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Caveat Emperor
03-11-2007, 08:34 PM
Now that I'm out of school and settling into my first full year as a member of working America, I've decided to do what so many in my position before me have done: attempt to take up golf as a hobby.

I've played off-and-on since I was 15, but never with any real seriousness. Part of the issue was finding decent equipment for a man of my stature -- I know from speaking with pros that I'll be needing extended length clubs (probably 2" additional). I am looking to buy a new set of irons here in the very near future so that I can start playing this spring.

So -- To the members of RZ who play regularly: whats in your bag? Any good brand recommendations? I'm especially interested in anyone who has had clubs either modified or custom made, as I may be heading down that route myself.

Shoot away!

justincredible
03-11-2007, 09:05 PM
I bought my clubs off of gigagolf.com. I got mine an extra 1" or 1.5" longer than the standard length. You can customize length, grips, shafts, etc. They have been great clubs for me and I bought a discontinued model and got all my irons for about $100 on sale. They are a lot better than my walmart clubs I bought a few years before. They would be great for you just starting out.

MWM
03-11-2007, 10:07 PM
I play Cleveland irons and woods and wedges. I love them.

Redhook
03-11-2007, 10:30 PM
I've played off-and-on since I was 15, but never with any real seriousness. Part of the issue was finding decent equipment for a man of my stature -- I know from speaking with pros that I'll be needing extended length clubs (probably 2" additional). I am looking to buy a new set of irons here in the very near future so that I can start playing this spring.

So -- To the members of RZ who play regularly: whats in your bag? Any good brand recommendations? I'm especially interested in anyone who has had clubs either modified or custom made, as I may be heading down that route myself.

Shoot away!

First, you need to decide approximately how much you want to spend. You can probably get a good set of used irons around $250...give or take a bit. To get a new set of good irons you will have to spend $500+, up to $800. However, when you buy a good brand you will be able to resell them 5 years down the road for $200 which you can then put down on a new set. So, first, figure out a budget and go from there.

Second, you must get fitted. You really need to go to a driving range that has clubs you can demo for fitting. You will need a pro there with you so he can put tape on the clubs and use a plastic hitting mat. The tape and mat will determine what lie you will need for your clubs. Very important! I highly doubt you'll need clubs 2" long. Unless you're Yao Ming, you probably won't need more than a 1/2" for your clubs. Your posture at impact, not necessarily address, is the determining factor for length and lie of clubs.

Either way, small or big budget, you need to take an hour to get fitted. Getting fitted will give you the confidence knowing you have the proper clubs. And you don't have to buy the clubs from where you got fitted from. You can get the specs and order them from a cheaper place if that's the route you want to go. Or, you can buy a cheaper set and bring them to a local club fitter, and have them match the new set to the specs you need. There are a lot of options, but the common denominator is you need to get fitted.

I am an assistant pro in Cincinnati. I know that Meadow Links Golf Academy (Winton Woods) has atleast 5 sets to demo from with plenty of pros to fit you. They have Ping, Titleist, Cleveland, Cobra, and Callaway. All great brands. I would recommend Cobra or Callaway for the average player and the other brands better players.

BTW, I play Cleveland TA1 irons. They're a blade iron which means they're the hardest to hit, but they also give the player the most feel and feedback. I also play Cleveland wedges. Still the best, but others are closing the gap (by copying....lol). Wilson 8802 blade putter. Taylor Made Retro Spoon 3-wood. And a Tommy Armour, don't laugh, driver.

Hope that helped. Feel free to ask more questions in this thread or even PM me if you'd like to. I'd be glad to help.

Caveat Emperor
03-12-2007, 12:24 AM
I've done some reading on the whole fitting process, and it seems to me (and I could definately be wrong) that in-depth fitting really only benefits experienced players because they have a repeatable swing that doesn't really differ from stroke to stroke. Someone like me, without as much time on the course, grips and swings differently with every approach. Would that affect the fitting?

Also, any feelings on component clubs v. OEM stuff? I'm pretty certain going used isn't going to be too big a savings, given that I'll be likely forced to pay to have the clubs adjusted on top of the cost of just buying them -- probably better off just ordering them to spec new.

(BTW -- I'm not Yao Ming, but I am 6'10", so he's only got a few inches on me :cool: )

paintmered
03-12-2007, 12:37 AM
I've done some reading on the whole fitting process, and it seems to me (and I could definately be wrong) that in-depth fitting really only benefits experienced players because they have a repeatable swing that doesn't really differ from stroke to stroke. Someone like me, without as much time on the course, grips and swings differently with every approach. Would that affect the fitting?

Also, any feelings on component clubs v. OEM stuff? I'm pretty certain going used isn't going to be too big a savings, given that I'll be likely forced to pay to have the clubs adjusted on top of the cost of just buying them -- probably better off just ordering them to spec new.

(BTW -- I'm not Yao Ming, but I am 6'10", so he's only got a few inches on me :cool: )

I wouldn't recommend getting custom-made clubs unless you are a solid single digit handicap. Also, if you know how your height changes the shaft length and lie angle of the clubs then you can order them straight from the manufacturer. Most club manufacturers have club fitting advice on their website. All you need is a measuring tape to figure out a few key lengths.

I play Hogan irons and Cleveland wedges. Highly recommend both.

jmcclain19
03-12-2007, 02:56 AM
CE - here's my story/advice about golf clubs. Lets just say I'll echo Paint's advice here.

I was in your shoes. Tons of money to burn on new clubs, so I spent big for some new Mizunos. I loved the look and feel of them - they were going away my favs when I was shopping and I spent a pretty penny getting custom fit for them. One day I saw my neighbor down the street was having a yard sale - she had a full set of Ping Zing 2's in excellent condition & stunningly - only wanted $50 for the entire 3-SW set. I ran home and grabbed some cash - not with the intent to use them, but I sure as heck knew they were worth more than $50.

Anyway - long story short- I started hitting and the range with them and loved them. Absolutely loved them. It took a while to make the full switch - I mean we're talking the difference between a set that I paid nearly a grand for against a set I paid $50 for - but once I did I've never looked back. I ended up giving my Mizunos to my younger brother when he was trying to get into golf and he uses them a lot.

So my end lesson - don't be caught up with prices or labels. I chose - and still stick with despite constant flirtations with other iron sets, a 10 year old set that cost 1/10 what my expensive custom set did. My long time golfing buddy bought the Tour Edge Iron Set. Not the biggest name brand out there but they always fair well I've seen in the Golf Digest Club Wars and he swears by them.

As for some tweaks - I pulled the 3 & 4 iron and replaced both with Cobra Bafflers - and have found both to be much easier at getting up. I pulled my 8 iron and replaced it with an extra wedge. I have my Ping Zing 2 PW - and a 50 & 58 Deg Callaway Forged Plus Wedges - and a 54 Deg Cleveland 588 Wedge that was a gift. I use the 54 way more than the others just due to comfort & circumstance. Not that I don't hit well w/ my Callaway Wedges, it's just I'm that much more confident and a better striker w/ the Clevelands. When it comes time I'll replace all 3 non Cleveland wedges with Clevelands.

I'm also a putter freak. I've had a Ping Doc 17 for a long time now, but I had a Ping Pal 2 & a Ping Anser I swapped back and forth forever. My putters get clipped down to 32" with Winn Grips replaced every few months for tackiness and are adjusted to just the right lie angle. Everyone always snickers and laughs - the Ping Doc 17 is the biggest putter your allowed with on the golf course, but I have found it to be sound, and once I adjusted to the bounce the ball has off the face my putting increased dramatically.

I also have a Cobra 460cc F-Speed Driver and a set of Cleveland Sport 15 & 19 Deg woods that I also pack - would recommend both.

For reference sake - i'm about 5'6 & 195lbs, and a 18ish handicap. All my clubs get clipped down several inches from the factory standard (From the drivers on down).

jmcclain19
03-12-2007, 03:01 AM
I've done some reading on the whole fitting process, and it seems to me (and I could definately be wrong) that in-depth fitting really only benefits experienced players because they have a repeatable swing that doesn't really differ from stroke to stroke. Someone like me, without as much time on the course, grips and swings differently with every approach. Would that affect the fitting?

Also, any feelings on component clubs v. OEM stuff? I'm pretty certain going used isn't going to be too big a savings, given that I'll be likely forced to pay to have the clubs adjusted on top of the cost of just buying them -- probably better off just ordering them to spec new.

(BTW -- I'm not Yao Ming, but I am 6'10", so he's only got a few inches on me :cool: )

Usually - most big shops include the fitting w/ the cost of buying new clubs.

Most big makers, like Mizuno, Nike, Ping, Callaway, etc - have huge Kiosk looking racks with dozens of clubs. With some special tape on the bottom & on the face of your club, it won't take long for anyone worth their salt to figure you out (you need x long shafts and x deg lie angle) and you can work from their on each mfg.

Also CE - Golf Digest did a huge feature a few months back on big golf companies traveling tour vans. Check out several websites and look for when the "fitting van" will be nearby. I know Cleveland always emails me when they are in town since I got my 3&5 wood that way. I went to a course one afternoon and the Cleveland Van was there. The guy was on the range, let me hit a few with some testers - dialed in exactly what I should use & the settings I needed, and bought both on site from the van for half price that day.

Redhook
03-12-2007, 05:50 AM
Most club manufacturers have club fitting advice on their website. All you need is a measuring tape to figure out a few key lengths.

This is a very inaccurate way of fitting someone's clubs. Yes, it could work, and for an average man it could work well, sometimes. However, with CE, he's very tall, so for him, getting a proper set is not nearly as easy. Here's one analogy that I can think of that would compare to measuring your height, arms, etc. for buying golf clubs.....

Imagine that you're going to buy a new car. You have the money and you're really excited about it. But, with this car, you cannot test drive it and the seat is locked into it's position. You can't slide the seat back and forth. You can adjust how much it leans up and back (lie angle), but you are hoping the length you ordered will fit you properly. Key word: hoping. So you guess at where the seat should be, but when you get into the car you are too close to the pedal. It's very cramped with now leg room, but you are stuck with that seat position. What do you do?

If you're going to spend more than a few hundred dollars for a set of clubs, getting a proper fit is imperative. Personally, I couldn't imagine spending $500-$1000 hoping that I guessed correctly in what I was ordering.

Redhook
03-12-2007, 06:00 AM
I've done some reading on the whole fitting process, and it seems to me (and I could definately be wrong) that in-depth fitting really only benefits experienced players because they have a repeatable swing that doesn't really differ from stroke to stroke. Someone like me, without as much time on the course, grips and swings differently with every approach. Would that affect the fitting?

Also, any feelings on component clubs v. OEM stuff? I'm pretty certain going used isn't going to be too big a savings, given that I'll be likely forced to pay to have the clubs adjusted on top of the cost of just buying them -- probably better off just ordering them to spec new.

(BTW -- I'm not Yao Ming, but I am 6'10", so he's only got a few inches on me :cool: )

Wow, you are tall. Since you are that tall and most of today's golf sets are made for people around 6'0" it is even more important to get fitted. You need to have an idea of how long your clubs need to be, what type of shaft would be best for you, what type of lie your clubs will need, how thick the grip needs to be, swing weight, etc. Just guessing at 2" long will be a waste of money.

Many driving ranges have fitting carts with tons of clubs in them. Some of these ranges may offer a free fitting or it could cost up to $50, but that is knocked off the price if you order the set from them. Even though your swing doesn't repeat good shots all the time, it will have some consistent elements to it on each swing. Fitting is definitely not just for single handicaps. It can help average golfers immensely. On top of that, the pro will probably give you a couple of tips during the fitting which should help your game.

The actual club head isn't very important at all. The shaft is almost everything. Some club heads do have a lower center of gravity that help get the ball in the air which definitely benefits some.

If I was you, I would call a few ranges and see what their fitting program is. Ask them about older models that would be less expensive. Go to an outdoor range too. You'll want to see the difference in ball flights where going to a place like Golf Galaxy would not let you see the real ball flight.

It all really depends on how much you want to spend. It would be total luck if you just ordered a set and it fit you well. Once you have an idea of what your specs need to be you can spend and order whatever you want. Used clubs can definitely be a great way to go. Some shops can adjust them for you at a discounted price if you buy the used set there. Just have your spec information with you and they can do that.

Last, get some hybrids. They're fantastic. They're much easier to hit than the long irons. Almost every pro is carrying one, with many carrying 2. With that being said, most amateurs would benefit carrying 2-3 hybrids, if not more.

RANDY IN INDY
03-12-2007, 07:59 AM
I play Mizuno MX-23 irons and the Mizuno MP-001 driver and fairway metals. I put a 19 degree hybrid club(Bazooka J-max) in my bag, recently, and I really like the versatility it gives me. Titleist Vokey wedges and Scotty Cameron putter. The MX-23 irons work well for me as I don't play all that often anymore and while they are forged irons, they still give me the "forgiveness" that I need when not playing much. The Mizuno forgings are second to none and feel like "butter" when you hit the ball flush.

In the past, when I played a lot, I played Titleist blades and then experimented with Callaway X14's a few years back when I started playing less(at that time, a couple of times a year). The Callaways were very forgiving but gave me little feedback as to how I was hitting the golf ball. They were very easy to play.

FutureRedsGM
03-12-2007, 10:28 AM
What's in the bag?

Driver: Nike Sasquatch 10.5 degree Reg Flex - this is new and I'm not real happy with it right now. I think I need to get a stiffer shaft in it. Any recommendations?

3 Wood: Callaway Steelhead 3, 15 degree

Hybrid: Taylormade Rescue Dual 19 degree

Irons: 4-PW Taylormade RAC Oversize. Striaght off the shelf

Wedges: Titleist Vokey Spin Milled 50 degee, 55 degree (bent from 56), and 60 degree

Putter: Titleist Scotty Cameron Terrylium 2

Balls: Titleist Pro V1x or Nike One Black

I'm 5'10 and I've been playing for about 10 years, but you wouldn't know it from my score. I regularly shoot between 95 - 100.

As far as fitting for you, I have always heard that Ping is is the market leader in club fitting. There is a program on their web page that can do a "quick fit" for you. You just input some measurements and your shot tendancies.

Good luck and I hope you enjoy the greatest game ever!!

paintmered
03-12-2007, 10:53 AM
This is a very inaccurate way of fitting someone's clubs. Yes, it could work, and for an average man it could work well, sometimes. However, with CE, he's very tall, so for him, getting a proper set is not nearly as easy. Here's one analogy that I can think of that would compare to measuring your height, arms, etc. for buying golf clubs.....

Imagine that you're going to buy a new car. You have the money and you're really excited about it. But, with this car, you cannot test drive it and the seat is locked into it's position. You can't slide the seat back and forth. You can adjust how much it leans up and back (lie angle), but you are hoping the length you ordered will fit you properly. Key word: hoping. So you guess at where the seat should be, but when you get into the car you are too close to the pedal. It's very cramped with now leg room, but you are stuck with that seat position. What do you do?

If you're going to spend more than a few hundred dollars for a set of clubs, getting a proper fit is imperative. Personally, I couldn't imagine spending $500-$1000 hoping that I guessed correctly in what I was ordering.

My thoughts were for him to start out with a $300-$500 set of irons. After his game develops for a few seasons, then the $500-$1000 is a more reasonable option.

Redhook
03-12-2007, 11:34 AM
My thoughts were for him to start out with a $300-$500 set of irons. After his game develops for a few seasons, then the $500-$1000 is a more reasonable option.

I think that would be a good idea too. But getting his specs first is still highly recommended for two reasons. One, having clubs that fit properly (or atleast in the ballpark) will help CE make his natural swing instead of manipulating the club and body to hit the ball. 2) Having clubs that are too long or too short can really do a number on one's body. You're chances of getting injured increase if you're clubs don't fit you well.

Like I've said earlier, you can get a set of used clubs, or even a cheaper set somewhere, just make sure they're close to the specs that you need so there won't be long-term effects of playing improper equipment.

SunDeck
03-12-2007, 04:29 PM
I shoot 95-100 with a set of clubs I got from my brother. They are an old set of Tommy Armour irons, steel shaft. No custom fitting, I actually choke down on them a little because it feels better for me.
I have a crappy old putter that I got with a $100 set of Knights when I first started golfing and I still use the 3W and 5W from that same set. Under no circumstances will I ever carry a driver- I'd be OB 75% of the time.

My golf partner shoots about the same as me, usually a couple strokes higher. He owns about $1500 worth of equipment that he inherited from his father when he passed away. He had them refitted for himself because he figured since he'd gotten them for free he should at least custom fit them.

We joke about this all the time, the fact that we shoot about the same despite the vast difference in the quality of our clubs. I tend to agree with the fact that a custom fitting doesn't make a whole lot of sense for a duffer like me, but I'm also not 6-10".

There is probably only one higher quality club I could be convinced to go out and buy and that would be a nice hybrid to replace my 3 iron. My brother also has a bazooka 19 degree and I used it when I was visiting him. I ended up using it off the tee several times. Anyway, my feeling is that average golfers put way too much into the clubs they own. All that technology doesn't help if you're hacking away from the outside in. Most of us would be better served by hooking up with a reliable teaching pro.

mole44
03-12-2007, 06:05 PM
I can play golf for free and I still don't wanna play. But thats cause I'm not any good.

vaticanplum
03-12-2007, 07:26 PM
The actual club head isn't very important at all. The shaft is almost everything. Some club heads do have a lower center of gravity that help get the ball in the air which definitely benefits some.

I'll say :cool:

(That is absolutely as much as I can contribute to a thread about golf.)

HumnHilghtFreel
03-12-2007, 07:28 PM
I'll say :cool:

(That is absolutely as much as I can contribute to a thread about golf.)

Well said. I would have thrown something in about making sure to get the timing of the windmill's blades down before you make your shot.

RFS62
03-13-2007, 09:32 AM
If you practice hard, you're going to beat your first set of clubs to death. It's not important to get a new set, in fact it's almost a waste of money. You can get a top line set of irons used.

But you absolutely need to be fitted by a pro. Your height makes this much more necessary than it would for a 6' tall golfer. You're going to learn posture and swing habits that you'll have to change when you finally do get longer shafts and larger grips, so do it now is my advice.

I'd find a nice set of used cavity back irons and have them reshafted to fit you. And I'd wait a while before you have the lie changed. Your swing will evolve a lot in the first few thousand swings. The lie angle may differ after you work out your preferences.

But the shaft and the grip size are crucial.

And ABSOLUTELY get some lessons from a pro. It makes a ton of difference if you start right and learn the fundamentals.

Yachtzee
03-13-2007, 09:59 AM
And ABSOLUTELY get some lessons from a pro. It makes a ton of difference if you start right and learn the fundamentals.

I think once I get to where Caveat is, this is my goal. I've been playing golf for years and have a nice set of clubs already, but I haven't played regularly in a long time and can no longer break 100. I think I need to take a few refresher lessons and then spend some time at the range.

I suggest that you try out any clubs you might wish to buy, if you go the new route or buy used from a golf shop. It might be tough to get a good feel because of your height, but it's worth a shot. Every brand and model feels different and some clubs just feel right for you and some don't. When I got my clubs, the place I went had a video driving range and let me try out all different varieties of clubs. I'm very happy with the ones I chose. Of course the clubs I was playing with before were hand-me-downs from my grandfather and father. Those clubs were actually older than I was.

Here's a question for you regular golfers with kids. There's a local sports program for kids called JumpStart Sports that runs programs for little ones (starting at 3 for soccer and t-ball). They've added a golf program for 4 year olds. I like the programs they run because it gets the kids out playing and getting exercise, but I'm wondering if 4 is a little too young for golf. Any thoughts?

Redhook
03-13-2007, 10:10 AM
Here's a question for you regular golfers with kids. There's a local sports program for kids called JumpStart Sports that runs programs for little ones (starting at 3 for soccer and t-ball). They've added a golf program for 4 year olds. I like the programs they run because it gets the kids out playing and getting exercise, but I'm wondering if 4 is a little too young for golf. Any thoughts?

Good question. I taught a couple of after school golf programs for 6-10 year olds. Some 6 year olds were more mature than some 10 year olds. It all depends on the child. 4 years old is pretty young, but it is possible. I would suggest introducing the game to him/her first, if you haven't already, and see if they can grasp it or not. Heck, Tiger, started at the age of 1 so 4 is definitely possible.

Most importantly, look into the safety of the class before joining it. It can be very, very dangerous with kids swinging clubs around. They don't understand what's going on and their attention spans go away so quickly that they can't stay in the designated areas very long. Be careful!

ColoradoHigh
03-13-2007, 11:05 AM
I've done some reading on the whole fitting process, and it seems to me (and I could definately be wrong) that in-depth fitting really only benefits experienced players because they have a repeatable swing that doesn't really differ from stroke to stroke. Someone like me, without as much time on the course, grips and swings differently with every approach. Would that affect the fitting?

Also, any feelings on component clubs v. OEM stuff? I'm pretty certain going used isn't going to be too big a savings, given that I'll be likely forced to pay to have the clubs adjusted on top of the cost of just buying them -- probably better off just ordering them to spec new.

(BTW -- I'm not Yao Ming, but I am 6'10", so he's only got a few inches on me :cool: )
You are tall enough to play a real sport. Why golf. If I were 6'10", one I'd be a really tall girl, two I'd play a sport that used my physical abilities. Again, Why golf. Name one golfer that is successful (PGA Wins) that is your height. I dated an NBA player who said "golf was a recreation for guys that don't look good in a ballet outfit". Charles Barkley is admittedly "pathetic" and Jordan has reportedly lost millions in his golf betting exploits. Is there a Gym nearby?

RFS62
03-13-2007, 11:19 AM
You are tall enough to play a real sport. Why golf. If I were 6'10", one I'd be a really tall girl, two I'd play a sport that used my physical abilities. Again, Why golf. Name one golfer that is successful (PGA Wins) that is your height. I dated an NBA player who said "golf was a recreation for guys that don't look good in a ballet outfit".



Cool. I usually defer to Billy Ray Cyrus for my heavy life philosophy, but hey, an NBA player.... that's right up there.

:beerme:

Puffy
03-13-2007, 12:31 PM
I play Cleveland irons and woods and wedges.

http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2005-8/1070272/cleveland.jpg

Chip R
03-13-2007, 02:52 PM
If you practice hard, you're going to beat your first set of clubs to death. It's not important to get a new set, in fact it's almost a waste of money. You can get a top line set of irons used.

But you absolutely need to be fitted by a pro. Your height makes this much more necessary than it would for a 6' tall golfer. You're going to learn posture and swing habits that you'll have to change when you finally do get longer shafts and larger grips, so do it now is my advice.

I'd find a nice set of used cavity back irons and have them reshafted to fit you. And I'd wait a while before you have the lie changed. Your swing will evolve a lot in the first few thousand swings. The lie angle may differ after you work out your preferences.

But the shaft and the grip size are crucial.

And ABSOLUTELY get some lessons from a pro. It makes a ton of difference if you start right and learn the fundamentals.

Those hickory shafts still working out for you, RFS? ;)

ColoradoHigh
03-13-2007, 03:50 PM
Cool. I usually defer to Billy Ray Cyrus for my heavy life philosophy, but hey, an NBA player.... that's right up there.

:beerme:

I hate to harm your achey breaky heart, but Michael Doleac majored in chemistry at Utah and was accepted to Dental School before joining the NBA. How did you and Billy Ray do in School?

Highlifeman21
03-13-2007, 04:39 PM
What's in my bag?

Driver - Nike Sasquatch Tour - 8.5 Degree with Aldila NV X Flex
3 Wood - Cleveland Launch - 15 Degree currently without a shaft
5 wood - Titleist 980 F - 19 Degree with Aldila NVS S Flex

Taylor Made Rescue 3 (Can't remember the Degree off the top of my head) with Flighted Rifle 6.0 Steel Shaft

Irons - Taylor Made TP Forged Combo 4-PW with Dynamic Gold S400 steel shafts/ Back up set = Titleist 962 3-PW with Dynamic Gold X100 steel shafts

Wedges - 52 and 56(bent to 55) Degree Cleveland CG 10 Black Pearl wedges in both low bounce and high bounce; 58 Degree Callaway (Whichever one Mickelson has in his bag with the goofy sole and bounce, and the ridiculously deep grooves)

Putter - Callaway Tour Blue TT1

Highlifeman21
03-13-2007, 04:59 PM
I've done some reading on the whole fitting process, and it seems to me (and I could definately be wrong) that in-depth fitting really only benefits experienced players because they have a repeatable swing that doesn't really differ from stroke to stroke. Someone like me, without as much time on the course, grips and swings differently with every approach. Would that affect the fitting?

Also, any feelings on component clubs v. OEM stuff? I'm pretty certain going used isn't going to be too big a savings, given that I'll be likely forced to pay to have the clubs adjusted on top of the cost of just buying them -- probably better off just ordering them to spec new.

(BTW -- I'm not Yao Ming, but I am 6'10", so he's only got a few inches on me :cool: )

The problem I've found with component clubs v. OEM is finding a good club builder. I'm almost to the point where I almost only trust my own work, and work I've gotten done with either Demo Vans or Tour vans. With components, you are dealing with too many pieces to be assembled, properly. You'll have the head, ferrule, shaft and grip, 3 of which can be successfull screwed up in the assembly process. Heads come in 1 piece, so it would take something special to screw that up! I'm not saying OEM is 100% perfect either. When I first started at Golf Galaxy, at least 1 shipment a week we'd have to return something that wasn't assembled properly, whether it was a grip put on wrong, or a shaft lined up incorrectly, or occasionally clubs would come in missing ferrules.

If you have a good club builder, then components can be marginally cheaper, but you need to figure out how much you're being charged for the clubs to be assembled. The only good club builder I know in Cincinnati is Etter, on Reading Rd, but the man isn't cheap.

You do bring up a good point with having to modify a used set to your height. IIRC, extensions cost something like $8 bucks a club at Golf Galaxy, and I think Etter charges $10 per club, so that adds up very quickly if you're going to get 14 clubs extended.

I want to strongly echo the opinions of many on this thread that with your height, you do need to get fit for clubs, even as a beginner. At 6'10", you'll easily be a 2+" extension. Unfortunately, most clubs manufacturers will rarely extend a club more than 2.5", unless you're going with an X flex, in which case they'll extend up to 4".

I'm going to have to respectfully disagree with Redhook about the fitting process though. The biggest thing that will determine the correct length of your golf club will be a simple wrist to floor measurement. We have fun little charts that give suggestions on the correct length given the wrist to floor measurement in relation to a height range. Most OEM sets are "fit" for a 6' male with a wrist to floor measurement between 35-36". With you being 6'10", your wrist to floor could easily be 38+", which means you'd roughly need the 2+" extension. That was a rough example I offered, but unless your fitter has a fitting club with at least a +2" extension, hitting balls as a way to fit for length might be an exercise in futility. The fitting process has two parts, dynamic and static. Static is the wrist to floor measurement, and dynamic is hitting balls, IIRC. Sometimes I get the terms flip flopped. It happens! While it would be a great advantage to hit a club that is the initial "correct" length, sometimes that luxury is not always available.

dabvu2498
03-13-2007, 05:07 PM
My bag is straight out of 1998.

Callaway Great Big Bertha Driver 9 degree stiff Graffalloy Prolite shaft

Callaway Big Bertha 4+ wood stiff Graffalloy Prolite shaft

Taylor Made RCG irons with S-90 rifle shafts (sweet)

588 Cleveland Wedges 52, 56, 60

Ping J-Blade putter

IslandRed
03-13-2007, 08:14 PM
Same here... haven't bought anything new since the mid-90s. I'm lucky if I play twice a year now.

King Cobra driver (10.5, I think) and 3-wood with steel shafts
Powerbilt cavity-back irons, 3-SW, with steel shafts
Very beat-up Ray Cook putter

I just don't play enough to even have a consistent bugaboo, I have the whole range of errors within a round -- hook, slice, fat, thin. My game is not only inconsistent, it's atypical. I can hit long irons better than fairway woods, which just isn't normal for someone who struggles to break 100. I putt pretty well. For me, it's all about avoiding that disaster from teebox to approach shot. My club choices -- stiff steel shafts, cavity-back irons, leaving the driver in the bag most of the time -- were all about control and forgiveness. In other words, instead of trying to maximize how good my good shots are, I try to minimize how bad my bad shots are.

Redhook
03-13-2007, 10:55 PM
The biggest thing that will determine the correct length of your golf club will be a simple wrist to floor measurement. We have fun little charts that give suggestions on the correct length given the wrist to floor measurement in relation to a height range. Most OEM sets are "fit" for a 6' male with a wrist to floor measurement between 35-36". With you being 6'10", your wrist to floor could easily be 38+", which means you'd roughly need the 2+" extension. That was a rough example I offered, but unless your fitter has a fitting club with at least a +2" extension, hitting balls as a way to fit for length might be an exercise in futility. The fitting process has two parts, dynamic and static. Static is the wrist to floor measurement, and dynamic is hitting balls, IIRC. Sometimes I get the terms flip flopped. It happens! While it would be a great advantage to hit a club that is the initial "correct" length, sometimes that luxury is not always available.

I definitely agree that measuring from the wrist to the floor (static) can work really well and will probably give an accurate fitting much of the time. For the average player, yes, it can probably be sufficient. However, I do believe posture at address is very important as well. And how a person swings the club (dynamic) definitely plays another important role in fitting the length and lie of clubs. IMO, though, it is absolutely necessary to hit the clubs at different lengths to see how they actually perform in action.

If you had to choose just one, measuring from the wrists would be the one choose, but if you can do the others as well, you'll get the most accurate fit.

Nugget
03-13-2007, 11:49 PM
You are tall enough to play a real sport. Why golf. If I were 6'10", one I'd be a really tall girl, two I'd play a sport that used my physical abilities. Again, Why golf. Name one golfer that is successful (PGA Wins) that is your height. I dated an NBA player who said "golf was a recreation for guys that don't look good in a ballet outfit". Charles Barkley is admittedly "pathetic" and Jordan has reportedly lost millions in his golf betting exploits. Is there a Gym nearby?

CE is a lawyer so golf comes as part of the requirements. Although I note that CE said he works in the public sector so he probably won't get to play as much.

As for clubs - go with what your comfortable with CE. I gather that you have played a bit so you can steer away from the beginner set. The thing is that it is very rare that you will be able to find a full set from a manufacturer that you are completely comfortable with. Manufacturer of my long irons are different to mids and shorts. Putter is different again. And then driver is a graphite shaft compared to the irons which are all steel.

SunDeck
03-14-2007, 06:54 AM
Here's a question for you regular golfers with kids. There's a local sports program for kids called JumpStart Sports that runs programs for little ones (starting at 3 for soccer and t-ball). They've added a golf program for 4 year olds. I like the programs they run because it gets the kids out playing and getting exercise, but I'm wondering if 4 is a little too young for golf. Any thoughts?

I think it depends on the kid. My six year old son likes to go to the driving range, but we've gone to the par three and he is not real into it. On the other hand, I have seen a few kids the same age who can hit the green.
Secondly, I would imagine a good program for four year olds would be more like play than golf.

Highlifeman21
03-14-2007, 10:14 AM
I definitely agree that measuring from the wrist to the floor (static) can work really well and will probably give an accurate fitting much of the time. For the average player, yes, it can probably be sufficient. However, I do believe posture at address is very important as well. And how a person swings the club (dynamic) definitely plays another important role in fitting the length and lie of clubs. IMO, though, it is absolutely necessary to hit the clubs at different lengths to see how they actually perform in action.

If you had to choose just one, measuring from the wrists would be the one choose, but if you can do the others as well, you'll get the most accurate fit.

If both options are available, then they should absolutely be utilized, so in that respect I agree.

Unfortunately, this sport discriminates against two types of golfers...

1. Very tall golfers
2. Left Handed Women

It's very hard to find the proper equipment for either group.

Just go the Tin Cup route and use a baseball bat, shovel and a rake to play. You'll probably enjoy the round that much more!

SunDeck
03-14-2007, 11:22 AM
If both options are available, then they should absolutely be utilized, so in that respect I agree.

Unfortunately, this sport discriminates against two types of golfers...

1. Very tall golfers
2. Left Handed Women

It's very hard to find the proper equipment for either group.

Just go the Tin Cup route and use a baseball bat, shovel and a rake to play. You'll probably enjoy the round that much more!

Every sport discriminates, but at least people can play golf until they are old. Very old.

Caveat Emperor
03-14-2007, 02:15 PM
CE is a lawyer so golf comes as part of the requirements. Although I note that CE said he works in the public sector so he probably won't get to play as much.

Government legal work has many perks (not having to account for billable minutes as I write this post, for example), but unfortunately the golf outing on somebody else's dime isn't really one of them.

I wanted to thank everyone for the advice in this thread. I'm going this weekend to get fitted and do some shopping. I've seen some iron sets on sale recently for $299 (one Nike, one Taylor Made, one Cleveland) and I'll probably hit up Golf Galaxy and check out the used rack as well.

Any additional advice is still greatly appreciated, or any overall experience with brands is helpful too!

Yachtzee
03-14-2007, 06:51 PM
Government legal work has many perks (not having to account for billable minutes as I write this post, for example), but unfortunately the golf outing on somebody else's dime isn't really one of them.

I wanted to thank everyone for the advice in this thread. I'm going this weekend to get fitted and do some shopping. I've seen some iron sets on sale recently for $299 (one Nike, one Taylor Made, one Cleveland) and I'll probably hit up Golf Galaxy and check out the used rack as well.

Any additional advice is still greatly appreciated, or any overall experience with brands is helpful too!

Have fun. Trying out different clubs is part of the fun.

Redhook
03-14-2007, 08:01 PM
I wanted to thank everyone for the advice in this thread. I'm going this weekend to get fitted and do some shopping. I've seen some iron sets on sale recently for $299 (one Nike, one Taylor Made, one Cleveland) and I'll probably hit up Golf Galaxy and check out the used rack as well.

That's a good idea and a good price. When you go to Golf Galaxy ask if you can demo the clubs. That will give you a good idea whether you like the club head or not. And then, if you do, ask what kind of alterations they will include free of charge if you decide to buy the set that you like. Hopefully, they'll include a free loft and lie check and maybe give you a really good discount on new grips and extra length for you. Try to get ask much free stuff as you can. There ultimate goal is to get the clubs out of there so they might give you a great deal. Go for it!

Highlifeman21
03-15-2007, 09:01 AM
That's a good idea and a good price. When you go to Golf Galaxy ask if you can demo the clubs. That will give you a good idea whether you like the club head or not. And then, if you do, ask what kind of alterations they will include free of charge if you decide to buy the set that you like. Hopefully, they'll include a free loft and lie check and maybe give you a really good discount on new grips and extra length for you. Try to get ask much free stuff as you can. There ultimate goal is to get the clubs out of there so they might give you a great deal. Go for it!

Having worked at the Golf Galaxy location in Springdale for a year +, they don't throw in any "perks", especially with used clubs. They might give you a free lie check, just to let you know where the set is when you buy it, but they won't change the loft or lie without handing them some cabbage.

I used to work in the club repair section, and often I would mod used clubs if they could be bent, and that was one of the big no no's I ran into while at Golf Galaxy. You think you'd do a lil customer service, and offer someone a service for free, and you'd retain customer loyalty, but obviously the corporate offices didn't think so. Charge charge charge!

Regardless, Golf Galaxy has a great selection, but like Redhook said, see what kinda perks they can throw in, since you're gonna be laying down a couple hundo on some equipment.

Hoosier Red
03-15-2007, 10:41 AM
What's in my bag?

Driver - Nike Sasquatch Tour - 8.5 Degree with Aldila NV X Flex
3 Wood - Cleveland Launch - 15 Degree currently without a shaft
5 wood - Titleist 980 F - 19 Degree with Aldila NVS S Flex

Taylor Made Rescue 3 (Can't remember the Degree off the top of my head) with Flighted Rifle 6.0 Steel Shaft

Irons - Taylor Made TP Forged Combo 4-PW with Dynamic Gold S400 steel shafts/ Back up set = Titleist 962 3-PW with Dynamic Gold X100 steel shafts

Wedges - 52 and 56(bent to 55) Degree Cleveland CG 10 Black Pearl wedges in both low bounce and high bounce; 58 Degree Callaway (Whichever one Mickelson has in his bag with the goofy sole and bounce, and the ridiculously deep grooves)

Putter - Callaway Tour Blue TT1

Am I counting correctly or is that 16 clubs?
I thought you were only allowed to carry 13.

FutureRedsGM
03-15-2007, 11:14 AM
CE, if you will PM me your e-mail address, I will forward an announcement from Golf Galaxy saying when the Cleveland fitting van will be in your area and providing discounts on Cleveland club purchases.

RFS62
03-15-2007, 11:16 AM
Am I counting correctly or is that 16 clubs?
I thought you were only allowed to carry 13.


Most low handicappers, much less pros like Highlifeman and Redhook, have a few options, like hybrids vs. long irons, or extra wedges with different styles or bounce depending on the course conditions.

You pick 14 to carry when you play. When I'm on the road, I carry about 17 clubs, but declare inelligible 3 when we start playing..

Puffy
03-15-2007, 11:40 AM
Most low handicappers, much less pros like Highlifeman and Redhook, have a few options, like hybrids vs. long irons, or extra wedges with different styles or bounce depending on the course conditions.

You pick 14 to carry when you play. When I'm on the road, I carry about 17 clubs, but declare inelligible 3 when we start playing..

First, what does inelligible mean? I know what ineligible means, but this seems to be a new word? Is it North Carolina slang?

Second, how exactly do you declare these clubs inelligible? Do you announce to the Starter, "Hey Starter, these three clubs are inelligible" or to the people you are playing with or is it to the voices in your head?

"OK Dave, these three clubs are inelligible"
"OK RFS62, that sounds nice. Did you bring the cheese?"
"These pretzels sure are making me thristy"
"These golf shoes hurt my feet"
"Which clubs are inellllllligible again?"
"That anal probe really opened things up for me"
"Did the alien use the 6 iron"
"Where's the cheese?"

SunDeck
03-15-2007, 11:44 AM
First, what does inelligible mean? I know what ineligible means, but this seems to be a new word? Is it North Carolina slang?

Second, how exactly do you declare these clubs inelligible? Do you announce to the Starter, "Hey Starter, these three clubs are inelligible" or to the people you are playing with or is it to the voices in your head?


Man, tough audience.
Give the guy a break; it's a stretch to transition from parchment to a keyboard.

Yachtzee
03-15-2007, 01:46 PM
Man, tough audience.
Give the guy a break; it's a stretch to transition from parchment to a keyboard.

Yeah, and haven't you ever read "The Canterbury Tales?" They didn't exactly have a standardized spelling for most words in that era. ;)

Redhook
03-15-2007, 07:24 PM
First, what does inelligible mean? I know what ineligible means, but this seems to be a new word? Is it North Carolina slang?

Second, how exactly do you declare these clubs inelligible? Do you announce to the Starter, "Hey Starter, these three clubs are inelligible" or to the people you are playing with or is it to the voices in your head?

"OK Dave, these three clubs are inelligible"
"OK RFS62, that sounds nice. Did you bring the cheese?"
"These pretzels sure are making me thristy"
"These golf shoes hurt my feet"
"Which clubs are inellllllligible again?"
"That anal probe really opened things up for me"
"Did the alien use the 6 iron"
"Where's the cheese?"

:laugh: :laugh:

That was actually pretty funny. I used to have 16 clubs with 4 of them being tag-teamed in and out of the lineup. Now, with the new hybrids, and different lofts on my wedges, I have 14 clubs that always stay in the bag. My wedges are 48, 54 (bent to a 53), and a 58. That way the gaps are 5 degrees which equals about 16 yards in distance (every degree approximately equals 3.25 yards for those who are counting at home;) ). Having a pitching wedge at 48, a SW at 56, and a lob wedge at 60 leaves an enormous gap. Not good. Normally, the gap between irons is 4 degrees, but when you get the wedges, I go with a 5 degree gap so I can carry a longer club like the 17 degree hybrid that I have.

Nugget
03-15-2007, 07:27 PM
Am I counting correctly or is that 16 clubs?
I thought you were only allowed to carry 13.

Nah - he has 13 plus the putter which whats allowed.

He only has a 4-9 irons and 3 wedges (I'm guessing he uses the 52 as his sand wedge). A rescue iron and a 3 woods.

CE - what billing code do you use for REDSZONE?

Caveat Emperor
03-15-2007, 09:12 PM
CE - what billing code do you use for REDSZONE?

GIK or BOSS :evil:

RFS62
03-15-2007, 11:21 PM
First, what does inelligible mean? I know what ineligible means, but this seems to be a new word? Is it North Carolina slang?


Yes, that's what it is. A new fangled slang designed to confuse and befuddle carpetbaggers and wannabe school marm spelling teachers. Oh, I see it's working.




Second, how exactly do you declare these clubs inelligible? Do you announce to the Starter, "Hey Starter, these three clubs are inelligible" or to the people you are playing with or is it to the voices in your head?



Yes, that's exactly how it happens. You walk up to the starter, who always counts the clubs in everyone's bag, and say "I declare the demon 3 iron INNELLLLIGIBLE!!!!!!"

Then you spin around three times, bark like a dog, and hop on one foot. It's a charming tradition, really.

Highlifeman21
03-17-2007, 11:20 AM
Am I counting correctly or is that 16 clubs?
I thought you were only allowed to carry 13.

I carry the maximum 14, I rotate wedges, my 5 wood, my hybrid and my 4 iron.

Highlifeman21
03-17-2007, 11:27 AM
Most low handicappers, much less pros like Highlifeman and Redhook, have a few options, like hybrids vs. long irons, or extra wedges with different styles or bounce depending on the course conditions.

You pick 14 to carry when you play. When I'm on the road, I carry about 17 clubs, but declare inelligible 3 when we start playing..

Redhook's waaaaaaay more of a pro than I am.

My only claim to fame is monday qualifying for Nike Tour event (when it was the Nike before the Buy.com and now the Nationwide) in Dayton.

In terms of club options, my options are different drivers, hybrids/long irons, and wedges.

Turf conditions and wind conditions will really dictate what's in my arsenal that day.