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chicoruiz
11-17-2006, 08:18 PM
Pretty much everyone knows that the language of baseball is a constantly changing thing: "baseball" was two words for quite a while, fans were once called "cranks", etc. But I was wondering if there are any baseball terms that you remember from your childhood that have faded from general use in recent years.

I personally can't think of too many. I don't think bases are called "sacks" very often any more. Fans still root, but whrn I was a kid they were often called "rooters"; not so much now. And I may be wrong, but I think the terms "keystone" and "hot corner" for second and third base have pretty much faded out.

There have to be better examples than those. Anybody got one?

Chip R
11-17-2006, 11:32 PM
Nobody really uses the term "Battery" for a pitcher and catcher anymore. I think people still use "the hot corner" though.

I might have mentioned once or twice on here that I play vintage base ball. ;) We play by 1860s rules and use the jargon that was used back then. For example:

Daisy cutter = ground ball
Hands = outs
(also used in a phrase with the word dead as in "two hands dead" meaning 2 outs)
Grounds = ball park
Leg it! = Run!
Striker = batter
Show some ginger = play harder and/or smarter
Whitewash = scoreless inning
Make your first (second, third) = single (double, triple)
Striker to the line = batter up
Sand = fortitude i.e. guts
Willow = bat
Match = game

mth123
11-17-2006, 11:38 PM
Baltimore chop, texas leaguer, frozen rope, can of corn. Don't hear these much either.

BCubb2003
11-17-2006, 11:50 PM
the pennant

TOBTTReds
11-17-2006, 11:55 PM
the pennant

Not since 1995

PressBox
11-18-2006, 12:05 AM
chicken dance / chicken hop = foul ball

max venable
11-18-2006, 12:13 AM
Can we submin ones we wish would fade?

I'll start with this one: "Hi, hello, and welcome..."

Feel free to make your own contribution ;)

Ravenlord
11-18-2006, 12:16 AM
Willow = bat
so does that mean bats were originally made of willow trees?

Chip R
11-18-2006, 12:19 AM
so does that mean bats were originally made of willow trees?


Well, I suppose when they just started they used whatever was available but by the time the game got organized, willow was the popular choice.

WMR
11-18-2006, 12:21 AM
"Hard hit ball, it'll stay in the park though..."

Ravenlord
11-18-2006, 12:22 AM
Well, I suppose when they just started they used whatever was available but by the time the game got organized, willow was the popular choice.

now this fascinates me...how would/does willow compare to pine, maple, and bamboo for its ballistics? i imagine it would be a bit on the heavy side, but it should have a bit more spring to it...

Far East
11-18-2006, 12:28 AM
Who's the hitter in the lineup who folows the on deck hitter?

I'm terrible at discerning lyrics by listening to a song, so I might be wrong about what I think I heard as a youth in this case also, but if memory serves, the next hitter is in the "hold."

Not in the "hole" as I hear younger fans say. I'm too lazy to research it, but it seems that long ago I heard a sportscaster explain that "on deck" and "in the hold" was originally borrowed from names for parts of a ship -- the hold obviously being a step down from the deck.

max venable
11-18-2006, 09:45 AM
"And it's gonna beeeeeeee.....GONE!"

Yachtzee
11-18-2006, 10:55 AM
Rhubarb

RedsBaron
11-18-2006, 11:48 AM
I haven't heard "...and this one belongs to the Reds" quite as often as I would prefer in recent years.

StillFunkyB
11-18-2006, 12:14 PM
I haven't heard "...and this one belongs to the Reds" quite as often as I would prefer in recent years.

I'll add "Rounding third, and heading for home." to that as well. Gonna miss Joe.

Out of all the Grande-isms, the "Dunn and gone" line the one the really annoys me.

I was gonna say "frozen rope" but it was already mentioned.

Another one that annoys me is "duck snort".

Jr's Boy
11-18-2006, 12:48 PM
''A Texas Leaguer''-a bloop single.

Spitball
11-18-2006, 03:35 PM
"Bush league" or simply "bush" refered to a behavior or act on the baseball field not considered worthy of a class individual. Now, I guess anything goes.

"Dead fish" was a curve that didn't break or a grooved fastball.

"Caught in a pickle" was a runner caught in a rundown. Also, a game we used to play between two bases. The runner usually ran to exhaustion before anyone ever tagged him out, though.

Gallen5862
11-18-2006, 03:39 PM
I havent heard " 1,2, or 3 Ducks on the Pond" lately which referred to the number of Runners on Base.

westofyou
11-18-2006, 03:41 PM
Back in the 1880's a shutout was called being "Chicagoed" or one might say, how many Chicagos were there this season?

Mostly because Chicago had the most shutouts in the NL and the most boastful press (Hence "Windy City")

mth123
11-18-2006, 03:46 PM
"Bush league" or simply "bush" refered to a behavior or act on the baseball field not considered worthy of a class individual. Now, I guess anything goes.

"Dead fish" was a curve that didn't break or a grooved fastball.

"Caught in a pickle" was a runner caught in a rundown. Also, a game we used to play between two bases. The runner usually ran to exhaustion before anyone ever tagged him out, though.

Those are good ones. I shouldn't have forgotten them in my post.

vaticanplum
11-18-2006, 03:50 PM
Mostly because Chicago had the most shutouts in the NL and the most boastful press (Hence "Windy City")

I applaud you for knowing this. Most people think it is a literal weather-related term; it actually came from the "windbags" of the city trying to prove Chicago's worldliness, particularly when they were trying to receive rights to the World's Fair.

gm
11-18-2006, 03:51 PM
"Smiling side of the scoreboard"

(can that truly be classified a 'baseball term' if only one announcer ever uses it?)

"In the catbird seat..." Vin Scully might still pull that one out, occasionally

reds44
11-19-2006, 03:56 PM
"And this one belongs to the Reds"

:(

RANDY IN INDY
11-19-2006, 10:07 PM
Twi-night double header
Uncle Charley or Lord Charles - a good curve ball
"And there goes another one into Burgerville"- Waite Hoyte calling a homer into the right field bleachers at Crosley Field.
In the "catbird seat" - In a favorable situation
Bonus Baby
Mustard - velocity
gopher ball
tater
five-o-clock hitter
horsehide

And how about this one. Anybody know what a "Figger Filbert" is?;)

Falls City Beer
11-19-2006, 10:08 PM
No one talks about playing pepper much anymore.

RFS62
11-19-2006, 10:39 PM
And how about this one. Anybody know what a "Figger Filbert" is?;)



Well, we have a bunch of them here on RedsZone.

Yachtzee
11-20-2006, 02:43 AM
No one talks about playing pepper much anymore.

Blame the faschists who started posting those "No Pepper" signs around ballparks in the days before that space on the wall was taken by backstop advertising boards.

cincyinco
11-20-2006, 04:46 AM
55 footer
dying quail
through the wicket
shoot the cripple
matchsticks
"hey blue"
Banjo hitter

and as a catcher i always liked "tools of ignorance"

RANDY IN INDY
11-20-2006, 08:01 AM
No one talks about playing pepper much anymore.

I hang around a lot of baseball fields and pepper is alive and well.

Wheelhouse
11-20-2006, 01:43 PM
Back in the 1880's a shutout was called being "Chicagoed" or one might say, how many Chicagos were there this season?

Mostly because Chicago had the most shutouts in the NL and the most boastful press (Hence "Windy City")

You may be joking, but I thought windy city is from the vicious wind that comes off the lake...

dabvu2498
11-20-2006, 01:54 PM
I applaud you for knowing this. Most people think it is a literal weather-related term; it actually came from the "windbags" of the city trying to prove Chicago's worldliness, particularly when they were trying to receive rights to the World's Fair.


You may be joking, but I thought windy city is from the vicious wind that comes off the lake...

Actually, the term was originated by the Cincinnati newspapers, decrying the "bluster" of the Chi-town press. At least some of it had to do with the rivalry between the baseball clubs of the two cities.

From Wikipedia:


The first known citations of "Windy City" are three from 1876, and all involve Cincinnati:

Cincinnati Enquirer, May 9, 1876 headline: "THAT WINDY CITY. Some Freaks of the Last Chicago Tornado."

Cincinnati Enquirer, May 13, 1876: "Only the plucky nerve of the eating-house keeper rescued the useful seats from a journey to the Windy City."

Chicago Tribune, July 2, 1876: "The Cincinnati Enquirer, in common with many other papers, has been waiting with great anxiety for the fulfillment of its prophecy: that the Chicago papers would call the Whites hard names when they lost. Witness these scraps the day after the Whites lost to the Athletics: There comes a wail to us from the Windy City."

For the Cincinnati papers, "Windy City" had meant a Chicago that was full of bluster.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windy_City%2C_Origin_of_Name_%28Chicago%29

vaticanplum
11-20-2006, 08:20 PM
You may be joking, but I thought windy city is from the vicious wind that comes off the lake...

No, dabvu is right. It may have originated in the Cincinnati papers, but I think it was picked up on and popularized by the New York press when the chicago "windbags" were in NYC to campaign for the World's Fair.

What you think is what everybody thinks. And it's conveniently accurate, but it's not where the nickname originated.

What does playing pepper mean?

RFS62
11-20-2006, 08:26 PM
What does playing pepper mean?



Pepper is a fantastic game with one hitter and several fielders standing just a few feet away. You toss the ball to the hitter, and he hits a sharp grounder or line drive back to the fielders. The hitter isn't trying to kill the ball, just make sharp contact. It's the best drill in the world for fast reflexes for the fielders and hand-eye coordination of the hitter.

Depending on the skill level of the players, it can get pretty fast and aggressive. Good players can control the ball and create some great "rallys", for lack of a better term.

I've played countless hours of pepper back in the day. May be the best overall baseball drill ever.

Crosley68
11-20-2006, 11:26 PM
I thought it WAS "in the hole". I thought it refered to being down the steps to the clubhouse.

Falls City Beer
11-20-2006, 11:28 PM
I hang around a lot of baseball fields and pepper is alive and well.

They play it all the time in little league up through high school still. But I guess I was thinking MLB, like pre-game announcers mentioning it and stuff.

RFS62
11-21-2006, 12:06 AM
They play it all the time in little league up through high school still. But I guess I was thinking MLB, like pre-game announcers mentioning it and stuff.



It used to be banned in mlb parks. You used to see "No Pepper" signs on the walls, but I can't remember the last time I saw one.

Probably because a stray linedrive could go into the stands.

vaticanplum
11-21-2006, 12:09 AM
I swear I've never heard of this playing pepper. It sounds pretty rad, kind of like Zip Zap Zoom. I'd like to see it.

Johnny Footstool
11-21-2006, 12:44 AM
No one throws a "scroogie" or a "trouble ball" anymore.

Pete Rose used to call good fielders "Wilson Pickett".

Homers are rarely referred to as "big flies" these days.



"Bush league" or simply "bush" refered to a behavior or act on the baseball field not considered worthy of a class individual. Now, I guess anything goes.

"Dead fish" was a curve that didn't break or a grooved fastball.

"Caught in a pickle" was a runner caught in a rundown. Also, a game we used to play between two bases. The runner usually ran to exhaustion before anyone ever tagged him out, though.

I thought a dead fish was a change up, a la Mario Soto.

I do hear "bush league" being used by softball players sometimes.

cincinnati chili
11-21-2006, 12:49 AM
"Boner"

As in Fred Merkle displayed a huge boner in the 1908 Series.

cincinnati chili
11-21-2006, 12:53 AM
Edit.

I just remembered, he didn't sport the boner IN the world series. It was in the tie-breaker to get IN the world series.

Thus, that sentence should read,

The Giants didn't get into the World Series, due to Merkle's massive boner.

Johnny Footstool
11-21-2006, 01:10 AM
Huh huh. You said "boner".

http://www.membrana.ru/images/articles/1055255898-1.jpeg

BuckWoody
11-21-2006, 09:39 AM
Another that Joe would use every now and again was to describe someone who was thowing some serious cheese (throwing very hard). Joe would say he had some "hemp" on that ball. :D

"Cheese" might be another one although I still hear it now and then.
"Yacker" for a curveball.
"Punch and Judy" or just "Judy" for a light slap hitter.

RANDY IN INDY
11-21-2006, 10:33 AM
I do hear "bush league" being used by softball players sometimes.

Probably because a lot of the "beer league" variety are exactly that!;)

Johnny Footstool
11-21-2006, 10:41 AM
Probably because a lot of the "beer league" variety are exactly that!;)

True. They might just be referring to what they're drinking -- "That's Busch."

westofyou
11-21-2006, 11:14 AM
I swear I've never heard of this playing pepper. It sounds pretty rad, kind of like Zip Zap Zoom. I'd like to see it.

Here's a picture of the barnstormers "The House of David" playing pepper in the 30's


http://www.maryscityofdavid.org/assets/images/PeppergameS.JPG

RANDY IN INDY
11-21-2006, 11:18 AM
There's a term not used much anymore. Barnstormers

RFS62
11-21-2006, 12:02 PM
Here's what Willie Mays had to say about playing pepper...

"Do you know anything about pepper? When the guy throws the ball and there's three or four guys playing around? We used to do that every day in spring training. And fans would come to the ball park like 11 o'clock, just to see that show. It would be three of us. It would be Hank Thompson, Monty Irvin and myself, and Leo would be the hitter. And every time we hit, we got to pay five dollars or miss a ball. And he was standing right there. He was standing on top of us. I mean he would hit it hard, and he could never get me, and it would make him so mad, because I would catch everything that came close to me. So one day he hit, and he hit it off the top of my knee. And Mr. Stoneham was watching in the stands over there, and I didn't know this. So now the guy comes out and he says, "Phone call for Mr. Durocher." And Mr. Stoneham called Leo and said, "Wait a minute. You may play pepper, and pepper is fine, but if you hurt his knee he can't play! What am I going to do then?" He says, "I don't want you doing that." So now Leo started bunting -- hitting the ball easy to me -- and then hitting the ball hard to the other two guys. And I'm wondering , "Why is he hitting it so easy to me now?" So he told me later, "I can't hit it hard to you anymore." I said, "Well why play pepper then, if you can't hit it hard?" So, they babied me a little bit. It was fun."

http://www.achievement.org/autodoc/page/may0int-5

Falls City Beer
11-21-2006, 12:52 PM
One of my favorite Marty-isms is when he refers to a home run as a "dong."

He doesn't do that nearly enough.

Cedric
11-21-2006, 12:56 PM
My Babe Ruth league coached forced us to play pepper every practice. Great game for hand eye coordination.

redsupport
11-21-2006, 12:57 PM
chin music

Johnny Footstool
11-21-2006, 01:01 PM
My Babe Ruth league coached forced us to play pepper every practice. Great game for hand eye coordination.

We used to play pepper with a tennis ball so that no one would get hurt.

RFS62
11-21-2006, 01:02 PM
We used to play pepper with a tennis ball so that no one would get hurt.


Dear Lord....

The terrorists have finally won.

Ltlabner
11-21-2006, 01:07 PM
We used to play pepper with a tennis ball so that no one would get hurt.

Did you wear helmets and kneepads too? :rolleyes:

Team Clark
11-21-2006, 01:25 PM
Change of Pace, A Wrinkle, In-Shoot, Out-Shoot are some of my faves.

One got through the "wickets" is a golden oldie.

I have not heard "tweener" in quite some time either.

I will always miss Harry Caray's "It Might be...It could be.... IT IS!!! A HOME RUN! HOLY COW!!". Thanks for keeping me tuned to WGN during my Teens Harry.

redsupport
11-21-2006, 01:26 PM
yakker, uncle charlie, hum that seed

RFS62
11-21-2006, 01:29 PM
We want a pitcher, not a belly-itcher

Johnny Footstool
11-21-2006, 01:33 PM
Did you wear helmets and kneepads too? :rolleyes:

The coaches babied us at practice. Liability issues and all that.

We'd play "500" in the street after practice and get pretty bruised and bloody.

gm
11-22-2006, 12:55 AM
We want a pitcher, not a belly-itcher

"Pitcher's got a rubber nose. Wiggles every time he throws!"

Infield chatterboxes, talk about a vanishing breed

"Heya batter-batter-batter...SuWING!"

RANDY IN INDY
11-22-2006, 10:44 AM
Dear Lord....

The terrorists have finally won.

:laugh: :lol: :laugh:

RANDY IN INDY
11-22-2006, 10:52 AM
"Break out Ol' Ben," when a pitcher is starting to lose it.

Speaking of chatter and 'terrorists," as RFS62 put it, we always try to keep our kids chattering to keep their heads in the game. Not the "Hey batter batter" stuff, but encouragement type chatter. This summer, at a tournament, we had the parents of another team come to our dugout to ask if we could have our kids be quiet because it was affecting their teams' ability to concentrate and upsetting their kids. I looked at the lady and said, "You're kidding aren't you?" She told me that she wasn't and that they thought it was terribly rude and that if we didn't stop, they would lodge a formal complaint with the tournament directors to have us kicked out of the tournament. Our reply was, "Do what you have to do." Nothing ever became of it, but they were hopping mad and rolling their eyes the rest of the game. I found it kind of funny,

westofyou
11-22-2006, 10:56 AM
She told me that she wasn't and that they thought it was terribly rude and that if we didn't stop, they would lodge a formal complaint with the tournament directors to have us kicked out of the tournament. Our reply was, "Do what you have to do." Nothing ever became of it, but they were hopping mad and rolling their eyes the rest of the game. I found it kind of funny,

Oh... that's just precious, just precious.

Good for you Randy.

RFS62
11-22-2006, 10:58 AM
This summer, at a tournament, we had the parents of another team come to our dugout to ask if we could have our kids be quiet because it was affecting their teams' ability to concentrate and upsetting their kids. I looked at the lady and said, "You're kidding aren't you?" She told me that she wasn't and that they thought it was terribly rude and that if we didn't stop, they would lodge a formal complaint with the tournament directors to have us kicked out of the tournament. Our reply was, "Do what you have to do." Nothing ever became of it, but they were hopping mad and rolling their eyes the rest of the game. I found it kind of funny,


Holy Cow!!!!!

Man, I would have turned up the volume big time!!!

Nothing better than identifying who has "rabbit ears".

That makes me think of a few other terms you just don't hear anymore. There have been some legendary "bench jockeys" applying "the needle" to those poor souls with "rabbit ears".

RANDY IN INDY
11-22-2006, 11:07 AM
My wife brought a small cowbell to one of our regular season games. Now, I'm not talking about your standard "pasture field" size cowbell. I'm talking about a cowbell that would fit inside a small coffee cup with plenty of room to spare. When our kids would make a good play, or score a run, she would ring it a little. Well, that was met with some criticism as well. Now folks, I have one of the standard sized ones that I took from my grandfathers' barn after he passed away a few years back. We might have to try that one out this spring.;) Nah, it's PC south Charlotte. I will behave myself.

Matt's playing in his last tournament of the season next weekend in Myrtle Beach. Pray for us some good weather. Nothin' better than a little baseball in December at the beach!

westofyou
11-22-2006, 11:10 AM
Now, I'm not talking about your standard "pasture field" size cowbell.That's what my mom used to call us home, that's what the baby boom did to the burbs, made it necessary for a distinctive call home since the there were about 30 kids living within 1 block of each other.

RANDY IN INDY
11-22-2006, 11:11 AM
Those make a lot of racket.

RFS62
11-22-2006, 11:28 AM
That's what my mom used to call us home, that's what the baby boom did to the burbs, made it necessary for a distinctive call home since the there were about 30 kids living within 1 block of each other.



Now all the kids have cell phones.

Yachtzee
11-22-2006, 12:17 PM
My wife brought a small cowbell to one of our regular season games. Now, I'm not talking about your standard "pasture field" size cowbell. I'm talking about a cowbell that would fit inside a small coffee cup with plenty of room to spare. When our kids would make a good play, or score a run, she would ring it a little. Well, that was met with some criticism as well. Now folks, I have one of the standard sized ones that I took from my grandfathers' barn after he passed away a few years back. We might have to try that one out this spring.;) Nah, it's PC south Charlotte. I will behave myself.

Matt's playing in his last tournament of the season next weekend in Myrtle Beach. Pray for us some good weather. Nothin' better than a little baseball in December at the beach!

I have a fever, and the only cure is MORE COWBELL!

Yachtzee
11-22-2006, 12:26 PM
I remember when chatter was so prevalent at youth baseball fields that it sounded like the 17-year cicadas were out.

RANDY IN INDY
11-22-2006, 12:28 PM
I have a fever, and the only cure is MORE COWBELL!

Funny you mention that. After the "cowbell incident," the team parents got together and ordered her a t-shirt that says just that. She wore it to most every game after that.

Johnny Footstool
11-22-2006, 12:55 PM
My mom had a plastic trumpet she used to bring to my high school soccer games. It was awful.

Falls City Beer
11-22-2006, 01:05 PM
My mom had a plastic trumpet she used to bring to my high school soccer games. It was awful.

That's awesome.

RANDY IN INDY
11-22-2006, 01:23 PM
My mom didn't have a trumpet, but she did have one of those voices that carried over everyone and everything. She always seemed to call me "Randall" in those situations and I hated to be called "Randall."

What I wouldn't give to hear her call me that today.

Johnny Footstool
11-22-2006, 01:28 PM
That's awesome.

Not so much. At least not when you're 17.

It's a fond memory now, though.

All the players in my senior class signed it back then. We sprayed some clear lacquer to preserve the ink. I brought it to the 10-year reunion and we had our picture taken with it.

vaticanplum
11-22-2006, 07:08 PM
My mom had a plastic trumpet she used to bring to my high school soccer games. It was awful.

When I was growing up my mother kept a hot pink plastic echo microphone in the car. When you talked into it, it sounded like a megaphone. She would roll down her window at stoplights and talk to other cars, occasionally saying "GET OUT. OF THE CAR. WITH YOUR HANDS UP." "Mortifying" doesn't really begin to describe my childhood.

westofyou
11-22-2006, 07:11 PM
When I was growing up my mother kept a hot pink plastic echo microphone in the car. When you talked into it, it sounded like a megaphone. She would roll down her window at stoplights and talk to other cars, occasionally saying "GET OUT. OF THE CAR. WITH YOUR HANDS UP." "Mortifying" doesn't really begin to describe my childhood.

And you mocked my mothers cleaning neurosis. :laugh:


"Hey good looking, we'll be back to pick you up later."

http://www.mrpophistory.com/images/AMPH_mrmicrophone.jpg

Chip R
11-22-2006, 07:50 PM
When I was growing up my mother kept a hot pink plastic echo microphone in the car. When you talked into it, it sounded like a megaphone. She would roll down her window at stoplights and talk to other cars, occasionally saying "GET OUT. OF THE CAR. WITH YOUR HANDS UP." "Mortifying" doesn't really begin to describe my childhood.


Mr. Microphone! :lol:

membengal
11-24-2006, 05:59 PM
"fiscal sanity"

BoydsOfSummer
11-29-2006, 04:13 PM
There's a term not used much anymore. Barnstormers


One of my teams in a DMB league is called the Buckeye Barnstormers.

Don't believe "dropball" has been mentioned.