PDA

View Full Version : New York City bans metal bats



vaticanplum
03-14-2007, 08:13 PM
Hope I didn't miss this posted anywhere else...

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/14/nyregion/14cnd-bats.html?_r=1&hp&oref=slogin

I would love to hear people's thoughts on this.

adampad
03-14-2007, 08:25 PM
I have no problem with someone saying metal bats are dangerous and should not be used. I have no problem with the other agruement either. What I DO have a problem with is the City Council making this decision instead of the High Schools, little leagues, ect. Can you imagine if they told MLB they had to use metal bats from now on, because wood bats could lead to splinters.

Ltlabner
03-14-2007, 08:30 PM
My gut responce to this is, "dear God, will the safety nuts ever give it a rest"? But that is purely a knee-jerk reaction. Will have to think this one out a bit.

Then again, I'm more of a tradional wooden bat sorta guy, so maybe the unintended consequences that almost always follow legislative action will end up doing something good (ie. ridding this planet of the evil that is aluminum bats in baseball).

M2
03-14-2007, 08:48 PM
NYC's always been a wood bat kind of town.

http://www.mediarebellion.com/i/hosted/cobra/Swan%203.jpg

KronoRed
03-14-2007, 08:49 PM
I like New York city better today

All metal bats should be banned, along with the DH

They are just...Wrong.

Yachtzee
03-14-2007, 09:33 PM
NYC's always been a wood bat kind of town.

http://www.mediarebellion.com/i/hosted/cobra/Swan%203.jpg

"Warriors. . . Come out and PLAAYEEEEAAAAY!"

Ravenlord
03-14-2007, 09:55 PM
good. hope more places follow suit.

Degenerate39
03-14-2007, 09:58 PM
Next they're going to make them play with rocks instead of baseballs.

REDREAD
03-15-2007, 10:33 AM
Good grief, further proof that we have too many people in government today. Don't they have anything better to do? Again, passing a law based on no evidence, just a "feeling" that alumimum bats are more dangerous.

I guess the government always knows what's best for us, and should make every decision for us. I forgot to take my vitamin this morning, I'm expecting to get my ticket and fine in the mail. :rolleyes:

Johnny Footstool
03-15-2007, 10:43 AM
"Warriors. . . Come out and PLAAYEEEEAAAAY!"

Ah, the Furies.

I appreciate their dedication to the baseball theme, but really, does it make sense to wear spiked cleats on pavement?

George Anderson
03-15-2007, 11:48 AM
This ban wont last long once the environmentalists get ahold of this. By banning aluminum bats more trees will have to be cut down to make wood bats. It will stage a big fight between the environmentalists and the safety police. A battle of the quacks!!

Redsland
03-15-2007, 11:50 AM
Next they're going to make them play with rocks instead of baseballs.
Nerf™ rocks, maybe.

westofyou
03-15-2007, 11:59 AM
BP Radio had the guy from NJ who was backing this on a few months ago, pretty interesting show.. all about metal bats etc...

Maybe someone can dig it up?

Triples
03-15-2007, 12:03 PM
Ah, the Furies.

I appreciate their dedication to the baseball theme, but really, does it make sense to wear spiked cleats on pavement?

I don't like metal bats anymore than the next guy...the ping sound is like fingernails on a chalkboard. But there are several other underlying issues that bother me more; a.) the gov't legislating something as trivial as this, b. the gov't wasting tax dollars on something like this c.) making a decision based on bad data; if they're worried about saftey they should be thinking about how many people get hurt from sprained ankles crosssing a base, broken fingers sliding into a base, injuries from getting plunked, steel spike injuries, etc, etc, d.) is the danger from the trampoline effect of aluminum bats really that pronounced in high school? Maybe in college and likely in pros but not in high school. I've probably watched 600 plus highschool and college games in the last 12 years or so and I can't recall a pitcher ever getting injured by a batted ball, but I recall lots of other injuries sustained before during and after games. Sorry, but it would take someone from NY City to come up with something like this. I just surprised it didn't orginate in California.

Chip R
03-15-2007, 12:06 PM
What would happen if a kid were killed or seriously injured by a shot off a wooden bat?

George Anderson
03-15-2007, 12:16 PM
I don't like metal bats anymore than the next guy...the ping sound is like fingernails on a chalkboard. But there are several other underlying issues that bother me more; a.) the gov't legislating something as trivial as this, b. the gov't wasting tax dollars on something like this c.) making a decision based on bad data; if they're worried about saftey they should be thinking about how many people get hurt from sprained ankles crosssing a base, broken fingers sliding into a base, injuries from getting plunked, steel spike injuries, etc, etc, d.) is the danger from the trampoline effect of aluminum bats really that pronounced in high school? Maybe in college and likely in pros but not in high school. I've probably watched 600 plus highschool and college games in the last 12 years or so and I can't recall a pitcher ever getting injured by a batted ball, but I recall lots of other injuries sustained before during and after games. Sorry, but it would take someone from NY City to come up with something like this. I just surprised it didn't orginate in California.

If this movement to ban aluminum bats takes hold nationwide then you will see several schools drop their baseball programs for economic reasons. I umpire High School baseball and know several Athletic Directors in the Indianapolis area and I cannot begin to tell you how many of them complain how baseball is such a drain financially on their budgets. If the schools have to now add the cost of providing 100-150 wooden bats at a cost of $25-$30 for a bat then schools will simply just cut the programs. Sure schools can require kids to bring their own bats but alot of kids in schools in the inner city will not be able to afford to do that. Sounds to me like a bunch of educated know it alls are passing laws without looking at the big picture

Triples
03-15-2007, 12:28 PM
If this movement to ban aluminum bats takes hold nationwide then you will see several schools drop their baseball programs for economic reasons. I umpire High School baseball and know several Athletic Directors in the Indianapolis area and I cannot begin to tell you how many of them complain how baseball is such a drain financially on their budgets. If the schools have to now add the cost of providing 100-150 wooden bats at a cost of $25-$30 for a bat then schools will simply just cut the programs. Sure schools can require kids to bring their own bats but alot of kids in schools in the inner city will not be able to afford to do that. Sounds to me like a bunch of educated know it alls are passing laws without looking at the big picture

I didn't get into the economic issues but your point is well taken. I thinka lot of folks look at this and say well many of the kids have their own aluminum bats @ $175-$200 per. so what's the big deal to have them buy a couple of wood bats. What folks don't understand is that at the highschool level, kids will break bats a lot more frequently than the pros do simply because they won't hit the ball on the sweet spot as often. Furthemore, the wood bats they will be able to afford to buy (those costing $25-$30 each) will be junk and will break easier than good wood bats that may cost twice that much.Your estimate of 100-150 bats per season might actually be low. If they are going to mandate wood bats then they should be sure to allow laminated wood bats that are much less prone to breaking.

They are also not taking into account that its more fun for a junior high and high school kid to play with aluminum than with wood. A marginal player can be productive at the plate with aluminum whereas they wouldn't bat .150 with wood.

Between the economic issues and the enjoyment factor frankly, I think you would see the popularity of baseball wane, especially in the inner city where its already struggling. I know, I know...kids have been playing baseball for a 100 years with wood bats and its still popular but I would argue that the kids today are different than they were in past generations. they need great instant gratification or they get bored more quickly. IMO

westofyou
03-15-2007, 12:35 PM
http://www.baseballprospectus.com/unfiltered/?p=269


March 14, 2007, 04:54 PM ET
Morning Aluminum

by Will Carroll

The metal bat debate is heating up, especially in New York City. John Franco and Mike Mussina went head to head on the debate, Mussina taking the position of Little League while Franco took the side of common sense. It’s never been a question to me that metal bats - especially the modern, whip-handled, carbon fiber, $500 bats - were “hotter” than wood. Imagine standing 60 feet away from Barry Bonds or Alfonso Soriano or Carlos Beltran. It’s actually more like 50 feet by the time the pitcher comes through. As bad as some hit pitchers have been (Bryce Florie comes to mind), there have been no deaths and I can’t even think of a pitcher who’s had his career ended. Compare that to the still statistically small, but very real stories that we hear every year about a high school baseball or even softball player taking one off the chest or head and dying.

I don’t understand the debate anymore. Metal bats came into the game because they were cheaper and would last longer. That’s not true anymore. Maple and other exotic combos have made wood bats nearly as guilty of getting “too hot.” You’ll never hear me called a purist, but in the fight for safety, you will find me on the side of wood bats in this debate.

George Anderson
03-15-2007, 12:40 PM
Triples.....Your right about kids needing the instant gratification or they get bored. I umpire a wooden bat league during the fall and even I find the play somewhat boring. Its not real common to see even a High School kid hit the ball into the outfield with a wooden bat and even if they do, the ball rarely goes over the outfielders head. Bottom line is the game isnt nearly as exciting as it is with the aluminum bats. But hey we live in a time where we can never be to safe!!

registerthis
03-15-2007, 12:43 PM
Good grief, further proof that we have too many people in government today.

Those dang city councils, always up to no good.

REDREAD
03-15-2007, 01:24 PM
Those dang city councils, always up to no good.

Yep, and this is further proof that politicians like to waste time with trivial things and step in to areas where their opinion is not wanted or needed.

Let the schools (or whoever is running the games) decide this.

I see one incident where a kid got killed by a hitter using a metal bat. He might've still died if the hitter was using a wood bat, we'll never know.

Didn't some kid get killed by a puck at an NHL game a few years ago? Based on one death, should we ban fans from watching live NHL games?

It's tragic, but freak accidents happen.

westofyou
03-15-2007, 01:58 PM
Didn't some kid get killed by a puck at an NHL game a few years ago? Based on one death, should we ban fans from watching live NHL games?Yep, and they instituted a rule putting netting around the end of the rink.

REDREAD
03-15-2007, 02:12 PM
Yep, and they instituted a rule putting netting around the end of the rink.


Which is a sensible solution, unlike banning metal bats.

I'm glad they did something about it, didn't mean to imply that it was ignored.

Yachtzee
03-15-2007, 02:45 PM
Yep, and this is further proof that politicians like to waste time with trivial things and step in to areas where their opinion is not wanted or needed.


The citizens of NYC elected them. I guess it comes down to whether you want a body of elected representatives making that decision or administrators wielding discretionary power.

The problem with metal or composite bats is that technology keeps getting better and better. Just looking at the softball thread, it's kind of scary that they have 32-34 inch bats that are lighter than the bats we used in grade school. Maybe banning metal bats may not be the best answer, but as technology progresses, it's only going to get scarier for kids to be out in the field.

westofyou
03-15-2007, 02:52 PM
Which is a sensible solution, unlike banning metal bats.

Metal bats from our youth are not the bats that have been drawing the attention, it's the new improved technology that has pushed this issue up higher, more so then a bunch of wily nilly junior politicians.

texasdave
03-15-2007, 02:55 PM
A sensible solution is to make metal bats that only hit as hard as wooden bats. I wouldn't think that would be too hard. Problem solved. Next.

Redsland
03-15-2007, 02:57 PM
What would happen if a kid were killed or seriously injured by a shot off a wooden bat?
There's always those big, red, plastic ones.

KronoRed
03-15-2007, 02:58 PM
There's always those big, red, plastic ones.

I like the yellow ones myself

Easier to see

Yachtzee
03-15-2007, 02:59 PM
There's always those big, red, plastic ones.

Man, the sweet spot on one of those things was ginormous!

REDREAD
03-15-2007, 03:40 PM
A sensible solution is to make metal bats that only hit as hard as wooden bats. I wouldn't think that would be too hard. Problem solved. Next.

Yes, but even this solution should be implemented at league level. For example, they could charge a bat fee and every kid would use the same bat. No kids could bring in their own $500 bat or whatever.

City council should have better things to do than make rules for kid baseball leagues.

Chip R
03-15-2007, 03:58 PM
So if someone gets mugged with a metal bat, is the penalty stiffer than if the mugging took place with a wooden bat? ;)

hebroncougar
03-15-2007, 03:58 PM
Good idea IMO. I coached HS ball for 8 years and have seen 2 pitcher's years and then some ruined. One with a broken leg, and one with a shattered shin on balls hit right back at them. Composite bats are much more safer, give a kid a truer measure of his ability, and are safer. Guys, it's about safety at these ages, and that's all this decision was about. The Easton spokesman in the article out to have to face the lady whose kid was killed by the ball back at him when he says "there's no safety issue". Kind of reminds me of the tobacco industry back in the day when cigarettes were safe. Don't insult my intelligence, that only ticks me off.

texasdave
03-15-2007, 03:59 PM
So if someone gets mugged with a metal bat, is the penalty stiffer than if the mugging took place with a wooden bat? ;)

Depends upon the 'exit speed' of the perpetrator.:p:

hebroncougar
03-15-2007, 04:00 PM
Which is a sensible solution, unlike banning metal bats.

I'm glad they did something about it, didn't mean to imply that it was ignored.

Tell me why banning metal bats is not sensible? Because some sales reps wont' make as much money? Freak accidents happen, sure, but when you can minimize their occurance, especially when KIDS are involved, I'm all for it.

Triples
03-15-2007, 04:31 PM
Good idea IMO. I coached HS ball for 8 years and have seen 2 pitcher's years and then some ruined. One with a broken leg, and one with a shattered shin on balls hit right back at them. Composite bats are much more safer, give a kid a truer measure of his ability, and are safer. Guys, it's about safety at these ages, and that's all this decision was about. The Easton spokesman in the article out to have to face the lady whose kid was killed by the ball back at him when he says "there's no safety issue". Kind of reminds me of the tobacco industry back in the day when cigarettes were safe. Don't insult my intelligence, that only ticks me off.

The question would be would either of those kids you mentioned been hurt had the ball been hit with a wood bat? The second question would be why does this kind of thing have to legislated by a gov't entity. Let the parents that run the little leagues make the decisions, or better yet let the national Little League step in. The third question would be why not request that the bat manufactures make a bat the doesn't have the same trampoline effect and the fourth and final question is what do you do about all the other injuries that are sustained playing baseball unrelated to a batted ball. I am personally familar with a young man who's spike caught in the turf and he tore his achilles tendon. Surgery and a year's rehab later he was back on the field but slower than before the injury. What to we do about that injury. have the city council pass a law prohibiting whering spikes for baseball...on and by the way he was wearing plastic spikes.

REDREAD
03-15-2007, 04:38 PM
Tell me why banning metal bats is not sensible? Because some sales reps wont' make as much money? Freak accidents happen, sure, but when you can minimize their occurance, especially when KIDS are involved, I'm all for it.

1. I don't think it's the government's role to step in here. Let the leagues decide their own rules.

2. No real proof that metal bats are significantly more dangerous than wood.

3. Some here say that the elite metal bats are the problem.. Ok, then how about just getting rid of those, instead of a blanket ban on all metal bats? When the government takes the decision away from the league, there's no flexiblity at all. Where does it stop? Is the government going to start putting saftey laws in effect for football too? I had two broken bone incidents from playing football as a kid.. I don't know if they were as severe as the two baseball injuries that you blamed on metal bats, but they were pretty bad.

gonelong
03-15-2007, 04:43 PM
There have been studies done that show the difference in speed of the ball coming off a wood bat and coming off a metal bat. Its quite a bit of difference.

The time you have to react in is much less from the metal bats, especially if you are standing 60' or less from the batter.

Part of the reason I quite playing softball was that the bats became so outrageous. I hadn't played for a few years but played a pickup game when one of my buddies needed a player. The first swing was with a new bat some guy had. The left fielder never even took his hands off his knees as it soared over his head. It was the farthest ball I had ever hit in years of playing softball. I played 3rd Base (now that was scary!) that tournament and its the last time I have played.

GL

REDREAD
03-15-2007, 04:47 PM
There have been studies done that show the difference in speed of the ball coming off a wood bat and coming off a metal bat. Its quite a bit of difference.

GL

Ok, for these elite metal bats, I can believe it. Like someone else pointed out though, wouldn't this ban extend to the plain Jane metal bats that we used in the 70's? That makes no sense, but that's what happens when you have the government decide things.

I just don't see a non-enhanced metal bat as being any more dangerous.
If the decision was up to the league, they could come up with a list of approved bats to keep the monster bats out of the game.

pedro
03-15-2007, 05:38 PM
I don't think the ban is inappropriate or an overstepping of gov't boundaries. They banned it for use in High School games which are typically played on public fields owned by the school districts in leagues sponsored and run by the schools. They are just trying to mitigate their potential liability which in the end benefits tax payers as they would be the ones in the end paying off any claims from lawsuits.

hebroncougar
03-15-2007, 05:41 PM
1. I don't think it's the government's role to step in here. Let the leagues decide their own rules.

2. No real proof that metal bats are significantly more dangerous than wood.

3. Some here say that the elite metal bats are the problem.. Ok, then how about just getting rid of those, instead of a blanket ban on all metal bats? When the government takes the decision away from the league, there's no flexiblity at all. Where does it stop? Is the government going to start putting saftey laws in effect for football too? I had two broken bone incidents from playing football as a kid.. I don't know if they were as severe as the two baseball injuries that you blamed on metal bats, but they were pretty bad.

Come on now................you don't think metal bats are more dangerous than wood??? It's nothing more than limiting weight in some leagues for football, or not allowing kids to play w/o helmets, etc. It's about safety. I don't think it's unjustifiable, and NYC isn't the first to do it.

Ltlabner
03-15-2007, 05:48 PM
Come on now................you don't think metal bats are more dangerous than wood??? It's nothing more than limiting weight in some leagues for football, or not allowing kids to play w/o helmets, etc. It's about safety. I don't think it's unjustifiable, and NYC isn't the first to do it.

But doesn't the school district typically dictate these sorts of rules and regs? Maybe I'm wrong, but my impression is that schools, or youth leages are the ones imposing standards like wearing helmets, equipment types, etc. So why should this be any different? If the government folks were really concerned they should have simply apprached the youth league/school district and said, "this sounds really dangerous, here's our evidence to show that it is, and we don't want to get sued, please change your rules". Then let the orginization handle it.

Of course they wouldn't get any attention or mention in the press for handling it that way.

hebroncougar
03-15-2007, 06:05 PM
But doesn't the school district typically dictate these sorts of rules and regs? Maybe I'm wrong, but my impression is that schools, or youth leages are the ones imposing standards like wearing helmets, equipment types, etc. So why should this be any different? If the government folks were really concerned they should have simply apprached the youth league/school district and said, "this sounds really dangerous, here's our evidence to show that it is, and we don't want to get sued, please change your rules". Then let the orginization handle it.

Of course they wouldn't get any attention or mention in the press for handling it that way.

What's the difference when it's kids safety in mind??? Maybe the NYC council told the HS governing body to do it. And they ignored them. I don't know if that's the case or not, but we are talking about safety here. That's it. Heck, we don't mind the government mandating seatbelts, or in some cases motorcycle helmets, etc. I really don't see the big deal. I would find it hard to believe that anyone wouldn't think that getting rid of aluminum bats was not a good thing. Who cares who makes the rule?

vaticanplum
03-15-2007, 06:16 PM
I don't think the ban is inappropriate or an overstepping of gov't boundaries. They banned it for use in High School games which are typically played on public fields owned by the school districts in leagues sponsored and run by the schools.

...and also played, within a few years, at the current Yankee Stadium, right down the street from New Yankee Stadium.

I never would have thought of it, and my gut instinct tells me no, but I wonder if that was even a small factor in this decision.

pedro
03-15-2007, 06:29 PM
...and also played, within a few years, at the current Yankee Stadium, right down the street from New Yankee Stadium.

I never would have thought of it, and my gut instinct tells me no, but I wonder if that was even a small factor in this decision.

I actually heard that they're now not going to keep the existing Yankee Stadium in tact.

vaticanplum
03-15-2007, 06:35 PM
I actually heard that they're now not going to keep the existing Yankee Stadium in tact.

:eek: Where did you hear that? I totally missed this.

edit: Pedro -- never mind. I assumed from your post that you meant that the plan had changed entirely. They're pulling down most of the structure, but they're still using it for high school fields, which is what I understood. Phew.

Still waiting on the answer to my now two-year-old question, which is whether they're going to keep the giant bat.

pedro
03-15-2007, 06:38 PM
:eek: Where did you hear that? I totally missed this.


on the radio. I think.


wikipedia confirms it.

In 2006, the Yankees began construction of a New Yankee Stadium, to open in 2009. Most of Yankee Stadium is expected to be demolished at that time, leaving only the underground clubhouses as part of replacement park facilities.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yankee_Stadium

pedro
03-15-2007, 06:42 PM
:eek: Where did you hear that? I totally missed this.

edit: Pedro -- never mind. I assumed from your post that you meant that the plan had changed entirely. They're pulling down most of the structure, but they're still using it for high school fields, which is what I understood. Phew.

Still waiting on the answer to my now two-year-old question, which is whether they're going to keep the giant bat.

I think they way they originally described it left a lot of people, including me, thinking they were not going to tear it down. That was probably a public relations move until people got used to the idea.

Chip R
03-15-2007, 07:23 PM
I think we are looking at this and saying this has to be one way or the other. But does it? If they are serious about protecting these kids and would still like to use aluminum bats, isn't there another way to do it? How about moving the rubber back 5 feet? It's not going to cost anything and a pitcher will have a little more reaction time to get out of the way of the ball. Or just put a screen in front of the pitcher like you do in batting practice. How about making the pitcher wear a helmet out there?

I don't think these people are doing this because they are bureaucrats. I think they are sincerely concerned with these kids' safety. I don't like aluminum bats for aesthetic reasons and I think it's tough for pitcher who can pitch inside and make a good pitch on the hands of the batter but that pitch becomes a base hit with a metal bat. It also is tough to evaluate a potential pro prospect who has used a metal bat all his life. The main goal here is to allow kids to play baseball. If they have to use wood bats, they may not be able to play baseball any more.

George Anderson
03-15-2007, 09:02 PM
What's the difference when it's kids safety in mind??? Maybe the NYC council told the HS governing body to do it. And they ignored them. I don't know if that's the case or not, but we are talking about safety here. That's it. Heck, we don't mind the government mandating seatbelts, or in some cases motorcycle helmets, etc. I really don't see the big deal. I would find it hard to believe that anyone wouldn't think that getting rid of aluminum bats was not a good thing. Who cares who makes the rule?

Being an ex High school coach you should know that many athletic departments cannot afford the extra $5,000 to $10,000 it would cost to equipt the entire program with wood bats. Heck our umpire association had to battle the schools to get a measley $5 a game raise this year. I can only imagine their response when they found out they will have to add another $10,000 to their budget. Like I posted earlier alot of schools will just drop their programs if wood bats are mandated.

I like the idea of the compromise to outlaw the newer aluminum bats and instead allow only the older style aluminum bats.

sonny
03-16-2007, 04:07 AM
They could be moving to all-nerf equipment....you know, for the kids.:rolleyes:

REDREAD
03-16-2007, 11:00 AM
Come on now................you don't think metal bats are more dangerous than wood??? It's nothing more than limiting weight in some leagues for football, or not allowing kids to play w/o helmets, etc. It's about safety. I don't think it's unjustifiable, and NYC isn't the first to do it.


I agree that the ultra high tech metal bats are dangerous. But the plain, low tech aluminum bats that I used when I was a kid are not any more dangerous than wood.

westofyou
03-16-2007, 11:03 AM
I agree that the ultra high tech metal bats are dangerous. But the plain, low tech aluminum bats that I used when I was a kid are not any more dangerous than wood.
And I'm pretty sure that they don't sell those anymore, just like they don't sell Coke in a bottle.

SunDeck
03-16-2007, 11:23 AM
And I'm pretty sure that they don't sell those anymore, just like they don't sell Coke in a bottle.

The still sell the 8 oz. (http://store.drsoda.com/oldfaslook8o.html) bottles.

REDREAD
03-16-2007, 11:45 AM
And I'm pretty sure that they don't sell those anymore, just like they don't sell Coke in a bottle.

Sure they do, we use them in our family softball game. I think we got them at Toys R Us.. There's always going to be a market for cheap, lowtech alumimum bats, because causal people aren't going to spend $500 on a bat.

If the entire NYC school district wanted a certain bat, I'm sure a bat company would accomodate a special order once a year.

hebroncougar
03-16-2007, 03:17 PM
Being an ex High school coach you should know that many athletic departments cannot afford the extra $5,000 to $10,000 it would cost to equipt the entire program with wood bats. Heck our umpire association had to battle the schools to get a measley $5 a game raise this year. I can only imagine their response when they found out they will have to add another $10,000 to their budget. Like I posted earlier alot of schools will just drop their programs if wood bats are mandated.

I like the idea of the compromise to outlaw the newer aluminum bats and instead allow only the older style aluminum bats.

When you're spending $250-300 for an aluminum bat, that buys 10 decent wood bats. I got wood bats for a wooden bat tourney I was in a couple of time for $39, and that was only buying a couple. The reality is kids want to buy their own bats anyways, so I as a coach would budget the same amount I did for the aluminum bats (1,000-1500), and have the kids buy the rest. I think 50 bats would get me done just like the 4-6 aluminums.

George Anderson
03-16-2007, 09:22 PM
When you're spending $250-300 for an aluminum bat, that buys 10 decent wood bats. I got wood bats for a wooden bat tourney I was in a couple of time for $39, and that was only buying a couple. The reality is kids want to buy their own bats anyways, so I as a coach would budget the same amount I did for the aluminum bats (1,000-1500), and have the kids buy the rest. I think 50 bats would get me done just like the 4-6 aluminums.

Kids wanna provide their own aluminum bats because they think the better the bat the better the hitter they will be. If they have to provide just a "plain jane" wood bat similar to what everyone else is using they wont be as eager to do so. I am sure parents of kids in the suburbs can afford to fork out $100-$200 a year on wood bats but I promise you inner city programs will suffer because those parents in most cases cannot or will not fork out the money. I used to coach inner city little league and those parents wouldnt fork out the registration fee for their kids to play, so I gaurantee they will not fork out money for equipment. Bottom line is your idea is only going to hurt inner city baseball which is already badly hurting.

Besides is it fair to require baseball players to use wood when soft ball players will still be allowed to use aluminum????

hebroncougar
03-17-2007, 09:49 AM
Kids wanna provide their own aluminum bats because they think the better the bat the better the hitter they will be. If they have to provide just a "plain jane" wood bat similar to what everyone else is using they wont be as eager to do so. I am sure parents of kids in the suburbs can afford to fork out $100-$200 a year on wood bats but I promise you inner city programs will suffer because those parents in most cases cannot or will not fork out the money. I used to coach inner city little league and those parents wouldnt fork out the registration fee for their kids to play, so I gaurantee they will not fork out money for equipment. Bottom line is your idea is only going to hurt inner city baseball which is already badly hurting.

Besides is it fair to require baseball players to use wood when soft ball players will still be allowed to use aluminum????

I think we are kind of on the same page, but I think wood bats won't be much of an added cost, whereas you do. I'm thinking 10 wooden bats to replace the one aluminum bat, and that I could deal with. Softball and baseball are apples and oranges my friend, it's infinitely more difficult to get hurt with a softball as it's much lighter, and their pros use aluminum anyways. So there are no wooden softball bats.

westofyou
03-19-2007, 12:14 PM
March 18: This week, the New York City Council passed a bill banning the use of metal bats in high school baseball games. Late last year, Will and Brad took a deeper look into the Wood vs. Metal bat debate. Today on BPR Weekend, we look back at those conversations, including our discussion with the New York bill's original sponsor, New York City Councilman Jim Oddo. In addition, New Jersey Assemblyman Patrick Diegnan join us to discuss wood bat legislation he's introduced in his state. Meanwhile, metal bat companies continue the development of cutting edge sports equipment. Easton's Vice President of Baseball and Softball Matt Arndt explains Easton's latest technological advances and the safety of today's metal bats.

http://www.baseballprospectus.com/radio/audio/bpr_070318_1.mp3

Always Red
03-19-2007, 01:38 PM
good discussion, and I think there is one more variable to the scenario, and that is age. Little leaguers often can't create enough energy even with a metal bat. I'm talking little guys 10 years old and younger, for instance; and I'm not talking about the kids who play on TV in the Little League WS.

I played HS baseball, as many here did, and still watch some, just for fun. No way should those kids be hitting with those new bats. And I can't believe in college they're still using them, either.

I think it's a great idea to limit the use of metal bats. Some common sense would need to be used as well. I'd outlaw them in high school and college use for sure, and in any select leagues in grade school aged kids. And using a "standardized bat" for all other uses, one that has been tested and is not a "superbat" is a great idea as well.

Oh, one more thing- no legislation needed on any of this. We already have too many laws! We need less laws, not more laws! In Cincinnati, AABC baseball is very popular. AABC has a board that makes the rules and laws for the leagues, and produces handbooks of the rules for all to use. This is how these changes should be made, from within.

Safety is paramount, but there's no way any pitcher can be made safe from being hit by a batted ball. After all, it is the objective of the game, to hit the ball, as hard as you can, right up the middle. Again, some common sense needs to be used. Baseball, by definition is not a safe game. Not as violent as football, but kids can and do get hurt by batted or thrown balls; no matter if they're hit by a wood bat or a metal bat.

The_jbh
04-16-2007, 03:21 PM
High School baseball would be the most boring thing in the world.


When we had out "optional" sunday morning batting practice in HS, we used to use Wood Bats so that we didn't really have to have more than 3 OFs shagging flyballs and pitchers etc... could work in the bullpens.

Plus anyone who throws 88mph or faster will be unhittable to everyone except the exceptional talents...