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redsmetz
11-15-2006, 07:39 AM
Every now and then I pinch myself when I think about some folks playing for the Reds in the past. It's not much, but it's sort of like, "yeah, they were a Cincinnati Red!" sort of thing. No biggie, but just to revel in the glory of that. These aren't even necessarily the most talented, just some that it's nice to say they were with the Reds.

This is not a complete list and certainly others can add, but these are a few I think of.

Tom Seaver, and not Tom Seaver washed up, but still in his prime. And the battery of Tom Seaver and Johnny Bench, one of the best ever.

Frank Robinson before he was a Triple Crown winner in Baltimore, he was a hot shot rookie and MVP here. And when at the All Star game at some point when they honored past players (I don't think this was the All Century team because I recollect it being 1998) and through some mix-up, Robbie had on a Reds cap. I went nuts! Yes, he was ours first!

Joe Nuxhall It's fun to say a wet behind the ears 15 year old played for our team and worked himself into a frenzy seeing the great Stan Musial on deck while pitching in a real big league game, but then the kid grew up and became a decent pitcher and subsequently a icon for the franchise.

The Big Klu The guy cut his sleeves off for heaven's sake. How cool is that. And he could hit the snot out of the ball. And in today's button down world, such a deviation would never be permitted, but don't you just love those photos of the musclebound Klue holding about a dozen bats???

Jim Thorpe I know, he wasn't much as a baseball and just had a couple of years with the hometown team, but I love that such a historically significant athlete stepped on the field here.

Deion Sanders Again, his overall baseball skills weren't HOF caliber, but wasn't it fun in the uptight Marge Schott era to see Neon Deion as a Cincinnati Red and that he liked it here? And was he ever fast. Didn't he lead the league in steals even with less than a full season playing?

I've got run, but feel free to add your own.

RFS62
11-15-2006, 07:43 AM
And the battery of Tom Seaver and Johnny Bench, one of the best ever.



At the very least, I'd argue that it was the most technically perfect form in all aspects of their defensive game of any battery in history.

Seaver and Bench were wonderful to watch, from a form point of view.

macro
11-15-2006, 10:43 AM
Cesar Cedeno: I rejoiced when the Reds got him before the 1982 season. Also, for what its worth, my favorite baseball glove of all time is my Rawlings Cesar Cedeno model, purchased in 1978.

Buddy Bell: I wanted this guy on our team long before he arrived.

Ken Griffey, Jr: Despite the heavy contract and the disappointments, it's cool that one of the best players in history has worn a Reds uniform.

Dave Parker: He always did look really funny without the beard, though. I loved his 1985 season.

Vida Blue: Oh...wait...never mind. :D

Oh, and redsmetz, I would include Seaver and Sanders on my list, too.

redsupport
11-15-2006, 10:44 AM
Bill Kelso - related tothe great equine hero
Bob Lee- unbelievable fastballer
John Noriega factor in Nicaraguan politics

redsmetz
11-15-2006, 10:45 AM
Cesar Cedeno: I rejoiced when the Reds got him before the 1982 season. Also, for what its worth, my favorite baseball glove of all time is my Rawlings Cesar Cedeno model, purchased in 1978.

Buddy Bell: I wanted this guy on our team long before he arrived.

Ken Griffey, Jr: Despite the heavy contract and the disappointments, it's cool that one of the best players in history has worn a Reds uniform.

Dave Parker: He always did look really funny without the beard, though. I loved his 1985 season.

I had to run take my son to school and that's why I ended, but you add some great ones. And you are correct that it's cool, despite all the disappointments, that Griff has been a Red. And Parker had some good years, albeit on some weak Reds teams. It's not a coincidence that three of the four you name have hometown roots.

westofyou
11-15-2006, 10:50 AM
Woddie Fryman - In 1972 the Tigers were in a tight race in the Al East, in early August they picked Fryman up on waivers and he went 10-3 and completed 6 games.

That's quite the pickup, Fryman didn't play professional ball until he was 25 and was discovered in a league pitching in Kentucky, that's an oldtimey story, the kind that props baseball up. After only 12 minor league games, he started the 1966 season with Pittsburgh and hurled three consecutive shutouts. In his career, he threw four one-hitters.

I thought for sure he'd help the Reds, but I was young and he no longer was and when he bailed I was certainly confused.

macro
11-15-2006, 10:53 AM
It's not a coincidence that three of the four you name have hometown roots.

You know, I didn't even think about that. Seriously.

But now that you mention it, I was really hoping that David Justice would find his way here before his career was over.

Also, what legendary pitcher wore a Reds uniform in Spring Training at the end of his career? Was it Steve Carlton or someone else?

Chip R
11-15-2006, 10:53 AM
Christy Mathewson

redsupport
11-15-2006, 10:55 AM
Woody Fryman and Dale Murrey always together in Reds hearts

macro
11-15-2006, 10:56 AM
Woddie Fryman - In 1972 the Tigers were in a tight race in the Al East, in early August they picked Fryman up on waivers and he went 10-3 and completed 6 games.

That's quite the pickup, Fryman didn't play professional ball until he was 25 and was discovered in a league pitching in Kentucky, that's an oldtimey story, the kind that props baseball up. After only 12 minor league games, he started the 1966 season with Pittsburgh and hurled three consecutive shutouts. In his career, he threw four one-hitters.

I thought for sure he'd help the Reds, but I was young and he no longer was and when he bailed I was certainly confused.

Same here, west. I was bitterly disappointed to see Perez and McEnaney traded, but was excited that Fryman and Dale Murray were coming to the Reds. The trade didn't work out to well, did it? Almost a decade later, Perez was back in a Reds uniform hitting a grand slam and the others had been out of baseball for years.

George Anderson
11-15-2006, 10:59 AM
Woody Fryman and Dale Murrey always together in Reds hearts

No I would say they are no doubt in Reds fans bowels.

redsupport
11-15-2006, 11:06 AM
large or small bowel?

George Anderson
11-15-2006, 11:09 AM
large or small bowel?

Didnt have time to look because I couldnt stand the smell they created.

Reverend Doo-Rag
11-15-2006, 11:29 AM
Also, what legendary pitcher wore a Reds uniform in Spring Training at the end of his career? Was it Steve Carlton or someone else?

Probably Rollie Fingers or Jack Morris.

Patpacillosjock
11-15-2006, 12:15 PM
mike cameron, dimitri young, david wells, paul oneill all had great seasons once they left us.

macro
11-15-2006, 12:15 PM
Ah, yes. I must be thinking of Jack Morris. And I don't remember the deal with Rollie Fingers. Was he in ST or just rumored to the Reds by trade or FA?

ashland_red
11-15-2006, 12:31 PM
To add to the list of those it's fun to think they played for the Reds.

Frank Viola and his 3 starts in 95.

redsupport
11-15-2006, 12:35 PM
jerry reuss
kent tekulve
camilio pascual

dabvu2498
11-15-2006, 12:46 PM
Ron Gant

shredda2000
11-15-2006, 01:17 PM
Kevin Mitchell (don't know why)

Reverend Doo-Rag
11-15-2006, 01:22 PM
Billy Martin
Don Newcomb
Mario Soto
Brad Lesley
Don Zimmer
Vida Revering
The Roses, the Bells, and the Boones
Ernie Lombardi
Ewell Blackwell

macro
11-15-2006, 01:29 PM
Billy Martin, Kevin Mitchell, Jerry Reuss, and Kent Tekulve are all excellent choices.

westofyou
11-15-2006, 01:30 PM
Billy Martin


Billy gave the Reds his best.

http://baseballminutia.com/blog/2006/05/22/37/



“We had picked up Billy Martin in the off season and I loved him. He had the Napoleon complex so many little guys have and he always seemed to be in a fight. Someone always wanted to knock him down and he’d always retaliate.”

Jim O’Toole

May 15th - Phillies vs. Reds. Reds pitcher Raul Sanchez hits three Phillie batters in a row, the third being 6’9” Gene Conley. In a fit of rage rookie Phillie manager Gene Mauch rushes Sanchez on the mound starting a fight between the two teams. In a “peacekeeper” role Martin gets popped in the face by Conley.


“I was holding back Mauch and Conley belted me. But I got Conley too. I had to jump up to hit him. Fighting him is like fighting a two story building.”

Billy Martin.

For his trouble Martin hurt his hand and missed two weeks.

Mauch was fined $100 by NL President Warren Giles.

Martins hitting mojo was never fully charged and as the decade matured his bat wilted. A contact hitter with both low strikeouts and walk totals Martins stay in Cincinnati was highlighted by his last year with a .300 plus on base percentage.

August 5th - The one-year anniversary of Martin getting beaned in the face as a Cleveland Indian by Senator pitcher Tex Clevenger’s fastball, Martin had seven facial bones broken, but declared it an accident and forgave Clevenger for the incident. On the anniversary the Reds are in Chicago playing the Cubs and the Senators are also in town to take on the White Sox in the evening.

Several of the Senator players visited the Reds clubhouse prior to the contest and engaged Billy Martin in a conversation, Billy felt that he was being crowded in the National League (The Dodgers in retaliation for a Roger Craig collision had beaned Vada Pinson three times since the incident causing the Reds to be somewhat on edge.) According Senator pitcher Hal Woodeshick Martin was “fed up with getting knocked on his ass every time up.” And then he swore, “Someone’s going to pay.”

On the mound that day for the Cubs was 22-year-old Jim Brewer, a rookie making his fourth start of his career. After walking Martin to lead off the game Brewer gave up 3 hits and allowed 2 runs. In the second inning he got two quick outs and Martin stepped to the plate. The first pitch was high and tight and Martin acted as if he had been struck in the helmet and took off for first, the ruse didn’t take and he was ordered back into the box. Brewer threw the 1-0 pitch and Martin took a half swing and his bat skittered out towards the mound landing ten feet to the right of the rubber.

Martin said it “Slipped” from there he walked out to the mound to retrieve his bat. In his hearing with Warren Giles he claimed that Brewer was “mouthing off and that if he had kept his mouth shut nothing would have happened. Brewer admitted he asked if Martin wanted to fight. Martin’s reply was “No, I’m out here to get my bat, kid.”

It was then that Martin attacked Brewer with a surprise right, fracturing his cheekbone and orbital, starting a general ruckus that featured an angry Brewer stalking the field with a broken bat in his hand.In the aftermath it was obvious the culture of the game was going to point to the pitcher vs. the hitter aspect of this fight. The Sporting News ran stories about Martins 1959 beaning, and even printed a letter to the editor about “The Carl May’s Pitch” from former Major Leaguer Dummy Hoy. The general consensus was that the batter was at the mercy of the headhunters.

Martin gave his final word on the matter,
“Nobody, and I mean nobody is going to throw at my head, they can hit me anyplace else, but not in the head.”

When a man has a history of violence, as well as a history of being beaned what to you use as your basis for your ruling on the matter?

This is the sort of thing that Giles had to ponder, even despite current Reds GM Gabe Paul’s assertion that “Its pretty difficult to figure the thinking processes of a man who has been hit in the jaw by a pitched ball.”


“We can’t have batters charging the mound every time they think the pitcher has thrown at them.”

Warren Giles

After hear both sides, Giles levied a $500 fine and a 5 game suspension for the infraction.

In the aftermath two opposing camps arose, those who felt the penalty was too lenient and those who felt it was not warranted due to the nature of the altercation, that being a pitcher - batter confrontation.

On the side of Giles was too harsh was Reds slugger Frank Robinson.


“Giles ruling should make Don Drysdale very happy.” At the time Drysdale led the National League in hit batsmen with ten.

dabvu2498
11-15-2006, 01:34 PM
Benito Santiago... x2

redsmetz
11-15-2006, 01:46 PM
Ah, yes. I must be thinking of Jack Morris. And I don't remember the deal with Rollie Fingers. Was he in ST or just rumored to the Reds by trade or FA?

The Reds were talking to Fingers about coming over, but we wouldn't rescind the stupid facial hair ban and he said no, not wanting to eliminate his trademark handlebar moustache. Still a shame.

The reminds me of another though - Greg Vaughn.

DonutBoy
11-15-2006, 01:47 PM
Need some love for Lee Smith, he being the all time saves leader until this year...

Speaking of Jerry Reuss- one of my most favorite Reds moments at the ol' ballyard. Reuss was absolutely HORRID for the Reds. It was probably in one of his last starts and I went to a game with my brother. We were probably in the blue seats with very few people there and the Reds were actually getting stomped. I don't remember the exact scenario, but Reuss had probably walked in a run or something and someone from up in the green or red seats yelled "PUT HIM ON THE F**KING BUS!"

Think Sam Kinison and you'll get an idea how loud it was :D

redsupport
11-15-2006, 01:49 PM
Dave Tomlin was superior

redsmetz
11-15-2006, 01:57 PM
Some have mentioned some of these folks, but the Reds have had five Cy Young Award winnners pitch for them some time in their careers, including one who got his start with us before getting away. And they've never had their own though.

Don Newcombe
Mike Cuellar (debuted with us)
Tom Seaver (IMO, Tom should have won in 1981 with the Reds)
John Denny
Frank Viola

We could have had two more with Vida Blue and Rollie Fingers, but alas that didn't happen.

dabvu2498
11-15-2006, 01:59 PM
Bill Gullickson

Chip R
11-15-2006, 02:01 PM
Billy Martin, Kevin Mitchell, Jerry Reuss, and Kent Tekulve are all excellent choices.


Billy once kept Nuxie from attacking an umpire.

dabvu2498
11-15-2006, 02:04 PM
Leon Durham

Patpacillosjock
11-15-2006, 02:05 PM
LMAO this is a great thread..i had forgotten about so many 90's reds players like Gant, Mitchell, Santiago, and Viola.

Greg Vaughn was another one..reggie sanders was the next "eric davis"

dabvu2498
11-15-2006, 02:09 PM
reggie sanders was the next "eric davis"

And Candy Sierra was the next Howie Nunn.

Patpacillosjock
11-15-2006, 02:10 PM
TiM Belcher, Juan Samuel, Jeff Reardon, Tony Fernandez, Jerome Walton, Vince Coleman, Ruben Sierra, Steve Avery, Denny Neagle, Dante Bichette, and one of my favorites: todd walker

Handofdeath
11-15-2006, 03:13 PM
Juan Encarnacion should be playing RF for the Reds right now.

Reverend Doo-Rag
11-15-2006, 03:58 PM
Clint Hurdle
Skeeter Barnes
Rolando Roomes
Babe Herman
Wally Post
Leo Durocher
Bip Roberts
Vince Coleman
Chris Sabo

redsmetz
11-15-2006, 04:27 PM
I mentiond Cy Young winners who've played for the Reds at some point, but we also have had nine different players who won the MVP award as a Red, plus nine others who won the award and played for the Reds at some point in their careers (plus one who won it with us, then won it again elsewhere).

The Reds MVP's have been

Ernie Lombardi 1938
Bucky Walters 1939
Frank McCormick 1940
Frank Robinson 1961 (also won with Baltimore)
Johnny Bench 1970 & 1972
Pete Rose 1973
Joe Morgan 1975 & 1976
George Foster 1977
Barry Larkin 1995

The others who have won and played for the Reds at some point are

Bob O'Farrell
Jim Bottomley
Jake Daubert
Jim Konstanty (started with the Reds)
Hank Sauer (started with the Reds)
Dave Parker
Kevin Mitchell
Terry Pendleton
Ken Griffey Jr.

Granted some of these players had but just a cup of coffee with the Reds, but they'd still make the list.

redsupport
11-15-2006, 04:32 PM
claude osteen

DannyB
11-15-2006, 05:15 PM
Tony Fernandez had a good year with us.I liked that guy even though he had an attitude similar to Rich Aurelias

Puffy
11-15-2006, 05:43 PM
I mentiond Cy Young winners who've played for the Reds at some point, but we also have had nine different players who won the MVP award as a Red, plus nine others who won the award and played for the Reds at some point in their careers (plus one who won it with us, then won it again elsewhere).

The Reds MVP's have been

Ernie Lombardi 1938
Bucky Walters 1939
Frank McCormick 1940
Frank Robinson 1961 (also won with Baltimore)
Johnny Bench 1970 & 1972
Pete Rose 1973
Joe Morgan 1975 & 1976
George Foster 1977
Barry Larkin 1995

The others who have won and played for the Reds at some point are

Bob O'Farrell
Jim Bottomley
Jake Daubert
Jim Konstanty (started with the Reds)
Hank Sauer (started with the Reds)
Dave Parker
Kevin Mitchell
Terry Pendleton

Granted some of these players had but just a cup of coffee with the Reds, but they'd still make the list.

You forgot Griffey. He won in 97

Puffy
11-15-2006, 05:45 PM
Taylor Douthit
Danny Tartabull, Jeff Montogomery and Trevor Hoffman (all Reds minor leaguers)
Noodles Hahn
Cesar Cedeno
Jim Coombs

Patpacillosjock
11-15-2006, 06:34 PM
Taylor Douthit
Danny Tartabull, Jeff Montogomery and Trevor Hoffman (all Reds minor leaguers)
Noodles Hahn
Cesar Cedeno
Jim Coombs


im surprised nobody has mentioned John Franco

redsmetz
11-15-2006, 08:37 PM
You forgot Griffey. He won in 97

I only forgot to type him. He was on my handwritten list, but I omitted him. I'll correct it. Thanks.

crazybob60
11-16-2006, 11:59 AM
im surprised nobody has mentioned John Franco

I am surprised nobody has mentioned Charlie Leibrandt...

I will think of some more here in a second....

crazybob60
11-16-2006, 12:10 PM
Ok....here's some others...

Jeff Russell

Current Indians pitching coach Carl Willis

I love that Paul O'Neill got his start here and then was just so instrumental in the Yankee run of success in the late 90's and early 00's. I just wonder if he wouldn't have been on those teams if they would have been as successful as they were because from what I have seen/heard, I heard he had a lot of influence in that clubhouse, wonder if he would have stuck around Cincinnati if things would have been different and the 1990 team could have been duplicated.....just dreamin' now.

Kurt Stillwell was always a favorite of mine and I was actually very upset when they decided to keep the hometown boy Barry Larkin over Kurt Stillwell not knowing what the future held in store for us.

And how bout some managers that have gone on to do some things like Terry Francona and Lloyd McClendon?

And I think Jeff Montgomery actually played in some big league games for the Reds, not just minor league games....



Also, can anybody tell me how Brad Lesley got his nickname "The Animal"?

Highlifeman21
11-16-2006, 12:15 PM
Juan Guzman
Russell Branyan
David Wells

Patrick Bateman
11-16-2006, 12:25 PM
BJ Ryan and Greg Vaughn

crazybob60
11-16-2006, 12:28 PM
Also, how bout those closers we had there in the 90's with Lee Smith, Jeff Reardon, Jeff Brantley, Jeff Shaw, Scott Williamson, etc....(sorry I just can't bring myself to type Danny Graves)

redsupport
11-16-2006, 12:29 PM
Ben Hayes
Geoff Combs
Joe Edelen were all premier closers

Praying Colonel
11-16-2006, 03:23 PM
Ross Grimsley
Hal McRae
Tom Hall (loved his nickname, "The Blade")
Charlie Leibrandt

Spitball
11-16-2006, 03:33 PM
Has anyone mentioned Mario Soto?

How about Rolando Roomes, Allen Knicely, Hal McRea, Hal King, Nick Esasky and Billy Doran?

redsmetz
11-16-2006, 03:37 PM
Has anyone mentioned Mario Soto?

How about Rolando Roomes, Allen Knicely, Hal McRea, Hal King, Nick Esasky and Billy Doran?

I'm sure WOY or someone can address this, but I think Mario Soto is probably one of the best pitchers the Reds ever had and he played on some very mediocre teams. I often wonder what he would have been like if he'd have played for us ten years or so earlier.

And Jose Rijo is another who is such a delight to remember him as a Red - even his failed comeback. What a tenacious competitor.

DannyB
11-16-2006, 10:09 PM
How about Danny Jackson?

westofyou
11-16-2006, 10:20 PM
I'm sure WOY or someone can address this, but I think Mario Soto is probably one of the best pitchers the Reds ever had and he played on some very mediocre teams. I often wonder what he would have been like if he'd have played for us ten years or so earlier.

And Jose Rijo is another who is such a delight to remember him as a Red - even his failed comeback. What a tenacious competitor.

Since Ewell Blackwell was traded the Reds have only had 5 pitchers lead the team in WS in a season.

Ted Abernathy 1967, Soto twice in the 80's Jose Rijo in 1993, Jeff Shaw in 1997 and Bronson Arroyo this year.

LINEDRIVER
11-16-2006, 10:32 PM
Curt Flood managed just 4 AB's in a total of 8 games with the Reds in 1956 & 1957.

In 1958, the 20-year-old Flood took over CF for the Cardinals, a job he would keep with St. Louis for 12 seasons. Flood would go on to win a total of 7 Gold Gloves, all coming consecutively from 1963-1969. He batted over .300 six times and led the NL with 211 hits in 1964.

redsupport
11-16-2006, 10:32 PM
Did Jeff kaiser ever lead the Reds, oops I meant Jeff Austin, sorry I meant Chris Bushing

Patpacillosjock
11-16-2006, 11:58 PM
How about Danny Jackson?


jack armstrong's 12-0 record at the all star break was quite memorabl for me for some reason.

redsupport
11-17-2006, 12:16 AM
Pat Pacillo was the best, oops I mean Scott Scudder, sorry I meant Bob Buchanon, no I meant Marcus Moore, or Ron Robinson or Scott Service, I guess alliteration is the theme

redsmetz
11-17-2006, 07:37 AM
How about Danny Jackson?

Jackson's 1988 was superb and he finished 2nd in the CYA voting behind Hershiser. I think that is the season Hershiser had the consecutive shutout innings. They finished with identical records, Orel had the better ERA, slightly higher K's and even had a save (which is surely what doomed Danny).

dabvu2498
11-17-2006, 08:30 AM
This guy:
http://mlb.mlb.com/images/2003/06/24/GpJp4iAr.jpg

macro
11-17-2006, 11:14 AM
jack armstrong's 12-0 record at the all star break was quite memorabl for me for some reason.

It wasn't memorable enough, because Armstrong was 11-3 at the All Star break that year. :) He went 1-6 after the break to finish 12-9. He had begun that 1990 season at 8-1.

Patpacillosjock
11-17-2006, 11:37 AM
It wasn't memorable enough, because Armstrong was 11-3 at the All Star break that year. :) He went 1-6 after the break to finish 12-9. He had begun that 1990 season at 8-1.


lol me = pwned.

LINEDRIVER
11-17-2006, 11:32 PM
jack armstrong's 12-0 record at the all star break was quite memorabl for me for some reason.

Are you really thinking of Wayne Simpson's 13-1 record at the 1970 All-Star break???

gm
11-18-2006, 02:57 PM
No one has mentioned Thug Life? (I can't even remember the dude's name anymore, but that nickname is a RZ legend...)

Reverend Doo-Rag
11-19-2006, 09:23 AM
No one has mentioned Thug Life? (I can't even remember the dude's name anymore, but that nickname is a RZ legend...)

Tim Hummel?

Patpacillosjock
11-19-2006, 12:29 PM
Tim Hummel?

why was he called thug life?