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vaticanplum
01-13-2007, 03:40 PM
I'm still getting to know this funny little city as a grown-up, and I think we should compile a list of weird and random facts that would be hard to glean from a guidebook or history book.

I will start with a most useful piece of knowledge I learned today:

The post office at the airport is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Need something mailed at 4 in the morning? Airport. Need something postmarked on a date that falls on Sunday? Airport. Oh how I love knowing things that allow me to procrastinate as much as I possibly can.

RedFanAlways1966
01-13-2007, 03:54 PM
The post office at the airport is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Need something mailed at 4 in the morning? Airport. Need something postmarked on a date that falls on Sunday? Airport. Oh how I love knowing things that allow me to procrastinate as much as I possibly can.

Are we talking about the "Northern Kentucky" Airport? Most major cities have their airports on the outskirts for obvious reasons (the Dayton airport is actually in Vandalia, OH), but how many of them have "their" airport in another state?!? :)

Heath
01-13-2007, 04:06 PM
Are we talking about the "Northern Kentucky" Airport? Most major cities have their airports on the outskirts for obvious reasons (the Dayton airport is actually in Vandalia, OH), but how many of them have "their" airport in another state?!? :)

Ah, but the Airport, while in Vandalia is actually City of Dayton property.

Sorry to hijack, VP.

And now, back to your regular scheduled programming.

Red in Chicago
01-13-2007, 05:30 PM
Ah, but the Airport, while in Vandalia is actually City of Dayton property.

Sorry to hijack, VP.

And now, back to your regular scheduled programming.

couldn't you come up with a better word:devil:

pedro
01-13-2007, 06:21 PM
Fairfax smells like cookies. (Keebler is there)

DoogMinAmo
01-13-2007, 07:05 PM
Fairfax smells like cookies. (Keebler is there)

And what is that smell from the Jim Beam plant on 75?

Heath
01-13-2007, 07:08 PM
And what is that smell from the Jim Beam plant on 75?

uhhh....Jim Beam? :D

Actually, I think it's the smell of ethanol.

redsmetz
01-13-2007, 07:10 PM
And what is that smell from the Jim Beam plant on 75?

It's not coming from the Jim Beam facility, but rather from the company just south of there, a flavoring company. Many times, it's butterscotch, but sometimes I smell vanilla. I can't remember what it's current name is these days.

remdog
01-13-2007, 07:39 PM
It's not coming from the Jim Beam facility, but rather from the company just south of there, a flavoring company. Many times, it's butterscotch, but sometimes I smell vanilla. I can't remember what it's current name is these days.

It used to be International Flavors and Fragrances (IFF) but that may have changed. Used to do business with them.

Rem

westofyou
01-13-2007, 08:03 PM
National League President Warren Giles office was in the Carew Tower form 1951-1969. It's now a conference room for Wood, Herron & Evans LLP.

justincredible
01-13-2007, 08:44 PM
And what is that smell from the Jim Beam plant on 75?

Whenever I drive past there it reminds me of the scent of a Cheese Danish.

KronoRed
01-13-2007, 08:48 PM
It's not coming from the Jim Beam facility, but rather from the company just south of there, a flavoring company. Many times, it's butterscotch, but sometimes I smell vanilla. I can't remember what it's current name is these days.

So that's why I always smell waffles, I kept thinking "What the heck are they putting in that whiskey?" :laugh:

KittyDuran
01-14-2007, 10:22 AM
It used to be International Flavors and Fragrances (IFF) but that may have changed. Used to do business with them.

RemI believe it's called Givaudan. And sometimes it smells like burnt dogfood...:p:

creek14
01-14-2007, 01:08 PM
There are clean restrooms right inside the door of the Westin.

And just a little trivia.
In the 70's there was a local band named Hopple Street Exit.

MrCinatit
01-14-2007, 01:21 PM
National League President Warren Giles office was in the Carew Tower form 1951-1969. It's now a conference room for Wood, Herron & Evans LLP.


Didn't Happy Chandler also have his office in Cincy, as well?

Not Cincy trivia, but re: Smells: Piqua was home to several underwear factories at one time. Wonder that THAT smell was?

westofyou
01-14-2007, 01:28 PM
Didn't Happy Chandler also have his office in Cincy, as well?

Not Cincy trivia, but re: Smells: Piqua was home to several underwear factories at one time. Wonder that THAT smell was?

Yep, Happy suspended Durocher from downtown IIRC.

pedro
01-14-2007, 01:31 PM
Cincinnati is home of the decadent, quasi-misogynistic leerings of the band The Afghan Whigs.

BoydsOfSummer
01-14-2007, 01:34 PM
Famous Cincinnatians

Artists
Jim Dine - major American artist of the second half of the 20th century born in Cincinnati in 1935. Attended Walnut Hills High School, the Cincinnati Art Academy and the University of Cincinnati College of Applied Arts.

Robert S. Ducanson - prolific artist of the Hudson River School style raised in Cincinnati.

Frank Duveneck - painter born in Covington, KY in 1848 who influenced a generation of painters.

Suzanne Farrell - ballet dancer born in Cincinnati in 1945.

James Levine - conductor and pianist born in Cincinnati - debuted with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra at age 10.

Hiram Powers - began his career as an artist in Cincinnati.

Harriet Beecher Stowe - author of Uncle Tom's Cabin - lived in Cincinnati, across the river from Civil War border-state Kentucky, and drew from these experiences for her book.

John Henry Twachtman - painter, born in Cincinnati in 1853, who studied under Frank Duveneck and is considered a leader in the Impressionist movement.

Tom Wesselmann - Cincinnati artist born in 1931 whose work was included in the American Pop Art exhibition at the Whitney Museum, New York.

Thomas Worthington Whittredge - artist who lived in Cincinnati, best known for his Hudson River School scenes.

Educators & Innovators
Daniel Carter Beard - Covington, KY resident who founded the Sons of Daniel Boone, which evolved into the Boy Scouts of America.

Nelson Glueck - leading biblical archaeologist born in Cincinnati, discovered the site of King Solomon's copper mines.

William McGuffey - professor at Miami University in Oxford, OH who redefined reading textbooks in the late 19th century with his eclectic Readers series.

John William Mauchly - Cincinnati born physicist who collaborated with others to build ENIAC, the first large electronic computer.

Neil Armstrong - first man on the moon who later served as a professor of engineering at the University of Cincinnati from 1971-1979.

Entertainers
Theda Bara - silent film star, born Theodosia Goodman in Cincinnati in 1890.

George Clooney - actor born in Augusta, KY

Rosemary Clooney - singer, actress and aunt of George Clooney born in Maysville, KY.

Doris Day - actress, born Doris von Kappelhoff in Cincinnati in 1924.

The Isley Brothers - R & B group from Cincinnati who had a major hit with "Twist & Shout", later re-recorded by the Beatles.

Ruth Lyons - television hostess broadcast her show on WLW-TV from 1947-1967

Sarah Jessica Parker - actress who grew up in Cincinnati.

Tyrone Power - movie star born in Cincinnati in 1914.

Roy Rogers - popular singing cowboy, born Leonard Franklin Slye in Cincinnati in 1911.

Steven Spielberg - innovative filmmaker born in Cincinnati.

Jerry Springer - talk show host, was once Mayor of Cincinnati and later anchor on WLWT-TV news.

Ted Turner - media mogul born in Cincinnati.

Andy Williams - singer, attended Western Hills High School in Cincinnati.

Presidents
Ulysses S. Grant - Civil War General and 18th President of the Unites States, born in Point Pleasant, OH in 1822.

Benjamin Harrison - 23rd President of the United States, born in North Bend, OH in 1833.

William Howard Taft - 27th President of the United States, born in Cincinnati in 1857.

Sports Stars
Eddie Arcaro - jockey born in Cincinnati who rode the Kentucky Derby winner 5 times and the Triple Crown winner once.

Steve Cauthen - born in Covington, KY, was the first jockey to exceed $6 million in earnings.

Anthony Munoz - Pro Football Hall of Fame tackle who played his entire career as a Cincinnati Bengal.

Oscar "Big O" Robertson - three-time basketball All-American at the University of Cincinnati, 1958-1960, and the NBA's Rookie of the Year in 1961.

Pete Rose - Major League Baseball's biggest lifetime hitter with 4,256 hits, was born in Cincinnati.

Roger Staubach - Dallas Cowboy Hall of Famer played football at Purcell High School in Cincinnati.

BoydsOfSummer
01-14-2007, 01:35 PM
Cincinnati Firsts

1835 First bag of airmail lifted by a hot air balloon.

1849 First city in the U.S. to hold a municipal song festival - Saengerfest.

1850 First city in the U.S. to establish a Jewish hospital.

1850 First city in the U.S. to publish greeting cards - Gibson Greeting Card Company.

1853 First practical steam fire engine. First city to establish a municipal fire department and first firemen's pole.

1869 First city to establish a weather bureau.

1869 First professional baseball team - the Cincinnati Red Stockings, now known as the Cincinnati Reds.

1870 First city in the U.S. to establish a municipal university - University of Cincinnati.

1870 First city to hold annual industrial expositions.

1875 First city to establish a Jewish theological college - Hebrew Union College.

1880 First city in which a woman, Maria Longworth Nichols Storer, began and operated a large manufacturing operation - Rookwood Pottery.

1880 First and only city to build and own a major railroad.

1902 First concrete skyscraper built in the U.S. - the Ingalls Building.

1905 Daniel Carter Beard founded the Sons of Daniel Boone, later known as the Boy Scouts of America.

1906 First university to offer cooperative education - University of Cincinnati.

1935 First night baseball game played under lights.

1952 First heart-lung machine makes open heart surgery possible.
Developed at Children's Hospital Medical Center.

1954 First city to have a licensed Public television station - WCET TV.

redsmetz
01-14-2007, 03:09 PM
I believe it's called Givaudan. And sometimes it smells like burnt dogfood...:p:

Yes, that's the name and, you're right, sometimes the aroma is not pleasing.

camisadelgolf
01-14-2007, 04:00 PM
My father works at Givaudan--he comes home smelling like the flavors they make. It's pretty disgusting.

There's a partially-built, abandoned subway under Cincinnati.

westofyou
01-14-2007, 05:26 PM
There's a partially-built, abandoned subway under Cincinnati.

http://www.cincinnati-transit.net/subway.html

http://www.cincinnati-transit.net/subway-c7.jpg

KronoRed
01-14-2007, 05:46 PM
Abandoning that is one of the great mistakes in Cincinnati history.

Caveat Emperor
01-14-2007, 05:52 PM
Abandoning that is one of the great mistakes in Cincinnati history.

Not really -- ask a Pittsburgh native how important the subway is to their city.

vaticanplum
01-14-2007, 06:25 PM
Not really -- ask a Pittsburgh native how important the subway is to their city.

The problem with the Cincinnati subway is that they've not managed to do ANYTHING with it, and have wasted quite a lot of money and time fighting over it instead of doing something productive with it. At this point, above-ground public transportation (something the city does really need) is more viable than a subway, you're right. But the city is still forced to maintain the subway tunnels due to the water lines that run through them and the fact that they literally hold up Central Parkway, among other things. So they are still spending tax dollars to maintain them without making better use of them.

There's been talk of using them for transit, for public walkways, for shopping, for art galleries...a whole bunch of things that have never come to fruition, sometimes for legitimate reasons, sometimes just because people couldn't agree on anything. The city also paid dearly for the building of the tunnels themselves; the whole process was poorly engineered and when it rained and soil eroded, houses along the subway line trails literally began to crack at the foundation.

KronoRed
01-14-2007, 06:29 PM
Not really -- ask a Pittsburgh native how important the subway is to their city.

I-75 would not be where it is today if the Subway had been completed, and that's reason enough for me to say they should have finished it.

Falls City Beer
01-14-2007, 06:30 PM
Cincinnatians won't adopt viable public transportation until the day they wake up and realize they're spending 3 hours a morning traveling the 10 miles they need to cover to make it to work. And then it'll be too late.

vaticanplum
01-14-2007, 06:34 PM
Cincinnatians won't adopt viable public transportation until the day they wake up and realize they're spending 3 hours a morning traveling the 10 miles they need to cover to make it to work. And then it'll be too late.

I think you're right. And this baffles the crap out of me.

I have to say that more people take buses to work than I expected. I recently had a short-term job working downtown and I would say the majority of people I worked with took the bus to work -- people from parts of the city but from the suburbs as well (West Chester etc.) I'm willing to bet most of that had to do with gas prices and parking more than time (for me, it is quicker -- and safer -- to drive given how relatively close to downtown I am).

But after normal working hours? Forget it. I wouldn't even know how to deal with bus schedules at that time, let alone how safe it might be.

Caveat Emperor
01-14-2007, 06:44 PM
The problem with the Cincinnati subway is that they've not managed to do ANYTHING with it, and have wasted quite a lot of money and time fighting over it instead of doing something productive with it.

You could subsititute any number of words with "subway" and that sentence could be re-used over and over again throughout Cincinnati history.

Personally, I'd be in favor of utilizing the subway, in conjunction with a light rail system, to connect the entire region. I'd love nothing more than not having to make the morning 45 minute drive into downtown and spend that time, instead, sleeping on a train ride.

The problem is, you have to make the plan worthwhile to all parts of the region -- and outside of direct-cash payments to everyone west of I-75, I don't see that ever actually happening. Maybe with gas prices still hovering north of $2 per gallon, the time is right to propose the issue again.

SunDeck
01-14-2007, 09:42 PM
Charles Manson was from Cincinnati.
So was Stephen Spielberg.
Neither spent much time there, probably until their teens at the most.

Cincinnati is the birthplace of reform judaism.

The owner of Samual Adams beer grew up in Cincinnati. Jim Koch's father was the last of a long line of brewmasters. Koch didn't go into brewing initially, but got into brewing after starting down a career path in consulting.

There are caves in the hills of Delhi, above the Ohio River, supposedly used by the nuns at the Motherhouse of the Sisters of Charity to hide escaped slaves.

If you stand by a drinking fountain in the corner of Union Terminal, you can talk to the person at the opposite drinking fountain, about 50 yards away without raising your voice.

The engraving of a steamboat on the Tyler Davidson Fountain was done by a man who'd never seen one. Someone obtained a used steamboat line ticket for him and he used the illustration on it to make the engraving.

If you live on the west side, it's still faster to use the Anderson Ferry to get to the airport.

The subway project was stopped because they ran out of money AND because by the time they wanted to start again there were two problems- the new trains were too big for the sharp turns and it was obvious that the population was not growing in the directions that the train lines were built. It would not have served enough people.

The Fountain Square garage was a station on the subway line, IIRC.

Ted Turner is from Cincinnati. His mother's funeral was at St. Francis De Sales church.

St. Francis De Sales church had (may still have) the world's largest free swinging bell. When rung, it shattered windows in the neighborhood.

Until World War One, if both parties of a legal proceeding agreed to it, the trial would be held in German.

BoydsOfSummer
01-14-2007, 09:50 PM
Until World War One, if both parties of a legal proceeding agreed to it, the trial would be held in German.
__________________ Why did they stop then? :dunno:

redsmetz
01-14-2007, 10:02 PM
Quote:
Until World War One, if both parties of a legal proceeding agreed to it, the trial would be held in German.
__________________

Why did they stop then?

With the anti-German hysteria as the U.S. entered the war on the side of England and France, the German language fell into little use. Up until then, it was still taught in both the public and private parochial schools. Likewise, many German named streets were renamed to more patriotic names. I don't remember the German name, but Liberty Avenue would be one such example.

I always like to remind folks who complain about Spanish that German was spoken for decades after the first wave of folks from Germanic countries arrived here, with significant newspapers in German.

Reds Nd2
01-14-2007, 10:52 PM
1935 First night baseball game played under lights.

No novelty, night baseball was first tried at Fort Wayne, Ind. in 1883. In 1909, the first night game ever played on a major-league field took place on the same field as last week's, between Elks from Cincinnati and Newport, Ky. Wrote Reporter Jack Ryder in the Cincinnati Enquirer: "If the attempt is a success it is likely that every ball park in the major leagues will be equipped with lighting apparatus." In 1927, it began to look as if Ryder's premature prophecy might eventually come true, when minor leagues began to experiment seriously with night baseball. Depression encouraged the idea. By last season, 70 minor-league clubs had installed floodlights, found that night crowds equaled those on Sunday afternoons. Major-league owners have been talking night baseball since 1932. Last winter Powel Crosley, who bought the Cincinnati Reds the year before out of his radio and refrigerator profits, got permission to have his team play seven night games, one against each of the other teams in the league. He spent $62,000 installing the 363 lights on eight giant towers above the grandstand which, when the President switched them on, poured more than 1,000,000 watts down on his field last week. To spectators who had no difficulty reading scoreboards, the most startling fact about the field was that, due to the arrangement of the lights, the players cast no shadows.
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,883406,00.html

Chip R
01-14-2007, 10:58 PM
WLW was the only radio station in the US that transmitted at 500,000 watts. It was truly the Nation's Station.

For $2 you can go up to the roof of Carew Tower and look upon the city.

Up until recently, Cincinnati used to have these odd streets where there were 3 lanes of traffic. Two one way and one the other way. They would switch depending on the time of day so if you were going towards downtown in the morning, the right two lanes would be used for that traffic and the other one would be used for traffic coming from downtown. And vice versa in the afternoon. Queen Ciy Ave and Hopple St. were streets that did that.

There used to be a canal where Central Parkway is now. That's how Over The Rhine got that name; from the German settlers in that area.

During one of the first night games in 1935, a woman named Kitty Burke (No relation to our Kitty Duran) walked out onto the field, grabbed a bat out of the hands of Reds player Babe Herman and took her place in the batter's box against Paul "Daffy" Dean of the St. Louis Cardinals. After a few aborted attempts to pitch to her, Dean threw an underhanded pitch and Burke grounded to 1st. She was the only woman ever to bat in the major leagues. After her at bat, fans in the stands were overheard praising Ms. Burke for not striking out. ;)

vaticanplum
01-15-2007, 01:07 AM
Up until recently, Cincinnati used to have these odd streets where there were 3 lanes of traffic. Two one way and one the other way. They would switch depending on the time of day so if you were going towards downtown in the morning, the right two lanes would be used for that traffic and the other one would be used for traffic coming from downtown. And vice versa in the afternoon. Queen Ciy Ave and Hopple St. were streets that did that.

I grew up by one of these (Beechmont Hill). Never occurred to me that it was weird in the slightest until I had friends from the Northeast visit me during college. They couldn't believe it, thought it was the most dangerous thing they had ever seen. I still see no problem with it as long as you're used to it...but I guess they did change it for a reason. though on Beechmont they made it a four-lane road and chopped out a bunch of trees to do it. It changed the whole landscape :censored:

That $2 carew tower thing is the kind of stuff I'm looking for. Things that I can take advantage of but wouldn't necessarily have known about. Cheers kids.

SunDeck
01-15-2007, 07:42 AM
http://www.mercantilelibrary.com/
The museums and exhibits (http://www.magazine.uc.edu/0105/museumsNONMED.htm)of UC. Also at UC, the jazz faculty at CCM seem to always have some series cooking. They do big band, five piece, you name it. Always a treat. And cheap.
The Rhein and Englander Doll Collections at the public library downtown. My wife worked on this collection for a while- she said there are some dolls in it that are worth thousands.
And speaking of the downtown library, the rare book collection there is outstanding. They always have items exhibited, too.

chicoruiz
01-15-2007, 08:05 AM
1. I always heard that Leonard Slye, aka Roy Rogers, was born at the approximate location of second base at old Riverfront/Cinergy Field.

2. The German language newsapaper was still being published at least into the 1970s. I remember as a kid going to the home of a friend of my parents where the more elderly family members spoke German.

3. I remember hearing at one time that the subway tunnels were full of old army C-rations stored there by the Department of Civil Defense. You can have my share, thanks...

Highlifeman21
01-15-2007, 09:59 AM
The problem with the Cincinnati subway is that they've not managed to do ANYTHING with it, and have wasted quite a lot of money and time fighting over it instead of doing something productive with it. At this point, above-ground public transportation (something the city does really need) is more viable than a subway, you're right. But the city is still forced to maintain the subway tunnels due to the water lines that run through them and the fact that they literally hold up Central Parkway, among other things. So they are still spending tax dollars to maintain them without making better use of them.

There's been talk of using them for transit, for public walkways, for shopping, for art galleries...a whole bunch of things that have never come to fruition, sometimes for legitimate reasons, sometimes just because people couldn't agree on anything. The city also paid dearly for the building of the tunnels themselves; the whole process was poorly engineered and when it rained and soil eroded, houses along the subway line trails literally began to crack at the foundation.


They voted down light rail a couple years back which would use existing railroad tracks b/c of some guy's AutoBody Garage in Deer Park. What a backwards thinking city.

Roy Tucker
01-15-2007, 10:20 AM
And just a little trivia.
In the 70's there was a local band named Hopple Street Exit.

I saw them play a few times when home from college as "Trudi and the Hopple Street Exit". I think Trudi was from Dayton.

Johnny Footstool
01-15-2007, 10:22 AM
Cincinnati is home of the decadent, quasi-misogynistic leerings of the band The Afghan Whigs.

Two classic albums (Congregation and the near-perfect Gentlemen) and a third that was very good (Black Love) made them a college radio fave in the mid-90's. Greg Dulli also provided the John Lennon-esque singing in the movie "Backbeat."

Rychian
01-15-2007, 10:51 AM
I dont know if you can still do it, but....
I loved going to Union terminal and going to the back of the building, Youd have to ask how to get to it. There is a big observation deck overlooking the train yard. It is really cool to watch all the switches and the loadings... Well if your into that sort of thing. I remember it either being free or cheap.


Tom

westofyou
01-15-2007, 11:38 AM
Two classic albums (Congregation and the near-perfect Gentlemen) and a third that was very good (Black Love) made them a college radio fave in the mid-90's.

Yet, Retarded from "Up in It" still rings in my head everyday.

And if you really want something hot check out there EP "Uptown Avondale"

paintmered
01-15-2007, 11:51 AM
I dont know if you can still do it, but....
I loved going to Union terminal and going to the back of the building, Youd have to ask how to get to it. There is a big observation deck overlooking the train yard. It is really cool to watch all the switches and the loadings... Well if your into that sort of thing. I remember it either being free or cheap.


Tom

Yep, you can still go to the observation deck. I was there a few weeks ago and it was free.

SunDeck
01-15-2007, 12:12 PM
Yep, you can still go to the observation deck. I was there a few weeks ago and it was free.

It's pretty cool, isn't it? I was there a few years ago and there were all the switches and controls, intact. And there were several poster sized photographs of the terminal. I am pretty sure there is a picture of my great grandfather there. He was a brakeman, lost an arm between the couplings (evidently, quite common), and was kept on at the yard after that. We only have a couple pictures of him, but the resemblance to the guy in that photo is pretty close.

vaticanplum
01-15-2007, 12:20 PM
This may be common knowledge, but speaking of Union terminal, the beautiful murals in the entryway were commissioned by FDR's WPA.

Chip R
01-15-2007, 12:49 PM
This may be common knowledge, but speaking of Union terminal, the beautiful murals in the entryway were commissioned by FDR's WPA.


Not to mention that in the History museum, they have a scale model of Cincinnati from I guess the 40s, where they have a miniature Crosley Field which lights up when it is evening in the model. It also has streetcars and other things of that era in there as well. The History Museum there is quite a place.

Doc. Scott
01-15-2007, 06:21 PM
Two classic albums (Congregation and the near-perfect Gentlemen) and a third that was very good (Black Love) made them a college radio fave in the mid-90's. Greg Dulli also provided the John Lennon-esque singing in the movie "Backbeat."

Following Black Love was my personal favorite (and their swansong), 1998's 1965.

Unfortunately, Dulli more or less renounced Cincinnati as his hometown around the mid-nineties. Besides, he met the band's guitarist in the drunk tank at Athens' Halloween 1987.

camisadelgolf
01-15-2007, 07:09 PM
St. Francis De Sales church had (may still have) the world's largest free swinging bell. When rung, it shattered windows in the neighborhood.

The largest free-swinging bell is the World Peace Bell in Newport, Kentucky.

SunDeck
01-15-2007, 07:12 PM
The largest free-swinging bell is the World Peace Bell in Newport, Kentucky.

Forgot about that- as did everyone else about three days after the millenium.
Whatever happened to the big tower that was supposed to go with it?

TeamBoone
01-15-2007, 08:42 PM
A few additional famous people (not sure I have all the spellings correct; forgive me):

Albert Sabin (polio vaccine)
John Audubon
Nick Lachey
Carmen Electra
Rikki Lake
Heimlich (can't remember his first name)
Barry Larkin
Ken Griffey, Jr. (and Sr.)
Noah Hunt (lead singer for Kenny Wayne Shepard Band)
John Ritter’s widow and actress (Amy ?)

Little Texas (country group)
Ass Ponys (though I’m not sure how famous they are)

Suspension bridge was the prototype for the Brooklyn Bridge;
First baseball stadium to sell beer;
First paid volunteer fire department (plus there's a museum where you can slide down the pole);
Was supposed to be the prominent city in the Midwest due to moving commodities by barge on the Ohio River (until the railroad… after which Chicago became the city of this distinction, though Cincinnati has a lot of rail activity);
Over 350 Fortune 500 companies have operations in Greater Cincinnati (7 of which are headquartered in Cincinnati);
Cincinnati ranks third in the nation (after NY and LA) as a Corporate broadcasting community.

And, I'm not totally sure about this one, but I think the college football hall of fame is here?

Yachtzee
01-15-2007, 11:16 PM
And, I'm not totally sure about this one, but I think the college football hall of fame is here?

It was in Mason, near Kings Island, but they moved it to South Bend, IN.

wolfboy
01-15-2007, 11:47 PM
1. I always heard that Leonard Slye, aka Roy Rogers, was born at the approximate location of second base at old Riverfront/Cinergy Field.

2. The German language newsapaper was still being published at least into the 1970s. I remember as a kid going to the home of a friend of my parents where the more elderly family members spoke German.

3. I remember hearing at one time that the subway tunnels were full of old army C-rations stored there by the Department of Civil Defense. You can have my share, thanks...

The bit about Roy Rogers might be true. The neighborhood known as "The Bottoms" was located in the area from around 6th St. to the north, Broadway to the west, Mt. Adams to the east, and the river to the south. Leonard Slye grew up in that neighborhood, which no longer exists, largely due to the construction of I-71. The Lindners and Buddy LaRosa had businesses in this neighborhood. If you ever visit Lytle Park, take the time to read some of the markers that are posted around the park. It's very fascinating, and has some great photographs of the now non-existent neighborhood.

Rychian
01-16-2007, 10:22 AM
About the Bell in newport. I personally knew the developer of the property during that time, or at least one of the developers. It was supposed to be huge, and be an extension of newport on the levee. The tower even had a contract with maisonette to move over, if it woudl get built. The FAA nixed it because of flight patterns to CVG. so, now we have the 2 story bell holder with a nice parking lot around it. oh well.