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View Full Version : Does J.D. Drew pssibly mean Dunn to Dodgers?



Wheelhouse
11-10-2006, 12:51 AM
...to replace the lefty outfield bat, and the 100 RBIs? Who would you want from L.A. for Dunn (realistically)?

Johnny Footstool
11-10-2006, 01:09 AM
No.

schroomytunes
11-10-2006, 01:42 AM
Well if I was Krivsky I would be on the phone right now with Coletti offering him this deal:

Reds trade: Adam Dunn

Dodgers trade: Andre Ethier(of) and Johnathon Broxton(RP)

The Reds then use the $$$ saved on Dunn to acquire a solid #2 or 3 pitcher like Vincente Padilla, Ted Lilly, or Andy Petitte.

wheels
11-10-2006, 01:56 AM
Actually, if I were Krivsky, I'd be trying to accquire Drew to go along with Dunn.

Talk about a guy that can cover some ground....

schroomytunes
11-10-2006, 02:52 AM
Jd Drew opted out of his contract.....that makes hima FA. But at what cost does he sign for us. he already turned down 3years 33 million. I for one would not offer anything but 4years 36million. Sorry if a repost.

RedLegSuperStar
11-10-2006, 05:47 AM
I'd rather deal with LA Angels.

Billingsley or Broxton would be guys I target

lollipopcurve
11-10-2006, 07:09 AM
I'd want Billingsley, from Defiance, Ohio.

My guess is Drew goes home to Georgia.

wheels
11-10-2006, 08:25 AM
Not that's it got a snowball's chance of happening, but plugging Drew into RF/CF, playing Freel at 2B, with Phillips at SS would make one heck of a lineup.

Freel 2B
Dunn LF
Drew RF/CF when Griffey's out
Encarnacion 3B
Griffey CF
Hatteberg/Votto 1B
Ross C
Phillips SS


Of course an OF consisting of two of the most oft injured players in the game would require a good 4th guy, and Freel would see lots of time out there as well.

Drew's a guy that can fill all of their offensive needs, and he's no slouch defensively.

Of course it's a pie in the sky idea, and the signing would probably prohibit them from accquiring pitching, but a fella can dream.

texasdave
11-10-2006, 08:53 AM
J.D. Drew opting out of his guaranteed 3-year contract worth $33 million dollars simply means that Cincinnati might be wise to sit out the free-agent market this off-season. At the very least they should tread carefully. With the influx of television revenue, overpaying is likely to be a way of life in baseball this winter.

RedsManRick
11-10-2006, 09:01 AM
To me, the real danger in this market isn't giving a JD Drew or Aramis Ramirez 15MM. It's giving Adam Kennedy 5MM. At least those first two will give you some value. There are going to be some very very mediocre players getting nice money, particularly once Soriano and Carlos Lee sign and the market starts to shrink.

texasdave
11-10-2006, 09:14 AM
To me, the real danger in this market isn't giving a JD Drew or Aramis Ramirez 15MM. It's giving Adam Kennedy 5MM. At least those first two will give you some value. There are going to be some very very mediocre players getting nice money, particularly once Soriano and Carlos Lee sign and the market starts to shrink.

Exactly. There are a handful of players that will be worth the money. But what is the likelihood of one of them ending up in Cincinnati? After that handful is gone there is still going to be a lot of clubs with television revenue stuffed in their pockets. And they are going to be feeling the pressure from fans to improve their club. And that is when the overpaying will begin IMO.

toledodan
11-10-2006, 09:51 AM
the tigers overpaid and got to the world series this year. pudge, rogers and jones all got contracts that no one else would match. if the reds want to make some noise they are going to have to open the piggy bank up. i'm not holding my breath!

Johnny Footstool
11-10-2006, 10:00 AM
the tigers overpaid and got to the world series this year. pudge, rogers and jones all got contracts that no one else would match. if the reds want to make some noise they are going to have to open the piggy bank up. i'm not holding my breath!

The Tigers also endured many years of misery and last-place finishes. Their home-grown pitching (Bonderman, Verlander, Zumaya, Rodney, etc.) played a bigger role in their World Series appearance than Pudge, Rogers, and Todd "Ugly Saves" Jones.

Overspending for the sake of overspending gets you guys like Eric Milton.

westofyou
11-10-2006, 10:07 AM
...to replace the lefty outfield bat, and the 100 RBIs? Who would you want from L.A. for Dunn (realistically)?

Who replaces Dunn?

Because what is said about Drew applies to Dunn as well.


"He led the club in RBIs. You just don't snap your fingers and find another player like that," Dodgers general manager Ned Colletti said on a conference call.

Krusty
11-10-2006, 10:10 AM
Well if I was Krivsky I would be on the phone right now with Coletti offering him this deal:

Reds trade: Adam Dunn

Dodgers trade: Andre Ethier(of) and Johnathon Broxton(RP)

The Reds then use the $$$ saved on Dunn to acquire a solid #2 or 3 pitcher like Vincente Padilla, Ted Lilly, or Andy Petitte.


I like that trade proposal.

RedLegSuperStar
11-10-2006, 10:29 AM
I like that trade proposal.

which means it is unlikly to happen.. Broxton is a must for us in the deal but to get Ethier as well wont happen.. LA loves the kid

Strikes Out Looking
11-10-2006, 10:47 AM
Well if I was Krivsky I would be on the phone right now with Coletti offering him this deal:

Reds trade: Adam Dunn

Dodgers trade: Andre Ethier(of) and Johnathon Broxton(RP)

The Reds then use the $$$ saved on Dunn to acquire a solid #2 or 3 pitcher like Vincente Padilla, Ted Lilly, or Andy Petitte.

How about Dunn and Milton for Ethier, Broxton and Lowe? You can then still go after Padilla or Lilly with the same payroll. Of course, you may have to give the Dodgers either dollars or another prospect to take Uncle Milty, but he would probably perform ok in Dodger Stadium.

Johnny Footstool
11-10-2006, 11:34 AM
Andre Ethier put up mediocre numbers in his minor league career, and his post-ASB numbers this season were a boring .277/.337/.429.

I don't understand what's so great about him.

Wheelhouse
11-10-2006, 11:40 AM
Who replaces Dunn?

Because what is said about Drew applies to Dunn as well.

Yes, it's obvious Dunn's production would have to be replaced, hopefully by a player(s) that could add some defense too.

westofyou
11-10-2006, 12:01 PM
Yes, it's obvious Dunn's production would have to be replaced, hopefully by a player(s) that could add some defense too.

LF Defense is equal to the mole on Cindy Crawford's face.

RedLegSuperStar
11-10-2006, 12:15 PM
LF Defense is equal to the mole on Cindy Crawford's face.

that is great.. nuff said!

RedsManRick
11-10-2006, 12:21 PM
I have no idea if Drew would sign here and at what cost. Given his refusal to sign with Philly as a draftee, I'm certainly doubtful. That said, if you could do a Dunn/Bonderman deal and sign Drew to fill his shoes at a similar price, I'd be THRILLED! Yes, Drew has injury issues. But quite frankly, I'm not convinced that a 280 lb Dunn isn't going to start becoming injury prone himself in the very near future.

For those who may not realize it, Drew is a very good offensive player, out OPS'ing Dunn over his career (.286/.393/.512). He's also a GG caliber defender in RF. It also opens up LF for Junior. An outfield of Jr./Deno/Drew goes from being one of the worst to above average. Freel shifts back in to his utility role, giving us a capable 4th OF given Drew's issues.

If you can add Bonderman to the rotation and replace Dunn with Drew, I think we move to legitimate playoff contender status with the only real payroll addition being the (hopeful) extension given to Bonderman

Johnny Footstool
11-10-2006, 12:22 PM
I have no idea if Drew would sign here and at what cost. Given his refusal to sign with Philly as a draftee, I'm certainly doubtful. That said, if you could do a Dunn/Bonderman deal and sign Drew to fill his shoes at a similar price, I'd be THRILLED! Yes, Drew has injury issues. But quite frankly, I'm not convinced that a 280 lb Dunn isn't going to start becoming injury prone himself in the very near future.

For those who may not realize it, Drew is a very good offensive player, out OPS'ing Dunn over his career (.286/.393/.512). He's also a GG caliber defender in RF. It also opens up LF for Junior. An outfield of Jr./Deno/Drew goes from being one of the worst to above average. Freel shifts back in to his utility role, giving us a capable 4th OF given Drew's issues.

If you can add Bonderman to the rotation and replace Dunn with Drew, I think we move to legitimate playoff contender status with the only real payroll addition being the (hopeful) extension given to Bonderman


I agree Drew + Bonderman > Dunn. I'd be happy if the Reds could pull it off.

I just don't think it's realistic.

Cant Touch This
11-10-2006, 12:28 PM
I'd like to see Matt Kemp included in the trade. I can't find his career Minor League stats, but I do have 2005 and 2006 and got to see him play several times here in Las Vegas.

In 2005, he hit .306, 27 HRs, and stole 23 bases (caught 6 times) with 90 RBIs and an OPS of .918. He struck out 92 times and walked 25 times in 418 ABs.

Last year, 2006, he hit .346, only 10 HRs, stole 25 bases (caught 5 times) with 70 RBIs and an OPS of .957. His K total dropped to 64 and BBs increased to 37 in 381 ABs.

He was called up to the Big Club and hit .253 with 7 HRs and 6 SBs in 154 ABs. His OPS with the Dodgers was .737 and he did strike out 53 times.

Still, not terrible numbers for his first 150 ABs in the Majors. I really like his Minor League numbers and was told by the GM of the Dodgers AAA team that Kemp was the best he's seen come through the system.

Defensively, the stats aren't there to support or argue his talents other than he committed only three errors in 2006.

His time in 2005 was spent with AA Jax and he split time in 2006 between AA Jax and AAA Las Vegas. He just turned 22 years old in September. I like his future.

Wheelhouse
11-10-2006, 12:45 PM
LF Defense is equal to the mole on Cindy Crawford's face.

That's well thought out--a ball hit to left field counts less than one hit to center or SS. And frankly, the metaphor supports my point: Cindy Crawford was set apart, and excelled as a model because of the mole on her face.

Johnny Footstool
11-10-2006, 12:49 PM
That's well thought out--a ball hit to left field counts less than one hit to center or SS. And frankly, the metaphor supports my point: Cindy Crawford was set apart, and excelled as a model because of the mole on her face.

I never noticed her mole. I was busy looking at the rest of her.

RedsManRick
11-10-2006, 01:09 PM
I can't find his career Minor League stats

www.thebaseballcube.com is your friend!

pedro
11-10-2006, 01:33 PM
That's well thought out--a ball hit to left field counts less than one hit to center or SS. And frankly, the metaphor supports my point: Cindy Crawford was set apart, and excelled as a model because of the mole on her face.

you're missing the point.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defensive_spectrum

In Sabermetrics, the defensive spectrum is the graphical representation of the positions on a baseball field, arranged from top (the easiest defensive positions) to bottom (the hardest).

The defensive spectrum looks like this:

1. Designated hitter
2. First baseman
3. Left fielder
4. Right fielder
5. Third baseman
6. Center fielder
7. Second baseman
8. Shortstop
9. Catcher
10. Pitcher

Like many original sabermetric concepts, the idea of a defensive spectrum was first introduced by Bill James in his Baseball Abstract series of books during the 1980s. The basic premise of the spectrum is that positions at the bottom end are more difficult than the positions at the top end of the spectrum. Therefore, the positions at the top are easier to fill, since the physical demands are less as you move left along the spectrum. A corollary to this is the fact that, since defensive skill is at less of a premium at the top end, players at those positions must provide more offense than those at the bottom end. Another corollary is that players can generally move from bottom to top along the spectrum successfully during their careers.

[edit] Shifts in the Defensive Spectrum

The defensive spectrum has shifted only once in the 130 year history of baseball. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, third base was generally considered to be more challenging than second base. This was because the double play was relatively uncommon in this period; thus, the third baseman, who had to field hard hit grounders and throw the ball 120 feet to first base, had a far more challenging job than the second baseman, who threw the ball 70 feet at most. The result of this was that there were far more good hitters at second base than third; great-hitting early second baseman include Nap Lajoie and Rogers Hornsby. This defensive spectrum looked something like this:

1. Designated hitter
2. First baseman
3. Left fielder
4. Right fielder
5. Second baseman
6. Center fielder
7. Third baseman
8. Shortstop
9. Catcher
10. Pitcher

However, by the 1920s and 1930s, the defensive spectrum was beginning to shift. Double plays were becoming steadily more common, increasing the defensive responsibilities of second base. Offense was therefore increasingly important at third base. One of the first new third baseman was Harlond Clift of the St. Louis Browns, who was notable as one of the first third baseman to hit 30 home runs. By 1945, second base was firmly established as a more defensively important position than third base.

Highlifeman21
11-12-2006, 03:30 AM
That's well thought out--a ball hit to left field counts less than one hit to center or SS. And frankly, the metaphor supports my point: Cindy Crawford was set apart, and excelled as a model because of the mole on her face.


Clearly Cindy Crawford is/was ugly, and clearly Adam Dunn's defensive woes are the biggest issue facing the Reds from improving as a team.

RedsBaron
11-12-2006, 07:08 AM
I never noticed her mole. I was busy looking at the rest of her.

Cindy Crawford has a mole? I never noticed.;)