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pahster
03-12-2007, 08:16 PM
I've got an interview for a job with the Missouri Division of Youth Services tomorrow. I will be graduating in May, and this is my first real interview. Can anyone offer any advice?

texasdave
03-12-2007, 08:32 PM
I'm not much for offering advice, but good luck!

Yachtzee
03-12-2007, 08:36 PM
I've got an interview for a job with the Missouri Division of Youth Services tomorrow. I will be graduating in May, and this is my first real interview. Can anyone offer any advice?

Unless it's for a job as an exotic dancer, don't rip off your shirt in the middle of the interview. They don't like that so much.

pahster
03-12-2007, 08:42 PM
Unless it's for a job as an exotic dancer, don't rip off your shirt in the middle of the interview. They don't like that so much.

...uh oh...

KronoRed
03-12-2007, 08:45 PM
Good luck..and yeah I'd follow that shirt advice ;)

George Foster
03-12-2007, 08:45 PM
Read up on their web site. Know the Guy or Gal that runs the department buy their name. If they ask you, do you know who runs our department?

Know their mission statement and be sure to say it at some time during the interview. On their web site it should say where in Missouri they spend most of their money and time.

How will you make this state funded department better? Have an answer down cold.

Write down any possible question they could ask you, and have a answer ready.

They will do a back ground check on you if they are serious about hiring you. If you have ever been arrested, be up front about it. They will find out anyway, as long as you were not under 18. Most records are sealed if you are under 18, so keep your mouth shut about that.

Be confident, but not cocky. Dress nice but not flashy. I like a suit, over just a jacket and tan pants.

You ask questions as well, about the job. "Where is the local office located if I am chosen for this position? Is there any travel associated with this position? DO NOT ASK ABOUT PAY OR BENIFITS, you will find that out if they offer you the job. If you don't like what they have to offer, don't take it.

It is OK to ask when will you be notified if you are chosen for this position. Be sure to get the business card of the person giving you the interview. Send them a very plain thank-you card the very next day thanking them for the oppuntunity (sp?) in interviewing for this position. "I hope to hear from you soon."

I hope this helps good luck:thumbup:

Redhook
03-12-2007, 08:46 PM
1) Get there early
2) Wear a nice, dark suit with a white/blue shirt
3) Bring a few of your resumes, on resume paper, with you in a leather folder
4) Be yourself
5) Don't give one word answers
6) Write thank you notes shortly after the interview
7) At the end, express interest in the job

Go to some web sites and look up possible interview questions so you can prepare for some of the tougher ones and how to answer them. Like, "What are your weaknesses?" "In one word, describe yourself."

Good luck!!

Yachtzee
03-12-2007, 09:09 PM
1) Get there early
2) Wear a nice, dark suit with a white/blue shirt
3) Bring a few of your resumes, on resume paper, with you in a leather folder
4) Be yourself
5) Don't give one word answers
6) Write thank you notes shortly after the interview
7) At the end, express interest in the job

Go to some web sites and look up possible interview questions so you can prepare for some of the tougher ones and how to answer them. Like, "What are your weaknesses?" "In one word, describe yourself."

Good luck!!

That's pretty much it in a nutshell. Although by early, try to limit it to 5-10 minutes early rather than 30 or so. When they're about to do an interview, some people need some time to look over your resume again and usually won't have time to do it until about 5 minutes before the interview. If you show up too early, a lot of people feel compelled to rush through whatever they were working on so that they don't keep you waiting. You don't want to start off with someone annoyed at you because you unexpectedly changed their schedule.

Also, unless its a sales job, fancy paper is probably overkill. I've gotten more jobs just doing away with the fancy paper and dressy fonts and just using a resume printed on plain copy paper that focuses on the key points of my experience that match the requirements for the position. A nicely pressed suit and polished shoes and a resume that focuses on substance rather than style will say a lot more about you than fancy paper.

Be prepared for those silly questions Redhook mentioned. I think they're some sort of inside joke interviewers use to make people squirm, because they rarely produce meaningful information about whether someone will do a good job.

Redsland
03-12-2007, 09:11 PM
They are interviewing you, but you are also interviewing them. It's a discussion, not an interrogation.

edabbs44
03-12-2007, 09:14 PM
They are interviewing you, but you are also interviewing them. It's a discussion, not an interrogation.

Great advice...don't force anything though. Think up a couple of killer questions. Look for any recent related news articles on youth services.

And be outgoing. Don't be a wallflower b/c they're probably interviewing a bunch of people and you need to stand out.

pahster
03-12-2007, 10:25 PM
Thanks, all.

paintmered
03-12-2007, 10:37 PM
They are interviewing you, but you are also interviewing them. It's a discussion, not an interrogation.

Lots of great advice in this thread, including this. I think the top three things employers look for are enthusiasm, competency and leadership. Go into the interview with answers ready to go for the canned interview questions. ASK QUESTIONS - turn the interview into a conversation. It shows you have a real interest in the position and you aren't wasting the interviewer's time. Relax, be yourself and let your natural personality show through.

I went through the job hunt a few months ago. I interviewed with seven different companies/offices, and received offers for five of them using this strategy.

vaticanplum
03-12-2007, 10:52 PM
Breathe. It's not new-agey, just the simplest advice to offer in any stressful situation. Your breathing is the first to go and if you're nervous it just makes everything worse. Take in air -- don't force it, just take it in. All at once it gives you something relaxing to concentrate on and still helps your stress level at the same time.

SunDeck
03-12-2007, 11:05 PM
Great advice here. I've been on both sides of the table and have found that the hiring process comes down to both parties trying to figure out if they would like to work with the people they are talking to.

Be yourself. Simple advice, but by being yourself you can focus on the interview instead of the "acting" part. If they don't like you as you are, then you don't want to work there, anyway.

Be professional. Do your research. Know the organization. Find out about their funding; it's all public record, even if it's a little hard to find. Show them with your questions and your insight that you are serious.

Relax. You are going to have a lot of opportunities in your career. If this interview doesn't work out, there will be others.

Good LUCK!

919191
03-13-2007, 08:58 AM
Trust me on this one- don't ask for a smoke and tell them you left yours in the bar.

beb30
03-13-2007, 02:28 PM
Go to MSN.com and do a search for jobs or interviews and they show you how to answer like the 7 toughest Interview questions and also how to prepare....great site

Johnny Footstool
03-13-2007, 05:32 PM
How did it go?

pahster
03-13-2007, 06:02 PM
It went ok. I don't feel like I made an idiot of myself, but I'm not sure if I'm quite what they're looking for. At this point I'm not sure that I want the job, though. I'd probably have to work 2nd or 3rd shift, and it sounds pretty stressful. I'm only planning on working one year before I go to grad school, so my job prospects are rather limited. It seems like a better fit would be one of the jobs through the university that have high rates of turnover, like in the admissions office or something similar. The problem, though, is that HR won't let me apply for jobs requiring degrees until I actually have one. This makes me a bit nervous, because who knows how long it'll take me to get an offer and by then I will be living entirely on my own. On the other hand, the university system will let me apply for dozens of jobs all at once, so I should have a fair range of choices.