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Jpup
12-25-2006, 11:04 PM
Tiger Woods had an answer for everything.

When he missed the cut at the U.S. Open for the first time in a major -- his first tournament after his father died of cancer -- some questioned whether he could rekindle his desire to dominate. He never finished worse than second in stroke play the rest of the season.

Phil Mickelson emerged anew as a serious threat to Woods by winning his second straight major at The Masters and nearly making it three in a row at the U.S. Open. Woods responded by winning the next two majors.

And there remained skepticism about his latest swing change, put to rest by a year that ranked among Woods' best ever on the PGA Tour. He won eight times in 15 starts, six in a row to close out his season, two more majors to reach 12 for his career.

About the only thing he couldn't answer was how he was voted AP Male Athlete of the Year.

Woods won the award over San Diego Chargers running back LaDainian Tomlinson, with tennis great Roger Federer a distant third. The 31-year-old Woods won for the fourth time in his career, tying the record set by Lance Armstrong, who won the last four years.

While pleased to hear he had won the award, Woods was perplexed it did not go to his good friend Federer, who continues to dominate tennis. Woods was in Federer's box at Flushing Meadows when the Swiss star captured the U.S. Open title.

"What he's done in tennis, I think, is far greater than what I've done in golf," Woods said. "He's lost what ... five matches in three years? That's pretty good."

Federer has actually lost a few more than that, but not many. His record in 2006 was an amazing 92-5, including 12 singles titles.

Woods received 260 points from sports editors around the country. Tomlinson, who has already set an NFL record of 31 touchdowns with one regular-season game left, was second with 230 points. Federer, who won three Grand Slam titles and lost in the final at the French Open, had 110 points.

Rounding out the top of the list were Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade (40 points) and St. Louis Cardinals slugger Albert Pujols and NL home run champion Ryan Howard of the Philadelphia Phillies (20 points each).

Fred Couples, the former Masters champion and all-around sports nut who attended Wimbledon this year, ran through the achievements of the top three and figured it would be a tough vote to cast.

"Roger Federer is pretty sporty," Couples said. "Tomlinson is going to pound the record by I don't know how many TDs. It's all great. You would think if you're Roger Federer and you didn't win it this year, you don't know what else you could possibly do. But Tiger ... it's not like he's not deserving. He's winning 55 percent of the tournaments he plays. He's probably ahead of Shaq's free-throw percentage."

Woods again made it look routine, winning at least eight PGA Tour events for the third time in his career and becoming the first player in history to capture multiple majors in consecutive seasons.

"Anytime you're over 50 percent winning in our sports, it's probably a good year," Woods said. "I know how hard it is. I know what it takes to get to that point. I hate to say it, but people in the media and fans don't understand how hard it is. Players do. The things players have said to me over the years, that means a lot."

What made this year different from others was the magnitude of his loss.

After winning his first two tournaments of the year, the Buick Invitational and the Dubai Desert Classic on the European Tour, Woods' progress slowed as his father's health deteriorated. Earl Woods, the father, architect and driving force behind his son as a person and a player, died May 3.

During a celebration of his father's life in the lobby of the Tiger Woods Learning Center, Woods refused to sit as he listened to stories about his father, his solemn face yielding to an occasional grin whenever someone told a humorous anecdote. He said later he tends to bottle up his emotions, and they burst forth at the British Open.

Using driver only once on the crispy links of Royal Liverpool, Woods won by two shots to become the first player in 23 years with back-to-back wins at the British Open, and the lasting image of his season was Woods sobbing on the shoulder of his caddie, and then his wife, realizing it was the first golf victory he couldn't share with his father.

"At that moment, it just came pouring out," he said that day. "And of all the things that my father has meant to me and the game of golf, I just wish he would have seen it one more time."

To this day, Woods said he quickly turns off the tape of British Open highlights when he taps in his final putt.

The rest of the year was a blur of trophies. He overpowered the field at the Buick Open; putted his best at the PGA Championship; outlasted Stewart Cink in a playoff at the Bridgestone Invitational; made two eagles in the first seven holes on his way to a 63 to overcome a three-shot deficit against Vijay Singh at the Deutsche Bank Championship; and then won by eight shots at the American Express Championship.

On paper, the results looked familiar. In his heart, Woods said it was his toughest year, which he ultimately described as a loss because of his father's death.

For his peers, it left them at a loss for words.

"We're used to it," Davis Love III said. "People were trying to compare this year to 2000, but 2000 was surprising. Now it's like saying, 'Hey, there's a Ferrari. Oh, there's another Ferrari. There's another Ferrari.' It's an outstanding year, but it's not his only one. If I had a year like his, they would say, 'What an incredible year.' For him, it's just another brilliant year.

"It's hard for him when he wins four tournaments and no majors because people say, 'What in the world happened?' That's when you realize how good he is," Love said.

Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press

AP male athlete of the year voting
Athlete Points
Tiger Woods 260
LaDainian Tomlinson 230
Roger Federer 110
Dwyane Wade 40
Albert Pujols 20
Ryan Howard 20
Vince Young 10
Shaun White 10
Floyd Landis 10

Red in Chicago
12-25-2006, 11:13 PM
when i think of an athlete, a golfer never comes to mind

Jpup
12-25-2006, 11:17 PM
when i think of an athlete, a golfer never comes to mind

Tiger Woods is a different story. He is a great athlete, which I presume, could do anything well in the world of sports. What he does is far away better than anybody that I have ever witnessed other than Micheal Jordan. I would probably put Tiger above Jordan. Anyone that thinks that golf isn't a sport hasn't ever witnessed it played well. You have your exception is every sport such as guys like David Wells in baseball and John Daly in golf. They don't appear to be great athletes but Tiger is another story. Simply amazing.

MWM
12-25-2006, 11:43 PM
Great choice. I can't think of anyone who should have come close to Tiger in this category.

And we've had the golfer/athlete discussion plenty of times. No need to rehash it here.

George Foster
12-26-2006, 12:41 AM
I know Tennis is not that popular anymore but no one is better at what they do than Roger Federer. I think he has won 85 out of his last 90 matches. True, Tiger plays 120 guys every tournament and Federer plays one-on-one, but not even Tiger can go 85 out of 90 one-on-one with the talant on the PGA tour.

Jpup
12-26-2006, 04:11 AM
I know Tennis is not that popular anymore but no one is better at what they do than Roger Federer. I think he has won 85 out of his last 90 matches. True, Tiger plays 120 guys every tournament and Federer plays one-on-one, but not even Tiger can go 85 out of 90 one-on-one with the talant on the PGA tour.

As far as dominance, Annika Sorenstam is way up there too.

remdog
12-26-2006, 06:09 AM
And we've had the golfer/athlete discussion plenty of times. No need to rehash it here.

Why? Because you say so? It's within the scope of the board and if people want to discuss it they don't need your permission.

Rem

remdog
12-26-2006, 06:28 AM
I know Tennis is not that popular anymore but no one is better at what they do than Roger Federer. I think he has won 85 out of his last 90 matches.

I don't think that the tennis tour is as deep at the top as it was when Samparas, Aggasi, Courier and Chang were at the top of their game but the dominance that Federer shows is quite remarkable to me. About the only one that gives him trouble is Rafael Nadal (although Federer has won the last two matches between them).

For the record, Federer was 92-5 for the year (94.8 winning percentage) with 4 of the 5 loses coming in finals. Pretty amazing.

BTW, Federer and Woods are reportedly fans of each other and have gone to watch each other play when they happen to be in the same city at the same time. Apparently they've struck up a friendship based partially on the fact that they can relate to each others' position in their respective sport and the idea that they are the one to beat every week. I would guess that they are possibly the only two people in the world that knows exactly what the other is going through in that position.

Rem

RFS62
12-26-2006, 08:31 AM
Great choice. I can't think of anyone who should have come close to Tiger in this category.




I'm a huge Tiger fan, but Federer's record is incredible also.

I'd be happy to see either of them win.

RFS62
12-26-2006, 08:36 AM
when i think of an athlete, a golfer never comes to mind





"I know how hard it is. I know what it takes to get to that point. I hate to say it, but people in the media and fans don't understand how hard it is. Players do. The things players have said to me over the years, that means a lot."



.

oneupper
12-26-2006, 08:38 AM
I know Tennis is not that popular anymore.

In the US. There IS a world out there and tennis is quite a universal sport (second to soccer in that respect, IMO).

remdog
12-26-2006, 09:13 AM
Hey 62:

Who was the second quote by? Tiger?

Rem

RedFanAlways1966
12-26-2006, 09:13 AM
My vote would have gone to Jim Coombs... but Tiger is deserving too. :thumbup:

RFS62
12-26-2006, 09:22 AM
Hey 62:

Who was the second quote by? Tiger?

Rem



Yes. And I couldn't agree more, regardless of the sport.

remdog
12-26-2006, 09:35 AM
Oneupper:

Over the past couple of years there have been studies suggesting that participation in tennis is once again on the rise in the US and that golf is in a down-trend.

One study found that people that played tennis on a regular basis was increasing while the number of people that played golf on a regular basis was declining. ('Regular' was somewhat loosely defined as participating twice per month, IIRC.) Seems to me that the reference point was a span of 5 years.

Another study found that the amount of money spent on tennis equipment was rising on a percentage basis faster than the amount of money spent on golf equipment although golf equipment retained a substantial lead in total dollars. This was a little surprising to me since tennis is a relatively inexpensive game to get into. A racquet or two, some good shoes and a $2.00 can of balls and you're in business. Public courts are free. As you move upscale things are more expensive but a top-line racquet is still under $200.00 and a club membership for most people is $100.00-200.00 per month for most families for unlimited playing time.

Anyway, I'm not dumping on golf but here in SoCal it has gotten really expensive. Unfortunately, in Orange County even the Muni courses can run up to about $75.00 per round and the course across from the resort where I work is rumored to be going from $250.00 up to $350.00 per round. The cost of the real estate and/or the money it would generate with another use (homes, apartments, shopping centers) is a major problem. Down in San Diego County they seem to be able to keep costs in check so far though. I understand that most muni courses (which are supposed to be rated very high) can still be played in the $25.00-$30.00 range.

Rem

VR
12-26-2006, 11:13 AM
10 years from now it will be Tomlinson's incredible year that will be talked about....one for the ages.
Not saying Woods or Federer didn't have incredible years, but LT has just dominated the NFL this year, which doesn't get done too often.

RBA
12-26-2006, 11:22 AM
Darn, I was sure Chris Deniforia was going to get it. Maybe they can go ahead and give it to him for 2007 right now. Surely, he can't be beat two years in a row.

dougdirt
12-26-2006, 12:18 PM
Darn, I was sure Chris Deniforia was going to get it. Maybe they can go ahead and give it to him for 2007 right now. Surely, he can't be beat two years in a row.

He wasnt beaten this year, the preliminary polls had him getting every vote. He felt bad for everyone and gave them a Christmas present, withdrawing himself for the voting.

Red Leader
12-26-2006, 03:34 PM
As far as dominance, Annika Sorenstam is way up there too.

They let her play on the PGA tour and now you want her to be considered for AP male athlete of the year. :dunno: :eek:




;) ;)

M2
12-26-2006, 04:14 PM
Without getting into the matter of golf not being a sport, you've got Roger Federer, Asafa Powell, Fabio Cannavaro, Ronaldinho and Benjamin Raich who had better years than Tiger Woods. Heck, Jeremy Warriner had every bit as good a year as Woods.

Mind you, the AP is provincial and haplessly behind the times. Travis Pastrana did the X Games equivalent of the four-minute mile this year.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z02GDd-XOZ0&mode=related&search=

dougdirt
12-26-2006, 05:13 PM
Without getting into the matter of golf not being a sport, you've got Roger Federer, Asafa Powell, Fabio Cannivaro, Ronaldinho and Benjamin Raich who had better years than Tiger Woods. Heck, Jeremy Warriner had every bit as good a year as Woods.

Mind you, the AP is provincial and haplessly behind the times. Travis Pastrana did the X games equivalent of the four-minute mile this year.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z02GDd-XOZ0&mode=related&search=

I remember watching that live, and I was honestly scared for his life. That is insane enough on a bike, much less on a motorcycle. If you over or under rotate that double flip, you are going to get messed up. You get off center, you are going to get messed up.

paintmered
12-26-2006, 06:47 PM
I remember watching that live, and I was honestly scared for his life. That is insane enough on a bike, much less on a motorcycle. If you over or under rotate that double flip, you are going to get messed up. You get off center, you are going to get messed up.



But riding a dirt bike doesn't make you an athlete either. :rolleyes:




I watched that. I couldn't sit down in anticipation because he was either going to pull it off or land himself in a trauma center.

M2
12-26-2006, 11:50 PM
I watched that. I couldn't sit down in anticipation because he was either going to pull it off or land himself in a trauma center.

I happened upon it completely by accident and it was one of the wildest things I've ever seen. I suspect everyone on the planet who saw it live had the same two word, eight letter, part blasphemy, part profanity reaction to it.

My guess is that it'll prove to be the X Games equivalent of the 1958 NFL Championship Game. I believe it's turned into one of the most popular viral sports videos ever.

Jpup
12-27-2006, 01:37 AM
They let her play on the PGA tour and now you want her to be considered for AP male athlete of the year. :dunno: :eek:




;) ;)

:laugh: I should have included when talking athletes in general.

guttle11
12-27-2006, 02:11 AM
Anyone who doesn't think ALL professional golfers are athletes need to pick up a 7-iron and hit 100 balls, walk 18 holes, wake up the next morning and repeat. Then realize that simple boarder-line tour players work 1000x harder than that.

Lorena Ochoa was the winner of the AP female athlete of the year.

Tiger, Federer, LT...not a bad choice among the three.

guttle11
12-27-2006, 02:29 AM
Oneupper:

Over the past couple of years there have been studies suggesting that participation in tennis is once again on the rise in the US and that golf is in a down-trend.

One study found that people that played tennis on a regular basis was increasing while the number of people that played golf on a regular basis was declining. ('Regular' was somewhat loosely defined as participating twice per month, IIRC.) Seems to me that the reference point was a span of 5 years.

Another study found that the amount of money spent on tennis equipment was rising on a percentage basis faster than the amount of money spent on golf equipment although golf equipment retained a substantial lead in total dollars. This was a little surprising to me since tennis is a relatively inexpensive game to get into. A racquet or two, some good shoes and a $2.00 can of balls and you're in business. Public courts are free. As you move upscale things are more expensive but a top-line racquet is still under $200.00 and a club membership for most people is $100.00-200.00 per month for most families for unlimited playing time.

Anyway, I'm not dumping on golf but here in SoCal it has gotten really expensive. Unfortunately, in Orange County even the Muni courses can run up to about $75.00 per round and the course across from the resort where I work is rumored to be going from $250.00 up to $350.00 per round. The cost of the real estate and/or the money it would generate with another use (homes, apartments, shopping centers) is a major problem. Down in San Diego County they seem to be able to keep costs in check so far though. I understand that most muni courses (which are supposed to be rated very high) can still be played in the $25.00-$30.00 range.

Rem

Golf, like almost any other business, is cyclical. Right now over-saturation and high prices have slowed and even shrunk the golf business quite a bit, in terms of rounds played. The course I work at had our rounds decrease by almost 10% but sales was only about 2% off.

It'll be back once Darwinism takes care of those problems.

Jpup
12-27-2006, 05:58 AM
Golf, like almost any other business, is cyclical. Right now over-saturation and high prices have slowed and even shrunk the golf business quite a bit, in terms of rounds played. The course I work at had our rounds decrease by almost 10% but sales was only about 2% off.

It'll be back once Darwinism takes care of those problems.

all it will take is one real hot challenger to Tiger on the PGA tour and golf will boom again. I don't see that happening soon though. Tiger is just that much better than everyone.

paintmered
12-27-2006, 01:01 PM
Golf is down right now because prices are high, and a good chunk of the Tiger boomers realized that the game is way harder than it looks.

Highlifeman21
12-27-2006, 01:34 PM
Anyone who doesn't think ALL professional golfers are athletes need to pick up a 7-iron and hit 100 balls, walk 18 holes, wake up the next morning and repeat. Then realize that simple boarder-line tour players work 1000x harder than that.

Lorena Ochoa was the winner of the AP female athlete of the year.

Tiger, Federer, LT...not a bad choice among the three.

I would debate that all professional golfers are athletes. While you need athletic ability, mainly coordination, to be able to play golf, I just don't see a strong argument to call professional golfers "athletes". It's a niche skill set that separates golfers from the other sports.

Being a golf pro, I don't consider myself an athlete b/c I play golf, but rather just am able to do a very specific athletic motion. For every Tiger Woods, there's a Tim Herron. For every Carmello Villegas, there's a Phil Mickelson. Each of the first two of the examples are very athletic looking, the second of each of the examples, not so much. All of them can play golf at a high level.

Highlifeman21
12-27-2006, 01:40 PM
Golf, like almost any other business, is cyclical. Right now over-saturation and high prices have slowed and even shrunk the golf business quite a bit, in terms of rounds played. The course I work at had our rounds decrease by almost 10% but sales was only about 2% off.

It'll be back once Darwinism takes care of those problems.


Unfortunately due to eminent domain issues in some states, golf courses are being reclaimed by municipalities to re-use the land as they see fit. In most cases, the reclaimed courses are being turned into housing developments. Most courses that become eminent domain cases usually sell their land to the developers to make a buck, rather than essentially being kicked off the land.

Right now your public daily fee courses are struggling. Private courses also have down rounds, but then can always adjust their budgeting through dues and things of that nature.

Unfortunately, very rarely do you see high quality public courses without some sort of substantial private money. It wouldn't surprise me to see within the next 10 years, all fully public clubs go the way of the dodo, and they will all be semi-private. Watch and see.

guttle11
12-27-2006, 04:53 PM
I would debate that all professional golfers are athletes. While you need athletic ability, mainly coordination, to be able to play golf, I just don't see a strong argument to call professional golfers "athletes". It's a niche skill set that separates golfers from the other sports.

Being a golf pro, I don't consider myself an athlete b/c I play golf, but rather just am able to do a very specific athletic motion. For every Tiger Woods, there's a Tim Herron. For every Carmello Villegas, there's a Phil Mickelson. Each of the first two of the examples are very athletic looking, the second of each of the examples, not so much. All of them can play golf at a high level.

There's examples like that in every sport. For every LT, there's a Sam Adams and for every Ken Griffey Jr there's a Mo Vaughn.

guttle11
12-27-2006, 04:54 PM
Unfortunately due to eminent domain issues in some states, golf courses are being reclaimed by municipalities to re-use the land as they see fit. In most cases, the reclaimed courses are being turned into housing developments. Most courses that become eminent domain cases usually sell their land to the developers to make a buck, rather than essentially being kicked off the land.

Right now your public daily fee courses are struggling. Private courses also have down rounds, but then can always adjust their budgeting through dues and things of that nature.

Unfortunately, very rarely do you see high quality public courses without some sort of substantial private money. It wouldn't surprise me to see within the next 10 years, all fully public clubs go the way of the dodo, and they will all be semi-private. Watch and see.

I don't know. I think that case in New York could open some eyes and save a few courses. However, few courses have the money those guys did.

Jpup
01-01-2007, 08:10 AM
I just saw on the news that Tiger and his wife, Elin, are expecting their first child sometime this summer. :)

http://sports.espn.go.com/golf/news/story?id=2714817

Tiger and Elin Woods will become first-time parents this summer, the world's top-ranked golfer announced Saturday.

The couple did not disclose the month of birth or whether the child is a boy or girl.

"Obviously, we couldn't be happier and our families are thrilled," said Woods, who turned 31 Saturday. "I have always wanted to be a dad. I just wish my father could be around to share the experience."

Woods was introduced to his future wife by fellow tour player Jesper Parnevik. The former Elin Nordegren, who turns 27 on Jan. 1, was a successful model in Sweden. They began dating and became engaged in November 2003 in South Africa, where Tiger was competing in the Presidents Cup. The couple was married on Oct. 5, 2004 during a private ceremony of family and close friends in Barbados.

"I'm going to stick close to home for the next few weeks," Woods said. "As I said on my Web site Friday, I'm going to start my 2007 PGA Tour season at the Buick Invitational in late January, which will allow Elin and I to spend more time with our families during this very special time in our lives.

http://espn-ak.starwave.com/photo/2006/1230/pga_g_woods_275.jpg

Chip R
01-28-2007, 07:37 PM
I don't know if we want to make this the Tiger Woods thread but guess who won again this week?

Oh, and Roger Federer won the Australia Open too. You think Tiger's hot, check out Federer.

George Foster
01-28-2007, 11:54 PM
I don't know if we want to make this the Tiger Woods thread but guess who won again this week?

Oh, and Roger Federer won the Australia Open too. You think Tiger's hot, check out Federer.

I think Federer should of won last year in my opinion.

Jpup
01-29-2007, 12:40 AM
I don't know if we want to make this the Tiger Woods thread but guess who won again this week?

Oh, and Roger Federer won the Australia Open too. You think Tiger's hot, check out Federer.

7 straight. I put him far and away as the best non-team sport althlete in sports today. He's the best golfer ever, simply amazing what he did this weekend and has done for a long time.

Razor Shines
01-29-2007, 02:15 PM
7 straight. I put him far and away as the best non-team sport althlete in sports today. He's the best golfer ever, simply amazing what he did this weekend and has done for a long time.

I feel bad for those young guys who had to start yesterday with him only two strokes down. That's not fair. Buckle looked like he thought he had to be perfect to beat him, when really if he'd have just played it safe and pared in at -15 he'd have at least been better off. But what would you think when you hear he eagled the 613 yd par 5?

Highlifeman21
01-29-2007, 07:18 PM
7 straight. I put him far and away as the best non-team sport althlete in sports today. He's the best golfer ever, simply amazing what he did this weekend and has done for a long time.


IMO, Tiger is in an argument with 3 other golfers as the best ever. If he breaks Jack's Majors record, that probably moves Tiger up a notch, but Ben Hogan and Bobby Jones still are hard to dispute.

And what he did this weekend wasn't that amazing at all, honestly. He beat a bunch of wide eyed rookies. Chuckie Three Sticks, aka Charles Howell III was the only "veteran" to be at the top of the leaderboard.

It was business as usual for El Tigre.

George Foster
01-30-2007, 01:15 AM
IMO, Tiger is in an argument with 3 other golfers as the best ever. If he breaks Jack's Majors record, that probably moves Tiger up a notch, but Ben Hogan and Bobby Jones still are hard to dispute.

And what he did this weekend wasn't that amazing at all, honestly. He beat a bunch of wide eyed rookies. Chuckie Three Sticks, aka Charles Howell III was the only "veteran" to be at the top of the leaderboard.

It was business as usual for El Tigre.

He won't be the best until he breaks Jack's record. You got to beat the man to be the man.

Dom Heffner
01-30-2007, 01:42 AM
I don't think that the tennis tour is as deep at the top as it was when Samparas, Aggasi, Courier and Chang were at the top of their game but the dominance that Federer shows is quite remarkable to me.

There is some truth in what you are saying. I'm not sure if you took Federer out of the equation that tennis would have a dominating star, other than Rafael Nadal.

In Federer's defense, even Agassi said Federer was better than Sampras and he played them both. Sampras was dominating on grass, but he could lose on hardcourts and was awful on clay.

And even in their heyday, those Americans you mentioned still lost to pretty average players.

Federer only got ousted once before making the final of every single tournament he played in last year. Only two people beat him the entire year.

Federer lost 4 times to Nadal last year (3 times on clay) and only once to any other player.
Nadal isn't average, and he just so happens to be pretty much unbeatable on clay where he beat Federer in a Slam.

I'll toot Agassi's horn here, though, because when someone like Federer can't win on clay, your hat has to go off to Andre to have enough game to beat those scrappy little Spaniards who live and breathe the stuff.

Tiger Woods is an amazing golfer and probably the best of all time, but I don't think he had the year Federer did. The guy has 10 majors since 2003.

Jpup
01-30-2007, 06:48 AM
IMO, Tiger is in an argument with 3 other golfers as the best ever. If he breaks Jack's Majors record, that probably moves Tiger up a notch, but Ben Hogan and Bobby Jones still are hard to dispute.

And what he did this weekend wasn't that amazing at all, honestly. He beat a bunch of wide eyed rookies. Chuckie Three Sticks, aka Charles Howell III was the only "veteran" to be at the top of the leaderboard.

It was business as usual for El Tigre.

There were some very, very good golfers in the field. The couldn't do what Tiger did. Phil couldn't get it done on his home course and Vijay finished something like 32nd I think, although I don't remember ever seeing him.

Tiger needs someone to compete with, but the best anyone can offer him is history and himself. No one is up to the challenge right now. Heck, Ernie Els stayed at the house.

remdog
01-30-2007, 10:43 AM
Tiger Woods is an amazing golfer and probably the best of all time, but I don't think he had the year Federer did. The guy has 10 majors since 2003.

I would agree with that. Jpup feels that Tiger is the best non-team sport althlete in sports today but I would choose Federer.

You can make an argument for either player and, certainly, Tiger has my admiration but I think the tennis format is tougher than the golf format. To win a grand slam event you have to win seven straight matches, head to head. To win a major you have to have the fewest strokes at the end of the fourth round. You can actually be second (or worse) any of the first three days and win the tournament. Be second in your tennis match over any one of the seven days and you're on a plane to the next stop.


By Dom Heffner: I'll toot Agassi's horn here, though, because when someone like Federer can't win on clay, your hat has to go off to Andre to have enough game to beat those scrappy little Spaniards who live and breathe the stuff.

I loved Agassi's game and the way he remade himself after the 'image is everything' half of his career tanked. That's when he became a 'Hall of Famer'. His win at Roland Garros was a triumph in spirit and determination and perfectly illustrated the things that so many fans love about both the player and the man. It took Andre years to win at Paris but I think Roger will eventually win there also---and more than once.

I watched the Federer/Roddick semi-final and Andy, despite the score, played extreamly well. He served fantastic, made very few unforeced errors and did what he must do (stragagy-wise) by coming to the net and volleying well. Yet, after that first set, Roger hit shot after amazing shot that were beyond any other players' comprehension.

I've viewed and played tennis for 35 years. I've seen players like Laver (the twilight of his career) through the present day and Roger Feder is best tennis player I've ever seen, barr none. (shrug)

Rem

gonelong
01-30-2007, 11:51 AM
I would agree with that. Jpup feels that Tiger is the best non-team sport althlete in sports today but I would choose Federer.

You can make an argument for either player and, certainly, Tiger has my admiration but I think the tennis format is tougher than the golf format. To win a grand slam event you have to win seven straight matches, head to head. To win a major you have to have the fewest strokes at the end of the fourth round. You can actually be second (or worse) any of the first three days and win the tournament. Be second in your tennis match over any one of the seven days and you're on a plane to the next stop.

I don't have a dog in this fight, both are worthy IMO. I think this is a little to simplified.

In Tennis you only have to beat one guy at a time.

In golf you have to beat EVERYONE at the same time.

GL

remdog
01-30-2007, 11:59 AM
I don't have a dog in this fight, both are worthy IMO. I think this is a little to simplified.

In Tennis you only have to beat one guy at a time.

In golf you have to beat EVERYONE at the same time.

GLI can see how some/many people see it that way and I don't have a problem with that.

I guess the anology would be someone that would have out-lived all his peers except for that day when he was six and drowned because spent 5 minutes too long at the bottom of a swimming pool. In tennis there's no 'well, I'll play better tomorrow' because, well, there is no tomorrow. (shrug) But hey, that's just my viewpoint.

Rem

remdog
02-04-2007, 11:06 PM
Tiger Woods, Roger Federer and Thierry Henry will team in an endorsement deal with Gillette that will put the trio in TV commercials around the world.

The agreement combining star power in golf, tennis and soccer was announced after the Dubai Desert Classic in which Woods finished two strokes behind winner Henrik Stenson.

http://money.iwon.com/jsp/nw/nwdt_rt_top.jsp?news_id=ap-d8n35p680&.html

Woods and Federer, the two dominant players in their sports, have become friends the past year. Woods was in Federer's box last year to watch his U.S. Open victory. A few months later, Federer walked the course with Woods at a golf tournament in China. Federer, a 10-time Grand Slam champion, strolled the course again Sunday in Dubai.

"Getting to know Roger has been pretty cool," Woods said. "We see sport on so many different levels the same way."

Federer said he'd started playing a bit of golf on courses in the United States and in Switzerland.

"I don't play that much golf, but I do hope to get Tiger to teach me," Federer said.

Rem

Jpup
02-05-2007, 01:58 AM
I would like to also point out that I guess I am a bit bias. I don't care for Tennis. I do enjoy watching and sometimes playing golf. I have tried tennis, but just couldn't really get into it. Watching the women play tennis is more enjoyable than watching the men IMO.

Redhook
02-06-2007, 07:49 AM
I'm biased towards golf (played professionally for 6 years), but that being said, I think Federer should've won last year's award. Tiger had a great year, similar to some of his previous years, but Federer's year was outstanding. Federer was more dominant in his sport last year.

It's easy and hard to compare the two. Who's better? That's a tough one. Last year, I think Federer. Over a career I would choose Tiger. They're both dominating their sports. No one's even close.

Comparing the two sports I believe golf is much more difficult. Golf is more about thinking where tennis is more of a reaction sport. Golf is slow where most of the time is walking and thinking about what to do next. It's mentally exhausting. You might only spend a few minutes actually hitting a shot in golf. Your mind is your best friend and worst enemy. In tennis, the mental aspect isn't nearly as important, IMO, because you don't have much time to think during a point. Everything happens so fast. Fast serve, quick return, a couple more returns and the point is over. I'm not saying tennis is easy by any stretch, but it's not in the same ball park as golf.

In golf, you have 14 clubs to master, in tennis you have one. In golf, you have changing courses every week, in tennis you have up to 3 types of surfaces. In golf, you have changing conditions every single day, in tennis you have the same court dimensions every day. Nothing stays the same in golf, where almost everything stays the same in tennis.

Personally, I think match play in golf is much easier than stroke play. I believe Tiger would have more majors right now if all majors were match play than stroke play. Beating 7 people is alot easier than beating 156 of them. The odds are much, much, much higher that one of the 156 will be hot over 1 out of 7 in match play being hot and taking over a tournament.

The last thing I'll say is Tiger has evolutionized golf. The sport and players have changed dramatically over the last 10 years. Players are stronger, fitter, and better. The purses have gone way up too. His global impact is beyond comparison. Plus, Tiger has won all over the world, on many different surfaces, and all the majors atleast twice. Federer has yet to win the French Open.

RFS62
02-06-2007, 08:00 AM
Great post, Redhook

:beerme: