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Ltlabner
02-22-2007, 06:37 PM
NOTE: I really thought this was something new. I heard it on BP radio this morning and after I did all the stat leg work and typed up this post, I did a google search and found this article (http://www.athomeplate.com/swip.shtml) from 2004 :(

Anyway, I know I'm a newbie to numbers, but I still found it interesting. Instead of WHIP which sticks pitchers for hits even when the fielder misjudges the play or dives and comes up short, SWIP (for those like me who were uneducated until today) = Strikes Outs - Walks / Innings Pitched. The thinking is it measures (1) the pitcher preventing hits in the manner over which he has the most input (2) the pitcher putting men on base in the manner over which he has the most controll. It does favor power pitchers over contoll guys. The higher the SWIP the better.

The radio show pointed out a list of pitchers with medicore WHIP but were basically productive pitchers. Typically their SWIP's were good. I can't remember any of those names now.

Anyway, probably old news to all of the numbers folks, but I thought it was interesting. Here's the numbers from the Reds pitchers last year, along with Saarloos and Santos. Also, threw in some comparisions.


NAME IP BB SO WHIP SWIP
Aaron Harang 234.3 56 216 1.27 0.68
Bronson Arroyo 240.7 64 184 1.19 0.50
Eric Milton 152.7 42 90 1.34 0.31
Elizardo Ramirez 104 29 69 1.46 0.38
Kyle Lohse 63 19 51 1.41 0.51
Kirk Saarloos 121.3 53 52 1.66 -0.01
Victor Santos 115.3 42 81 1.66 0.34

Johan Santana 233.7 47 245 1 0.85
Jake Peavy 202.3 62 215 1.23 0.76
Chris Carpenter 221.7 43 184 1.07 0.64

FlightRick
02-22-2007, 08:36 PM
I, also, am no real Stat Wonk (beyond what I need to know to run a solid fantasy team, anyway)... so SWIP is new to me.

Would I be onto anything if I said I'd be intrigued by a "WHIP - SWIP" calculation? Subtracting the latter from the former *does* double-count bases-on-balls, I realize, and that might taint the precious data... but I think you'd end up with a number that (the lower the better) gives a more-well-rounded overall picture to a pitcher's contribution to "OutMaking-osity." Which I realize sounds like a stat that Paris Hilton would excel in after one and a half rum shooters, but you know what I mean....