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Rojo
11-28-2006, 08:39 PM
So, the boss wants to take us out for lunch here in San Francisco. Someone hates sushi, another's allergic to Indian, so, we settle on the Cheesecake Factory. I suppress a groan, I LOATHE the Cheesecake Factory.

First, the menu's the size of phone book.

Second, the food's not good. But what it lacks in taste is made up for in size. Every meal is gargantuan. I order a club sandwich with fries but can't even finish half (and I'm 250lbs). Everyone at the table had to work the waiter double-time to box that slop up so that we can, ostensibly, eat it at home. (Mine will sit, first in the fridge, then in the garbage).

Last, their signature dish, cheesecake, sucks. The gang's looking over 100 different variations of cheesecake: almond/raspberry/carmel and peanutbutter/cookiedough/whatever, etc...and I want to know if they just have cheesecake. They do, but I'm overruled. The cheesecakes that are delivered are, once again, gargantuan. These people just don't get it. A cheesecake is supposed to be a low, cool wedge of tangy creaminess, a sublime compliment to hot coffee. Instead we're treated to a whipped up excercise in sugar overkill.

Please go away Cheesecake Factory.........and take Olive Garden with you.

HotCorner
11-28-2006, 08:47 PM
So tell us how you really feel.

Falls City Beer
11-28-2006, 08:47 PM
So, the boss wants to take us out for lunch here in San Francisco. Someone hates sushi, another's allergic to Indian, so, we settle on the Cheesecake Factory. I suppress a groan, I LOATHE the Cheesecake Factory.

First, the menu's the size of phone book.

Second, the food's not good. But what it lacks in taste is made up for in size. Every meal is gargantuan. I order a club sandwich with fries but can't even finish half (and I'm 250lbs). Everyone at the table had to work the waiter double-time to box that slop up so that we can, ostensibly, eat it at home. (Mine will sit, first in the fridge, then in the garbage).

Last, their signature dish, cheesecake, sucks. The gang's looking over 100 different variations of cheesecake: almond/raspberry/carmel and peanutbutter/cookiedough/whatever, etc...and I want to know if they just have cheesecake. They do, but I'm overruled. The cheesecakes that are delivered are, once again, gargantuan. These people just don't get it. A cheesecake is supposed to be a low, cool wedge of tangy creaminess, a sublime compliment to hot coffee. Instead we're treated to a whipped up excercise in sugar overkill.

Please go away Cheesecake Factory.........and take Olive Garden with you.


I really love that I work in a profession where no one talks to anyone else.

vaticanplum
11-28-2006, 08:47 PM
Is the Cheesecake factory a chain?

Heath
11-28-2006, 08:55 PM
Is the Cheesecake factory a chain?

Yep, go up to the Greene in Dayton or Easton in Columbus.

Bring $100 bills. Lots of them.

I'm with Rojo.

Reds4Life
11-28-2006, 08:59 PM
Is the Cheesecake factory a chain?

There is one at Kenwood mall.

It's ok, but nothing special, and isn't worth the price.

Rojo
11-28-2006, 09:01 PM
Is the Cheesecake factory a chain?

Yes and a poor runner-up to Bob Evans.

vaticanplum
11-28-2006, 09:01 PM
There is one at Kenwood mall.

It's ok, but nothing special, and isn't worth the price.

I don't do malls. They make me feel like I'm suffocating. And shopping is one of my top five favorite things to do, the other four of which currently escape me.

I had no idea this was a chain restaurant. Why are chains always the worst? Wait, that's a cylical question, isn't it?

Rojo
11-28-2006, 09:03 PM
FTR, I don't consider myself a foodie. I eat fast food once a week and hot dogs from stands but I just hate the crass overkill of their food. I can't enjoy myself because I'm worried about how much of this soulless food I can choke down.

Ltlabner
11-28-2006, 09:05 PM
Yes and a poor runner-up to Bob Evans.

:laugh:

Frankly, Frisch's might have them beat too.

Rojo
11-28-2006, 09:07 PM
:laugh:

Frankly, Frisch's might have them beat too.


Frisch's is the same as Bob's Big Boy and Shoney's? I ask because I loved the fudge cake at Bob's. And the clam plate at HoJo's.

Ltlabner
11-28-2006, 09:08 PM
Frisch's is the same as Bob's Big Boy and Shoney's? I ask because I loved the fudge cake at Bob's. And the clam plate at HoJo's.

Yes. Not sure if they are part of the same franchise system or not, but they are generally the same resturants.

vaticanplum
11-28-2006, 09:09 PM
So, the boss wants to take us out for lunch here in San Francisco. Someone hates sushi, another's allergic to Indian, so, we settle on the Cheesecake Factory. I suppress a groan, I LOATHE the Cheesecake Factory.

This is what kills me about this restaurant being a chain. You're in San Francisco for crying out loud, there have got to be a dozen good and reasonably-priced places to eat on every block near where you work.

I will say this for the Olive Garden though: my old roommate's mother pointed out to her daughter once when she was complaining about going to the Olive Garden that it was the only place her teenage brother could eat as much as he wanted at a reasonable price (I guess it's all-you-can-eat, or maybe they have an all-you-can-eat night). It was a money-saving ventures for them for food that was mildly stomachable. This is valid.

Falls City Beer
11-28-2006, 09:09 PM
:laugh:

Frankly, Frisch's might have them beat too.

I secretly love Frisch's--and actively miss it.

Something infinitely charming about its blend of Morrison's Cafeteria oldster-ishness and its repudiation of the Cracker Barrel ethic. It's like the most clueless restaurant on the planet. I sympathize.

KittyDuran
11-28-2006, 09:10 PM
Frisch's is the same as Bob's Big Boy and Shoney's? I ask because I loved the fudge cake at Bob's. And the clam plate at HoJo's.I don't think it's the same as Shoney's but in KY there are some Jerry's.

Blimpie
11-28-2006, 09:11 PM
I really love that I work in a profession where no one talks to anyone else.Just a shot in the dark, but...

http://www.cartoonstock.com/lowres/jsi0023l.jpg

vaticanplum
11-28-2006, 09:12 PM
I secretly love Frisch's--and actively miss it.

Something infinitely charming about its blend of Morrison's Cafeteria oldster-ishness and its repudiation of the Cracker Barrel ethic. It's like the most clueless restaurant on the planet. I sympathize.

I love it too, though I never thought about it so philosophically :laugh: . I just go for the onion rings.

My first job was waitressing at Big Boy. God, how I relish throwing that into casual conversation at every opportunity. In a way, I lost my girlish innocence working at Big Boy, as it was there that I learned that I made better tips when I wore the blouse with the red Big Boys printed on it, which was a size smaller and tighter than the blouse with the navy blue Big Boys. And the majority of people I waited on were over 65 and that "difference" in tip amounted to about 15 cents a table. Folks, I wish I was making this up.

Blimpie
11-28-2006, 09:15 PM
I love it too, though I never thought about it so philosophically :laugh: . I just go for the onion rings.

My first job was waitressing at Big Boy. God, how I relish throwing that into casual conversation at every opportunity. In a way, I lost my girlish innocence working at Big Boy, as it was there that I learned that I made better tips when I wore the blouse with the red Big Boys printed on it, which was a size smaller and tighter than the blouse with the navy blue Big Boys. And the majority of people I waited on were over 65 and that "difference" in tip amounted to about 15 cents a table. Folks, I wish I was making this up.You have paid your pennance, my dear. Please enter Heaven whenever you are ready...

Falls City Beer
11-28-2006, 09:15 PM
My first job was waitressing at Big Boy. .

That gawky and brutally uncoordinated busboy at BigBoy?

That was me: my first "career" as well.

Ltlabner
11-28-2006, 09:19 PM
I secretly love Frisch's--and actively miss it.

Something infinitely charming about its blend of Morrison's Cafeteria oldster-ishness and its repudiation of the Cracker Barrel ethic. It's like the most clueless restaurant on the planet. I sympathize.

Mrs. Ltlabner and I sneek in a Frisch's breakfast bar about every 3 months or so. It's greasy, fatty and chock full of plenty of things that will shorten your life. But it's ooooohhhh so good. Typically we will only eat a very lite dinner later that day as we'll be bloated.

I also don't mind a hot fudge cake now and again.

Yuuuuummmmyyyy.....hot fudge cake.

Ltlabner
11-28-2006, 09:20 PM
My first job was waitressing at Big Boy. God, how I relish throwing that into casual conversation at every opportunity. In a way, I lost my girlish innocence working at Big Boy, as it was there that I learned that I made better tips when I wore the blouse with the red Big Boys printed on it, which was a size smaller and tighter than the blouse with the navy blue Big Boys. And the majority of people I waited on were over 65 and that "difference" in tip amounted to about 15 cents a table. Folks, I wish I was making this up.

The only waitress uniform more unflattering than a Frisch's uniform is those worn by Bill Knapps waitresses.

vaticanplum
11-28-2006, 09:22 PM
That gawky and brutally uncoordinated busboy at BigBoy?

That was me: my first "career" as well.

It's a colorful cast of characters at Big Boy, or at least it was at mine. The only person I really talked to was this 16-year-old girl who completely fascinated me. She had dropped out of school to take care of her year-old baby (and work at Big Boy, naturally) and she had this loser of a boyfriend whom she carted around to his jobs which came in went in about two-day spurts every few months. She would sit in the break room and read the paper, and always commented on the articles. She was fascinated by politics and had very unique, unspoiled opinions on them. Then when she realized she was talking about them, she'd get very embarrassed and light up a cigarette and mumble that she didn't know what she was talking about. She said once that she would have liked to have gone to college but that her boyfriend would never let her take a class at the community college. It was heartbreaking, to say the least. She was a very sweet girl. Her name was Kayla.

Anyway, my point is that I only ever met one person at Big Boy who could remotely qualify as normal. And it was not a busboy.

vaticanplum
11-28-2006, 09:24 PM
The only waitress uniform more unflattering than a Frisch's uniform is those worn by Bill Knapps waitresses.

But they give you a cake on your birthday.

I am absolutely positive that this is the second time Bill Knapps has been brought up on this board within the last few months.

The Big Boy skirt was extraordinary. It was below-knee length (very practical for a mobile profession like waitressing), and didn't really have a definitive color.

Sorry to derail the thread Rojo. Down with the Cheesecake Factory!

VR
11-28-2006, 09:31 PM
But they give you a cake on your birthday.

I am absolutely positive that this is the second time Bill Knapps has been brought up on this board within the last few months.

The Big Boy skirt was extraordinary. It was below-knee length (very practical for a mobile profession like waitressing), and didn't really have a definitive color.

Sorry to derail the thread Rojo. Down with the Cheesecake Factory!

I dined at a BBB in Minnesota last month. It was weirdly americana. Maybe it's all my years on the west coast that have made me miss the diners of the midwest.

Speaking of Diners.....Fog City Diner....San Francisco....shoulda went there Rojo, awesome restaurant.

VR
11-28-2006, 09:34 PM
That gawky and brutally uncoordinated busboy at BigBoy?

That was me: my first "career" as well.
http://www.kochanowicz.com/Bob'sBigBoyWendy's.JPG

IslandRed
11-28-2006, 09:54 PM
Funny thread. General comments on the restaurants mentioned:

Cheesecake Factory: Way overhyped. But you know, occasionally I can go for gargantuan excess. I don't eat the way I used to -- I'm not sure it would be possible; in college, I could knock down better than a slice of pizza per 10 pounds of body weight without cracking a sweat -- but I can still dial it up now and then. I'd have a higher opinion of the cheesecake if it wasn't one of my wife's specialties.

Olive Garden -- Outside of the breadsticks and Toscana soup, it's just OK. It's another one of those quantity-over-quality places that I liked better when I ate like a horse. Carrabba's beats it by miles, and I'm not just saying it because a buddy of mine owns a few of them.

Cracker Barrel -- I live in the epicenter of Cracker Barreldom, I think I could reach six within 30 minutes from my house. Not my favorite but at least the one nearest me serves up a pretty good breakfast.

Bob Evans -- Much better.

Frisch's, Jerry's -- I haven't been to one of those since I was a kid.

Shoney's -- Do they still do the weekend breakfast bar? That's the only reason I ever went, to load up before hitting the road for a long day. (See previous comments about eating like a horse.)

vaticanplum
11-28-2006, 10:00 PM
Cracker Barrel rules. Watching young kids for an afternoon and it's raining outside? Hello, Cracker Barrel. Not very vegetarian-friendly. But it makes up for it. The first time I was ever in a Cracker Barrell I thought I had died and gone to heaven. Light-up rock candy and old baseball pictures all in the same place.

cincinnati chili
11-28-2006, 10:09 PM
The only Cheesecake factory I've been to was in Denver. I remember thinking that the entrees were UNDER-priced for the portion sizes but that the desserts and drinks were OVER-priced to make up for it.

I try to avoid the chain places, but I didn't think the CFs are as bad as the Olive Gardens or Red Lobsters etc. Maybe they've gotten worse in the last five years

Yachtzee
11-28-2006, 10:10 PM
We have a Bob's Big Boy up here. It's kind of a "Lone Ranger" these days. We used to have quite a few Big Boys, but that's the last one in the area and I can't say it will be around too much longer. They don't even bother to stock the display cases with all the Big Boy paraphernalia they usually sell. It's pretty dirty too. The Frisch's Big Boys in SW Ohio are much better.

I went to a Cheesecake Factory once, but the wait was too long, so we ended up at a California Pizza Kitchen instead. I suspect the Cheesecake Factory is to cheesecake as the California Pizza Kitchen is to pizza. Personally I'd much rather go to a small pizza joint that specializes in one style of pizza. NY-Style pizza is always best at an NY-Style joint and Chicago-Style is always best at a Chicago-Style joint. Trust me, I worked at 5 different pizza joints delivering pizzas through high school and college (but never a chain like Pizza Hut, Dominos, or Papa John's). I know my pizza.

IslandRed
11-28-2006, 10:14 PM
Cracker Barrel rules. Watching young kids for an afternoon and it's raining outside? Hello, Cracker Barrel. Not very vegetarian-friendly. But it makes up for it. The first time I was ever in a Cracker Barrell I thought I had died and gone to heaven. Light-up rock candy and old baseball pictures all in the same place.

Chuckle... the Old Country Store half of the place is loved by many and sends many others into Kitsch Shock. I just go there to eat. It's one of the few places that serve real country ham, the salt-cured type. I still like Bob Evans better, mostly because of the skillet breakfasts, e.g. pot roast hash.

My kids each have one of the kid-sized Cracker Barrel rocking chairs. My grandfather bought one for each of his great-grandchildren before he passed away. They love those chairs.

IslandRed
11-28-2006, 10:22 PM
I try to avoid the chain places, but I didn't think the CFs are as bad as the Olive Gardens or Red Lobsters etc.

I think I went at least a decade without eating at a Red Lobster. Why would anyone who lives in Florida, with all that fresh seafood available, eat at Red Lobster?

Here in Tennessee, it's a little different. You'd be amazed at how hard it is to come by places that have a good selection of seafood at a reasonable price. You can go high-end or you can go fried catfish (nothing wrong with that), but there aren't a lot of options in the middle. Depending on where we are when the urge strikes for seafood, sometimes Red Lobster is what there is.

Red in Chicago
11-28-2006, 10:56 PM
i've been to three different cheesecake factories...the one in schaumburg, il, is always so crowded, that you'll end up waiting at least 30 minutes...definately not worth the wait. the one in oak brook, il is actually better and you never have to wait for a table...the only thing i like is the crabcake sandwich...the fries are usually aweful...prior to the spinach scare, i use to enjoy the spinach / artichoke dip, but now i don't dare eat it again...

someone mentioned the olive garden...i really can't think of a grosser place to eat italian (if you can even call it that) food...that said, i have rarely found an italian restaurant that i can say i liked...

cracker barrell is aweful as well...i can't even get past the odor...must be all the junk they sell in the lobby...

i've been to frische's by the ballpark...can't say too much about the food, but it does have a kind of charm that i'm not use to here in chicago...must be something about those flirty waitresses

Rojo
11-29-2006, 12:54 AM
This is what kills me about this restaurant being a chain. You're in San Francisco for crying out loud, there have got to be a dozen good and reasonably-priced places to eat on every block near where you work.

Not really. As I alluded to, there's a fine sushi place and an even better Indian place nearby, the rest are either sandwich places or fine dining.

And my co-workers are clueless.

Rojo
11-29-2006, 01:06 AM
Speaking of Diners.....Fog City Diner....San Francisco....shoulda went there Rojo, awesome restaurant.


You know that San Francisco is 50 square miles right? We work downtown, we're on foot.

Since you've been to SF, you've probably been right by the Cheesecrap Factory of which I *****. Its atop the Macy's on Union Square. And this time of year? Yeah, it's was lousy with bridge-and-tunnel.


I don't remember the Red Lobster being that bad. When I was seventeen, once a week, I'd have to drive my grandmother to the beauty parlor, then to Red Lobster, then to Von's "where they have that fresh-squeezed OJ I like so much". Once in the grocery store, she'd always remember that she needed some more Vodka and menthols. Lovely woman.

Despite that, Red Lobster didn't seem that bad.

remdog
11-29-2006, 06:13 AM
The Cheesecake Factory is every mall in southern California (and God knows we have scores of them). I avoid them if at all possible. As mentioned above, they are cut from the 'give 'em crappy food but give 'em lots of crappy food' restaurant business model. I may not like it but, for a lot of chains, that model works to the tune of big bucks. (shrug)

I have a friend from Italy. He usually comments on how large the portions are at most American restaurants as opposed to the portions served in Italy. The other thing that he comments on is that Americans usually eat every bit of it----no wonder we've become a nation of lard-asses.

In the mid-80's I worked at Pier 23 on the Embarcadero in San Francisco. The Fog City Diner was a few blocks away and good for lunch at least once a week. I love that place. They used to have a flank steak that was marinated in something which two of its' ingrediants were maple syrup and ketchup. That was probably my favorite thing on the menu. There was a Fog City Diner cookbook out at one time and I spent about 20 minutes going through it in the bookstore. I was willing to buy the book just to get the receipe for the marinade! Unfortunately, I never found it.

Rem

Roy Tucker
11-29-2006, 08:02 AM
I'll chime in on the Cheesecake Factory is WAY overrated. I don't mind paying premium prices as long as the food is premium. If it is just ordinary (which CF is), then I'll pass.

When on the road, I try to hit up the locally owned places. But the homogenization of America has set in with a vengence. Olive Gardens, Applebees, TGI Fridays, Chilis, Red Lobster, etc etc abound. More often than not, I'm not in the mood nor have the energy to drive past all these places in search of a hidden gem.

Roy Tucker
11-29-2006, 08:11 AM
And I was a long-time grill cook at the Frisch's Big Boy in Athens OH and Centerville OH. Flip them burgers, drop the PTs, and keep the onion rings coming.

I will speak for the loveliness of Frisch's waitresses. *Man* did I mine that vein for a long time. They were either long-time Southern Ohio veteran types with many miles and wrinkles or fresh college girls. The vet types I made sure I stayed on the good side of. The college girls were, well, eager college girls and I was an eager college guy. God bless you Ellen, Barbara, Linda, Betty, Belva, Nancy, etc etc etc. wherever you may be.

Ltlabner
11-29-2006, 08:13 AM
Cracker Barrel rules. Watching young kids for an afternoon and it's raining outside? Hello, Cracker Barrel. Not very vegetarian-friendly. But it makes up for it. The first time I was ever in a Cracker Barrell I thought I had died and gone to heaven. Light-up rock candy and old baseball pictures all in the same place.

I have breakfast with a friend at Cracker Barrell every Saturday at 6:00am. Loves me some of them fluffy biscuits and real bacon. Gooooooood eating.

Good food. Don't care too much for the nick-nacks.

RANDY IN INDY
11-29-2006, 08:28 AM
I've eaten at the Cheesecake Factory here in Charlotte(Southpark) a couple of times and I really didn't think it was all that bad for a chain restaraunt. The service was good, the portions were a little too big, but all in all, the food was pretty good.

max venable
11-29-2006, 09:04 AM
I completely disagree with most of you on this one. I like the Cheesecake Factory. In fact, my wife and I like it a lot. I've never gotten an entree there that I didn't like. I ate at one in Atlanta about three weeks ago...ordered the Buffalo Busters...unbelievable! And, yes, I couldn't finish but is that such a bad thing...doggie boxes help me make two meals out of it.

The deserts are expensive. But holy smokes do they have good cheesecake. I think I've been to 4, maybe five different ones. The only unpleasant experience we've had is having to wait too long. But it's almost always been worth it.

Cheesecake Factory = good.

registerthis
11-29-2006, 09:27 AM
I really love that I work in a profession where no one talks to anyone else.

Well, you make up for it here. :)

registerthis
11-29-2006, 09:36 AM
Along the same lines of large portions = good, I submit Ruby Tuesday. Ugh.

Their menu is as large as a billboard, so when you're looking at it you're completely cut off from others at your table. Then, the food comes, and I swear each plate is enough to feed a small village. I can never eat it all, and since I hate wasting food, I'll dutifully box it up where--much like Rojo's Cheesecake leftovers--it will sit until such time as I decide to throw it away, or it becomes a science fair project.

My wife and I honeymooned in San Francisco/Napa, and I can't for the life of me comprehend why anyone would eat at the Cheesecake Factory out there. We stayed in this kitschy hotel called the Phoenix, and there was this terrific, nondescript Vietnamese place across the street from us that served food many times better than the Factory (or Ruby's or any other bland chains) without the 3 hour waits. Our entire time there was pure food bliss.

DC isn't lacking in good restaurants either. Our favorite place here is a ramshackle Ethiopian restaurant a couple of blocks from our condo. It's a place where it's probably better if you don't see them actually *making* the food, but man is it good.

Falls City Beer
11-29-2006, 09:37 AM
Well, you make up for it here. :)

Trust me: my written persona is far more interesting than the thing itself.

westofyou
11-29-2006, 10:34 AM
Only 1 Cheesecake Factory in the Burbs of Portland and only 2 Olive Gardens in all of Portland.

Franchise restaurants aren't looked upon fondly in this town.

Dom Heffner
11-29-2006, 11:06 AM
Rojo- I like the Cheesecake Factory, but I agree with you on one thing: their menu is too big.

They hand you a novel and then come back in 5 minutes to take your order. I told the waiter that came to my table a few weeks ago that from what I saw up to page 3, I wanted the thai chicken pizza, but I still had 10 pages to go.

They need to specialize. Their menu is all over the place.

BuckeyeRed27
11-29-2006, 11:09 AM
I'm really surprised about this thread too. I love Cheesecake. Who cares if they have big portions? It is better than any other chains (TGIF, Chilis, etc.). I have never had a meal there I didn't like. A few of the chicken pasta dishes are excellent. Also if you like Fish Taco's they have really good ones.
You can definatley put me in the Cheesecake = Good group.

Johnny Footstool
11-29-2006, 11:24 AM
I absolutely hate the Cheesecake Factory. Their menu is one of those nasty affairs that list a few of the ingredients, but not all of them. For a picky anti-tomato freak like myself, this is incredibly frustrating.

I recently ordered a chicken pasta dish served in alfredo sauce. Seemed simple enough. Unfortunately, the plate looked like it was filled with tomato soup. I asked the waiter, and he told me their alfredo sauce has tomato puree in it (gag). The manager came to the table and offered to help me pick something different, but everything that interested me was full of tomato gunk or mushroom gunk. I ended up getting a $10 hamburger that tasted suspiciously like a Quarter Pounder.

Of course, it's my wife's favorite restaurant, and she wants to go there every year on her birthday. I'm just going to start getting cheesecake for dinner (the Dutch Apple Streussel is excellent).

BTW - Ruby Tuesday is my least favorite restaurant ever. Bad food, prepared badly and brought out by bad waiters and waitresses.

ochre
11-29-2006, 11:43 AM
My favorite "restaurant snobbery" story involves a couple of co-workers from a couple of jobs ago. They were in Seattle on a business trip (Microsoft conference of some sort). They had parked their rental car in a downtown parking garage and on their way out of the garage asked the attendant for directions to a "good seafood restaurant". He pointed them to one a couple of blocks away. They get there and go in to eat. Turns out it's a Sashimi type joint. They went ahead and struggled through it, or went to another restaurant, or whatever.

Upon their return to the parking garage the aforementioned attendant asked them how they liked it. Judging largely by their physical reaction to the question, he immediately followed the query up with something like, "Oh, you meant 'Red Lobster'." Their midwestitude had been discovered.

Still to this day I laugh a little inside when I think of those two and this situation.

Hoosier Red
11-29-2006, 12:32 PM
I don't do malls. They make me feel like I'm suffocating. And shopping is one of my top five favorite things to do, the other four of which currently escape me.

I had no idea this was a chain restaurant. Why are chains always the worst? Wait, that's a cylical question, isn't it?

Were you a teenage canadian pop star as well?

Johnny Footstool
11-29-2006, 12:45 PM
My favorite "restaurant snobbery" story involves a couple of co-workers from a couple of jobs ago. They were in Seattle on a business trip (Microsoft conference of some sort). They had parked their rental car in a downtown parking garage and on their way out of the garage asked the attendant for directions to a "good seafood restaurant". He pointed them to one a couple of blocks away. They get there and go in to eat. Turns out it's a Sashimi type joint. They went ahead and struggled through it, or went to another restaurant, or whatever.

Upon their return to the parking garage the aforementioned attendant asked them how they liked it. Judging largely by their physical reaction to the question, he immediately followed the query up with something like, "Oh, you meant 'Red Lobster'." Their midwestitude had been discovered.

Still to this day I laugh a little inside when I think of those two and this situation.

Most midwesterners definitely have a skewed sense of taste. A friend of mine says a couple of co-workers went brought back a bag of Starbucks coffee during a trip to Seattle. They made it at the office and offered some to everyone. He declined, saying he didn't like coffee, but they said, "No, you don't understand -- this is Starbucks coffee...from Seattle!" as if the mass-produced, packaged coffee purchased in Seattle was somehow imbued with magical goodness that the mass-produced, packaged Starbucks coffee available in the local grocery store didn't have.

KittyDuran
11-29-2006, 12:53 PM
I've only been to the Cheesecake Factory twice (both times at Kenwood). The food was good but the service was awful - extremely slow.

Redsland
11-29-2006, 01:27 PM
Cheesecake Factory: Slow. Bland. Loud.

Roy Tucker
11-29-2006, 01:35 PM
Most midwesterners definitely have a skewed sense of taste. A friend of mine says a couple of co-workers went brought back a bag of Starbucks coffee during a trip to Seattle. They made it at the office and offered some to everyone. He declined, saying he didn't like coffee, but they said, "No, you don't understand -- this is Starbucks coffee...from Seattle!" as if the mass-produced, packaged coffee purchased in Seattle was somehow imbued with magical goodness that the mass-produced, packaged Starbucks coffee available in the local grocery store didn't have.

Used to be that way about Coors beer when it was only available in Colorado. It was commonly believed by us rube midwesterners as nectar of the gods.

When it became widely available in this area, people began saying "wait a minute, maybe this isn't so great".

Chip R
11-29-2006, 01:59 PM
Used to be that way about Coors beer when it was only available in Colorado. It was commonly believed by us rube midwesterners as nectar of the gods.

When it became widely available in this area, people began saying "wait a minute, maybe this isn't so great".


Grass is always greener on the other side of the fence.

I've never been to Cheesecake Factory. I used to frequent Olive Garden and Cracker Barrel quite frequently as one of my former girlfriends loved both places - especially Cracker Barrel. They had one right next door from this hotel we used to stay at. It was convenient and I actually got a lot of stuff there for my niece and nephews - cheap little gifts that kids like. I think places like that are good when you are in an unfamiliar city where you don't know what places are good to eat at and you're not sure how to get to them.

TeamCasey
11-29-2006, 02:30 PM
Cracker Barrel rules.

Hash Brown casserole. :)

TeamCasey
11-29-2006, 02:34 PM
In the mid-80's I worked at Pier 23 on the Embarcadero in San Francisco. The Fog City Diner was a few blocks away and good for lunch at least once a week. I love that place. They used to have a flank steak that was marinated in something which two of its' ingrediants were maple syrup and ketchup. That was probably my favorite thing on the menu. There was a Fog City Diner cookbook out at one time and I spent about 20 minutes going through it in the bookstore. I was willing to buy the book just to get the receipe for the marinade! Unfortunately, I never found it.

Rem


http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/0898159997/sr=1-1/qid=1164828863/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/002-8946824-0041653?ie=UTF8&s=books

Chip R
11-29-2006, 02:43 PM
Hash Brown casserole. :)

Yep. Not much Spam in that.

ochre
11-29-2006, 02:46 PM
Cheesecake Factory: Slow. Bland. Loud.
but not necessarily in that order?

:)

Roy Tucker
11-29-2006, 02:50 PM
I think places like that are good when you are in an unfamiliar city where you don't know what places are good to eat at and you're not sure how to get to them.

Case in point...

The Tucker family made the Cincinnati->Dallas->Cincinnati run over Thanksgiving. We ate at the Cracker Barrel in West Memphis AR on the drive down and the Olive Garden in Jackson TN on the way back.

It kept the kids and spousal unit happy.

Johnny Footstool
11-29-2006, 03:01 PM
Used to be that way about Coors beer when it was only available in Colorado. It was commonly believed by us rube midwesterners as nectar of the gods.

When it became widely available in this area, people began saying "wait a minute, maybe this isn't so great".

Yep. They used to hire rednecks in black Trans-Ams to bootleg it east of the Mississippi. They usually picked it up in Texarkana and ran it Eastbound, 'cause the boys were thirsty in Atlanta. They had a long way to go, and a short time to get there.

[cue banjo]

KittyDuran
11-29-2006, 03:02 PM
Grass is always greener on the other side of the fence.

I've never been to Cheesecake Factory. I used to frequent Olive Garden and Cracker Barrel quite frequently as one of my former girlfriends loved both places - especially Cracker Barrel. They had one right next door from this hotel we used to stay at. It was convenient and I actually got a lot of stuff there for my niece and nephews - cheap little gifts that kids like. I think places like that are good when you are in an unfamiliar city where you don't know what places are good to eat at and you're not sure how to get to them.You pretty much know what you're getting and are not risking having your stomach digest something unfamiliar.

KittyDuran
11-29-2006, 03:04 PM
Case in point...

The Tucker family made the Cincinnati->Dallas->Cincinnati run over Thanksgiving. We ate at the Cracker Barrel in West Memphis AR on the drive down and the Olive Garden in Jackson TN on the way back.

It kept the kids and spousal unit happy.I'm usually Shoney's for breakfast and either a Ruby Tuesdays or Applebees for dinner on the road going south. I did go for something sort of local in Chattanooga last year and ate at the Mellow Mushroom for pizza - pretty good but the parking (being downtown) was the pits.

westofyou
11-29-2006, 03:07 PM
Mellow Mushroom

Atlanta Chain, all the rocker rejects from my sisters HS worked at the one by our office.

pedro
11-29-2006, 03:10 PM
Atlanta Chain, all the rocker rejects from my sisters HS worked at the one by our office.


good pizza.

Rojo
11-29-2006, 03:10 PM
I'm really surprised about this thread too. I love Cheesecake. Who cares if they have big portions?

Getting the righ size portion -- not too little, not too much -- really adds to the meal. Put too much food in front of people and they tend to eat too much.

Plus, when I see that much food, I put my eating into overdrive and it becomes a chore. Really.

More plus, I don't want to carry a stupid bag out of the restaurant.

max venable
11-29-2006, 03:28 PM
Interestingly, I ate at the Mellow Mushroom in ATL about two months ago.

Mellow = good.

I love the kind of pizza you can fold or roll up and eat.

KittyDuran
11-29-2006, 03:57 PM
Interestingly, I ate at the Mellow Mushroom in ATL about two months ago.

Mellow = good.

I love the kind of pizza you can fold or roll up and eat.I think I had the make your own pizza (which is my usual)... pepperoni, onions, green olives, and banana peppers - then I put red pepper flakes on top of it!:beerme:

VR
11-29-2006, 04:20 PM
In the mid-80's I worked at Pier 23 on the Embarcadero in San Francisco. The Fog City Diner was a few blocks away and good for lunch at least once a week. I love that place. They used to have a flank steak that was marinated in something which two of its' ingrediants were maple syrup and ketchup. That was probably my favorite thing on the menu. There was a Fog City Diner cookbook out at one time and I spent about 20 minutes going through it in the bookstore. I was willing to buy the book just to get the receipe for the marinade! Unfortunately, I never found it.

Rem

As your good fortune would have it, I own said recipe book. I will look up that recipe for you sometime soon. (we're in the process of remodeling, so that book could be anywhere)
Could it have been their flatiron steak? that thing was groovy good.

bucksfan
11-29-2006, 05:01 PM
I have not had the experience of CF yet. I understand the comments about the chains. In my opinion there are some good and some bad, and the franchises can vary also. I generally prefer to find the non-chain place also. But there are times or sitautions that don't permit or at least easily allow for the often-times required research to find a suitable alternative.

max venable
11-29-2006, 05:10 PM
Cheesecake Factory must be doing something right. They're always packed.

Redlegs23
11-29-2006, 05:41 PM
I like the Cheesecake Factory. The lady and I will go there and split a meal and a piece of cheesecake. This solves the expensive and too large of portions problem. Banana cheesecake is excellent. The waits are usually really long but we just walk around the mall for about an hour or so and enjoy the wait, instead of sitting on a bench waiting like at other restaurants.

I don't really understand the too large of portions argument. Here's an idea, stop eating when you're full. Another idea, if you don't like carrying bags out of the restaurant, don't ask for a take home box. Problem solved.

registerthis
11-29-2006, 05:50 PM
Cheesecake Factory must be doing something right. They're always packed.

Yeah, and Vanilla Ice sold a bunch of albums.

Doesn't necessarily make him a good musician.

registerthis
11-29-2006, 05:53 PM
I don't really understand the too large of portions argument. Here's an idea, stop eating when you're full.

It's been conclusively proven that, for a majority of the people, having larger portions means that they will eat more than if a smaller portion were provided--frequently past the point when they are normally full.

This is a uniquely American phenomenon, too. Ask almost anyone visiting the U.S. from overseas about their impressions of American restaurants, and the near-unanimous opinion you will receive in return is the nearly-unbelieveably huge portions of food that so many restaurants will give you.

And people wonder why we are so fat.

Super_Barry11
11-29-2006, 05:54 PM
I love the Cheesecake Factory. But then, I'm pretty weird when it comes to food. For our first date, my boyfriend took me to Bix in San Francisco, and the whole time I was there, I kept talking about how much I love the Olive Garden. :laugh: I think he was a bit insulted. :p:

vaticanplum
11-29-2006, 06:02 PM
I don't really understand the too large of portions argument. Here's an idea, stop eating when you're full. Another idea, if you don't like carrying bags out of the restaurant, don't ask for a take home box. Problem solved.

The problem is that not everybody thinks that way, and as people have mentioned, one of the ostensible benefits of chain restaurants is that they are easily recognizable. Thus, they are a big draw to travelers. And travelers in hotels don't always have access to fridges to keep their food.

A lot of these restaurants are in malls. People are often in malls in the midst of shopping or before seeing a movie. They can't keep the food with them; it'll spoil.

It's a perfectly individual choice to eat as much or as little as you want. But I have worked at a couple of chain restaurants and the amount of food thrown out daily is beyond sickening. Not only the amount uneaten, but the amount brought in every day, because the quantities of food ordered to make are usually huge...they are decided on by people in corporate offices halfway across the country that have no concept of the local weather, local goings-on, no idea that this town is traditional Catholic and Fridays during Lent should probably not be heavy on the meat orders, what-have-you; no idea how business may be affected on any given night apart from what the national average for a Tuesday night is. So they overorder everything. Health regulations dictate that all perishable food is labeled and pitched within a given time. The food is often shipped from far away rather than locally, thus lengthening its transit time and diluting its quality as well as further shortening its life once it gets to the restaurant. There is an enormous, enormous amount of food wasted this way too. And yet at most major chains, employees don't eat for free or even a discount. In some, they are not allowed to eat at their places of employment even on their days off.

The same goes for other regulations. Every rule is dictated by the top. The standards of service are laid out in specific detail; there's no room for personal decisions or personality or deviation from anything in special cases, because servers are perpetually terrified that they're being "shopped". Otherwise the quality of service is judged by paperwork; thus, service tends to be bad. All restaurants are held to the same rules and standards; thus, your cleaning job entails doing this, this and that, check it off and move on. A big pile of dirty rags in the corner? Not on the list. It doesn't get cleaned. And no one is held responsible; there's too much service staff to have any idea who passed on cleaning it and they weren't technically supposed to after all. The backs of these restaurants tend to be huge and thus easy to get dirty and hard to clean. Generally speaking, they are filthy places, with very smart protocols in place for when the health inspectors come around. I have horror stories about the backsides and underbellies of chain restaurants that would send Red in Chicago into a nuclear bomb shelter for the rest of his life.

Call me pretentious if you want. And I have my weaknesses in certain chains too, as I've noted. But on the whole I think they're morally bankrupt enterprises that care only about money and not about service or food, about giving people the least they can without getting arrested for it and trying to hide the lack of quality of everything behind huge portions. And I feel bad because I know there are dirt-poor, passionate chefs somewhere developing these dishes and sometimes good ones get through. And believe me I know that there are good servers out there who sometimes have no other choice than to work at these places. But overall, beyond your table and into the kitchen, they are gross.

westofyou
11-29-2006, 06:06 PM
Call me pretentious if you want.
Only if it's over a big bowl of Pho and a papaya salad or a stack of papadum and a bowl of Punjabi Pickles.

Chip R
11-29-2006, 06:10 PM
The problem is that not everybody thinks that way, and as people have mentioned, one of the ostensible benefits of chain restaurants is that they are easily recognizable. Thus, they are a big draw to travelers. And travelers in hotels don't always have access to fridges to keep their food.

A lot of these restaurants are in malls. People are often in malls in the midst of shopping or before seeing a movie. They can't keep the food with them; it'll spoil.

It's a perfectly individual choice to eat as much or as little as you want. But I have worked at a couple of chain restaurants and the amount of food thrown out daily is beyond sickening. Not only the amount uneaten, but the amount brought in every day, because the quantities of food ordered to make are usually huge...they are decided on by people in corporate offices halfway across the country that have no concept of the local weather, local goings-on, no idea that this town is traditional Catholic and Fridays during Lent should probably not be heavy on the meat orders, what-have-you; no idea how business may be affected on any given night apart from what the national average for a Tuesday night is. So they overorder everything. Health regulations dictate that all perishable food is labeled and pitched within a given time. The food is often shipped from far away rather than locally, thus lengthening its transit time and diluting its quality as well as further shortening its life once it gets to the restaurant. There is an enormous, enormous amount of food wasted this way too. And yet at most major chains, employees don't eat for free or even a discount. In some, they are not allowed to eat at their places of employment even on their days off.

The same goes for other regulations. Every rule is dictated by the top. The standards of service are laid out in specific detail; there's no room for personal decisions or personality or deviation from anything in special cases, because servers are perpetually terrified that they're being "shopped". Otherwise the quality of service is judged by paperwork; thus, service tends to be bad. All restaurants are held to the same rules and standards; thus, your cleaning job entails doing this, this and that, check it off and move on. A big pile of dirty rags in the corner? Not on the list. It doesn't get cleaned. And no one is held responsible; there's too much service staff to have any idea who passed on cleaning it and they weren't technically supposed to after all. The backs of these restaurants tend to be huge and thus easy to get dirty and hard to clean. Generally speaking, they are filthy places, with very smart protocols in place for when the health inspectors come around. I have horror stories about the backsides and underbellies of chain restaurants that would send Red in Chicago into a nuclear bomb shelter for the rest of his life.

Call me pretentious if you want. And I have my weaknesses in certain chains too, as I've noted. But on the whole I think they're morally bankrupt enterprises that care only about money and not about service or food, about giving people the least they can without getting arrested for it and trying to hide the lack of quality of everything behind huge portions. And I feel bad because I know there are dirt-poor, passionate chefs somewhere developing these dishes and sometimes good ones get through. And believe me I know that there are good servers out there who sometimes have no other choice than to work at these places. But overall, beyond your table and into the kitchen, they are gross.


Yep. That and they make the servers wear at least 14 pieces of flair. ;)

vaticanplum
11-29-2006, 06:27 PM
Only if it's over a big bowl of Pho and a papaya salad or a stack of papadum and a bowl of Punjabi Pickles.

I honestly have never eaten any of those things. Street cred up 1000%.

vaticanplum
11-29-2006, 06:28 PM
Yep. That and they make the servers wear at least 14 pieces of flair. ;)

This coupled with the Canadian pop star thing makes me positive that I'm missing all kinds of cultural references in this thread.

westofyou
11-29-2006, 06:35 PM
I honestly have never eaten any of those things. Street cred up 1000%.

I ate a hot dog at Stuckeys once and I'm still here.

Right now people all over the world are eating something that would make you squirm, sweat or gag.

Come on in the water's fine.

remdog
11-29-2006, 06:38 PM
As your good fortune would have it, I own said recipe book. I will look up that recipe for you sometime soon. (we're in the process of remodeling, so that book could be anywhere)
Could it have been their flatiron steak? that thing was groovy good.

You sir, are my new instant best buddy! :)

I believe you could be correct about the flatiron steak. If you do find the recipe feel free to post it here---I'm sure there are others that would enjoy it also.

I think the cut of steak is secondary to the marinade to some degee. That was the part of the recipe that I was trying to find.

Gracious. Danka. Thank you. Merci. Grattzi.

Rem

Rojo
11-29-2006, 06:41 PM
I don't really understand the too large of portions argument. Here's an idea, stop eating when you're full. Another idea, if you don't like carrying bags out of the restaurant, don't ask for a take home box. Problem solved.

It sickens me to waste food. So, I take it home and usually avoid it until it goes bad.

More is less, why are Americans the only people on the planet to not get this?

Yachtzee
11-29-2006, 08:23 PM
Yep. They used to hire rednecks in black Trans-Ams to bootleg it east of the Mississippi. They usually picked it up in Texarkana and ran it Eastbound, 'cause the boys were thirsty in Atlanta. They had a long way to go, and a short time to get there.

[cue banjo]

Eastbound and down, loaded up and truckin'

Blimpie
11-29-2006, 08:26 PM
Eastbound and down, loaded up and truckin'...we gonna do what they say can't be done...:rockband:

VR
11-29-2006, 09:29 PM
You sir, are my new instant best buddy! :)

I believe you could be correct about the flatiron steak. If you do find the recipe feel free to post it here---I'm sure there are others that would enjoy it also.

I think the cut of steak is secondary to the marinade to some degee. That was the part of the recipe that I was trying to find.

Gracious. Danka. Thank you. Merci. Grattzi.

Rem
Alright, I think this is it.
"Grilled Skirt Steak with Wild West Steak Sauce"

Marinade,
1 - 1/2 inch piece of ginger, peeled and grated
4-6 cloves of garlic, chopped
1 teaspoon freshly ground, white pepper
2 tablespoons pure maple syrup
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 Tbsp. olive oil
2 Tbsp. rice vinegar
1 Tbsp sesame oil

Marinate 2 1/2 lbs skirt steak for 2-4 hours.


Sauce
1 Tbsp tamarind paste
2 Tbsp br. sugar
1/2 cup ketchup
1/3 cup ketjap manis or tamari soy sauce
1 papaya peeled and seeded
1 tsp. chile paste
2 tsp. chile powder
1/4 cup rice vinegar
3/4 cup water
1 tsp minced ginger
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 tsp freshly ground pepper.

Combine all ingredients in a saucepan and simmer 30 minutes. Puree and chill.


Wow, that sounds good....enjoy it rem>

pahster
11-29-2006, 09:34 PM
... I like Cheesecake Factory...

But I dislike the part at the end where I'm supposed to pay.

cincinnati chili
11-29-2006, 09:48 PM
This coupled with the Canadian pop star thing makes me positive that I'm missing all kinds of cultural references in this thread.

15 pieces of flair. Rent the movie "Office Space," especially since you've waitresses in chain restaurants. There are several cultural references in this movie that are actually worth catching.

http://i.imdb.com/Photos/Ss/0151804/th-office3.jpg

remdog
11-29-2006, 09:59 PM
Thanks, VR! (Yummmm......)

That's a lot of marinade! Hmmmm, if you and Mrs. VR are ever in the neighborhood maybe we could make this as a group project! :)

Thanks again!

Rem

BuckeyeRed27
11-29-2006, 10:10 PM
Well they have opened 9 stores this year and I've made 17% on the stock since June. Eat up everybody.

max venable
11-29-2006, 11:25 PM
Yeah, and Vanilla Ice sold a bunch of albums.

Doesn't necessarily make him a good musician.

That's not the point. They're making a ton of $$$ (as did Vanilla Ice). They're doing something right, Ice did something right.

I don't think CF is in to to win culinary awards. I think they're in it to make dough. And that they are.

RFS62
11-30-2006, 06:43 AM
They're making a ton of $$$ (as did Vanilla Ice). They're doing something right, Ice did something right.



Yikes!!!!

So, does that mean they're gonna flame out soon and be a laughingstock in the culinary world from now until eternity?

Did they steal their cheesecake recipe from Marie Callender?

cincinnati chili
11-30-2006, 07:14 AM
Yikes!!!!

So, does that mean they're gonna flame out soon and be a laughingstock in the culinary world from now until eternity?

Did they steal their cheesecake recipe from Marie Callender?

Will gangsta rap moguls dangle cheescake factory over a balcony, demanding rights to their intellectual property?

RFS62
11-30-2006, 07:20 AM
Will gangsta rap moguls dangle cheescake factory over a balcony, demanding rights to their intellectual property?



Boy, they wish.

Chicks always fall for the dangerous pastries

Heath
11-30-2006, 07:28 AM
And I was a long-time grill cook at the Frisch's Big Boy in Athens OH and Centerville OH. Flip them burgers, drop the PTs, and keep the onion rings coming.

I will speak for the loveliness of Frisch's waitresses. *Man* did I mine that vein for a long time. They were either long-time Southern Ohio veteran types with many miles and wrinkles or fresh college girls. The vet types I made sure I stayed on the good side of. The college girls were, well, eager college girls and I was an eager college guy. God bless you Ellen, Barbara, Linda, Betty, Belva, Nancy, etc etc etc. wherever you may be.

:laugh: I had a buddy who worked at Perkins (fantastic stuff, btw) who in college did the reverse you did Roy. He prefered the "classics".

I never worked in restaraunts except for a short spell at the Golden Arches. Most of my part-time works was for a sporting goods store in the Mall. Instead of being captive with waitresses, you could either oogle the plasto-babes at the Gap or at the Jewelry or the seemingly bookish gals who worked the Bombay Company. Retail life tends to be a little "lonely' and people are away from home. It's like college. Every mall had a bar or two that would be open until midnight or one AM. 95% of the time after 10pm were Mall employees. Sometimes the locals had an advantage and would play tour guide of all the local establishments. The web of mall romance was pretty deep. You learn pretty quickly.

Rojo
11-30-2006, 01:17 PM
Well they have opened 9 stores this year and I've made 17% on the stock since June. Eat up everybody.

"Nobody ever went broke underestimating the American public" ~ H.L. Mencken

Redsland
11-30-2006, 01:23 PM
I have horror stories about the backsides and underbellies of chain restaurants that would send Red in Chicago into a nuclear bomb shelter for the rest of his life.
Like these (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&EAN=9780060934910&itm=2)?
:runaway:

registerthis
11-30-2006, 01:28 PM
I ate a hot dog at Stuckeys once and I'm still here.


I can top that--I once ate a 25˘ hotdog at a Columbus flea market.

Some things are just better left undiscovered.

registerthis
11-30-2006, 01:31 PM
That's not the point. They're making a ton of $$$ (as did Vanilla Ice). They're doing something right, Ice did something right.

I don't think CF is in to to win culinary awards. I think they're in it to make dough. And that they are.

So they're a good business...but NOT necessarily good food.

I'd say they're doing something WELL, but not particularly RIGHT.

Johnny Footstool
11-30-2006, 02:28 PM
So they're a good business...but NOT necessarily good food.

I'd say they're doing something WELL, but not particularly RIGHT.

Like Budweiser, McDonalds, Pizza Hut, "Friends", the "Friday the 13th" movies, etc.

registerthis
11-30-2006, 03:00 PM
Like Budweiser, McDonalds, Pizza Hut, "Friends", the "Friday the 13th" movies, etc.

I can't tell you how disappointing it was to visit Ireland and discover that they drink Bud over there.

It'd be sorta like finding out that Paul McCartney listens to Kevin Federline.

max venable
11-30-2006, 03:12 PM
So they're a good business...but NOT necessarily good food.

I'd say they're doing something WELL, but not particularly RIGHT.

I like their food. A lot. Apparently a whole bunch of other folks do too.

BuckeyeRed27
11-30-2006, 03:22 PM
I can't tell you how disappointing it was to visit Ireland and discover that they drink Bud over there.

It'd be sorta like finding out that Paul McCartney listens to Kevin Federline.

Totally agree on that. I asked a bar tender in Dublin if anybody bought it and he told me it was their most popular beer. I ordered a Guiness.

registerthis
11-30-2006, 03:22 PM
I like their food. A lot. Apparently a whole bunch of other folks do too.

I'm glad you enjoy it, but my point is that "big sales" does not necessarily equal "quality product." It only means "good business model."

McDonald's has sales far surpassing Cheesecake Factory--would you place the quality of their food ahead of CF?

registerthis
11-30-2006, 03:25 PM
Totally agree on that. I asked a bar tender in Dublin if anybody bought it and he told me it was their most popular beer. I ordered a Guiness.

Yep, I had the same experience. Although my bartender laughed and said "Yeah, it's swill...but it sells, so I carry it."

Not much Bud drinking in Australia, I discovered. All they have is Foster's, Carlton Draught and Victoria Bitter. Victoria wasn't bad, Draught was drinkable, but Foster's was crap.

Rojo
11-30-2006, 03:39 PM
I can't tell you how disappointing it was to visit Ireland and discover that they drink Bud over there.

I bartend once a week in bar that caters mostly to Irish. We have Guiness and Bass on tap and they mostly drink Bud and Coors Light -- a lot of it.

Falls City Beer
11-30-2006, 03:41 PM
I bartend once a week in bar that caters mostly to Irish. We have Guiness and Bass on tap and they mostly drink Bud and Coors Light -- a lot of it.

My grandfather on my mother's side was first-generation Irish--drank nothing but Jameson and Bud (the Bud affiliation stems from them being a union outfit--as opposed to the scabadelic Coors).

westofyou
11-30-2006, 03:46 PM
My grandfather on my mother's side was first-generation Irish--drank nothing but Jameson and Bud (the Bud affiliation stems from them being a union outfit--as opposed to the scabadelic Coors).

Ambitious Brew : The Story of American Beer

by Maureen Ogle (http://www.amazon.com/Ambitious-Brew-Story-American-Beer/dp/0151010129/sr=8-1/qid=1164919570/ref=sr_1_1/104-3960130-2228746?ie=UTF8&s=books)


Editorial Reviews
From Publishers Weekly
Conventional wisdom has it that giant breweries, driven by corporate greed, have flooded the U.S. with inferior-tasting swill, and the only beer worth drinking is from scattered boutique microbrewers. Nonsense, says Ogle: companies like Miller and Anheuser-Busch are actually near-perfect embodiments of the American dream (in which "liberty nurtured ambition, and ambition fostered success")—and if their beers became noticeably blander 50 years ago, it's because consumers wanted it that way. Ogle (All the Modern Conveniences) looks back at the early years of brewers like Phillip Best, Frederick Pabst and Adolphus Busch as they rose to success making European-style beers for fellow immigrants, converting plenty of native palates along the way. Such men, she claims, should be heralded as captains of industry like Gilded Age icon J.P. Morgan. This material is strong, as is Ogle's analysis of the slow but steady rise of the Prohibition movement, but her narrative loses momentum as she tries to encompass the post–WWII era and add the most successful microbrewers to her list of heroes. Her exuberant musings on the American spirit become distracting, but there's more than enough drama in the family sagas to keep even the soberest of readers turning the pages. (Oct.)

Roy Tucker
11-30-2006, 04:00 PM
I bartend once a week in bar that caters mostly to Irish. We have Guiness and Bass on tap and they mostly drink Bud and Coors Light -- a lot of it.

It's easy to drink a lot of Bud or Coor's. It's not as easy to drink a lot of Guinness or Bass.

I laugh when I hear the Bud ads that talk about "drinkability". That means, "we purposely brew this beer so that you can consume massive quantities of it and get hugely drunk".

registerthis
11-30-2006, 04:01 PM
It's easy to drink a lot of Bud or Coor's. It's not as easy to drink a lot of Guinness or Bass.

I laugh when I hear the Bud ads that talk about "drinkability". That means, "we purposely brew this beer so that you can consume massive quantities of it".

I had a Belgian beer last night that had an alcohol content of 10.9%.

you don't want to drink more than a couple of those bad boys.

Johnny Footstool
11-30-2006, 04:19 PM
I talked to a few folks from England last spring. They were drinking Corona. I asked them about Bass and Newcastle, and they told me that's what hobos drink. :confused:

westofyou
11-30-2006, 04:22 PM
I talked to a few folks from England last spring. They were drinking Corona. I asked them about Bass and Newcastle, and they told me that's what hobos drink. :confused:

I'm hoboing up on some of Sierra Nevada's Celebration Ale later on myself.

Rojo
11-30-2006, 04:29 PM
It's easy to drink a lot of Bud or Coor's. It's not as easy to drink a lot of Guinness or Bass.

Yeah, I think that's it. They park themselves on a bar stool for most of the weekend.

Roy Tucker
11-30-2006, 04:45 PM
I'm hoboing up on some of Sierra Nevada's Celebration Ale later on myself.

We recently had a couple hours to kill in Jackson TN so we visited the Casey Jones Museum. One of their big annual events is the Hobo Gathering. They said we could meet hobo royalty and attend a hobo jungle. My middle daughter has always said she wants to be a hobo, so we may go back.

registerthis
11-30-2006, 05:18 PM
I talked to a few folks from England last spring. They were drinking Corona. I asked them about Bass and Newcastle, and they told me that's what hobos drink. :confused:

That just tells me that the hobos drink good beer in England. Good on 'em.

Yachtzee
11-30-2006, 08:01 PM
I talked to a few folks from England last spring. They were drinking Corona. I asked them about Bass and Newcastle, and they told me that's what hobos drink. :confused:

Well, in England, Stella Artois is considered 'white trash' beer. Budweiser is often praised as high quality while major English brews are trashed, mainly by the younger crowd. But then you meet the sane ones who know there's nothing better than a hand-pulled pint of real English ale. At least that's my experience. Can we get one of our English members to give us their insight?

cincinnati chili
11-30-2006, 09:24 PM
How did we get from cheesecake to hobos?

Not complaining. Just think it's interesting.

Heath
11-30-2006, 10:03 PM
How did we get from cheesecake to hobos?

Not complaining. Just think it's interesting.

Don't forget Vatican's tight shirts, Roy Tucker's cook experiences, and mutual admiration between Frisch's and out of town RedZoners.

This is easily the most ADD-thread ever on RedZone.

vaticanplum
11-30-2006, 10:07 PM
This is easily the most ADD-thread ever on RedZone.

The African webcam is a close second (hey what happened to that anyway?)

bucksfan
11-30-2006, 11:23 PM
Well, in England, Stella Artois is considered 'white trash' beer. Budweiser is often praised as high quality while major English brews are trashed, mainly by the younger crowd. But then you meet the sane ones who know there's nothing better than a hand-pulled pint of real English ale. At least that's my experience. Can we get one of our English members to give us their insight?

I'm not English but my times in English pubs (2 trips of 1 wk each and 1 trip of 2 wks) showed the European beers to be the most consumed by my very informal survey ;) Note I only really drank in Southport (several times) and Liverpool. Hoever I am not sure if I woul dhave even noticed the American beers as I was not looking for them.

woy - The Sierra Nevada Celebration Ale caught my eye in the store the other day. How's it taste?

westofyou
11-30-2006, 11:38 PM
woy - The Sierra Nevada Celebration Ale caught my eye in the store the other day. How's it taste?

Just had three pints, the hops are nice, not spicy like the Christmas Anchor Steam or sticky sweet like The Deschutes Jubilale, I also had a taste of the New Belgian 2 Below... Malty and barlywine like...

Good stuff the Christmas craft beers.

pedro
11-30-2006, 11:40 PM
Just had three pints, the hops are nice, not spicy like the Christmas Anchor Steam or sticky sweet like The Deschutes Jubilale, I also had a taste of the New Belgian 2 Below... Malty and barlywine like...

Good stuff the Christmas craft beers.



I just had two pints myself. good stuff.

DoogMinAmo
12-01-2006, 12:58 AM
Just had three pints, the hops are nice, not spicy like the Christmas Anchor Steam or sticky sweet like The Deschutes Jubilale, I also had a taste of the New Belgian 2 Below... Malty and barlywine like...

Good stuff the Christmas craft beers.

Great Lakes Christmas Ale is niiiiice. Good luck finding some though.

Yachtzee
12-01-2006, 01:03 AM
Great Lakes Christmas Ale is niiiiice. Good luck finding some though.

I'll second you on that. Great stuff, but hard to find outside NE Ohio.

registerthis
12-01-2006, 09:19 AM
I'll second you on that. Great stuff, but hard to find outside NE Ohio.

I like me some Burning River Ale. Both because I just think it's a good ale, and because the bottles are a good conversation piece with friends who don't know the fantastic history of Cleveland.

Roy Tucker
12-01-2006, 09:24 AM
I like me some Burning River Ale. Both because I just think it's a good ale, and because the bottles are a good conversation piece with friends who don't know the fantastic history of Cleveland.

There's a red moon rising
On the Cuyahoga River
Rolling into Cleveland to the lake

There's an oil barge winding
Down the Cuyahoga River
Rolling into Cleveland to the lake

Cleveland city of light city of magic
Cleveland city of light you're calling me
Cleveland, even now I can remember
'Cause the Cuyahoga River
Goes smokin' through my dreams

Burn on, big river, burn on
Burn on, big river, burn on
Now the Lord can make you tumble
And the Lord can make you turn
And the Lord can make you overflow
But the Lord can't make you burn

Burn on, big river, burn on
Burn on, big river, burn on

Yachtzee
12-01-2006, 09:37 AM
I like me some Burning River Ale. Both because I just think it's a good ale, and because the bottles are a good conversation piece with friends who don't know the fantastic history of Cleveland.

Burning River is great.

Other conversation piece beer names from Great Lakes:

Edmund Fitzgerald Porter - honors the men who lost their lives on the Edmund Fitzgerald, immortalized in the Gordon Lightfoot song of the same name. When I worked there, some families of men on the Edmund Fitzgerald drove all the way to Cleveland from Minnesota to try the beer. They enjoyed the beer and thought it was a great way to honor the men who lost their lives. We made sure to treat them well while they were in town.

Eliot Ness Vienna Lager - Not many people know that Eliot Ness, after his work with the Untouchables, went on to become the Safety Director of Cleveland. He used to frequent the bar that is now part of the GLBC restaurant. The bartenders and tour guides like to point out a bullet hole in the bar and often pose the question, "Was it meant for Eliot Ness?"

Blackout Stout - Remember that blackout a few years back that took out power all over the Northeastern US and Canada? Started in NE Ohio.

NoCalRed
12-01-2006, 09:08 PM
Just had three pints, the hops are nice, not spicy like the Christmas Anchor Steam or sticky sweet like The Deschutes Jubilale, I also had a taste of the New Belgian 2 Below... Malty and barlywine like...

Good stuff the Christmas craft beers.

Maybe I'll give the Celebration Ale a try although I am a little skeptical of Sierras "specialty" brews. I tried their summer beer and it was really not very good, but I should have known it is a lager after all.

Speaking of seasonal beers right now I am currently finishing up drinking my yearly pumpkin ale. I have to say, with out patting myself on the back too much, that I did a really good job with it this year. It's really malty, sweet, and a nice thick head..yummy. It also makes nice gifts for friends and coworkers. :beerme:

remdog
12-01-2006, 09:16 PM
To tie this entire thread together we need someone to post about the cheesecake ale made in the Frisches' kitchen while fliping bergers and sweet -talking waitresses which is conviently served in humongous portions at all Cracker Barrel Restaurants. Cheesecake Ale is apparently being smuggled to Portland in order to satisfy some duo out there that only seems to drink things that are unheard of and will never be heard of again (if that's possible) :beerme:

Rem

Redhook
12-02-2006, 09:01 AM
I like me some Burning River Ale. Both because I just think it's a good ale, and because the bottles are a good conversation piece with friends who don't know the fantastic history of Cleveland.

That's a great beer, my favorite. I think it's great that you can get this beer on draft at the Red's games. I believe it's $1 more than Bud Light, but it's alot better and has almost twice the alcohol in it. Better value ;) . If anyone's wondering where I found it, it's at a small booth on the lower level in between home plate and first base. I'm not sure if there's another one in the stadium.

As far as the Cheesecake Factory goes, I think the food is pretty bad. I've eaten three meals there, the last being 4 years ago in Orlando. I wish they'd limit the number of items on the menu and focus more on quality. I do love the Godiva chocolate cheesecake. It's incredible. I'll definitely go back for that. It's one of the few, if not the only one, that doesn't have all that foo-foo icing and extras on top. I highly recommend it.

oneupper
12-02-2006, 09:04 AM
Cheesecake Factory Down on Outlook
Friday December 1, 1:34 pm ET


Cheesecake Factory Shares Fall on 3rd-Quarter Earnings Miss, Lackluster 4th-Quarter Outlook

NEW YORK (AP) -- Shares of Cheesecake Factory Inc. tumbled Friday after the casual-dining chain pulled a hat trick of bad news, reporting a lower third-quarter profit, slumping quarterly same-store sales, and offering softer-than-expected guidance for the current quarter.

Late Thursday, the company said it expects fourth-quarter profit between 22 cents and 24 cents, while analysts polled by Thomson Financial expect a higher profit of 26 cents per share. It also forecast revenue between $351 million and $354 million, while analysts are looking for sales of $356.5 million.

The Cheesecake Factory also reported third-quarter net income fell 17 percent to 23 cents per share, while analysts were looking for 24 cents per share. Same-store sales, or sales in stores open at least a year, declined 1.6 percent during the quarter.

Cheesecake Factory said same-store sales have been flat to slightly positive so far in the fourth quarter.

Investors sent shares down $1.59, or 5.7 percent, to $26.12 during afternoon trading on the Nasdaq. The stock has traded between $21.65 and $39.28 during the past 52 weeks.

Some analysts, however, were more positive than investors about the results.

The fourth-quarter same-store sales report "is higher than our previous minus-0.5 percent fourth-quarter estimate and suggests that the company may be seeing some modest fundamental improvement," said Goldman Sachs analyst Steven T. Kron, who raised his same-store sales expectations to flat in the fourth quarter.

Bear Stearns analyst Joseph T. Buckley called results "mixed," noting that sales had previously been released so there was no surprise on the top line and affirmed his "Outperform" rating on the stock.

SunTrust Robinson Humphrey analyst Christopher O'Cull, was more negative, particularly regarding fourth-quarter same-store sales news.

"Given it is lapping easier comparisons due to softer hurricane-related same-store sales (in the fourth quarter last year), we believe quarter-to-date results do not represent the underlying trend and that same-store sales may decelerate through the balance of 2006.

He downgraded the company to "Reduce" from "Neutral."

Heath
12-02-2006, 12:19 PM
Cheesecake Factory Down on Outlook
Friday December 1, 1:34 pm ET

Way to Rojo - you collapser of the American Dream. It's all your fault.....


:D

SunDeck
12-02-2006, 12:52 PM
Just had three pints, the hops are nice, not spicy like the Christmas Anchor Steam or sticky sweet like The Deschutes Jubilale, I also had a taste of the New Belgian 2 Below... Malty and barlywine like...

Good stuff the Christmas craft beers.

I'm bottling a dark lager tonight. It'll be my Christmas brew. Three weeks in the cold garage ought to mellow it out nicely.

westofyou
12-02-2006, 12:53 PM
I'm bottling a dark lager tonight. It'll be my Christmas brew. Three weeks in the cold garage ought to mellow it out nicely.

Do you spice it with cheer or make it extra strong?

SunDeck
12-02-2006, 01:00 PM
Do you spice it with cheer or make it extra strong?

Well, let's just say I'm gonna make sure this batch brings on the cheer.

http://www.beertravelers.com/images/drunk.jpg

Redlegs23
12-02-2006, 02:19 PM
I'm going to the Cheesecake Factory tonight.

Red in Chicago
12-02-2006, 06:01 PM
Cheesecake Factory Down on Outlook
Friday December 1, 1:34 pm ET

it had been doing alright since august and i thought i was finally going to reach break even...unfortunately, it looks like i'm going to have to wait it out a little longer...i really don't like the idea of taking a loss just for tax purposes, but i also don't like holding onto companies that aren't moving in the right direction...

Rojo
12-04-2006, 02:10 PM
My grandfather on my mother's side was first-generation Irish--drank nothing but Jameson and Bud (the Bud affiliation stems from them being a union outfit--as opposed to the scabadelic Coors).

And the Jameson affiliation might stem from religion. In San Francisco, most bars carry Jameson -- the "catholic" whiskey -- and don't carry the "protestant" Bushmills.

NoCalRed
12-04-2006, 08:00 PM
I'm bottling a dark lager tonight. It'll be my Christmas brew. Three weeks in the cold garage ought to mellow it out nicely.

Aaah a fellow brewer. Not to take over the thread here too much, but how long you been brewing? Extract or whole grain? Cheers:beerme: