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View Full Version : RIP: Eddie Feigner



westofyou
02-10-2007, 11:21 AM
http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/news/story?id=2760759

Eddie Feigner, the hard-throwing softball showman who barnstormed for more than 50 years with his "The King and His Court" four-man team, died Friday. He was 81.

http://www.stripes.com/photoday/040105.jpg

"Eddie Feigner was a genuine Jekyll and Hyde," Knight said. "On the field, a master showman, brilliant pitcher, creator of the most popular softball attraction in history. And off the field, one tough son of a gun. He was a former Marine, everything was by the numbers. He made millions and was generous to a fault. Some guys got fired three times in the same day and rehired in the next moment."

Feigner not only pitched from the standard mound, 46 feet from home plate, but also from second base, behind his back, on his knees, between his legs, from center field and blindfolded. In a nationally televised exhibition against major-leaguers at Dodger Stadium in 1964, he struck out Willie Mays, Willie McCovey, Maury Wills, Harmon Killebrew, Roberto Clemente and Brooks Robinson in order.

Feigner began "The King and His Court" in 1946 on a dare in his hometown of Walla Walla, Wash. He had just thrown a shutout in his nine-man team's rout of a team from Pendleton, Ore., and the Oregon team challenged him to another game. Backed by just a catcher, first baseman and shortstop, Feigner pitched a perfect game, winning 7-0.

(Dumb Oregon cowboys.) ;)

MaineRed
02-16-2007, 02:52 PM
Sorry to hear this. I saw these guys play about twenty years ago and Eddie could still bring it. These guys were the real deal. I remember the other guy there with Eddie in the picture. Dave, something.

In a nationally televised exhibition against major-leaguers at Dodger Stadium in 1964, he struck out Willie Mays, Willie McCovey, Maury Wills, Harmon Killebrew, Roberto Clemente and Brooks Robinson in order.

Someone needs to post that on youtube.

oneupper
02-16-2007, 03:37 PM
The "King and his Court" even made his way to Venezuela in the late 70s IIRC.

SunDeck
02-16-2007, 04:02 PM
My dad played fast pitch SB and was on a travelling team in the army back in the late 50's. He said that with a good pitcher, the ball started out low and would rise to around the letters, so that the swing plane of the bat was headed in the opposite direction of the pitch. The steeper the climb for the pitch, the harder to hit.
I can't remember if my dad said he played against him, but he definitly had seen him pitch. He said Feigner scraped his knuckles on the ground when he pitched, and usually had tape on his right hand to protect it. This, he said, made Feigner practically unhittable; it would be sort of like swinging at a ball that is coming straight up at you.