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View Full Version : Mark Cuban to offer $625 million to buy Cubs



BCubb2003
02-28-2007, 01:22 PM
If it goes through, it could alter the NL Central...


http://www.radaronline.com/exclusives/2007/02/mark-cuban-in-megabucks-bid-for-cubs.php

klw
02-28-2007, 01:24 PM
[QUOTE=BCubb2003;1251494]If it goes through, it could alter the NL Central...

Yeah they make start spending indiscriminately.

zombie-a-go-go
02-28-2007, 01:25 PM
[QUOTE=BCubb2003;1251494]If it goes through, it could alter the NL Central...

Yeah they make start spending indiscriminately.


:lol:

KronoRed
02-28-2007, 01:26 PM
Him up in the TV booth...

High comedy, I hope he gets them.

Unassisted
02-28-2007, 01:33 PM
Bud doesn't like boat-rocking, let alone people like Cuban who stand up in the boat and yell about the direction it's headed. I'll be surprised if this gets very far past the rumor stage.

MartyFan
02-28-2007, 01:33 PM
I think he would be great for Baseball...Love the guys passion in the NBA...sure he is a bit of a sideshow but he sparks the fans to let them know he loves the team too!

Heath
02-28-2007, 01:37 PM
Hey it's his money.

If he wants perpetual losers to waste money on, go ahead.

KronoRed
02-28-2007, 01:38 PM
Bud doesn't like boat-rocking, let alone people like Cuban who stand up in the boat and yell about the direction it's headed. I'll be surprised if this gets very far past the rumor stage.

Good point.

harangatang
02-28-2007, 01:42 PM
I didn't think the Cubs could get any worse.

Red Leader
02-28-2007, 01:45 PM
That's like $10M for each win this season...

harangatang
02-28-2007, 01:47 PM
That's like $10M for each win this season...The Cubs are going to be 62.5-99.5 this year then? I'm sure Cubs fans will love not losing 100 games.:)

RichRed
02-28-2007, 01:50 PM
I know it's apples-to-oranges, but the Mavs were a perennial doormat before Cuban took over. Now look at them. I like the Cubs just the way they are, thanks.

Red Leader
02-28-2007, 01:52 PM
I know it's apples-to-oranges, but the Mavs were a perennial doormat before Cuban took over. Now look at them. I like the Cubs just the way they are, thanks.

Dude, you're forgetting about the goat. No amount of money can lift that curse. It's a goat!

texasdave
02-28-2007, 02:31 PM
Dude, you're forgetting about the goat. No amount of money can lift that curse. It's a goat!

The Cubs need to attack that curse head-on. They need Steve Bartman to lead a goat out to the mound and throw out the first pitch on Opening Day. No curse could stand up to that.

BCubb2003
02-28-2007, 02:45 PM
It's amazing how much money came out of that little audio thing Mark Cuban sold off before the dotcom bubble burst.

Roy Tucker
02-28-2007, 02:48 PM
I know it's apples-to-oranges, but the Mavs were a perennial doormat before Cuban took over. Now look at them. I like the Cubs just the way they are, thanks.

That's how I feel too. The Mavs were the laughingstock of the NBA (and that's saying something for that era) and Cuban's $$$ and drive turned that team around.

Goat or no goat, he'd turn the Cubs around and dominate the NL Central for years ala Turner's Braves.

To think of 10-15 years of insufferable Cubs fans coming to GABP is more than I can bear. I'd rather stick red-hot pokers in my eyeballs.

M2
02-28-2007, 02:56 PM
Bud doesn't like boat-rocking, let alone people like Cuban who stand up in the boat and yell about the direction it's headed. I'll be surprised if this gets very far past the rumor stage.

True, but he'd be great for the game. MLB needs a higher profile in the midwest.

I'm with Roy on the Ted Turner analogy.

Puffy
02-28-2007, 02:57 PM
Cuban knows sports and knows how to build a team. The Mavs are good for a reason. I'd hate to see him get the Cubs.

Always Red
02-28-2007, 03:21 PM
Cuban knows sports and knows how to build a team. The Mavs are good for a reason. I'd hate to see him get the Cubs.

I agree, Puffy. Cuban is a winner, whether you love him or hate him, the guy knows what he's doing, and he's driven.

He'd be great for the Cubs and Chicago, bad for the Reds and the White Sox.

Razor Shines
02-28-2007, 04:07 PM
Cuban knows sports and knows how to build a team. The Mavs are good for a reason. I'd hate to see him get the Cubs.

Yep. I wish he wanted to buy the Reds.

Red in Chicago
02-28-2007, 04:16 PM
oy vey...i really don't want to see and hear this guy on the tv/radio everyday in chicago:bang:

StillFunkyB
02-28-2007, 04:43 PM
Yeah, woulda loved to see him buy the Reds.

Don't think we would have to complain about him not opening up the wallet.

WMR
02-28-2007, 04:49 PM
Dice-K, Arroyo, Harang, Zito, and Lohse??

Wouldn't have been a bad starting rotation.

Yachtzee
02-28-2007, 05:00 PM
In some ways, he reminds me of a Bill Veeck with money. I may not always agree with what he says, but I like the way he spends time sitting with the fans and the fact that he holds chats and responds to fans' emails. Not many owners make themselves that accessible to their customers. I would hate to see him own the Cubs, more out of jealousy than anything.

Outshined_One
02-28-2007, 05:18 PM
Rumor's Been Shot Down: (http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/chi-070228cubsrumor,0,4379471.story?track=rss)


The Cubs are not about to become Cuban's, contrary to an Internet report.

Mark Cuban, the billionaire blogger, entrepreneur and owner of pro basketball's Dallas Mavericks, on Wednesday shot down a Radar Online report that said he is "is set to offer $625 million to buy the Chicago Cubs from Tribune Co."

"Not true," Cuban said by e-mail.

Radar quoted "a source familiar with the matter" as saying Cuban is "desperate to buy the Cubs" and "wants this so bad." It said it got no response from Cuban, who responded to a Chicago Tribune inquiry concerning the report in less than 15 minutes.

"I have no idea where they got their info," Cuban said.

Tribune Co., which owns the Cubs, the Chicago Tribune and other media properties, is currently exploring options to boost shareholder value.

MaineRed
02-28-2007, 05:18 PM
I was going to say what Razor said, I just wish it was the Reds.

I don't think Cuban is as much of a sideshow as the media makes him out to be. I don't think being who he is instead of throwing a suit on, that he probably doesn't even own makes him a sideshow. He goes to games, cheers on his team, even follows them on the road and says what he thinks when he is passionate that something needs to change.

More people should challenge the NBA refs like he has. For all the critism of NFL umps and the baseball strike zone is amazing how freely the NBA refs get off. They are absolutely horrible. Anyone seen Violet Palmer? If she was a college ref do you think she'd be doing Duke and NC, Wisconsin and Ohio State? So why is she doing NBA games? Where did she get her training? Same with all these refs. A good portion of them are younger than most college refs at the big time level. Where are they coming from? And they are the best the world has to offer? Cuban is dead on. But David Stern has this policy that you can't criticize and for some reason the media follows right along. The games are so inconsistently officiated it is beyond belief most of the time.

Bad for our Reds but good for baseball. Cuban is the best owner in sports and I'm not sure who is second.

Cooper
02-28-2007, 06:07 PM
Big time into sabrmetrics. I'd venture to say he has more sabr dudes on his staff than half the NBA teams combined. As a Reds fan -he would be way difficult to compete against, but he'd be good for baseball.

Unassisted
02-28-2007, 06:26 PM
True, but he'd be great for the game. MLB needs a higher profile in the midwest.

I agree that he'd be a force for positive change and force the spotlight away from the coasts sometimes in a game that desperately needs to have a spotlight there. I just don't see the fit, since he has to realize that current MLB ownership and leadership is about as eager to change the status quo as the Vatican is.

Owner Mark would probably tear his hair out in frustration and sell out in 6 months after a few meetings with this batch of owners and Bud.

Forget selling a team to him. They should hand him a 10-year $500 million contract to be the next commissioner and drag the game into the 21st century. It would be the best half-billion MLB ever spent.

Shaknb8k
02-28-2007, 07:45 PM
Ive said this on here many times but im a baseball fan before Im a Reds fan. I know its really hard to say but I think he would be good for baseball. Im all for it. It would give quite a bit of publicity to the NL Central since winning a WS and representing the NL in the WS for 3 years hasnt hardly got any publicity. That being said there is no way Bud lets this happen.

StillFunkyB
02-28-2007, 09:47 PM
I agree that he'd be a force for positive change and force the spotlight away from the coasts sometimes in a game that desperately needs to have a spotlight there. I just don't see the fit, since he has to realize that current MLB ownership and leadership is about as eager to change the status quo as the Vatican is.

Owner Mark would probably tear his hair out in frustration and sell out in 6 months after a few meetings with this batch of owners and Bud.

Forget selling a team to him. They should hand him a 10-year $500 million contract to be the next commissioner and drag the game into the 21st century. It would be the best half-billion MLB ever spent.

Doesn't sound like such a bad idea.

Then again, I don't care who is commish as long as it's not Bud Selig, and they actually do something to make their product more accessible.

As it stands right now, Major League Baseball could really give a rats patoot about their customers.

Unassisted
07-13-2007, 09:28 AM
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/scorecard/mlbnews.asp?articleID=206071


Report: Cuban wants the Cubs

Dallas, TX (Sports Network) - The Chicago Cubs are on the market and one of the reported suitors is the controversial owner of the NBA's Dallas Mavericks, Mark Cuban.

According to a report from the Dallas Morning News, Cuban has applied to Major League Baseball for a potential purchase of the Cubs. The franchise was put up for sale by the Tribune Company in April.

"I submitted the application and have no comment on the rest," Cuban was quoted by the paper in an e-mail response.

Cuban has owned the Mavericks since January 2000 and is considered one of the top owners in the NBA, although he has often clashed with league commissioner David Stern over numerous topics. Stern has fined Cuban several times, particularly over officiating.

The Tribune Company bought the Cubs, as well as historic Wrigley Field, in 1981. The sale also includes a 25 percent interest in Comcast SportsNet Chicago.

Highlifeman21
07-13-2007, 09:30 AM
Mark Cuban would be great for MLB.

The NL would now have a financial rival to the Yankees.

Marc D
07-13-2007, 09:53 AM
Mark Cuban would be great for MLB.

The NL would now have a financial rival to the Yankees.

I wouldn't want anyone actually waking the Cubs up but I agree he would be good for MLB.

The old guard would hate him, and thats a good thing.

Highlifeman21
07-13-2007, 10:38 AM
I wouldn't want anyone actually waking the Cubs up but I agree he would be good for MLB.

The old guard would hate him, and thats a good thing.

I would give Cuban 3 years to turn the Cubs around, and then look out.

I'm sure the Cubs would quickly approach a $200M payroll, and you'd see a lot of guys coming and going on that roster.

cumberlandreds
07-13-2007, 10:40 AM
I wouldn't want anyone actually waking the Cubs up but I agree he would be good for MLB.

The old guard would hate him, and thats a good thing.

I don't think the good ole boys will let him the MLB club. I would be really surprised if the owners would approve a sale to Cuban no matter how much money he has. Just too flamboyant for them.

Joseph
07-13-2007, 10:58 AM
We'll see how much 'expansion' of the game Bud truly wants by how this vote goes. Cuban would raise the presence of baseball everywhere due to his antics.

As the saying goes, theres no such thing as bad press.

MartyFan
07-13-2007, 12:09 PM
I would give Cuban 3 years to turn the Cubs around, and then look out.

I'm sure the Cubs would quickly approach a $200M payroll, and you'd see a lot of guys coming and going on that roster.

Why would Cuban get Three years to turn around a team that already has a 100 million dollar payroll and Mr. C only gets one before being hung out to dry?

Just askin...

I think Cuban would be SO GREAT for the NL and for the game of Baseball...the game need an innovator another Comisky (spelling?) who isn't afraid to use and harness the sideshow...I think the one thing Cuban did with the Mavs is he showed the local fan base that it is okay to be passionate about the game, the team and the players...he sold a lot of merch and tickets the first couple years to a franchise that was still laughable for the better part of the 10 years prior to his purchase.

Matt700wlw
07-13-2007, 03:48 PM
I wonder if Cuban would sit behind home plate and yell at the umps?

KronoRed
07-13-2007, 03:53 PM
I don't see Bud or the owners approving this if they can get away with it

Spitball
07-13-2007, 04:53 PM
I don't see Bud or the owners approving this if they can get away with it

No, they wouldn't take a chance on his unpredictable behavior. They will have options for potential owners who will toe-the-line.

And, in this age of arbitration and as the fan of a smaller market team, I would not want to see him handing out further irresponsible contracts that would drive up the comparative contracts of marginal talent. I do not believe he would be good for baseball.

Red in Chicago
07-13-2007, 05:01 PM
I wouldn't want anyone actually waking the Cubs up but I agree he would be good for MLB.

The old guard would hate him, and thats a good thing.

While I don't really care for Cuban and really dislike the Cubs, it might make for very exciting baseball on the Northside again.

Spitball
07-13-2007, 05:49 PM
While I don't really care for Cuban and really dislike the Cubs, it might make for very exciting baseball on the Northside again.

Tim Kujerkian (sp?) and Peter Gammons say there is no possible way the major league owners would vote to allow Cuban to be a baseball owner. Further, Jerry Reinsdorf does not like Cuban and would fight his move to buy the team.

deltachi8
07-13-2007, 09:42 PM
Tim Kujerkian (sp?) and Peter Gammons say there is no possible way the major league owners would vote to allow Cuban to be a baseball owner. Further, Jerry Reinsdorf does not like Cuban and would fight his move to buy the team.

I think for that reason I support Cuban's bid to buy the Cubs.

Yachtzee
07-13-2007, 10:04 PM
I think it might be interesting to have an outspoken owner like Cuban who is unafraid to speak his mind. I'm not concerned about him blowing up salary structure because the current owners have been doing that themselves for a while. I actually think Cuban has a good understanding of customer service and realizes that the fans should always be the #1 concern. That kind of owner sounds much better than the blowhards who talk of "the good of the game," but really mean "the good of myself."

mth123
07-13-2007, 10:09 PM
Cubs took on a lot of debt this past winter. You'd think MLB would be happy to find an owner withdeep pockets to take over for an owner that wants out.

RFS62
07-13-2007, 10:26 PM
No way on earth MLB will allow this.

Unassisted
07-13-2007, 11:35 PM
No way on earth MLB will allow this.

You're probably right, unless he manages to strike a nostalgic chord in the owners who remember Ted Turner. Cuban is actually a lot less buffoonish than ol' Ted was. He's every bit as canny a media mogul, though.

The fact that Cuban is keeping quiet about his bid after submitting his bid strikes me as a very clear demonstration that he's willing to play by the rules. That should impress the old guard.

I'm just amazed that Cuban wants to be in their club. I never figured he could tolerate MLB's tendency toward inertia.

Unassisted
09-18-2007, 09:56 AM
Cuban was kicking the tires of his potential purchase at yesterday's game against the Reds.

http://www.suntimes.com/sports/mariotti/562271,CST-SPT-jay18.article#


Fan who would be king

Bleacher bum Mark Cuban had a blast rooting for the Cubs on Monday night. If he was as popular in the suites as he was in the seats, he could own the place

September 18, 2007
BY JAY MARIOTTI

He probably has a better shot of winning ''Dancing With The Stars'' while doing the funky chicken, or the Bud Selig Macarena, than he does of owning the Cubs. But Mark Cuban was in the ballpark anyway Monday night, screaming and shaking with all the other loons, watching in his old-time Cubs jersey as the team he's trying to buy pulled off a ninth-inning, grandstand-rattling comeback victory.

''What a [bleeping] game,'' Cuban e-mailed from somewhere in Wrigleyville after the 7-6 classic, which kept the Cubs a game ahead of Milwaukee in what has become a hot, little race in a lukewarm division.

» Click to enlarge image
Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban (in Cubs jersey) celebrates with Cubs fans in the right-field bleachers on Monday night.
(Tom Cruze/Sun-Times)

For the record, Cuban didn't storm the field to confront an umpire or lean into the dugout to advise Lou Piniella. Nor did he race out and jump into the moving pile of Cubs at second base after Mark DeRosa's game-winning hit, which followed a leadoff walk to Ryan Theriot, a single by Derrek Lee and a slicing triple to the wall by Aramis Ramirez that eluded the diving lunge of Cincinnati center fielder Norris Hopper. But I'm sure he wanted to. And we can assume he was the only billionaire/prospective owner partying among the masses, enjoying a meaningful autumn at Wrigley.

''Its a blast,'' Cuban e-mailed in the first inning, much too busy for apostrophes.

And where was he sitting? Please don't say a corporate suite.

''Right-field bleachers,'' he e-mailed in the fourth, after Cliff Floyd and DeRosa hit back-to-back homers to give the Cubs a 3-1 lead.

Were the fans mobbing him, urging him to buy the Cubs and save them from the Tribune Co. clones threatening to buy them?

''Just having fun,'' he e-mailed in the fifth, after the Reds scored three runs to take a 4-3 lead off the maddening Rich Hill.

I looked through the binoculars and couldn't find him. I asked an usher about his whereabouts, only to get a dumbfounded look. So I shot another e-mail: Which is more likely to happen, him winning ''Dancing With The Stars'' or buying the Cubs?

''Me hitting a home run,'' he responded in the sixth, after Hopper leaped and smacked against the ivy to make a sensational catch on a Ramirez blast.

A good luck charm?
And how passionately was he rooting for the home team? ''All of us have Cubbies jerseys on,'' he wrote, after the Reds had taken the lead in the sixth and $136 million baserunner Alfonso Soriano was thrown out at third on a groundball to short.

There is nothing like the seventh-inning stretch, as we've seen with Eddie Vedder and John Cusack, to make the inconspicuous celebrity stand out in the crowd. Ten rows above the UnderArmour logo on the wall, there was the would-be next owner, in his vintage jersey, singing and raising his fist and high-fiving two of his best friends, then posing for pictures with fans. Has Dennis FitzSimons, the faceless CEO behind the Tribune Co., ever sat in right field? Cuban, the Internet billionaire, would rather be a fan than a suit.

''U spying on me?'' he wrote in the eighth, just before the great rally.

Here we thought Cuban was just Bartman with a private plane, the black cat with a posse. Seems he's a good-luck charm. Maybe he should stick around. Better, maybe they should let him buy the team.

How interesting he would appear on a day the Los Angeles Times reported that Tribune Co. -- the Times is owned by the Tribsters, friends -- may break off its sports-related assets to maximize value in the Tower's Great Garage Sale. That means the Cubs would be offered separately in a package with Wrigley Field, land around the ancient ballpark and a 25 percent share of the local Comcast SportsNet operation, slightly improving chances that Selig will keep his grimy little nose away from the sale and not hand-deliver the franchise to a local clout group headed by his buddy, John Canning, an 11 percent owner of the very Brewers who are battling the Cubs. That is the underlying conflict of interest in this Interstate 94 scrum between a large American city and a little town with no discernible skyline or relevance, other than cheese, sausage and Selig's frozen custard stand.

Chip R
09-18-2007, 10:02 AM
That is the underlying conflict of interest in this Interstate 94 scrum between a large American city and a little town with no discernible skyline or relevance, other than cheese, sausage and Selig's frozen custard stand.


Not too snobby, is he?

Highlifeman21
09-18-2007, 12:49 PM
Why would Cuban get Three years to turn around a team that already has a 100 million dollar payroll and Mr. C only gets one before being hung out to dry?

Just askin...

I think Cuban would be SO GREAT for the NL and for the game of Baseball...the game need an innovator another Comisky (spelling?) who isn't afraid to use and harness the sideshow...I think the one thing Cuban did with the Mavs is he showed the local fan base that it is okay to be passionate about the game, the team and the players...he sold a lot of merch and tickets the first couple years to a franchise that was still laughable for the better part of the 10 years prior to his purchase.

Cuban and his deep pockets would get 3 years. Castellini's pocket aren't as deep, and I can't for the life of me imagine them growing exponentially in depth.

I'm fine with Bob C as an owner, just as long as the payroll doesn't start to decrease. Keep it at 75+ Mil and I can't really complain.

MLB should embrace Cuban to help grow its brand.

Heath
09-18-2007, 12:51 PM
Not too snobby, is he?

Hey, he was one of us at one point.

Roy Tucker
09-18-2007, 01:04 PM
I've said it before, but Mark Cuban as the Cubs owner just scares the bejeezus out of me. I can see him transforming the Cubs into a real juggernaut.

For MLB, that's a great thing. For Reds fans, that's bad news.

Chip R
09-18-2007, 02:20 PM
I've said it before, but Mark Cuban as the Cubs owner just scares the bejeezus out of me. I can see him transforming the Cubs into a real juggernaut.

For MLB, that's a great thing. For Reds fans, that's bad news.


It's not like the Cubs were hesitant to spend money during the offseason or during the season as witnessed by Z's contract. All it's gotten them is 1 game in 1st in baseball's worst division. Hardly world beaters.

15fan
09-18-2007, 04:58 PM
I'd rather Mark Cuban hold out a few years before getting into MLB. After Fidel Castro finally goes the way of Strom Thurmond, we can annex Cuba as state #51 and Mark can be in charge of the new team in Havana.

They'll be Cuban's Cubans.

Outshined_One
09-18-2007, 05:28 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v387/sweetpeteman/cuban.jpg

Matt700wlw
09-18-2007, 05:30 PM
Dirk would play centerfield

Ravenlord
09-18-2007, 05:50 PM
i would love this, though i'd rather see him buy the Pirates.

while i think Cuban would be a good owner, i think it would take a few years to really come around; primary reason being that basketball is entirely a team sport as opposed to baseball.

however, the end of time is more likely to happen than Bud allowing someone as interesting as Mark Cuban to even have a legitimate entertaining of owning an MLB franchise.

RedsManRick
09-18-2007, 05:51 PM
Dirk would play centerfield

Are you sure you want Dirk guarding the basket?

Ravenlord
09-18-2007, 05:59 PM
Are you sure you want Dirk guarding the basket?
at his height, first base all the way.

Matt700wlw
09-18-2007, 06:03 PM
at his height, first base all the way.

Be like Richie Sexon :D

RFS62
09-18-2007, 10:03 PM
Never, ever gonna happen

Unassisted
05-01-2008, 11:24 AM
Mum Cuban sits with Trib execs at Wrigley

May 1, 2008
Recommend (6)

BY CHRIS DE LUCA

News flash: Mark Cuban didn't want to talk during his visit to Wrigley Field on Wednesday. Talk about trying to win over Major League Baseball.

''I'm here as a Cubs fan,'' Cuban said, waving off a group of reporters as he took his front-row seat -- one chair from the Cubs' dugout -- before their game against the Milwaukee Brewers. ''How can I enjoy my beer if you guys are around?''

Cuban, braving the 47-degree weather wearing a long-sleeve shirt, signed autographs before the game and sat with Tribune Co. executives in their premium seats.

It's no secret Cuban is among the six to 10 groups ready to make a formal bid for the Cubs, who have been put on the block by Tribune chairman and CEO Sam Zell. As Cuban continues to clear hurdles in MLB's tough weeding-out process, the less that the usually talkative -- and controversial -- owner of the Dallas Mavericks says, the better for his bid.

And those with an insight into the proposed sale indicate Cuban is no longer the dark horse he once was considered when he initially expressed interest last year.

Cuban became a billionaire with his innovative Internet ventures and is believed to have the resources to swing a quick deal for the Cubs. Zell -- the profanity-spewing billionaire who bought Tribune Co. last year -- certainly would have no problems doing business with Cuban.

The stumbling block always has been MLB's stodgy owners approving the next owner of the Cubs. Commissioner Bud Selig has taken a special interest in the Cubs and would seem to clash with Cuban.

But Zell, who is reportedly $12.8 billion in debt, almost certainly will insist on getting the highest bid for his team, and Cuban appears poised to spend what it takes.

Insiders believe Cuban could put together a package with more available assets quicker than the group thought to be the leading contender. That group, headed by private- equity mogul John Canning Jr., also has several deep-pocketed investors and has close ties to Selig.

Before there is any movement in the sale of the Cubs, the team first must provide its financial books to the approved bidders -- a pool that includes Cuban and Canning's group. Though Zell recently indicated that might happen by this week, a team source said the Cubs still are working to get those books in order, and they likely won't be delivered to MLB until the end of May.

Zell is facing a Dec. 4 deadline to pay a $650 million debt obligation. Despite widespread speculation Zell is in a tight squeeze, a source close to Zell said there is no danger of that payment not being made.

As for braving the frigid temperatures at Wrigley on Wednesday, Cuban was spotted slipping into a just-purchased Cubs jacket by the second inning. His next purchase that inning: a beer.

fearofpopvol1
05-01-2008, 12:37 PM
Signing autographs? Who would want Mark Cuban's autograph??

Chip R
05-01-2008, 12:38 PM
Signing autographs? Who would want Mark Cuban's autograph??


Cubs fans. Need I say more? :rolleyes:

George Anderson
05-01-2008, 01:07 PM
Signing autographs? Who would want Mark Cuban's autograph??

I would love to get his autograph on a blank check after he had a few to many beers :D

KoryMac5
05-01-2008, 01:38 PM
I am a long time Dallas Mavericks fan who loves Mark Cuban as an owner, for all his faults (and there are many) he consistently shows he is not afraid to do what is necessary to make his team successful. WHen looking at this deal you must look past some of his antics and focus on his skills as a buisness man running a team. He is not afraid to spend money on free agents, nor is he against adding payroll in a trade if it helps his team. He has done a lot to make Dallas an attractive team to potential free agents (private jet, revamped locker room, new facilities). If this deal goes through it spells trouble for the rest of the NL.

15fan
05-01-2008, 01:39 PM
In the last 6 months, Mrs. fan and I had occasion to dine with one of Zell's top level executives. After a few drinks, I asked about the reported strategy of selling the Cubs and Wrigley Field independantly of each other.

(I'll be the first to admit that mergers & acquisitions are not my forte, but I like to think that I have a basic understanding of the way that business and corporate America operate.)

Didn't really get much of an answer, other than the standard - maybe the entities are worth more individually than they are in combination - response. It left me thinking that either Zell is brilliant with respect to thinking ahead/outside the box (as evidenced by his estimated net worth of $6 billion according to Forbes in 2007), or that he's looney.

I can see the rationale for buying the team as a stand-alone entity: You can then threaten to take your team elsewhere for a better deal unless the local/state government puts you in a sweet new facility with generous financial terms.

At the other end of the spectrum is owning the team/park/media outlet in combination. Transfer pricing, taxation, etc all come into play.

But why just buy the ballpark? That's the part I just can't get my brain around. You're either going to (1) put the tennant(s) over a barrel (and thus speed up their move or new facility), or (2) lose money, especially on an old facility which likely has some pretty hefty upkeep costs.

Only other thing I can think of is that you buy the stadium because you have way too much money, and an ego that needs stroking. Maybe being able to simply say, "Hi, I'm _________ and I own Wrigley Field" at cocktail parties is what motivates you.

Maybe that's where Cuban comes in?

But if you've got that kind of $$$, why buy just the park? Why not buy the team, too?

My brain hurts from trying to figure this out.

Chip R
05-01-2008, 01:47 PM
If this deal goes through it spells trouble for the rest of the NL.


You mean the Cubs might actually spend money? I guess the Trib never thought of that when they signed Soriano, Lilly and Marquis to those deals or extended Lee and Ramirez. Maybe Cuban will hire a big name manager who has won elsewhere. Man, it'll only be a matter of time before he gets a World Series trophy to put on his mantle next to his NBA Chamoionship trophies.

WMR
05-01-2008, 01:56 PM
You mean the Cubs might actually spend money? I guess the Trib never thought of that when they signed Soriano, Lilly and Marquis to those deals or extended Lee and Ramirez. Maybe Cuban will hire a big name manager who has won elsewhere. Man, it'll only be a matter of time before he gets a World Series trophy to put on his mantle next to his NBA Chamoionship trophies.

bwahahaahahahahah

KoryMac5
05-01-2008, 02:43 PM
You mean the Cubs might actually spend money? I guess the Trib never thought of that when they signed Soriano, Lilly and Marquis to those deals or extended Lee and Ramirez. Maybe Cuban will hire a big name manager who has won elsewhere. Man, it'll only be a matter of time before he gets a World Series trophy to put on his mantle next to his NBA Chamoionship trophies.

It isn't about spending money to make your team successful, it is how you spend your money. Cuban made sound decisions when he purchased the Mavs for 236 million dollars, he hired good people to run the show and I assume he will do the same thing if he buys the Cubs. In the 20 years before Cuban bought the team, the Mavs had a winning percentage of 40%, and playoff record of 21-32. In the six years following, the team has won 69% of their regular season games and have reached the playoffs each season. I would much rather have an owner (Cuban) who reaches the post season every year than one who has yet to sniff it (Cast).

bucksfan2
05-01-2008, 03:07 PM
I used to be a big Cuban fan. I hate the NBA but have always liked the passion and energy he put into being the owner of the Mavs. Now I root for Cuban to lose in everything he does (it is over a movie that he produced or financially backed). If he buys the Cubs it would be one more reason for me to root against the Cubs.

oneupper
05-01-2008, 03:13 PM
But if you've got that kind of $$$, why buy just the park? Why not buy the team, too?

My brain hurts from trying to figure this out.

The issue is that Zell is a Real Estate guy. That's what he does and supposedly knows. I also seriously doubt he bought Tribune Co. for the newspapers.

fearofpopvol1
05-01-2008, 03:18 PM
It isn't about spending money to make your team successful, it is how you spend your money. Cuban made sound decisions when he purchased the Mavs for 236 million dollars, he hired good people to run the show and I assume he will do the same thing if he buys the Cubs. In the 20 years before Cuban bought the team, the Mavs had a winning percentage of 40%, and playoff record of 21-32. In the six years following, the team has won 69% of their regular season games and have reached the playoffs each season. I would much rather have an owner (Cuban) who reaches the post season every year than one who has yet to sniff it (Cast).

No doubt Cuban has turned around the Mavs, but he still hasn't put them over the hump and it doesn't look like it's going to be any easier any time soon. What makes you think he can get the Cubs over the hump? The Cubs already reached the playoffs last year and will most likely do it again this year. I'm not sure that Cuban can add much value to the Cubs.

Chip R
05-01-2008, 03:21 PM
It isn't about spending money to make your team successful, it is how you spend your money. Cuban made sound decisions when he purchased the Mavs for 236 million dollars, he hired good people to run the show and I assume he will do the same thing if he buys the Cubs. In the 20 years before Cuban bought the team, the Mavs had a winning percentage of 40%, and playoff record of 21-32. In the six years following, the team has won 69% of their regular season games and have reached the playoffs each season. I would much rather have an owner (Cuban) who reaches the post season every year than one who has yet to sniff it (Cast).


It's easier to make the playoffs when twice the teams in your league are eligible.

Unassisted
06-07-2008, 10:10 AM
http://www.suntimes.com/sports/baseball/cubs/992514,cuban060608.article#


Cuban still believes he has a shot at Cubs

June 7, 2008
Recommend

Mark Cuban addressed several subjects today while guesting on the "Waddle and Silvy Show" on WMVP-AM (1000).

Where are you on this whole thing about buying the Cubs:

Cuban: The books hopefully will come out today, Monday or Tuesday. Who knows, and then I'll get to work. All the accountants will start doing their things. Hopefully I'll be in the mix. I think I have a shot.

Are you an approved buyer in MLB:

Cuban: Naw, I'm gonna sneak in. I'm like, you know, I got a billion bucks, maybe I can sneak in. … Yeah, I'm approved and that's why I'll be able to get a copy of the book and so hopefully I have as good a shot as anybody.

On Jerry Reinsdorf:

Cuban: Actually Jerry and I get along pretty well. I think we've grown used to each other, and I have nothing but enormous respect for Jerry in what he's done, and you know if you talk to his son or if you talk to any of the folks at the Bulls that I have to deal with in the NBA, we're actually on the same side of issues probably 99.99 percent of the time. So we get along really well. I think if you talk to any of the folks in the NBA, they'll tell you that I'm a great partner, that I bust my butt to try to do what's best for the league and, you know, that's not always what's portrayed in the media, but those who know know and I think that will pay off and if I can come up with a competitive bid for the Cubs then I think I've got a shot.

Will you call Reinsdorf to get him to back you?

Cuban: There's a process involved in all this stuff and, you know, I've been through it before and I'll go through the process again and so if talking to Jerry is something I need to do then certainly I will and, you know, knowing Jerry he'd be wide-open to it, he's just that good of a guy.

Does Sam Zell owning the Cubs help your bid?

Cuban: Well it really depends on what the other bidders do. You know, Sam's obviously a smart businessman and he's gonna do what's best for him. Major League Baseball has survived a long time without Mark Cuban and they can survive a long time without me and so they'll do what they think is best for them.

And my job is to convince everybody involved that not only is it a good financial move to sell to Marc Cuban but it's also, you know, a good partnership move that I can add value beyond just my checkbook to not just the Cubs, to not just the city of Chicago, but also to Major League Baseball. Because to me one of the thing's I've learned with the Mavericks is when I thought I bought the Dallas Mavericks when I wrote the check eight years ago, and in reality even though I wrote the check the city of Dallas and Fort Worth still own the Mavericks and it's about being a good citizen, it's about contributing to the community and to me that's viewed to be just as important as Major League Baseball or the Tribune company, you know, what can I do for Wrigleyville, what can I do for the community, and what are the ways that I fit in and add value.

Because, you know, part of the issue that's been apparent to me in looking at all this is that, you know, the previous owners before Sam Zell bought the Tribune, you know, the Tribune and the Wrigleyville area around Wrigley Field didn't always get along so well and so I think there are a lot of things we can do community-wise that can enhance my chances and so, you know, I'm gonna pull out all the stops, that's about the best way to describe it.

Cuban: Well, I mean, you know, the Cubs experience in Wrigley Field is what it is. I mean, there's nothing more special in all of sports than going to a Cubbie game. You know, it's more in terms of you've got to be a partner with the people that live around you. And there's peoples live who don't go up and down based off of the Cubs, they have to live in that area and how can you be partners with them so schools, and community centers and the rest can benefit from the Cubs and Wrigley Field and, you know, those are would be some of the things I'm including on my list.

Would you want Wrigley Field to be part of the deal?

Cuban: Absolutely. Definitely would want Wrigley Field to be part of the deal because you have to protect the experience. The state's job is to look out for the citizens of the state of Illinois, not just for Cubs fans and that doesn't necessarily mean it's going to be a good match and, you know, separating the two, again, it's Sam Zell's final decision, but it'd be important to me to own Wrigley because you want to protect Wrigley. You know, a lot of people question whether a new owner is going to come in and change it and change the ivy and change just the feel of it and the experience of it, and that's something I would not want to do.

Beasley or Rose?

Cuban: You know, it's one of those things: it's like saying Jessica Biel or Jessica Alba. You try not to think about it because you know you got no shot.

On Avery Johnson, are you surprised he didn't get more of a look in Chicago:

Cuban: Well, I don't think he's out of the running yet. You know, until they pick somebody you never know and, you know, you can't always believe all the speculation you hear and read in the media. I know, when we've gone through processes or trades or coaches or whatever, you know, good organizations are pretty quiet about it and you certainly can't always believe, especially when you've got guys like Sam Smith up there. There's always going to be crazy speculation, so I wouldn't say that Avery's out of the running, and he's a good coach it's just that we needed a new voice, but with the young guns that you guys got up there, the first pick, you know, he really could be somebody that helps you.

Blitz Dorsey
06-07-2008, 11:21 PM
I thought this was a new thread at first. I almost said, didn't this come up 2 years ago?

As a Reds fan, I would not want Cuban to be the owner of any NL Central team... except the Reds.

Highlifeman21
06-08-2008, 09:13 AM
I've said it before, I'll say it again.

Cuban is exactly what MLB needs. He's a gateway owner to lead to a change in MLB-wide ownership to combat Selig.

And combating Selig should be a priority with MLB owners.

RFS62
06-08-2008, 10:06 PM
I've said it before, I'll say it again.

Cuban is exactly what MLB needs. He's a gateway owner to lead to a change in MLB-wide ownership to combat Selig.

And combating Selig should be a priority with MLB owners.



Combat Selig?

The owners are THRILLED with Selig. He's their man, he's no impartial commissioner. He represents them in every way.

KYRedsFan
06-08-2008, 10:09 PM
Yeah, the owners are the guys stopping this from happening, because Selig has been great for them.

KronoRed
06-08-2008, 11:50 PM
The owners are THRILLED with Selig. He's their man, he's no impartial commissioner. He represents them in every way.

As he should considering the union is still stronger.

Unassisted
06-09-2008, 09:52 AM
Cuban is exactly what MLB needs. He's a gateway owner to lead to a change in MLB-wide ownership to combat Selig.

And combating Selig should be a priority with MLB owners.

I'm not sure what Cuban brings to the table as an innovator that MLB isn't already doing. He made his billions in Internet streaming audio and video. MLB has embraced, invested in and monetized Internet streaming in ways that no other sport has matched. He's currently heading up an HD TV network and a movie studio. MLB has embraced HD in most markets, but there's not a clear case for that producing financial benefits.

He might make ripples in support of instant replay and using Questec to call balls and strikes, but that's far from a slam dunk. If you read his blog, you find Cuban's not a guy who favors innovation just for the sake of innovation.

Triples
06-09-2008, 10:05 AM
Love the Cubs or hate them, Cuban would be good for baseball. Baseball's battle cry "but we've always done it this way" got stale a few years back. The game is an amazing economic success despite its self. I think Cuban would make going to a baseball game fun for the average baseball ignorant fan rather than someone that is either not a baseball geek or a beer swilling drunk. And I do love his passion. One thing I didn't see in this thread is the fact that his players play over their heads because they too love the guy. Maybe he would treat his baseball players like humans instead of pork chops. Someone in this thread said it best when he said I wish Cuban would buy the Reds.

REDREAD
06-09-2008, 10:12 AM
Bud doesn't like boat-rocking, let alone people like Cuban who stand up in the boat and yell about the direction it's headed. I'll be surprised if this gets very far past the rumor stage.

I don't know about this.. When was the last time a the highest bidder for a team got turned down? I can't remember it happening. If Cuban is the high bidder, my guess is that the owners will approve the sale. The other owners will want their highest bid approved when they sell.

Bud is all about money. If Cuban bids 10 million more than the next highest bidder, that raises the value of all franchises. The Cubs will go to the highest bidder, IMO.. even if that's Cuban.

Edit: didn't realize this was an ancient thread... Thought it was another offer....

Unassisted
06-09-2008, 10:18 AM
I don't know about this.. When was the last time a the highest bidder for a team got turned down? I can't remember it happening. If Cuban is the high bidder, my guess is that the owners will approve the sale. The other owners will want their highest bid approved when they sell.

Bud is all about money. If Cuban bids 10 million more than the next highest bidder, that raises the value of all franchises. The Cubs will go to the highest bidder, IMO.. even if that's Cuban.

Edit: didn't realize this was an ancient thread... Thought it was another offer....I thought you were trying to put me in the position of arguing against myself. ;) With the benefit I didn't have back then of having seen Cuban keep his mouth shut about MLB and say nothing but nice things about the sport for months, I do have to disagree with my earlier post. :eek:

REDREAD
06-09-2008, 10:35 AM
I thought you were trying to put me in the position of arguing against myself. ;) With the benefit I didn't have back then of having seen Cuban keep his mouth shut about MLB and say nothing but nice things about the sport for months, I do have to disagree with my earlier post. :eek:

Sorry man, I didn't realize this thread was so old...
But you are free to argue with yourself.. that would be fun :)

KronoRed
06-09-2008, 01:55 PM
As a Reds fan, I would not want Cuban to be the owner of any NL Central team... except the Reds.

Eh I wouldn't mind them reaching the playoffs every year and then combusting, would be amusing.

RichRed
06-09-2008, 02:04 PM
Eh I wouldn't mind them reaching the playoffs every year and then combusting, would be amusing.

Nah, even that's too good for 'em. Just think how many more times we'd hear, "This is the year!"

Highlifeman21
06-09-2008, 03:16 PM
Combat Selig?

The owners are THRILLED with Selig. He's their man, he's no impartial commissioner. He represents them in every way.

Like I said, combating Selig should be their priority, but they blindly embrace him. Selig's bad for MLB, and in turn, his sheep owners are enabling him to continue to ruin MLB.

That being said, Cuban won't stir the pot much, as he likes history and tradition, but would serve as a gateway owner to bring fresh blood into the league. The current owners aren't going to live forever. The old men's club eventually will fall.

Hopefully, they take Selig with its downfall.

Hoosier Red
06-09-2008, 05:36 PM
Like I said, combating Selig should be their priority, but they blindly embrace him. Selig's bad for MLB, and in turn, his sheep owners are enabling him to continue to ruin MLB.

That being said, Cuban won't stir the pot much, as he likes history and tradition, but would serve as a gateway owner to bring fresh blood into the league. The current owners aren't going to live forever. The old men's club eventually will fall.

Hopefully, they take Selig with its downfall.

What exactly has he done that is "killing" baseball?
Other than open up dozens of new revenue streams, increase exposure internationally, avoid labor strife for 15 years?
If they were going to fire him, the 1994 season is the only black mark in my mind. That's when you fire him. Not after he's helped rebuild the sport for 15 years after.

Unassisted
09-13-2008, 06:55 PM
Rumor has it that Cuban is out of the running for the Cubs... or if you believe this article (http://chi-ball.com/blog/2008/09/12/cuban-out/), he was never really in the running.

Unassisted
10-10-2008, 09:56 AM
http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/baseball/cubs/chi-081009-mark-cuban-chicago-cubs-sale,0,6237581.column


Cuban: Financial crisis will slow Cubs sale

Rick Morrissey

In the wake of the news

10:53 PM CDT, October 9, 2008

What, you expected the Cubs' sale to go smoothly?

After the club's torturous playoff loss to the Dodgers, which brought on a great depression?

While the U.S. financial system is in convulsions?

No.

According to Mark Cuban, the shaky economic situation will change the math in Tribune Co.'s sale of the Cubs, including his offer for the team. He held court with reporters Thursday night before the team he owns, the Mavericks, defeated the Bulls at the United Center.

The team he wants to own might be worth less today than it was three weeks ago, before the current financial crisis exploded.

"Yeah, it's going to affect the deal structure," Cuban said. "Because of the way the deal was originally meant to be structured, it's going to create a challenge. So it'll certainly have an impact. Anytime the cost of capital goes up, the cost of assets goes down. Which is what you're seeing in the stock market."

When Cuban says "deal structure," what he's really saying is price. Before the recent economic trouble, the price of the Cubs, Wrigley Field and broadcast properties was expected to rise above $1 billion. Now? Just as in most other segments of the business world, no one has a clue.

And if you're among the people who have spent years praying for Tribune Co. to sell the team, well, you might have to keep those hands clasped together longer. Major League Baseball wanted the sale done by the end of the calendar year, but Cuban wouldn't hazard a guess when a deal might be struck.

"Oh, God, I have no idea," he said. "Honestly, they'd be crazy to do something now. Because it's not optimal for them, and it's not optimal for the buyer. So there's not really a rush. Nothing's going to change. They weren't asking everybody about should they opt in on (pitcher) Rich Harden. They're doing what they need to do."

Tribune Co. announced in April 2007 that it was selling the team and hoped to be out of baseball sometime after that season. Although new Tribune Co. Chairman Sam Zell said he wanted to move quickly at the time, the process has dragged.

Zell might be amenable to Cuban's buying the team, but that doesn't mean the Mavs boss would gain ownership. Cuban faces an uphill battle with Major League Baseball owners, three-quarters of whom are needed to approve any sale. There is still resistance to him among some owners, who see him as a maverick, lowercase, that baseball doesn't need. Besides Cuban, at least four other groups are in the bidding.

Rumors have swirled that Cuban has added investors with Chicago ties to his bid group in hopes of making him more attractive to owners. Asked Thursday whether that were true, Cuban said he was "not discussing the stuff at all."

Cuban said he and Zell hadn't talked about the current economic mess and how it would affect the sale of the team but added anyone who has been dealing with banks lately knows everything has changed.

"It's really a fluid process," he said. "There are a lot of pieces that need to be put together. As is typical, my offer was a lot more creative than most, so there were more moving pieces. It's still moving forward, just not as quickly.

"I don't have a time frame to give you. I'm in no rush. ... Again, until there's more certainty in the financial market, then uncertainty is expected. So it's going to cost either me, him, or both of us money. Any buyer and seller in any transaction. So unless there's some pressing issue to sell it now, it doesn't make it a lot of sense to do it."

If it sounds like a ball of confusion, it is. But if you're looking for some certainty in this uncertain world, it's a pretty safe bet neither the Cubs nor any other sports franchise is going to lower prices because of the struggling national economy.

Meanwhile, Cuban doesn't expect the Cubs to consult him before making off-season personnel moves.

"That would be crazy," he said. "I just have my fan hat on, and they've done a good job so far. Sports are a crazy business. If there was a template, we'd all be champions, right? But there's one winner and 29 or 30 losers; one guy wins, everybody else is tied for last. That's the way it works."

This time, it might work more slowly.

westofyou
10-10-2008, 10:11 AM
Like I said, combating Selig should be their priority, but they blindly embrace him. Selig's bad for MLB, and in turn, his sheep owners are enabling him to continue to ruin MLB.


Continue to ruin baseball?

Which today is healthier than at any other time in the history of the game?

If this is the ruins then I'd hate to see what you'd say about the 60's, don't like the man, don't like his methods, sure.... but seriously the game is currently being ruined?

I must not be paying enough attention to baseball..... wait until I tell my wife, she'll disagree but I guess I should pay more attention then I have.

Scrap Irony
10-10-2008, 11:23 AM
Not only is it healthy in terms of attendance, but the collective bargaining agreement is perhaps the most comprehensive and worked on in all of sports. It took years, but Selig has done a... (groan) great job as commissioner.

cincrazy
10-10-2008, 03:26 PM
I'm not sure if Cuban has the patience to be a great MLB owner. There's no questioning how much he cares about the Mavs, but baseball is a different game than the NBA. Longer season, more patience required. And he could throw his money around, but that doesn't mean it'd solve anything if he doesn't spend it wisely.

If he puts a good baseball man in charge and lets him do his thing, then the Cubs are way better off than anyone else. But if he meddles and gets involved too much, I don't think it would work out.

Highlifeman21
10-10-2008, 04:17 PM
Continue to ruin baseball?

Which today is healthier than at any other time in the history of the game?

If this is the ruins then I'd hate to see what you'd say about the 60's, don't like the man, don't like his methods, sure.... but seriously the game is currently being ruined?

I must not be paying enough attention to baseball..... wait until I tell my wife, she'll disagree but I guess I should pay more attention then I have.

I attribute Selig turning a blind eye to steroids to help put butts in seats, and more coin in everyone's pockets.

The latter certainly isn't a bad thing, but Selig's means to reach his ends isn't my particular cup of tea.

Is it a good game now? Sure.

I just don't like how we got here.


I don't like Selig, I don't like his methods, and I don't like that he's getting credit for where baseball's at now, when you look at how it got there.

Unassisted
10-10-2008, 04:20 PM
If he puts a good baseball man in charge and lets him do his thing, then the Cubs are way better off than anyone else. But if he meddles and gets involved too much, I don't think it would work out.

Ask Avery Johnson which of those categories Cuban falls under. ;)

Unassisted
10-10-2008, 06:27 PM
Another update, with a more positive spin, from Cuban's hometown paper.

http://www.star-telegram.com/287/story/965008.html


Dallas Mavericks win, but baseball is the talk
By JAN HUBBARD
jhubbard@star-telegram.com

CHICAGO — The Chicago Bulls opened their preseason Thursday night against the Dallas Mavericks so, of course, it was a perfect time to talk  ... baseball.

Cubs fans are still in mourning after their team was swept out of the playoffs by the Dodgers, so for the 100th time in the past 100 years, they are searching for reasons to be happy.

Mark Cuban could be one of them if his bid to purchase the Cubs is accepted and approved. So when he was approached before the game by three Chicago-area reporters, the questions were not about new Dallas coach Rick Carlisle and how the Mavericks might adjust to his up- tempo offense.

The Cubs and their future are the issue and the people want to know, what’s up, Mark?

"I have no idea," Cuban said. "I’ve got a better chance of telling you about a transgender operation [than the status of the sale]."

Cuban said the difficulties on Wall Street have slowed the process, which is obviously complicated because it is a transaction of more than $1 billion.

"I don’t have a time frame," Cuban said. "I’m in no rush. There’s not a drop-dead date. Until there’s more certainty in the financial market, that uncertainty is expensive. It’s going to cost either me, [current Cubs owner Sam Zell] or both of us money. ... So unless there is pressing issue to sell it now, it doesn’t make a lot of sense.

"Our people are talking to their people and coming up with different structures. With things as volatile as they are now, it’s hard to pinpoint the right structure. ... But we keep trying to move the ball forward."

Unassisted
11-07-2008, 10:04 AM
Looks like the end of the dream is near and it's not a happy ending.

http://www.suntimes.com/sports/deluca/1266088,CST-SPT-deluca07.article#


Bidder pill for fans: No Cuban for Cubs
OWNERSHIP MESS | Selig, MLB's old guard want no part of Mavs' boss


November 7, 2008
BY CHRIS DE LUCA

DANA POINT, Calif. -- Throw out Sam Zell's idea of selling the Cubs by the end of the year because he still hasn't reached his goal of narrowing the field from five bidders to two. And sources close to commissioner Bud Selig sounded an alarm this week during the annual general managers meetings: Forget about Mark Cuban buying the Cubs.

Cuban, the Dallas Mavericks' owner, was the fan favorite, the guy who liked to drink beer, watch the game from the bleachers and spend money. He was the most appealing bidder to Zell's group, who knew Cuban could swing the quickest transaction for a team and ballpark that at one time figured to fetch $1 billion.

Global financial crisis or not, baseball's old guard plans to stand firm against letting Cuban into the club. ''There's no way Bud and the owners are going to let that happen,'' a Major League Baseball source said this week. ''Zero chance.''

This would be a blow to Zell and Cubs fans who are eager to get finality on a team that's in limbo.

On Opening Day 2007, the Cubs officially went on the market. Zell's group was hoping for a quick transaction, certainly before Opening Day 2008. That same MLB source promised a deal won't be done by Opening Day 2009.

''We'll be standing here at next year's GM meetings,'' the source said, ''and this will still be unresolved.''
Slow movement

All of this likely will put the group headed by John Canning Jr. -- Selig's personal favorite -- back as the front-runner.

Either way, the slow process figures to have a financial effect on the Cubs, who are pursuing expensive San Diego Padres ace Jake Peavy and still have their eyes on free-agent pitchers Ryan Dempster and CC Sabathia. A potential deal for Baltimore Orioles second baseman Brian Roberts, who's a year away from free agency, could include a new, richer contract.

Already, the payroll figures to make a significant jump in '09 with so many backloaded contracts. Among the notable pay raises, outfielder Kosuke Fukudome goes from $6 million to $11.5 million, pitcher Ted Lilly from $7 million to $12 million, pitcher Jason Marquis from $6.37 million to $9.87 million, left fielder Alfonso Soriano from $13 million to $16 million, third baseman Aramis Ramirez from $14 million to $15.65 million and pitcher Carlos Zambrano from $15 million to $17.5 million.

Will the Cubs' ownership question put a crimp in general manager Jim Hendry's ambitious offseason plans?

''We'll be given a fair payroll number,'' Hendry said. ''I don't have a final figure yet, but there is no indication that we are going to go backward. We're in the middle of a pretty good situation. The last couple of years, we've got it going in the right direction, and we don't have an old team. We still have a lot of positives, and our [minor-league and scouting] departments are doing real well.''
Global crisis

Had Cuban purchased the Cubs, there was a feeling he'd open the checkbook even wider to end the team's 100-year World Series title drought. But this week at the GM meetings, Selig cautioned executives to be prudent in the face of the world financial crisis.

''There are some very real issues in the global economy,'' White Sox GM Ken Williams said. ''For any of us to believe this isn't going to ultimately affect our business, you have to have your head in the sand.''

Hendry agreed.

''We've all been fortunate with the Cubs to work for a great company that increased payrolls the last couple of years, even with the club for sale,'' Hendry said. ''And I was fortunate enough that they gave me a contract extension without a new owner in place. We have a lot to be thankful for.

''At the same time, you face the reality of the world that it's very tough economic times.''

And it's becoming clear Mark Cuban won't ride in to save the day.

Mario-Rijo
11-07-2008, 03:18 PM
Looks like the end of the dream is near and it's not a happy ending.

http://www.suntimes.com/sports/deluca/1266088,CST-SPT-deluca07.article#

As a Reds fan I'm happy to hear that Cuban can't join the ole' boys club, if he were trying to buy the Reds I'd be furious!!!

Unassisted
11-07-2008, 06:53 PM
As a Reds fan I'm happy to hear that Cuban can't join the ole' boys club, if he were trying to buy the Reds I'd be furious!!!Not me. The ol' boys of this decade haven't brought as much winning to the Reds as the ol' girl they used to have in the previous one. I'm ready to see what a younger boy could do at the controls of the purse strings in Cincinnati. I hope this doesn't rule out the possibility of some young whippersnapper with newfangled ideas and Internet billions buying our favorite team in the future. :thumbdown

Phhhl
11-07-2008, 08:02 PM
As a Reds fan I'm happy to hear that Cuban can't join the ole' boys club, if he were trying to buy the Reds I'd be furious!!!


For purely selfish reasons, I am glad Cuban got snubbed. I kind of agree that he could be good for baseball. But, combining the most onoxious owner with the most obnoxious fans and most obnoxious franchise in baseball is just way too much obnoxiousness for my blood. I would much rather see a city recently overwhelmed with an outbreak of liberalism return to some old fashioned fiscal conservatism in it's baseball team.

Mario-Rijo
11-07-2008, 08:15 PM
Not me. The ol' boys of this decade haven't brought as much winning to the Reds as the ol' girl they used to have in the previous one. I'm ready to see what a younger boy could do at the controls of the purse strings in Cincinnati. I hope this doesn't rule out the possibility of some young whippersnapper with newfangled ideas and Internet billions buying our favorite team in the future. :thumbdown

I should have expounded on that. I meant "if he were trying to buy the Reds and got kept out because the other owners didn't want him in the club (for obvious reasons), I'd be furious at the other owners and Selig"!!!

Yachtzee
11-07-2008, 11:18 PM
That is definitely what I don't like about baseball. Trying to buy a baseball team is almost like trying to join an exclusive country club. The current members tend to screen potential buyers to determine which ownership group is most likely to get along with them rather than which group is most likely to put a winning product on the field for its fans.

Outshined_One
11-08-2008, 03:52 AM
Cuban's response (http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/baseball/cubs/chi-081107-mark-cuban-chicago-cubs,0,5829530.story):


DENVER - Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban remains as interested as ever in buying the Cubs, dismissing a report that Major League Baseball might not want him as an owner.

Highlifeman21
11-08-2008, 08:30 AM
I hope the recent news makes Cuban fight even harder to buy the Cubs.

Cuban's been great for the NBA and he'll be even better for MLB.

Big Klu
11-08-2008, 08:58 AM
Just wondering, but how has Mark Cuban been good for the NBA, and how would he be good for baseball?

Highlifeman21
11-08-2008, 09:30 AM
Just wondering, but how has Mark Cuban been good for the NBA, and how would he be good for baseball?

Cuban created competition in the West.

Before Cuban, it was the Lakers.... and the Lakers....

Now, the West is the dominant league in the NBA, and you now have 8 solid teams making the playoffs, whereas in years past you had teams sub-.500 making the playoffs.

Was it last year or the year before that a 50 win team didn't make the playoffs in the West?



I'm hoping Cuban would bring a similar level of competition to the NL Central.

Joseph
11-08-2008, 09:41 AM
The NBA has a salary cap. What Cuban would bring to the NL Central is a payroll that dwarfs all the other teams in the division. He'd bring more attention to the Cubs. He'd make the fans more obnoxious. He'd do nothing for the division.

Outshined_One
11-08-2008, 12:51 PM
Just wondering, but how has Mark Cuban been good for the NBA, and how would he be good for baseball?

His majority stake in the Dallas Mavericks was purchased for $285m in 2000. Here (http://www.forbes.com/lists/2007/32/biz_07nba_Dallas-Mavericks_324736.html) is the current snapshot of the Mavericks, who are now valued at a little over $461m. Their revenue has increased substantially since Cuban bought the Mavericks. Attendance (http://www.basketballreference.com/teams/teamatt.htm?tm=DAL&lg=n) is also up since the 2000-2001 season.

He's a very smart businessman who has added enormous value to a franchise that was once a pushover from a financial perspective. Moreover, by increasing the popularity of his own team, he has added popularity and interest to the NBA, which has spilled over to other franchises.

That sort of thing could carry over to MLB if he owned the Cubs and ran them in a comparable fashion.

Yachtzee
11-08-2008, 04:33 PM
His majority stake in the Dallas Mavericks was purchased for $285m in 2000. Here (http://www.forbes.com/lists/2007/32/biz_07nba_Dallas-Mavericks_324736.html) is the current snapshot of the Mavericks, who are now valued at a little over $461m. Their revenue has increased substantially since Cuban bought the Mavericks. Attendance (http://www.basketballreference.com/teams/teamatt.htm?tm=DAL&lg=n) is also up since the 2000-2001 season.

He's a very smart businessman who has added enormous value to a franchise that was once a pushover from a financial perspective. Moreover, by increasing the popularity of his own team, he has added popularity and interest to the NBA, which has spilled over to other franchises.

That sort of thing could carry over to MLB if he owned the Cubs and ran them in a comparable fashion.

I think what people fail to realize about Mark Cuban is that one of the biggest things he brought to the NBA was the idea that owners should actually care about the fans, listen to them and be responsive to them. This is a guy who sits in the seats with the fans and gets into the game. He makes his email available to fans and does his best to respond to them. He doesn't just see himself as an owner, but as a fan as well. This is the biggest area where I think MLB can learn from Mark Cuban. I think the majority of MLB owners pay lip service to listening to fans' concerns, but in reality I think there's this notion that all that really matters is sending a team out there to play the games and having a few give aways during the season. They'd rather rely on gimmicks, give aways and a new publicly financed ballpark rather than actually interact with fans.

RFS62
11-08-2008, 11:22 PM
I said it before, and I'll say it again.

There is no way on earth that MLB will ever let Cuban in. Never, ever.

Other than having a bazillion dollars, he has NOTHING in common with them, and would be a tremendous pain in the rear to them.

He is the polar opposite of what they're looking for.

It doesn't matter if he would be good for the game or not. They're not going to sign up for his endless yapping.

Highlifeman21
11-09-2008, 08:38 AM
I said it before, and I'll say it again.

There is no way on earth that MLB will ever let Cuban in. Never, ever.

Other than having a bazillion dollars, he has NOTHING in common with them, and would be a tremendous pain in the rear to them.

He is the polar opposite of what they're looking for.

It doesn't matter if he would be good for the game or not. They're not going to sign up for his endless yapping.

What if he convinced them he could grow the game and put more coin in their pockets?

You think they would want to make less money if it meant keeping him out of the league?

RFS62
11-09-2008, 10:02 AM
What if he convinced them he could grow the game and put more coin in their pockets?

You think they would want to make less money if it meant keeping him out of the league?



I'm betting they think the game is growing just fine under Selig, and he's their lap dog.

If you're an owner, and you have the perfect shill for a front man in Selig to take all the blame for any problems, would you want to have to deal with Cuban's penchant for complaining to the press?

I think your premise that the owners might be dissatisfied with the growth of the game under Selig is completely false.

The game has never been in better financial shape, and is coming off another record season in attendance and revenue.

Chip R
11-17-2008, 12:39 PM
Looks like Cuban has a little legal trouble now

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081117/ap_on_bi_ge/mark_cuban_insider_trading

Unassisted
11-17-2008, 01:44 PM
Looks like Cuban has a little legal trouble now

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081117/ap_on_bi_ge/mark_cuban_insider_tradingConsidering the relatively small number of dollars involved, he should have no problem making that go away, even if he has to pay a big fine. The bigger issue is whether the old boys at MLB will use that dustup against him to keep him from owning the Cubs.

westofyou
11-17-2008, 02:08 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/16/sports/baseball/16araton.html?scp=3&sq=mark%20cuban&st=cse



November 16, 2008
Sports of The Times
Suffering and Snobbery as Cuban Pursues Cubs
By HARVEY ARATON

It is common knowledge that Mark Cuban, who apparently has not suffered enough watching his Dallas Mavericks being eliminated in the first round of the N.B.A. playoffs the last two years, is trying to buy the Chicago Cubs.

Reports have placed him as the highest bidder for baseball’s beacon of suffering and devotion, at $1.3 billion, although an anonymous source told The Chicago Sun-Times that Cuban had “zero chance” of getting into an ownership club that probably views him as a cross between a lost Steinbrenner child and a character from a Seth Rogen movie.

“There is no reason to comment on anonymous comments from unsolicited sources,” Cuban responded, with his usual disdain for how information is disseminated when it doesn’t originate from his own unsparing forum — which, as he considers himself the real McCain, he calls Blog Maverick.

I happen to respect and like Cuban, even if he spends a good deal of time suggesting that hard-working journalists have the brainpower of the average raccoon. For one thing, unlike many sports owners, he is a self-made man, the product of a blue-collar family from a Pittsburgh suburb, Mount Lebanon, Pa. For another, during his largely successful eight-plus-year run as the Mavericks’ owner, he seems to have figured out how to be conspicuously fanatical, though not overly meddling or abusive, at least of his players.

If you could fuse the best of the Steinbrenner boys — Hal’s more-thoughtful business acumen and brother Hank’s competitive zeal — you would have a reasonable facsimile of Cuban, except with a less liberal political lean and more formally dressed.

With the Mavericks in New York on Sunday to play the Knicks at Madison Square Garden, there is a fair chance that Cuban will be within earshot of the Dallas huddle in his trademark T-shirt and jeans. Given the dot-com, down-home uniform, along with the outspokenness, we don’t need anonymous sources to know why there would be at least some opposition in baseball’s ownership cabal to Cuban’s acquiring a stake in the Cubs or to purchasing them outright from the Tribune Company.



For all the wrong reasons, they would happen to be right.

“He took one of the worst teams in the N.B.A. and made it one of the best,” Nets point guard Devin Harris, a former Maverick, said recently at the team’s training center in East Rutherford, N.J. “He gutted everything, changed the whole culture. He’s very hands-on, obviously very good taking an organization and remaking it.”

But aren’t the Cubs one of the last teams in major league baseball in need of a re-creation or identity enhancement by a singularly powerful presence? They already are Wrigley Field and Ernie Banks, a black cat and Ron Santo, Steve Bartman and Moises Alou.

Contemporarily, they are Lou Piniella, the National League’s manager of the year, and a good team that continues to experience bad postseason things — not all that different, actually, from Cuban’s basketball team. Which may have made, perhaps with his blessing or insistence, a memorably short-sighted trade last winter when Harris and two first-round draft picks were sent to the Nets for the aging and only occasionally still-potent Jason Kidd — but that’s another story.

Suppose Cuban did gain controlling interest and managed to turn the Cubs into a World Series champion, breaking a drought that dates to 1908. Would that really be in the best interests of baseball? Aren’t the Cubs, in their inevitably and appealingly tragic role, just about perfect the way they are?

If baseball is smart, it will encourage the Tribune Company to choose among other reported bidders, so long as the terms are not embarrassingly inferior to Cuban’s and everyone is convinced the team would not be run on a shoestring. Then Commissioner Bud Selig and friends will sit down with Cuban and figure out how to get him a franchise that could really use his willingness to invest, transform and self-promote.



How about in Washington, where the recently relocated Nationals are already another administration in need of imminent change? How about Kansas City or Seattle, once thriving baseball markets that have fallen on inept times? How about the ball club right in Cuban’s backyard, the consistently mediocre Texas Rangers?

How about Pittsburgh, Cuban’s hometown, where a new stadium has failed miserably to deliver on the standard promise of a competitive product?

“Made a run at the Pirates several years ago, but they were not interested in selling,” Cuban wrote in an e-mail message when I asked if his baseball interest was limited to the Cubs because of the franchise’s uniqueness, or if he had considered trying to buy in a market in greater need of energized ownership. “But at this point and going forward, my only interest is in the Cubs.”

Maybe that changes if he doesn’t win the sweepstakes for a franchise working on a 100-year jinx. Wherever else Cuban might buy, the odds of winning a World Series would instantly be better than on the North Side of Chicago.

Chip R
11-17-2008, 02:14 PM
Considering the relatively small number of dollars involved, he should have no problem making that go away, even if he has to pay a big fine. The bigger issue is whether the old boys at MLB will use that dustup against him to keep him from owning the Cubs.


People do go to jail for insider trading, though.

westofyou
11-17-2008, 02:15 PM
People do go to jail for insider trading, though.

http://blog.kir.com/archives/images/martha-stewart-jail-criminal.jpg

mbgrayson
11-17-2008, 02:29 PM
People do go to jail for insider trading, though.

But the lawsuit referenced above is a CIVIL lawsuit, not criminal.


The SEC filed a civil lawsuit against Cuban in federal court in Dallas. The agency alleged that in June 2004, Cuban was invited to get in on the coming stock offering by Mamma.com (http://us.rd.yahoo.com/dailynews/ap/ap_on_bi_ge/storytext/mark_cuban_insider_trading/29915800/SIG=10id77pel;_ylt=ArPOUOKoJ6uBZdX6vRD_lulv24cA/*http://Mamma.com) Inc. after he agreed to keep the information private.


Also, June of 2004 is over 4 years ago.....what is the statute of limitations if a prosecutor wanted to make this into a criminal case?

Outshined_One
11-18-2008, 12:47 AM
http://blog.kir.com/archives/images/martha-stewart-jail-criminal.jpg

Oddly enough, the insider trading charges never stuck. She ended up going to jail for something else.

RBA
11-18-2008, 10:49 AM
Selective enforcement.