08-2006, 07:39 PM
I read a few books during my summer vacation. Juiced by Jose Canseco is good in my opinion. And My Prison Without Bars by Pete Rose was decent. I tried to read Sparky Anderson's book but it was a real snoozer to me.

RedsFanatic
11-08-2006, 07:55 PM
The new Michael Lewis book, The Blind Side, is an excellent read.

Redsland
11-08-2006, 08:02 PM
My last baseball book was "Three Nights in August," by Buzz Bissinger. Author follows Tony LaRussa around for a season, then presents a particular three-game series as a case study in his management approach. Interesting anecdotes, but few real surprises. A good read if you like case studies about baseball games.

My last sports book was "Patriot Reign," by Michael Holley. Author follows Bill Belichick around for a season, and gives a full, behind-the-scenes account of everything from draft day to game-planning to team meetings and in-game adjustments. A must-read for football nuts.

Jr's Boy
11-08-2006, 08:21 PM
''Weaver on strategy,the classic work on the Art of Managing a Baseball Team''.A position by position breakdown on just about every facet of the game.Alot of great insight into running a ball club by one of the greatest skippers ever in baseball,the great Earl Weaver.

Reds Nd2
11-08-2006, 08:34 PM
Has anyone read Built to Win by John Schuerholz? I tried reading it and really wanted to like it, but about a third of the way through I grew tired of some rather snide comments and put the book down. I was curious what others thoughts were.

As far as recommendations, I've read and second the opinions regarding Mind Game and Baseball Between the Numbers. I also recommend The Numbers Game by Alan Schwarz. An interesting look at the early days of baseball stats. Weaver on Strategy is a must read IMO.

George Anderson
11-09-2006, 12:36 AM
I recently read a book about Lou Gehrig called "Luckiest Man " and it was without question one of the best baseball books I have ever read. The thing I found most interesting about the book were the details of the disease and how it slowly took his life, something I never knew about before.

I also read a book about Babe Ruth called the "Big Bam". It was good but not in the must read department like the Gehrig book. It did however have alotta saucy tidbits for example details of an alleged trist between the Babe and Eleanor Gehrig.

I also read Joe Nuxhalls book and recommend it also.

blumj
11-09-2006, 01:45 AM
Halberstam's Belichick book, "Education of a Coach".

RedsBaron
11-09-2006, 07:48 AM
I just finished reading "Baseball Between the Numbers." It seemed like a good general intro to sabermetrics.

Good book. I keep meaning to start a thread to discuss some of the articles in that book.
Earlier this year I read "The Last Coach," a biography of Bear Bryant written by Allen Barra. I recommend it.
Frank DeFord's "The Old Ballgame" is an interesting dual biography of Christy Mathewson and John McGraw, and Rob Neyer's "Big Book Of Baseball Blunders" is a fun read.

dabvu2498
11-09-2006, 09:23 AM
I'm reading an older (1983, I believe) book by Willie Morris called The Courting of Marcus Dupree. It's about the recruitment of the "next Herschel Walker" out of Philadelphia, Mississippi in the fall of 1981. It's part history, part sports book, part sociology, part biography, part geographical sketch. Willie Morris is one of my favorite authors and I can't believe I've never read it before. Highly recommend.

Roy Tucker
11-09-2006, 10:13 AM
It's been out a few years, but I just recently read John Feinstein's "The Last Amateurs". It's a chronicle of the 1999-2000 Patriot League basketball season (Army, Navy, Lafayette, Lehigh, Bucknell, Holy Cross and Colgate).

It's interesting since it's pretty high-level NCAA Div. 1-A hoops, but most of the guys know they won't be going on to the NBA (instead they become stockbrokers and accountants). Well-told, but it got a little long towards the end.

dabvu2498
11-09-2006, 11:44 AM
It's been out a few years, but I just recently read John Feinstein's "The Last Amateurs". It's a chronicle of the 1999-2000 Patriot League basketball season (Army, Navy, Lafayette, Lehigh, Bucknell, Holy Cross and Colgate).

It's interesting since it's pretty high-level NCAA Div. 1-A hoops, but most of the guys know they won't be going on to the NBA (instead they become stockbrokers and accountants). Well-told, but it got a little long towards the end.

Awesome book. Love the story about the Spitler kid from Holy Cross using the fact that he was the worst player on the worst team in the worst conference in D1 college basketball as a pickup line.

Handofdeath
11-09-2006, 05:37 PM
I'm reading an older (1983, I believe) book by Willie Morris called The Courting of Marcus Dupree. It's about the recruitment of the "next Herschel Walker" out of Philadelphia, Mississippi in the fall of 1981. It's part history, part sports book, part sociology, part biography, part geographical sketch. Willie Morris is one of my favorite authors and I can't believe I've never read it before. Highly recommend.

Freakin' Marcus Dupree:bang:

Patpacillosjock
11-12-2006, 01:51 AM
The new Michael Lewis book, The Blind Side, is an excellent read.


agreed..great book

BoydsOfSummer
11-12-2006, 07:50 PM
The Draft--Pete Williams.

Follows the NFL draft process for a year and from the different perspectives of Players, Agents and teams. Billed as the "Moneyball football equivelant". I don't know so much about that, but it's an interesting book and good read.

11BarryLarkin11
11-12-2006, 08:25 PM
Has anyone read Built to Win by John Schuerholz? I tried reading it and really wanted to like it, but about a third of the way through I grew tired of some rather snide comments and put the book down. I was curious what others thoughts were.

As far as recommendations, I've read and second the opinions regarding Mind Game and Baseball Between the Numbers. I also recommend The Numbers Game by Alan Schwarz. An interesting look at the early days of baseball stats. Weaver on Strategy is a must read IMO.

I was also a bit disappointed by the Schuerholz book. There were some interesting nuggets, but he focused too much on the applicability of his leadership style to the business world. I think most would have found it to be much more enjoyable if he were to just give a breakdown of the GM job and the nuts and bolts of running a baseball organization.

I read it months ago, but from my recollection he also misstated the point of Moneyball. He rails against the idea that statistics alone (however, he does utilize them as part of his analysis) can be used to evaluate ballplayers (personally, I tend to doubt that even Billy Beane would advocate to the contrary), while overlooking the main idea of the book. Statistical analysis was a tool used to exploit inefficiencies in the market for baseball players. To me, the idea of baseball players being subject to market forces and the subsequent need to exploit market inefficiencies was the larger idea of the book, while statistical analysis was the tool used to uncover the inefficiences. Both are important concepts, but Schuerholz chose to take up the sword to defend the establishment against the wave of statistical analysis.

But, it was interesting to read how he almost acquired Barry Bonds and how much he hated giving up Dan Meyer in the Tim Hudson trade.

As for recommended reading, I loved the new Hal Chase book. It's called "The Black Prince of Baseball: Hal Chase and the Mythology of the Game". I'd definitely recommend it.

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&EAN=9781894963299&itm=1

LoganBuck
11-12-2006, 10:20 PM
I just read Moneyball, a very entertaining read. I also plan on reading Juiced.

gonelong
11-12-2006, 10:49 PM
I just read Dollar Sign on the Muscle.

<against the grain rant>
Maybe I have been anticipating this for too long, but I was pretty disappointed with it. It was a quick read, but it seemed to me it was 50 pags of solid gold material (REAL SOLID) wrapped up in a 350 pages of old guys grousing about how underappreciated they are, how the new kids don't know anything, and how things were "better" back in their day. Standard grumpy old man fare.

I've been more enteratained at the Barbershop.
</against the grain rant>

GL

jmcclain19
11-13-2006, 02:22 AM
For Baseball - I'll second the Numbers Game by Alan Schwartz. Excellent excellent book. I'm giving away a few copies for Christmas to members of the family who are baseball fans who I know will really enjoy it. I'd never even heard the name Henry Chadwick before, and had no idea how much a part of the history of the game he is.

And I think it would be a mis-statement to think of the book as a "Stats" book. It's more of a Baseball history book, explaining some of baseball's aspects that are so woven into the game we don't even question as to why they exist that way (like why do batters get no ABs for walks?) - there is a fascinating story as to why that exists.

I'd also recommend Jerry Crasnick's License to Deal. Crasnick followed around Dontrelle Willis' agent Matt Sosnick for a year and talks about what goes on. Really fascinating behind the scenes look at agents, specifically how agents deal with draft day, and about how different agent treatment is for minor leaguers than major leaguers. And the whole shady idea of client stealing is apparently incredibly prevalent, The only part I really didn't like in the book, is Crasnick pretty much at times has Sosnick as the protagonist hero and all the other agents are the bad guys. Sosnick is a seemingly nice guy - a regular person trying to enter the cutthroat world of baseball agents, but I'm positive he's not a hero and I'm positive all the others aren't bad guys. But it's really informative about minor league baseball as well as agent/baseball player relations. Has some (unsurprisingly) not nice things to say about Scott Boras et al.

Both books are great off season reads- they were my reading last winter and certainly held me over well.

For general sports – anyone who is a college football fan needs to read Rammer Jammer Yellow Hammer by Warren St. John. I’ll just say it’s absolutely hilarious. It’s about the fans that follow Alabama football every week (the author buys an RV and follows the team around) but you can transcend those stories to just about every major football program in the nation.

westofyou
11-13-2006, 11:58 AM
I just read Dollar Sign on the Muscle.

<against the grain rant>
Maybe I have been anticipating this for too long, but I was pretty disappointed with it. It was a quick read, but it seemed to me it was 50 pags of solid gold material (REAL SOLID) wrapped up in a 350 pages of old guys grousing about how underappreciated they are, how the new kids don't know anything, and how things were "better" back in their day. Standard grumpy old man fare.

I've been more enteratained at the Barbershop.
</against the grain rant>

GL

I agree, but the old guys give you a scouting history symposiam, names, organizations philosophy, etc.. it also has some history cache.

Sometimes the Barbershop gives it in spurts.

--------------------------------------------

I like to mass read baseball books, I usually have a couple going that I swing and out of. Right now I'm reading Red Legs and Black Sox, The Teamates and the Last Nine Inninngs.

The aformentioned Numbers Game is awesome, other good light Basbeall History reads that can't be missed are:

Diamonds in the Rough - Zoss - Bowman

Creating the National Pastime - White

Past Time - Jules Tygial

Handofdeath
11-13-2006, 12:10 PM
Thanks guys. Believe it or not, we have most of the ones suggested already.

dfs
11-13-2006, 12:23 PM
I'm wrapping up Tom Browning's book. It's a fun little read that any reds fan would enjoy. It's kind of a chineese food book in that you read it and 2 hours later you want to read a bit more. It doesn't really stay with you and you've probably read the stories (or stories like them) in countless other jock retrospectives, but it's fun.