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registerthis
12-14-2006, 12:40 PM
I'm having problems with my PC freezing up on me for no apparent reason this morning, and am just generally about to the point of tossing the thing out the window and onto the street below in a fit of computer desk rage. So, this got me thinking--Mac, or PC?

Just wondering what those on here use, and why you prefer one over the other. Obviously, what you're using it for could result in drastically different answers. But I'm feeling like a nice little anti-PC rant right now. What does everyone else think?

Unassisted
12-14-2006, 12:47 PM
I prefer Macs. They work without being susceptible to viruses and spyware. I've been a Mac user since 1987, so I'm used to the interface. PC fans will undoubtedly mention the lack of software, but there aren't any applications that I clamor for on the Windows side.

M2
12-14-2006, 01:09 PM
I use both. Mac at home, PCs at work. Never in zillion years would I pay for a PC.

dougdirt
12-14-2006, 01:12 PM
Depends what you want to use your computer for.

oneupper
12-14-2006, 01:22 PM
Oneupper's house has 4 Macs and a Dell I do accounting on. Quicken and Quickbooks don't work well with macs.

Macs are ideal for homes. Easy to set up, easy to maintain (not maintenance-free, however). And the virus and spyware issue is huge.
Apple's support is good, IMO, although I've never had to use it much.
iLife software is great for photos, home movies, music etc...

The latest MacBook I bought turned out to be a dud. Came down with what is known as Random Shutdown Syndrome. I didn't send it in until I was sure that Apple had a grasp on the issue (the were reports of 'repaired" macs continuing to show symptoms). However, when I did send it in, it came back fixed (no problems since).

I digress, get a Mac if you can afford it.

gonelong
12-14-2006, 01:26 PM
I have never used a MAC, but I have an interest in checking one out.

I have to say, those MAC/PC commercials are brilliant. Paint the MAC as the younger generations computer while the pudgy, stodgy, older drone toils with his less than effective PC.

Just brilliant, IMO.

GL

oneupper
12-14-2006, 01:28 PM
I have never used a MAC, but I have an interest in checking one out.

I have to say, those MAC/PC commercials are brilliant. Paint the MAC as the younger generations computer while the pudgy, stodgy, older drone toils with his less than effective PC.

Just brilliant, IMO.

GL

Once you go MAC, you never go BACK :thumbup:

gonelong
12-14-2006, 01:31 PM
Once you go MAC, you never go BACK :thumbup:

I perceived a switch over to a MAC as quite and undertaking for me. We are PC based at work and I do take work home on an infrequent basis.

I also have a side business (software & web design) with a few co-horts and they are all PC based as well.

Plus I have trained the Mrs. to where she can do everything on the PC herself.

Maybe my perception is not correct, but my perception is that a change now would be a monumental PITA.

GL

registerthis
12-14-2006, 01:38 PM
I have never used a MAC, but I have an interest in checking one out.

I have to say, those MAC/PC commercials are brilliant. Paint the MAC as the younger generations computer while the pudgy, stodgy, older drone toils with his less than effective PC.

Just brilliant, IMO.

GL

i agree. My wife and I both love the MAC commercials as well. She's a mAC user, I'm not that familiar with them. But I do a sizeable amount of home recording, so my next home computer may very well end up being a MAC.

westofyou
12-14-2006, 01:44 PM
I use both. Mac at home, PCs at work. Never in zillion years would I pay for a PC.

Complete opposite, Steve Jobs gets nothing from me.

vaticanplum
12-14-2006, 01:48 PM
I prefer Macs which is what I have at home. Honestly, for someone like me who is far from a computer guru, it is *still* a little harder for me to use, even though I've been using Macs almost exclusively for years except when I have to deal with PCs at this-or-that job. But the virus control is completely worth it in my opinion. I've never had a single problem with my current ibook, not one, in about two and a half years (knock on wood). This was unheard of when I was using PCs: virus, hard drive, blah blah blah. It is sturdy and handy and it just doesn't break. So I love it.

Johnny Footstool
12-14-2006, 01:56 PM
Macs are nice to look at and render graphics beautifully.

PCs actually have catalogs of software they can run.

Yachtzee
12-14-2006, 01:56 PM
I've been a PC user all my life. The only time I have ever used a Mac was once or twice back in the days when university computer labs were filled with them. That being said, I think I might try out one of those dual core processor Macs. One reason I've been avoiding Macs is that with it being a PC world, I've been affraid that I wouldn't be able to do things like email docs between home and work, or now home and school and work. But now that there's Office for Mac and those dual core processors that can run Windows if necessary. Not that I really want to use Windows. I'm just concerned about needing some piece of software for my profession that will only run on Windows.

westofyou
12-14-2006, 01:59 PM
PCs actually have catalogs of software they can run.

Yep, case in point I use prototyping software (http://www.axure.com/) that's not available in Mac, why is this?

Because Mac may have funny commercials and all that, but businesses don't build their business on them.

Johnny Footstool
12-14-2006, 02:14 PM
Because Mac may have funny commercials and all that, but businesses don't build their business on them.

Remember the movie "Independence Day" in which Jeff Goldblum uses an Apple Powerbook to decrypt the alien security codes? I always thought it was funny that the least-compatible computer on earth could somehow communicate with the sophisticated devices of a marauding alien race.

M2
12-14-2006, 02:14 PM
I perceived a switch over to a MAC as quite and undertaking for me. We are PC based at work and I do take work home on an infrequent basis.

I also have a side business (software & web design) with a few co-horts and they are all PC based as well.

Plus I have trained the Mrs. to where she can do everything on the PC herself.

Maybe my perception is not correct, but my perception is that a change now would be a monumental PITA.

GL

Honestly, switching to a Mac is no more difficult that plugging it into the wall.

I wouldn't necessarily suggest it for the software business, but as a home machine it couldn't be easier. I liken it to owning a car. The Mac's like a Toyota that you pretty much don't have to worry about. It's reliable, well-designed, drives well and gets you everywhere you need to go. For those who are going to want to tweak their car's performance and spend a lot of time under the hood it's probably not a good fit, but that's a sliver of the buying public.

PCs still hold a desktop advantage in offices because it's easier and cheaper to buy them by the truckload and because the support staff all have MCSEs. Mind you, my guess is if someone sat down and figured out the cost of employing all those MCSE technicians and the down time of the average PC, the cost of Mac as a workstation would start to look a lot better.

harangatang
12-14-2006, 02:14 PM
PC hands down. Macs are so uncompatible, there's so many more things you can do with a PC.

westofyou
12-14-2006, 02:16 PM
Mind you, my guess is if someone sat down and figured out the cost of employing all those MCSE technicians and the down time of the average PC, the cost of Mac as a workstation would start to look a lot better.

Seriously, I've being hearing that for 16 years now.

M2
12-14-2006, 02:21 PM
but businesses don't build their business on them.

Depends on your business needs. Pretty much any media company is better off using Macs (from publishing to news to entertainment). If you're software development or spreadsheet heavy, then a PC is probably what you need, but what most businesses do is curse their constant server failures and spend inordinate amounts of time and money servicing their desktops/laptops.

M2
12-14-2006, 02:32 PM
Seriously, I've being hearing that for 16 years now.

I've seen it in practice, not that it matters any more than the slew of benchmark reports or finanical projects that have been done over the years. The barrier is that businesses have invested in PCs and it's rare that an IT department will ever recommend a switch because they've got jobs to protect. If you're a company of any size, you're talking about a massive culture change for something that's got little to do with your core business.

Until someone offers workstations at a significantly lower price the execs aren't going to take the whip to the IT department to make the switch.

westofyou
12-14-2006, 02:49 PM
Until someone offers workstations at a significantly lower price the execs aren't going to take the whip to the IT department to make the switch.

"You have to have a wildly different strategy and you have to be right. It's that second part that gets tricky."

Scott McNealy

RosieRed
12-14-2006, 02:59 PM
At home I have a PC. At work I use both, at the same time. My work computer is a Mac, but it runs a Windows PC interface through Parallels. On the PC side I mostly work with words, on the Mac side in Photoshop, Illustrator, etc.

I like both. (Is that allowed??)

M2
12-14-2006, 03:05 PM
"You have to have a wildly different strategy and you have to be right. It's that second part that gets tricky."

Scott McNealy

Scott's a bright guy, dead on about the network. Never figured out how to sell software though.

Anyway, some day someone's going to figure out how to build an inexpensive, reliable workstation that lets you chose you O/S like you do your Web browser. It'll probably come from China and take a little while to wend its way over to the states.

Falls City Beer
12-14-2006, 03:08 PM
Complete opposite, Steve Jobs gets nothing from me.

Macs are crap: glitchy and expensive to fix. Windows is slow, no question, but any jobber can fix a problem.

westofyou
12-14-2006, 03:12 PM
It'll probably come from China and take a little while to wend its way over to the states.

I'm currently working a reverse engineering of an application that out sources all their java scripting (which the application is written in) to China

westofyou
12-14-2006, 03:12 PM
Macs are crap: glitchy and expensive to fix. Windows is slow, no question, but any jobber can fix a problem.

And Steve Jobs nibbles from the candy bins at Whole Foods.

Falls City Beer
12-14-2006, 03:17 PM
And Steve Jobs nibbles from the candy bins at Whole Foods.

Tofutti Time!!!

Ltlabner
12-14-2006, 03:20 PM
I am in sales and travel frequently. I've used windows based laptops since 1995 and have never once had an issue with them. They are constantly in and out of my breifcase, riding in my car and flying on airplanes but they keep working, hardware, software and all. I'm probably more advanced than a basic user (not by much) so I can tinker if something does get a little hinky.

Most of my business computing consists of email, power point, excell, using citrix, CAD files, some video/graphics, and the occasinal foray into access databases. I've used a pocket pc along with the windows laptop and have used many different 3rd party software with both the desktop and PC and have never run into the horror stories that I'm told, by law, will befall me someday.

At home I have PC for the reason Jonny Footstool said, I can actually use the computer becuase there is software available. At home it's emailing, web surfing, documents, spreadsheets and games.

RFS62
12-14-2006, 03:24 PM
A lot of the software I use is vertical market stuff, and all for the PC.

The MAC commercials are brilliant, but I've spent 20+ years with PC's and don't see any need to change.

M2
12-14-2006, 03:27 PM
Macs are crap: glitchy and expensive to fix. Windows is slow, no question, but any jobber can fix a problem.

Which is good given the number of problems the average PC experiences. The PCs I've used for work have required constant maintenance. Recently had to deal with a situation where our remote workers kept having their PC laptops die on them.

Meanwhile I've owned Macs at home for the past decade. Total maintenance cost to date: $0. Pretty much every freelance writer I know owns a Mac because of that. They don't have the time or the money for the maintenance and upkeep.

Johnny Footstool
12-14-2006, 03:46 PM
Tofutti Time!!!

:laugh:

Oh, Robert, anything is possible, as long as you imagineer it!

Falls City Beer
12-14-2006, 03:50 PM
Which is good given the number of problems the average PC experiences. The PCs I've used for work have required constant maintenance. Recently had to deal with a situation where our remote workers kept having their PC laptops die on them.

Meanwhile I've owned Macs at home for the past decade. Total maintenance cost to date: $0. Pretty much every freelance writer I know owns a Mac because of that. They don't have the time or the money for the maintenance and upkeep.

I suspect it's because you have an older model Mac.

The new models (ibooks in particular) are total garbage--my wife has gone through two $1400 Macs in 5 years. I still have my $600 HP from three years ago, only having to replace my AC cable. All of my colleagues are Mac geeks. Some complain; some don't.

I think modern day PCs are more like Toyotas--unsexy, but effective, compatible, and, if unburdened by really heavy downloading, very, very reliable.

Roy Tucker
12-14-2006, 04:01 PM
Scott's a bright guy, dead on about the network.


He ripped that line off from DEC's "the network is the system and the system is the network" marketing blurb who had ripped it off from Regis McKenna.

M2
12-14-2006, 04:05 PM
I suspect it's because you have an older model Mac.

Got the latest iMac a little over a year ago. Couldn't be happier. Don't know about iBooks directly, though I know a ton of freelancers who swear by them. They can't afford to take a job and not be able to deliver on the deadline because of a computer glitch. I've lost count of the number of PC-induced panics I've encountered (either from colleagues or those submitting to me) over the years.

M2
12-14-2006, 04:07 PM
He ripped that line off from DEC's "the network is the system and the system is the network" marketing blurb who had ripped it off from Regis McKenna.

Though, unlike DEC, he made the right bet on TCP/IP.

Roy Tucker
12-14-2006, 04:12 PM
Though, unlike DEC, he made the right bet on TCP/IP.

Yep, DEC seemed to have a knack for picking the wrong horse in the race. Network protocols, PC vs. servers, chip sets, etc., you name it, they screwed it up.

(Roy, DECnet/OSI engineering circa 1982)

RANDY IN INDY
12-14-2006, 04:17 PM
Have used both, but my wife has been in the publishing business for a long time and we have always had a Mac at home. I love it. No problems, easy to use. Wouldn't trade it for a PC.

nate
12-14-2006, 05:07 PM
To be quite honest, I would discount the opinion of anyone who practices "Platform Fundamentalism" on either side of the (what passes for a) Mac/PC debate. "Macs are crap", "PCs are hard to use", "Macs aren't compatible", "PCs are boring", et al. are not comments that are useful to helping you make the decision about what platform is right for you.

In my opinion, the most important issues are:

*what is your budget
*what software do you want to run
*what hardware do you want to hookup to your computer

Then again, what would an OT forum be without an OS debate?

M2
12-14-2006, 05:25 PM
To be quite honest, I would discount the opinion of anyone who practices "Platform Fundamentalism" on either side of the (what passes for a) Mac/PC debate. "Macs are crap", "PCs are hard to use", "Macs aren't compatible", "PCs are boring", et al. are not comments that are useful to helping you make the decision about what platform is right for you.

In my opinion, the most important issues are:

*what is your budget
*what software do you want to run
*what hardware do you want to hookup to your computer

Then again, what would an OT forum be without an OS debate?

Well sure, if you're going to be all sensible about things.

beb30
12-14-2006, 05:43 PM
Depends what you want to use your computer for.

exactly

Roy Tucker
12-14-2006, 05:49 PM
And I assume PC == Intel/Windows

Introducing Intel/Linux into the fray makes the discussion even more interesting.

15fan
12-14-2006, 05:56 PM
As long as the machine can deliver a steady stream of porn, does it really matter what label is on the box? :evil:

pedro
12-14-2006, 06:15 PM
I'm a software developer. Mac's are not an option. Even if I wasn't I don't think I'd go mac as there is just too much software I like, such as Rhapsody, that don't work on Mac.

reds1869
12-14-2006, 07:15 PM
I switched to MAC five years ago and have never looked back. I'm using the same machine I bought back then and it is STILL faster than any of the new Windows machines I use at work.

oneupper
12-14-2006, 10:00 PM
As long as the machine can deliver a steady stream of porn, does it really matter what label is on the box? :evil:

The Mac has Applescript, which you can use to easily write small little programs that can say..sequentially open or download certain files (say certain jpegs or mpegs) that you may find in certain parts of the web...

Get the picture? (or all of them)? :evil: