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Chip R
02-26-2007, 06:44 PM
If RL can do music, I can do books.

1. If I Never Get Back - Darryl Brock
2. Master Of the Senate - Robert Caro
3. The First Boys of Summer - Greg Rhodes & John Erardi
4. The Hustler's Handbook - Bill Veeck & Ed Linn
5. Nice Guys Finish Last - Leo Durocher & Ed Linn
6. Big Ten Country - Bob Wood
7. Freedom - William Safire
8. The Fifties - Davd Halberstam
9. Have A Nice Day - Mankind (Mick Foley)
10. The Great Shark Hunt - Hunter S. Thompson
11. The Iowa Baseball Confederacy - W.P. Kinsella

deltachi8
02-26-2007, 07:03 PM
you mean for readin' and stuff?

pedro
02-26-2007, 07:16 PM
This is incredibly hard for me as I read a lot and I've read nearly every book by the authors listed so I'll just toss out my favorites off the top of my head, knowing that I could never distill my favorites down to one list (This list is just novels)


A prayer for Owen Meany - John Irving
Lonesome Dove - Larry McMurtry
Nobody's Fool - Richard Russo
Skinny legs and All - Tom Robbins
Wonder Boys - Michael Chabon
Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger
Skipped Parts - Tim Sandlin
God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater -Kurt Vonnegut
Cloudsplitter - Russell Banks
Christopher Moore - Fluke
To Kill a Mockingbird- Harper Lee

westofyou
02-26-2007, 07:48 PM
Just Fiction

Prayer for Owen Meany - John Irving
David Copperfield - Dickens
Gone with the Wind - Margret Mitchell
Cats Cradle - Vonnegut
The Depford Trilogy - Robertson Davies
Huckleberry Finn - Twain
To Kill a Mockingbird - Lee
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest - Ken Kesey
Catch-22 - Joseph Heller
Catcher in the Rye

Shout out to

Battle Cry - Leon Uris

Puffy
02-27-2007, 12:06 PM
1. Penthouse
2. Playboy
3. Big uns
4. Britney Spears: My life in Pictures
5. Pimpin for Dummies
6. Fart Jokes 2007
7. The Scouting Report by Marty Brennanmen
8. The Early Years of My Life (1888-1924) by RFS62
9. A Real Man's Guide to Banana Hammocks by ChipR
10. Get Off My Lawn by Roy Tucker
11. My Son Plays Youth League Football by Red Leader

Dom Heffner
02-27-2007, 12:31 PM
To Kill a Mockingbird- Harper Lee
Great Expectations- Charles Dickens
The Complete Correspondence Between Jefferson and Adams
Origins of the Bill of Rights- Levy

I'm drawing a blank- will have to post more later.

Red Leader
02-27-2007, 12:33 PM
I'm so disappointed that my biography: My Dad's a Doctor, didn't make your list, Puffy.

:cry: :cry: :cry:

Puffy
02-27-2007, 12:34 PM
I'm so disappointed that my biography: My Dad's a Doctor, didn't make your list, Puffy.

:cry: :cry: :cry:

You made that a book - I just thought that was a pick up line.

Ohhhhh, a whole thread on Red Leader's pick up lines.......

:evil:

Sweetstop
02-27-2007, 12:59 PM
I'm emotionally attached to all the following for one reason or another.

To Kill A Mockingbird - Harper Lee (w/o a doubt my favorite, I've read it over and over)

The Great Gatsby - F. Scott Fitzgerald (every time I read it, I like it better..the perfect novel)

Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen (also read numerous times..I'll admit it, I'm in love w/ Mr. Darcy)

Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy (I just read this 3 summers ago while house and dog sitting in Chicago for my daughter and her husband when they went to France. I had lots of time to just relax and read and enjoy. Tolstoy has no equal. I will read it again before I'm gone.)

Middlemarch - George Eliot (I just read this in the last year, and as soon as I finished, I was ready to start it again. She was so far ahead of her time. I miss the characters.)

Gone With The Wind - Margaret Mitchell (this isn't great lit. or anything, but I read it twice as a girl of 12, when all around me was falling apart, and it was my refuge. I also fell in love w/ Rhett Butler.)

The World According To Garp - John Irving (My introduction to Irving, I remember laughing my way through all the craziness and heartbreak and couldn't wait for his next book.)

In Cold Blood - Truman Capote (he scared the begeezus out of me..a book I couldn't put down once I started reading it.)

Slouching Towards Bethlehem or The White Album - Joan Didion (for many reasons I identify w/ her and her writing. These compilations of essays and articles are my favorites.)

Little House Books - Laura Ingalls Wilder (I'm adding these because they are some of the first (non-picture variety) books I read aloud to my children when they were very young (3 or 4 maybe)..we loved them. The children basically learned to read w/ them. Just brings back that wonderful time, doing one of my favorite things.)

pedro
02-27-2007, 01:04 PM
I'm a big fan of In Cold Blood and Gone with the Wind too.

Never read any Tolstoy.

Ravenlord
02-27-2007, 01:06 PM
Never read any Tolstoy.

he reminds me of Tolkein, only set in the real world.

westofyou
02-27-2007, 01:06 PM
Gone With The Wind - Margaret Mitchell (this isn't great lit. or anything, but I read it twice as a girl of 12, when all around me was falling apart, and it was my refuge. I also fell in love w/ Rhett Butler.)

Exactly why my wife loves it and why she turned me on to it.. I have a taste for the epic long ones.


The World According To Garp - John Irving (My introduction to Irving, I remember laughing my way through all the craziness and heartbreak and couldn't wait for his next book.)

I love Irving, he was and still a big part of my life in the 80's

pedro
02-27-2007, 01:06 PM
he reminds me of Tolkein, only set in the real world.

Very descriptive?

Ltlabner
02-27-2007, 01:07 PM
Where the Red Fern Grows
A Wrinkle in Time
Charlie Mike - Leonard B Scott
Sympathy for the Devil - Kent Anderson
Red Storm Rising - Tom Clancey
Red Thrust - Steven Zaloga
Mutual Contempt - Jeff Shesol
Confessional - Jack Higgens
The Eagle Has Landed - Jack Higgins
Treasure/Iceburg/Vixen 06/Raise The Titanic - Clive Cussler

Ravenlord
02-27-2007, 01:08 PM
Very descriptive?

yep. painfully even at times...at least in War and Peace. still a kick ass book though.

westofyou
02-27-2007, 01:08 PM
Very descriptive?

Guys with hairy feet who live in huts?

dabvu2498
02-27-2007, 01:22 PM
Kite Runner -- Khaled Hosseini (thanks to my wife for forcing me to read it -- perhaps the best piece of literature I've ever touched)
A Prayer for Owen Meany -- John Irving
To Kill a Mockingbird -- Harper Lee
My Dog Skip -- Willie Morris
My Losing Season -- Pat Conroy
The Sound and the Fury -- Faulkner
Candide -- Voltaire
Russka -- Edward Rutherford
The Right Stuff -- Tom Wolfe
Gone With the Wind -- Margaret Mitchell

Roy Tucker
02-27-2007, 01:33 PM
I took my favorites from different times and places...

The Rabbit trilogy (plus novella) - John Updike
Lonesome Dove - Larry McMurtry
The Stand - Stephen King
The World According To Garp - John Irving
The Killer Angels - Jeffrey Shaara
Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
The Grapes of Wrath - John Steinbeck
Stranger in a Strange Land - Robert Heinlein
The Brothers Karamazov - Fyodor Doestoevsky
The Caine Mutiny - Herman Wouk
The Kid from Tomkinsville - John R. Tunis (had to throw this in for my namesake)

Sweetstop
02-27-2007, 01:35 PM
Read the Pevear and Volokhonsky translation of Anna Karenina, which is supposed to be one of the best, most true to Tolstoy. This book covers every aspect of life, and it was as meaningful to me, sitting in my daughter's back yard in Portage Park (Chicago) w/ the dogs and a cup of tea, as it would have been sitting somewhere on Levin's farm in 1877 Russia.

woy and pedro: you must read!

Sweetstop
02-27-2007, 01:39 PM
Kite Runner -- Khaled Hosseini (thanks to my wife for forcing me to read it -- perhaps the best piece of literature I've ever touched)
A Prayer for Owen Meany -- John Irving
To Kill a Mockingbird -- Harper Lee
My Dog Skip -- Willie Morris
My Losing Season -- Pat Conroy
The Sound and the Fury -- Faulkner
Candide -- Voltaire
Russka -- Edward Rutherford
The Right Stuff -- Tom Wolfe
Gone With the Wind -- Margaret Mitchell

The Kite Runner IS excellent. My son's g/f gave me her copy a while back. There's a piece in the latest TIME about the Afghanistani kite makers who are making the kites for the movie version. Can't wait to see it.

dabvu2498
02-27-2007, 01:43 PM
The Kite Runner IS excellent. My son's g/f gave me her copy a while back. There's a piece in the latest TIME about the Afghanistani kite makers who are making the kites for the movie version. Can't wait to see it.

Hosseini also has a new book due out this spring.

pedro
02-27-2007, 01:50 PM
Read the Pevear and Volokhonsky translation of Anna Karenina, which is supposed to be one of the best, most true to Tolstoy. This book covers every aspect of life, and it was as meaningful to me, sitting in my daughter's back yard in Portage Park (Chicago) w/ the dogs and a cup of tea, as it would have been sitting somewhere on Levin's farm in 1877 Russia.

woy and pedro: you must read!

thanks for the tip. :)

westofyou
02-27-2007, 01:50 PM
The Kite Runner IS excellent. My son's g/f gave me her copy a while back. There's a piece in the latest TIME about the Afghanistani kite makers who are making the kites for the movie version. Can't wait to see it.

My wife has been lobbying me to read that... but I'm in a fiction stall right now, trying to finish Irving's newest book (which I think sad to say.. I hate.)

Roy Tucker
02-27-2007, 01:57 PM
The Kite Runner IS excellent. My son's g/f gave me her copy a while back. There's a piece in the latest TIME about the Afghanistani kite makers who are making the kites for the movie version. Can't wait to see it.

My book club read it a couple years back. Excellent book.

It was also the Hamilton County Library 2005 reading project (city-wide book club).

I had trouble with Irving's latest as well woy.

Crash Davis
02-27-2007, 01:57 PM
Top 11 All-Time Fiction:

1. A Fan's Notes, Frederick Exley
2. Middlemarch, George Eliot
3. The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald
4. The God of Small Things, Arundhati Roy
5. Nine Stories, J.D. Salinger
6. Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain
7. Revolutionary Road, Richard Yates
8. The Sportswriter, Richard Ford
9. A Passage to India, E.M. Forster
10. One Hundred Years of Solitude, Gabriel Garcia Marquez
11. The Little Prince, Antoine de Saint-Expery

pedro
02-27-2007, 02:00 PM
I had trouble with Irving's latest as well woy.

As much as I love Irving, I haven't even tried to read the new one after failing to finish "The Fourth Hand"

Crash Davis
02-27-2007, 02:03 PM
Top 11 Non-Fiction:

1. America, Charles Kuralt
2. The Great Shark Hunt, Hunter S. Thompson
3. The Proud Highway, Hunter S. Thompson
4. The American Political Tradition, Richard Hofstadter
5. Ball Four, Jim Bouton
6. Helter Skelter, Vincent Bugliosi
7. Lords of the Realm, John Helyar
8. The End of Faith (Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason), Sam Harris
9. From Dawn to Decadence (1500 to the Present), Jacques Barzun
10. All the President's Men, Bob Woodward & Carl Bernstein
11. Paris 1919, Margaret MacMillan

westofyou
02-27-2007, 02:03 PM
I had trouble with Irving's latest as well woy.

Yep, it's the equivalent of my reaction to U2's Zooropa, a bit of the original vibe and a lot of other stuff I don't really find compelling.

It was the same with Bleak House by Dickens for me.

dabvu2498
02-27-2007, 02:05 PM
4. The American Political Tradition, Richard Hofstadter

I had a prof in college that made us read damn near everything that man had written.

I might have liked some of it if it hadn't been force-fed to me.

Crash Davis
02-27-2007, 02:12 PM
I had a prof in college that made us read damn near everything that man had written.

I might have liked some of it if it hadn't been force-fed to me.

My high school history teacher loved his work. He threw away our textbooks and gave us all a copy of Hofstadter instead. It's really too advanced for high schoolers, but it does something important that text books don't: it makes you think. I think it's a very well balanced look at American politics & history.

I've read his "Anti-Intellectualism in American Life", and I found that one to be a bit more tedious but very high quality nonetheless. I've been planning to check out a few more of his books, but I've just never gotten around to it. A new book, or music, or football game, or 6 pack of Killians always manages to trip me up instead.

dabvu2498
02-27-2007, 02:17 PM
My high school history teacher loved his work. He threw away our textbooks and gave us all a copy of Hofstadter instead. It's really too advanced for high schoolers, but it does something important that text books don't: it makes you think. I think it's a very well balanced look at American politics & history.

I've read his "Anti-Intellectualism in American Life", and I found that one to be a bit more tedious but very high quality nonetheless. I've been planning to check out a few more of his books, but I've just never gotten around to it. A new book, or music, or football game, or 6 pack of Killians always manages to trip me up instead.

American Violence: A Documentary History is of high quality.

nycredsfan
02-27-2007, 02:38 PM
Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Chabon
White Noise by DeLillo
The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Murakami
New York Trilogy by Auster
Gravity's Rainbow by Pynchon
Pastoralia by Saunders
Collected Fictions by Borges (this is probably cheating)
The Loser by Bernhard
Frog by Dixon
Cloud Atlas by Mitchell
Motherless Brooklyn by Lethem

RosieRed
02-27-2007, 02:41 PM
Why do I find these lists so impossible?!

These are completely random ...

The Unbearable Lightness of Being -- Milan Kundera
The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay -- Michael Chabon
The Poisonwood Bible -- Barbara Kingsolver
The Shipping News -- Annie Proulx
High Fidelity -- Nick Hornby
Foxfire: Confessions of a Girl Gang -- Joyce Carol Oates
She's Come Undone -- Wally Lamb
The Time Traveler's Wife -- Audrey Niffenegger
Anna Karenina -- Leo Tolstoy
Catcher in the Rye -- J.D. Salinger
The Brothers Karamazov -- Fyodor Dostoevsky

Honorable mention: Gone With the Wind, and nearly anything by Dickens.

My favorite books when I was growing up were Where The Red Fern Grows and Indian in the Cupboard.

pedro
02-27-2007, 02:43 PM
Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Chabon
White Noise by DeLillo
The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Murakami
New York Trilogy by Auster
Gravity's Rainbow by Pynchon
Pastoralia by Saunders
Collected Fictions by Borges (this is probably cheating)
The Loser by Bernhard
Frog by Dixon
Cloud Atlas by Mitchell
Motherless Brooklyn by Lethem


Really liked Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Chabon.

Couldn't ever get through Gravity's Rainbow but I did like Vineland quite a lot.

Roy Tucker
02-27-2007, 02:45 PM
Why do I find these lists so impossible?!

These are completely random ...

The Unbearable Lightness of Being -- Milan Kundera
The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay -- Michael Chabon
The Poisonwood Bible -- Barbara Kingsolver
The Shipping News -- Annie Proulx
High Fidelity -- Nick Hornby
Foxfire: Confessions of a Girl Gang -- Joyce Carol Oates
She's Come Undone -- Wally Lamb
The Time Traveler's Wife -- Audrey Niffenegger
Anna Karenina -- Leo Tolstoy
Catcher in the Rye -- J.D. Salinger
The Brothers Karamazov -- Fyodor Dostoevsky

Honorable mention: Gone With the Wind, and nearly anything by Dickens.

My favorite books when I was growing up were Where The Red Fern Grows and Indian in the Cupboard.

Great list Rosie :thumbup:

Sweetstop
02-27-2007, 02:51 PM
Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Chabon
White Noise by DeLillo
The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Murakami
New York Trilogy by Auster
Gravity's Rainbow by Pynchon
Pastoralia by Saunders
Collected Fictions by Borges (this is probably cheating)
The Loser by Bernhard
Frog by Dixon
Cloud Atlas by Mitchell
Motherless Brooklyn by Lethem


Loved the Chabon book also. My son-in-law insisted I read White Noise (DeLillo is his favorite author), and I really liked it...almost made my top 10.

westofyou
02-27-2007, 02:53 PM
Non Fiction

Ball Four - Jim Bouton
The Fifties - Halbersam
The Reckoning - Halberstam
Desert Solitaire - Edward Abbey
Europe - Norman Davies
The Cosmic Trigger - Robert Anton Wilson
Myths to Live By - Joseph Campbell
Bill James Historical Abstract
The Joy of Cooking

Sweetstop
02-27-2007, 02:54 PM
Why do I find these lists so impossible?!

These are completely random ...

The Unbearable Lightness of Being -- Milan Kundera
The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay -- Michael Chabon
The Poisonwood Bible -- Barbara Kingsolver
The Shipping News -- Annie Proulx
High Fidelity -- Nick Hornby
Foxfire: Confessions of a Girl Gang -- Joyce Carol Oates
She's Come Undone -- Wally Lamb
The Time Traveler's Wife -- Audrey Niffenegger
Anna Karenina -- Leo Tolstoy
Catcher in the Rye -- J.D. Salinger
The Brothers Karamazov -- Fyodor Dostoevsky




Honorable mention: Gone With the Wind, and nearly anything by Dickens.

My favorite books when I was growing up were Where The Red Fern Grows and Indian in the Cupboard.

Poisonwood Bible, The Shipping News :thumbup:

Read Indian in the Cupboard aloud to my kids. Good book. My daughter also loved Cynthia Voigt and Madeleine L'Engle books. :)

nycredsfan
02-27-2007, 03:14 PM
Really liked Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Chabon.

Couldn't ever get through Gravity's Rainbow but I did like Vineland quite a lot.

I've been struggling with Pynchon's new one off and on for a few months now. Usually I would say that The Crying of Lot 49 is my favorite Pynchon, but I have been on a long book kick lately. It started with finally getting around to Infinite Jest.

Chabon's new one, The Yiddish Policemen's Union, comes out on May 1st and they are currently filming a movie of Mysteries of Pittsburgh, so there is lots of Chabon goodness to look forward to.

pedro
02-27-2007, 03:59 PM
I've been struggling with Pynchon's new one off and on for a few months now. Usually I would say that The Crying of Lot 49 is my favorite Pynchon, but I have been on a long book kick lately. It started with finally getting around to Infinite Jest.

Chabon's new one, The Yiddish Policemen's Union, comes out on May 1st and they are currently filming a movie of Mysteries of Pittsburgh, so there is lots of Chabon goodness to look forward to.


Love Mysteries of Pittsburgh. Didn't know they were making a movie. That's cool. edit: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0768218/fullcredits#cast

looks like they cut out Arthur Lecomte. I like the casting of Peter Saarsgard as Cleveland though. My cats' name is Cleveland, partly in honor of this character.


I really liked the Crying of Lot 49 too.

Looking forward to the new Chabon.

SunDeck
02-27-2007, 04:24 PM
Honestly, I like every book that I finish. If it's not well written, or if the story doesn't enthrall me in some way then the books gets returned. But this is the nature of my professional life- a librarian needs to read very widely in order to be good at their job. So favorites? That's too hard to do for me.



But I have a long list of books that I've only gotten fifty pages into.
Speaking of which, here is one of the best reviews (http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/000844.html) of the Da Vinci Code, ever.

pedro
02-27-2007, 04:26 PM
re: Mysteries of Pittsburgh -

Looks like they changed the story line a bit.

During his first summer after graduating from the University of Pittsburgh, Art Bechstein (Foster) falls into a romance with a married couple.

nycredsfan
02-27-2007, 04:37 PM
re: Mysteries of Pittsburgh -

Looks like they changed the story line a bit.

During his first summer after graduating from the University of Pittsburgh, Art Bechstein (Foster) falls into a romance with a married couple.

I read that the screenwriter combined the characters of Arthur and Cleveland into one character. I don't have high hopes for this one as I can't see the writer/director of Dodgeball being able to pull off this material. Peter Sarsgaard is an excellent choice for Cleveland, but I can't picture Mena Suvari as Phlox.

pedro
02-27-2007, 04:39 PM
I read that the screenwriter combined the characters of Arthur and Cleveland into one character. I don't have high hopes for this one as I can't see the writer/director of Dodgeball being able to pull off this material. Peter Sarsgaard is an excellent choice for Cleveland, but I can't picture Mena Suvari as Phlox.


at least it's not Katie Holmes.

nycredsfan
02-27-2007, 04:43 PM
Speaking of adaptations, John Krasinski (The Office) is adapting David Foster Wallace's Brief Interviews with Hideous Men and Spike Jonze and Dave Eggers are working on Where the Wild Things Are. I'm pretty excited about both of those.

Sweetstop
02-27-2007, 04:54 PM
Spike Jonze and Dave Eggers are working on Where the Wild Things Are.

Perfect to do Sendak.:)

pedro
02-27-2007, 04:56 PM
Speaking of adaptations, John Krasinski (The Office) is adapting David Foster Wallace's Brief Interviews with Hideous Men and Spike Jonze and Dave Eggers are working on Where the Wild Things Are. I'm pretty excited about both of those.

WTWTA is live action isn't it?

edit: just checked . It's not.

Joseph
02-27-2007, 04:56 PM
Fahrenheit 451 - Ray Bradbury

I'm sure there is more to the list, but this one was rather fantastic for me and it's held its appeal to this day.

M2
02-27-2007, 06:16 PM
Complete Works - William Shakespeare (best writing ever)
Morte D'Arthur - Sir Thomas Mallory (Caxton version, it's the reason why we read prose today)

Everything else tends to cycle with me. Books, for me, tend to be more about my understanding of them at the place and time when I read them than anything else. That doesn't necessarily lend itself to compiling favorites.

Though here's three I'd probably consider in any top 10:

For Whom the Bell Tolls - Ernest Hemingway
Confederacy of Dunces - John Kennedy Toole
Slaughterhouse Five - Kurt Vonnegut

Some others that would make my list on a frequent basis:

Motherless Brooklyn - Jonathan Lethem
Lord of the Rings trilogy - J.R.R. Tolkein (it wasn't necessarily designed to be chopped up into three books)
Going After Cacciato - Tim O'Brien
Catch-22 - Joseph Heller
In Parenthesis - David Jones

I've always thought Stephen King's "The Stand" was unfairly dismissed by literary types. Epic story, sharp characters. Yeah, it's too linear, but the chief complaint against it usually boils down to its characters are too busy for endless introspection. I'm not sure that's a bad thing. I've read a lot of novels where I was aching for someone to do something (James Joyce I'm looking at you).

I store non-fiction in a different portion of my brain. Bill James' Historical Baseball Abstract and George Dangerfield's Strange Death of Liberal England are first-rate reads though.

pedro
02-27-2007, 06:18 PM
Going After Cacciato - Tim O'Brien


Great book.

I really liked the Stand too. Steven King was my first great literary love. W/out him I'd probably not be the reader I am today.

M2
02-27-2007, 06:26 PM
I really liked the Stand too. Steven King was my first great literary love. W/out him I'd probably not be the reader I am today.

We probably read "The Stand" at around the same time and age. I remember finishing it and thinking "Holy crap that was good." Went back and re-read it 15 years later and it blew me away that it was even better than I realized when I first read it.

chicoruiz
02-27-2007, 06:30 PM
Ten works of fiction I don't think have been mentioned yet:

1. The Aubrey-Maturin Novels- O'Brian
2. The Quincunx- Palliser
3. The Flashman Novels- Fraser
4. Ring Lardner's Best Stories
5. The Most Of S.J. Perelman
6, The Once And Future King- White
7. The Postman Always Rings Twice- Cain
8. Piece Of Cake- Robinson
9. The Adventures Of Augie March- Bellow
10. Edwin Mullhouse- The Life and Death Of An American Writer, 1943-1954- Millhausen

westofyou
02-27-2007, 06:32 PM
We probably read "The Stand" at around the same time and age. I remember finishing it and thinking "Holy crap that was good." Went back and re-read it 15 years later and it blew me away that it was even better than I realized when I first read it.

I read it the summer of 1978, loved it, lapped everything he wrote up until 1988. Haven't read a thing since by him.

Go figure.

Falls City Beer
02-27-2007, 07:04 PM
Ten works of fiction I don't think have been mentioned yet:

1. The Aubrey-Maturin Novels- O'Brian
2. The Quincunx- Palliser
3. The Flashman Novels- Fraser
4. Ring Lardner's Best Stories
5. The Most Of S.J. Perelman
6, The Once And Future King- White
7. The Postman Always Rings Twice- Cain
8. Piece Of Cake- Robinson
9. The Adventures Of Augie March- Bellow
10. Edwin Mullhouse- The Life and Death Of An American Writer, 1943-1954- Millhausen


Perelman and Lardner. Great, great choices.

Every baseball fan should read "Alibi Ike."

vaticanplum
02-27-2007, 07:14 PM
I could probably pass with sweetshop's list, but I'll change it up a bit...all fiction, and no poetry or plays except for Shakespeare (I can't cut him out).

Complete Works - Shakespeare
Bartelby the Scrivener (short story, but long enough) - Herman Melville
Ada, or Ardor - Vladimir Nabokov
High Fidelity - Nick Hornby
Peter Pan - James Barrie
The Master and Margarita - Mikhail Bulgakov
All the Names - Jose Saramago
Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
The Chosen - Chaim Potok
The Great Gatsby - F. Scott Fitzgerald
Native Son - Richard Wright

and the Little House books, which get better every time I read them.

I appear to have a lot of books about angry or stunted young men. Hmmm. To be fair, that's a huge portion of literature.

I love this thread...it is reminding me of books I've always wanted to read but haven't. Keep em coming.

Falls City Beer
02-27-2007, 07:34 PM
Novels:

1. Madame Bovary--Flaubert (peerless)
2. Magic Mountain--Mann
3. The Idiot--Dostoevsky
4. Nostromo--Conrad
5. Lord Jim--Conrad
6. The Secret Agent--Conrad
7. Wieland--Charles Brockden Brown
8. Day of the Locust--West
9. They Shoot Horses, Don't They?--McCoy
10. Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man--Joyce
11. Wings of the Dove--James
12. Golden Bowl--James
13. Jekyll and Hyde--Stevenson
14. Sister Carrie--Dreiser
15. An American Tragedy--Dreiser
16. Wise Blood--Flannery O'Connor
17. Ada--Nabokov
18. Jude the Obscure--Thomas Hardy
19. Dead Souls--Gogol
20. Bleak House--Dickens
21. Scarlet Letter--Hawthorne
22. Absalom, Absalom!--Faulkner
23. Go Down, Moses--Faulkner
24. Gulliver's Travels--Swift
25. The Confidence Man--Melville

Falls City Beer
02-27-2007, 07:35 PM
I could probably pass with sweetshop's list, but I'll change it up a bit...all fiction, and no poetry or plays except for Shakespeare (I can't cut him out).

Complete Works - Shakespeare
Bartelby the Scrivener (short story, but long enough) - Herman Melville
Ada, or Ardor - Vladimir Nabokov
High Fidelity - Nick Hornby
Peter Pan - James Barrie
The Master and Margarita - Mikhail Bulgakov
All the Names - Jose Saramago
Great Expectations - Charles Dickens
The Chosen - Chaim Potok
The Great Gatsby - F. Scott Fitzgerald
Native Son - Richard Wright

and the Little House books, which get better every time I read them.

I appear to have a lot of books about angry or stunted young men. Hmmm. To be fair, that's a huge portion of literature.

I love this thread...it is reminding me of books I've always wanted to read but haven't. Keep em coming.

Holy Crap! I said Ada by Nabokov without even looking at yer list. Whoa.

lollipopcurve
02-27-2007, 07:51 PM
All right, from my youth, mostly. Novels. Since the kids, well, who reads any more....

Gravity's Rainbow -- Thomas Pynchon
Tristram Shandy -- Lawrence Sterne
Ulysses -- James Joyce
Lie Down in Darkness -- William Styron
On the Road -- Jack Kerouac
Et tu, Babe -- Mark Leyner
Universal Baseball Association, J. Hemry Waugh, Proprietor -- Robert Coover
The Power and the Glory -- Graham Greene
The Waves -- Virginia Woolf
The Vox Populi Stories -- Dallas Wiebe
Pale Fire -- Vlad Nabokov

pedro
02-27-2007, 07:53 PM
Et tu, Babe -- Mark Leyner


Mark Leyner doesn't so much write as he attacks your senses. Great stuff.

My advice to the young people of today? I'm tempted to say: Surround yourself with flunkies and yes-men and have naked slaves, perfumed with musk, fan you with plastic fronds while you write. Because that's what worked for me. But what does history teach us?

dsmith421
02-27-2007, 07:54 PM
I realize this list is all over the place.

One Hundred Years of Solitude (GGM)
Hard Times (Dickens)
Trinity (Uris)
Dubliners (Joyce)
Huckleberry Finn (Twain)
The Name of the Rose (Eco)
Catch-22 (Heller)
The Brothers Karamazov (Dostoyevsky)
The Shadow of the Wind (Ruiz Zafon)

vaticanplum
02-27-2007, 08:09 PM
Holy Crap! I said Ada by Nabokov without even looking at yer list. Whoa.

Great, great book. I also almost said Bleak House instead of Great Expectations.

I have tried to read Portrait of an Artist so many times. I canNOT get through it.

Also, as a side note pertaining to many other people's lists, I loathe Tim Robbins. I think Even Cowgirls Get the Blues is the only book I've ever read which made me furious at the end that I had wasted my time with it. Maybe we should have a thread of authors that people think they should like but don't, like the classic songs thread.

pedro
02-27-2007, 08:18 PM
Great, great book. I also almost said Bleak House instead of Great Expectations.

I have tried to read Portrait of an Artist so many times. I canNOT get through it.

Also, as a side note pertaining to many other people's lists, I loathe Tim Robbins. I think Even Cowgirls Get the Blues is the only book I've ever read which made me furious at the end that I had wasted my time with it. Maybe we should have a thread of authors that people think they should like but don't, like the classic songs thread.


I'll field that as I think I'm the only one who mentioned him. Yeah, I can understand not liking his books. I didn't like the last couple ones at all. I'm also not sure that I'd like it as much now as I did when I originally read all those books back in high school. I thought it was hot **** then though and so did pretty much everyone my age who was even vaguely counter culture and read.

vaticanplum
02-27-2007, 08:27 PM
I'll field that as I think I'm the only one who mentioned him. Yeah, I can understand not liking his books. I didn't like the last couple ones at all. I'm also not sure that I'd like it as much now as I did when I originally read all those books back in high school. I thought it was hot **** then though and so did pretty much everyone my age who was even vaguely counter culture and read.

That's why it upsets me that I don't like him. I feel that way about a lot of beat writers, I guess.

Also, Pedro, thanks for being classy and not pointing out my name issue. I always mix them up :)

MrCinatit
02-27-2007, 08:35 PM
I'm going to cheat, in more ways than one:

2001/2010 - Arthur C. Clarke
Cosmos/Contact/A Demon Haunted World - Carl Sagan
Ball Four - Jim Bouton
Les Miserbales - Victor Hugo
1984/Animal Farm - George Orwell
The complete works of H.G. Wells
Gulliver's Travels - Jonathen Swift
The Beatle's Anthology
Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams
American Hero - Larry Beinhart
Last of the Mohicans - James Fenimore Cooper
Catch-22 - Joseph Heller
Slaughterhouse Five - Kirt Vonnegut

Falls City Beer
02-27-2007, 08:53 PM
Great, great book. I also almost said Bleak House instead of Great Expectations.

I have tried to read Portrait of an Artist so many times. I canNOT get through it.

Also, as a side note pertaining to many other people's lists, I loathe Tim Robbins. I think Even Cowgirls Get the Blues is the only book I've ever read which made me furious at the end that I had wasted my time with it. Maybe we should have a thread of authors that people think they should like but don't, like the classic songs thread.

Give Portrait one more shot. Really. What's so disarming about Joyce is that in contrast to his almost overwhelming anti-sentimentalism there exist moments of such heartbreakingly affective directness. In other words, whatever is "felt" is earned, unlike in the works of so many other writers.

And Lolita, while absolutely brilliant in its own right, is no match for Ada. I agree.

Betterread
02-27-2007, 09:29 PM
1. Flaubert - Sentimental Education
2. Waugh - Brideshead revisited
3. Joyce - Ulysses
4. Beckett - Molloy
5. Calvino - Invisible cities
6. Dostoyevski - Brothers Karamazov
7. WG Sebald - Emigrants
8. WG Sebald - Rings of Saturn
9. Joan Didion - Play it as it lays
10. Nabakov - Pale fire
11. Thackeray - Vanity Fair
12. Fernando Pessoa - Book of disquiet
13. Andre Breton & Philippe Soupault - the Magnetic fields
14. J.G. Ballard - Crash
15. Raymond Queneau - Witch Grass
16. John Cheever - the Wapshot Chronicle
17. Bocaccio - The Decameron
18. Plutarch's Lives
19. Eliot - Middlemarch
20. Fitzgerald - great gatsby

pedro
02-27-2007, 09:41 PM
That's why it upsets me that I don't like him. I feel that way about a lot of beat writers, I guess.

Also, Pedro, thanks for being classy and not pointing out my name issue. I always mix them up :)


That's me. Always classy ;)

If I'm going to toss a name in of a famous & popular writer who I just don't enjoy it'd have to be Hemingway.

Falls City Beer
02-27-2007, 09:44 PM
That's me. Always classy ;)

If I'm going to toss a name in of a famous & popular writer who I just don't enjoy it'd have to be Hemingway.

Hemingway went downhill...fast.

Betterread
02-27-2007, 09:48 PM
Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Chabon
White Noise by DeLillo
The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Murakami
New York Trilogy by Auster
Gravity's Rainbow by Pynchon
Pastoralia by Saunders
Collected Fictions by Borges (this is probably cheating)
The Loser by Bernhard
Frog by Dixon
Cloud Atlas by Mitchell
Motherless Brooklyn by Lethem

Great list - I forgot about white noise, or it would be on my list and Borges is the best, but I thought I had to restrict myself to novels. Oh well.

RosieRed
02-28-2007, 12:01 AM
I have tried to read Portrait of an Artist so many times. I canNOT get through it.

I can't either. I've owned a copy for at least 12 years, have picked it up and started it at least 8 times.

There's another classic fiction book, I'm drawing a blank, that I've tried to read a number of times ... it has a ton of footnotes ... man. That's going to drive me crazy. But anyway, I'm not a huge fan of footnotes as it turns out, especially in fiction books.

Some of my favorite non-fiction/memoirs:
The Orchid Thief -- Susan Orlean
Lovely Bones/Lucky: A Memoir -- Alice Sebold (I know the former is "fiction," but close enough, IMO)
South -- Ernest Shackleton
Paula -- Isabel Allende
Stolen Lives -- Malika Oufkir
Guns, Germs & Steel -- Jared Diamond
Into the Wild and Into Thin Air -- Jon Kraukauer
At Home in The World -- Joyce Maynard (not sure why, but I just really liked this book when I read it)
In the Heart of the Sea -- Nathaniel Philbrick

I read so many travel/adventure/disaster books, I could have a favorite list of just that genre.

Some fiction might have made my list had I remembered them earlier:
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn -- Betty Smith
Bastard Out of Carolina -- Dorothy Allison
Summerland -- Michael Chabon (this is probably my favorite of his, actually, I don't know why I spaced on it earlier)

Gainesville Red
02-28-2007, 01:01 AM
I'll never be able to narrow it down to eleven. We'll see how it goes.

No particular rank.

-The Right Stuff. Tom Wolfe

- A Farewell to Arms. Hemingway

- Dharma Bums and On the Road. Kerouac

- The Grapes of Wrath. Steinbeck (Maybe #1)
-Jarhead. Anthony Swofford

- All The President's Men. Bernstein, Woodward

- The Rum Diary. Hunter Thompson

- Fight Club. Chuck Palahniuk

- Moneyball. Michael Lewis

- Helter Skelter. Buglliosi

- The Natural. Bernard Malamuc

- Hell's Angels. Hunter Thompson (Another maybe #1)

- Strip Tease. Carl Hiaasen

- All The King's Men. Robert Penn Warren

- Thank You For Smoking. Christopher Buckley

- Breakfast of Champions and Slaughterhouse Five. Maybe Slapstick. Vonnegut.

- Fear and Loathing either in Las Vegas or on the Campaign Trail '72. Hard to choose

- Hiroshima. John Hersey. (maybe #1)

- Big Sur. Kerouac

- The Bonfire of the Vanities. Wolfe

- Stormy Weather or Tourist Season. Carl Hiaasen.

- The Jordan Rules. Sam Smith

- Game of Shadows. Mark Fainaru-Wada and Lance Williams. It's intresting and they almost went to prison for it.

- The First Third. Neal Cassady

- Clemente by David Maraniss.

- 1984. George Orwell.

- The Boys of Summer. Roger Kahn.

- Either of the Summer of ' books by David Halberstam as well as The Fifties.

- The Jungle. Upton Sinclair.

- How Disney Devours the World. Carl Hiaasen

- Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Wolfe. (Maybe #1)

- Old Man and the Sea. Hemingway

-all of the other Carl Hiaasen books. Read anything you can from Carl Hiaasen


I had a felling there would be more than 11. I can't and won't cut it down. If anything there should probably be more of them. I'm sure I've forgotten plenty that I should have ranked.

zombie-a-go-go
02-28-2007, 06:27 AM
1. Infinite Jest - David Foster Wallace
2. Weetzie Bat - Francesca Lia Block
3. The Trial - Franz Kafka
4. American Gods - Neil Gaiman
5. The Stand - Stephen King
6. Catcher in the Rye - JD Salinger
7. The Great and Secret Show - Clive Barker
8. No Exit - Jean-Paul Sartre
9. Neuromancer - William Gibson
10. The Bonfire of the Vanities - Tom Wolfe
11. Dungeons and Dragons Players Handbook v3.5 (it sees the most use, so...)

MrCinatit
02-28-2007, 07:09 AM
- The Natural. Bernard Malamuc


Excellent call. I read the book after seeing the movie several times - what amazed me was how the movie was almost exactly like the book, page per page - until the last two pages. While I love the movie, the different endings make them two totally different stories.

Roy Tucker
02-28-2007, 07:33 AM
... and no poetry or plays except for Shakespeare (I can't cut him out).



When I started my list, I automatically started with Shakespeare. Best writer ever, bar none.

But after some semantic soul searching, I couldn't really say his plays are my favorite *books*. So I took them off. To thine own self be true, I supose.

Sweetstop
02-28-2007, 08:08 AM
I could probably pass with sweetshop's list

I love this thread...it is reminding me of books I've always wanted to read but haven't. Keep em coming.



:thumbup:

SandyD
02-28-2007, 08:09 AM
I guess it all in how you define "favorite." And how you define "book." ;)

zombie-a-go-go
02-28-2007, 08:11 AM
I guess it all in how you define "favorite." And how you define "book." ;)

I actually had difficulty writing down 11, not because I had so many, but because I'm hard pressed to say anything is my "favorite." So I just went with a list of books I'd recommend to others.

SandyD
02-28-2007, 08:13 AM
Yeah, I'm kind of the same way. I don't really do "favorites" too well.

M2
02-28-2007, 11:23 AM
I can't either. I've owned a copy for at least 12 years, have picked it up and started it at least 8 times.

There's two types of people in the world: those who love James Joyce and those who find him to be beyond tedious. I'm decidedly in the latter camp.


That's why it upsets me that I don't like him. I feel that way about a lot of beat writers, I guess.

I've never been a fan of the beat writers either. IMO, the only thing they connected with was their own egos.


The Once And Future King- White

Amazing book, funny and dripping with humanity, stark realization it leads us to as well -- that modern man is medeivally brutal, but lacking in nobility.

I'm planning on reading some Flashman books on the beach this summer.


Et tu, Babe -- Mark Leyner

No one does absurdity better than Leyner.


Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams

Funny is seriously underrated and Adams managed to be funny about the very underpinnings of existence.

TeamCasey
02-28-2007, 11:28 AM
The Stand - Stephen King

That would top my list.

TeamCasey
02-28-2007, 11:34 AM
She's Come Undone -- Wally Lamb

Forgot about that one. :thumbup:

TeamCasey
02-28-2007, 11:37 AM
I really liked the Stand too. Steven King was my first great literary love. W/out him I'd probably not be the reader I am today.

Exactly. I come from a whole family of voracious readers. I never was. One day I picked up Salem's Lot and was hooked.

Falls City Beer
02-28-2007, 11:53 AM
If you've read "The Dead" by James Joyce and not been moved to tears, then you've never been in love.

There's a cumbersome exterior to Joyce at times, but a soul like few others.

(Plus, Joyce hates Tennyson [the death of English poetry--my least-favorite poet ever], and that's okay by me).

westofyou
02-28-2007, 11:56 AM
If you've read "The Dead" by James Joyce and not been moved to tears, then you've never been in love.

If you've read anything by Vonnegut and didn't laugh, then you're probably dead.

Falls City Beer
02-28-2007, 11:58 AM
If you've read anything by Vonnegut and didn't laugh, then you're probably dead.

I enjoy Vonnegut. I would never call one of his novels "great," but I've truly relished a few of his books.

dsmith421
02-28-2007, 12:00 PM
If you've read "The Dead" by James Joyce and not been moved to tears, then you've never been in love.


I hated Joyce until I read "Dubliners"...after that, I went back to "Portrait" and realized that it was a restatement of many of the same emotions except made more evocative by the author's use of language.

I still prefer "Dubliners" but certainly see Joyce in a different light than when I was reading his stuff in HS/College.

M2
02-28-2007, 01:29 PM
If you've read "The Dead" by James Joyce and not been moved to tears, then you've never been in love.

There's a cumbersome exterior to Joyce at times, but a soul like few others.

(Plus, Joyce hates Tennyson [the death of English poetry--my least-favorite poet ever], and that's okay by me).

I've been in love. I've read "The Dead", multiple times in fact (not my choice). I was not moved to tears, in fact I was bored out of my skull. Like I said, reading through a bunch of tedium waiting for some emotionally constipated character to actually feel something doesn't work me, at any level. Those who love Joyce, love him utterly. I can respect that. Joyce's universe and characters are just too narrow-band for my tastes. It comes across as didactic rather than lived to me.

Oddly, I really like Andre Dubus, who also writes about complicated emotions, but those complications are present in his characters rather than suppressed past recognition.

I'm with you and Joyce on Tennyson, though. He took English poetry into Candyland while the French had the good sense to go stark raving mad. World War I, and Wilfred Owen, dragged it out of its ornamental decline.

Falls City Beer
02-28-2007, 01:49 PM
I've been in love. I've read "The Dead", multiple times in fact (not my choice). I was not moved to tears, in fact I was bored out of my skull. Like I said, reading through a bunch of tedium waiting for some emotionally constipated character to actually feel something doesn't work me, at any level.

.

So I suppose "Prufrock"'s a bust too?

M2
02-28-2007, 02:10 PM
So I suppose "Prufrock"'s a bust too?

Big bust.

Don't even get me started on "Four Quartets".

I recognize Joyce as a man and artist of depth, it just doesn't come together for me. I'm not sure Eliot ever gleaned anything about the human condition beyond how to paste images together.

Joyce cares about the reader, that's where he's aiming to connect. I find that admirable. Eliot, far as I can tell, was trying to impress the literary community. He succeeded. Though, to be fair, I hate Milton too on many of the same grounds and future generations will be handed a poetic Mount Rushmore with both he and Eliot chiseled into it.

RedsBaron
02-28-2007, 04:03 PM
11 favorite novels, in no particular order:
1. "The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald. One of the few novels that I have read several times. Its relatively short length makes repeated readings easier, but it is such a perfect jewel of a book.
2. "The Winds of War" and "War and Remembrance" by Herman Wouk. Two novels but really one story. Of the two, I preferred "Winds." I can recall first reading the book while I was in law school. I stayed up until about 4 a.m. finishing the book.
3. "The Cruel Sea" by Nicholas Monsarrat. It took me a while to "get into" this classic tale of war on a British corvette in WWII, but it stuck with me.
4. "A Piece of Cake" by Derek Robinson. A memorable novel set during the Battle of Britain. It made me laugh out loud, and it made me think. I've never been nearly as fond of his other novels for some reason.
5. "All Quiet On The Western Front" by Erich Maria Remarque. Sad.
6. "1984" by George Orwell. Sadder.
7. "Johnny Tremain" by Esther Forbes. My favorite book as a kid.
8. "Catch 22" by Joseph Heller. I laughed on almost every page, but it too made me think.
9. "Lonesome Dove" by Larry McMurtry. I never wanted this book to end, and I hated it when Gus died.
10. "The Eagle Has Landed" by Jack Higgins. I got bored with his books eventually, as he fell into a formula, but this one was a great page turner.
11. Virtually all of Robert B. Parker's "Spenser" novels; always a fun read, and the dialoge between Spenser and Hawk, Spenser and Susan, really Spenser and anyone, makes me laugh.

westofyou
02-28-2007, 04:09 PM
9. "Lonesome Dove" by Larry McMurtry. I never wanted this book to end, and I hated it when Gus died.

So true.

Puffy
02-28-2007, 04:32 PM
Don't even get me started on "Four Quartets".



Also known by its other name - "One Dollar"

:devil:

pedro
02-28-2007, 04:34 PM
9. "Lonesome Dove" by Larry McMurtry. I never wanted this book to end, and I hated it when Gus died.


I love those books. The entire series. (streets of laredo, dead man walking, commanche moon)

I also like the "last Picture Show, Texasville, Duane's Depressed" trilogy.

vaticanplum
02-28-2007, 08:34 PM
When I started my list, I automatically started with Shakespeare. Best writer ever, bar none.

But after some semantic soul searching, I couldn't really say his plays are my favorite *books*. So I took them off. To thine own self be true, I supose.

The traditional view of Shakespeare (and one I wholeheartedly support on one level) is that his work is meant to be performed and witnessed, not read. It's not literature; it's drama. I agonize over kids in school who read Shakespeare plays and never get the chance to see them performed. They will not understand the way they are meant to. Throw in the language barrier on top of that, and it's no wonder a lot of kids are turned off by him. If Shakespeare is to be part of any curriculum, a requirement of that should be seeing his work performed. I would pass a law about that if I could.

On the other hand, studying Shakespeare on an academic level is breathtaking. You've got about four centuries of theory to work with, not to mention the most deeply human and in one sense simplistic collection of words ever written, and the amount of stuff that pops up in the text -- the amount of information sometimes contained in a single syllable -- is mind-boggling. So that's why I list him within my books, even though I agree that it's not technically the case. Though I believe those plays must be living, in the end there's not a piece of writing I'd rather sit down and furrow my brow over than Shakespeare. It's a new world ever single time, but it always leads back to my own.

GAC
02-28-2007, 08:40 PM
8. The Early Years of My Life (1888-1924) by RFS62

Wasn't the original title to this book "War and Piece"?

Anything by John Steinbeck.

Also Tolkein and Twain.

But I also liked reading Louis L'Amour and Zane Grey. ;)

bucksfan
02-28-2007, 09:11 PM
1) Heaven is a Playground - Rick Telander
2) Following the Equator - Mark Twain
3) Town and City - Jack Kerouac
4) On the Road - Jack Kerouac
5) Tales from Margaritaville - Jimmy Buffett (collection of short and verty entertaining stories)
6) Cat's Crade -Kurt Vonnegut Jr.
7) Songlines - Bruce Chatwin
8) Dharma Bums - Jack Kerouac
9) Why Time Begins on Opening Day - Thomas Boswell
10) Boys of Summer - Roger Kahn
11) All Creatures Great and Small - James Herriot (could have put any of the 4 books of this series in here for me)

chilsonrolen
12-09-2011, 02:53 AM
My top 11 favorite books are: Think & Grow Rich, The Hite Report, Angels & Demons, To Kill a Mockingbird, Valley of the Dolls, Gone with the Wind, The Purpose Driven Life, The Revolt of Mamie Stover, The Celestine Prophecy, Steps to Christ and Goodnight Moon.

TRF
12-09-2011, 03:51 PM
Sherwood - Parke Godwin and the follow up Robin and the King, not as good, but the two best Robin Hood books ever written IMO
The entire Dresden Files series - Jim Butcher
I was a huge fan of Piers Anthony's Incarnations of Immortality when i was 18 or so. I tried reading them again... oy.
Island in the sea of time - SM Sterling
Days of Infamy - Harry Turtledove In fact anything by Harry Turtledove
Job A comedy of Justice - Robert A. Heinlein
Watchmen Graphic Novel - Alan Moore
Titan, Wizard and Demon - John Varley three very good books.

Caveman Techie
12-12-2011, 02:22 PM
Here is my list in no particular order (God that'd take me a few months to re-read them all just to make sure)

When the legends die - Hal Borland
Red Storm Rising - Tom Clancy
DragonFlight - Anne Mccaffrey
The Dark Tower Series, The Wolves of Calla - Stephen King
The Dark Tower Series, Song of Sussanah - Stephen King (The rest were good, but not my favorites)
Debt of Honor - Tom Clancy
Executive Orders - Tom Clancy (although I think they should only count as one)
Enders Game - Orson Scott Card
The Stand - Stephen King
The Hollow Hills - Mary Stewert
Starship Troopers - Robert Heinleim

RonDunn95
12-12-2011, 06:22 PM
Robinson Crusoe - Daniel Defoe
A Fine Balance - Rohinton Mistry
Catch-22 - Joseph Heller
Vanishing Point - David Markson
Trainspotting - Irvine Welsh
American Psycho - Bret Easton Ellis
Amsterdam - Ian McEwan
The Untouchable - John Banville
An Obedient Father - Akhil Sharma
The Shining - Stephen King
Underworld - Don DeLillo