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MrsHammer
03-16-2007, 04:19 PM
I am the proud mom of a 9 mth old little girl who just learned how to crawl, and is finding out that she can explore now. So, my husband and I need to do the dreaded babyproofing in our house. This is our first child, so we haven't had to do this before. I know the basic things that need to be done, such as cabinet & drawer locks, outlet covers, door knob covers, toilet locks, etc. But, I was hoping that maybe some experienced parents may be able to offer some advice on things that they have come across that the average person may not think of. Also, if you have any recommendations of specific brands or types of locks, etc that work best, I would be very appreciative. A bit more info that may be useful....we have a single story house, so there are no stairs to deal with....we do not have a pool...no pets.

thanks!

Red Leader
03-16-2007, 04:26 PM
We went with all of the basic stuff you covered and were fine. One thing I don't think you mentioned are clips for the blinds on the windows. Those "pull strings" that hang down from blinds are serious stangulation hazards. Probably don't have to worry about that at 9 months, but 12-18 you might consider it.

Our O.B. told us that the first year for your first baby, everything is in God's hands. He gets them to that point while you're learning to be a parent. We still made numerous calls to poison control, etc. Luckily everything turned out.

Sorry I can't be more helpful, but we only took care of the cabinet doors and drawers with ties, outlet covers, and when they got older the door knob covers, toilet locks, and clips for the blinds. I'd also heavily suggest investing in a infant seat for the bathtub if you don't have one. Even if you hold them in your hands while you wash them, accidents can happen. We had one that suctioned to the bottom of the tub. The kids loved it and we were at ease while we washed them.

oneupper
03-16-2007, 04:58 PM
Baby-gate. Even if you don't have stairs, you can block off some areas of the house where you don't want her to roam. Just remember to close them (and tell visitors also).

Johnny Footstool
03-16-2007, 05:02 PM
Any tips for baby-proofing an entertainment center? I'm concerned about my son crawling behind there and getting into the wires. Is there any option other than full-sized baby gates?

Red Leader
03-16-2007, 05:11 PM
Any tips for baby-proofing an entertainment center? I'm concerned about my son crawling behind there and getting into the wires. Is there any option other than full-sized baby gates?


You know, when it came to stuff like that, we did it up, white trash style. I went to Lowe's and had them cut me a couple pieces of plexiglass. I taped it to the back edge of both sides of the entertainment center.

My wife threw a fit. I said "Look, it's going to look trashy for 4-6 months until the baby is old enough to know better, but at the end of the day, I'll sleep well knowing my kid isn't going to strangle himself or get electrocuted."

It stayed up for 5 months, then it came down. We had friends of ours over several times. Only one of them commented on it and he said "that's cool, good idea. Never can be too careful with youngsters..."

I could have cared less if someone actually made fun of me for doing that. That's not what was important.

Roy Tucker
03-16-2007, 05:13 PM
Sounds like you have all the basics. I was going to mention the blinds cords and baby gates but was beat to it. Baby gates are good for limiting space.

We had heat registers in the floor that young uns liked to drop stuff down to hear it rattle down the ducts. Either close them up or put a piece of screen in them.

Don't leave pet food around. My youngest loved dry dog food (which was OK except for she occasionally barked).

Crawl around on the floor at their level and look for small objects or other booby traps. You basically can't have any loose objects.

Corner guards or bumpers if you have sharp (or not so sharp) corners.

Protruding screw heads or nails in furniture.

And I guarantee they'll find something you would have never thought of in a million years.

TeamCasey
03-16-2007, 05:25 PM
For your own sanity ...... throw away any Sharpie markers you have in the house for the next 5 years.

Yachtzee
03-16-2007, 05:35 PM
We didn't go crazy. Just baby gates, outlet covers and cleats for the pull strings on the blinds. For our first, we just used the baby gates to limit space and then always kept the baby in the same area with us so that we could keep an eye on him. We weren't quite as productive having to keep one eye on the kid at all times, but we figured that even with all the precautions one could take, kids can still find a way to get into things. The way I am, I would be far too trusting that all those things would actually work. Paying attention to the baby was the best way to avoid mishaps for me. Of course with #2 at 7 months, I'll have to test that theory all over again.

vaticanplum
03-16-2007, 06:42 PM
Don't leave pet food around. My youngest loved dry dog food (which was OK except for she occasionally barked).

:laugh:

If you throw out plastic bags (grocery bags etc.), always tie them in a knot first to reduce risk of strangulation. Ok, this is as much for critters who get into your garbage as for children, but it is for kids too. And cut the plastic thingie-things that hold six-packs of soda together so that none of them are circular. This is so birds don't get them caught around their necks and choke.

When she gets old enough (she might be now if she's peek-a-boo age), have her put her hands in the air every time you close the car door so you can see them (and don't slam them in the door).

Keep your pot and pan handles turned into the center of the stove when you're cooking so she can't reach them and pull hot food or boiling water down on herself. Also for your own benefit, not hers, always look inside the oven before you turn it on. When kids start walking a lot of them like to hide things in there.

Unassisted
03-16-2007, 07:35 PM
The better job you do paying attention to them, the less you'll have to secure. We used the plastic drawer locks and cabinet locks with kid #1. By the time #2 came around a few years later, we realized from our experience with #1 that we were able to keep track of what he was up to well enough that fewer plastic locks were necessary.

Some of those baby-proofing measures can be hazardous to the grownups in the house. If you keep a gate at the top of the stairs in your house, you must learn to resist the temptation to step over it - always open it. I almost fell down the stairs a couple of times and learned that the hard way. :oops:

SunDeck
03-16-2007, 07:38 PM
Man, I'm feeling irresponsible for not getting a toilet lock. Whatever that is. We did the outlet covers, the cabinet locks and a baby gate. We also moved anything toxic to the garage shelf, up out of reach.

If you have blinds, you might want to put hooks on the woodwork so that you can hang the strings out of reach.

You'll gradually move every picture, knick knack and other breakable to higher ground, so might as well get on that one right now.

That's about the extent of our baby proofing and neither of our kids got into any trouble.

oneupper
03-16-2007, 08:50 PM
Man, I'm feeling irresponsible for not getting a toilet lock. Whatever that is.

So I wasn't just me. I was wondering about the door knob covers also...:confused:

TeamCasey
03-16-2007, 09:31 PM
Man, I'm feeling irresponsible for not getting a toilet lock.

Is it so they don't flush things down there? I recall one of my cousins flushed a puppy down the toilet. He didn't go down thank goodness. His little head was sticking out of the hole and he was rescued. :)

George Anderson
03-16-2007, 09:35 PM
If you have an attached garage make sure you put up high all gasoline cans, bug spray etc. Alot of people only focus on the house and forget about the garage.

pedro
03-16-2007, 09:38 PM
Is it so they don't flush things down there? I recall one of my cousins flushed a puppy down the toilet. He didn't go down thank goodness. His little head was sticking out of the hole and he was rescued. :)


woy tried to flush a pillow down the toilet.

SunDeck
03-16-2007, 10:08 PM
So I wasn't just me. I was wondering about the door knob covers also...:confused:
Those are supposed to keep kids from opening doors, but my brother has them and I got so frustrated with them when I visited him that I vowed we'd never have them.

Red Leader
03-16-2007, 11:23 PM
Is it so they don't flush things down there?

Well, that's one reason, but the biggest reason is so a little one doesn't open the lid, try to peak in and fall in head first. Little ones that age are top heavy, and they don't have much strength. If they fall head first into a toilet and their feet come off the ground, chances are pretty good they're not going to be able to get themselves out, or even lift their heads out of the water. Sounds crazy, and it may not happen too often, but kids have drowned in toilets that way.

919191
03-17-2007, 01:20 AM
When my 5 year old was maybe 18 months or so, I heard him scream, but it sounded really distant. I looked around, and still heard him, but he was gone. I then realized he climbed into the dryer and closed the door and paniced. Luckily, it hadn't been used for a while and was cool. Put a oock on those doors.

RFS62
03-17-2007, 07:48 AM
woy tried to flush a pillow down the toilet.


Yeah, but that was a couple of weeks ago, right?

:p:


TC, you're right about the sharpie markers. My 2 year old grandaughter just marked up one of our dining room chairs.

SunDeck
03-17-2007, 10:39 AM
TC, you're right about the sharpie markers. My 2 year old grandaughter just marked up one of our dining room chairs.

And grandpa did what? Whatever it was, I'll bet it was different than what you'da done to one of your own kids.

SunDeck
03-17-2007, 10:40 AM
Well, that's one reason, but the biggest reason is so a little one doesn't open the lid, try to peak in and fall in head first. Little ones that age are top heavy, and they don't have much strength. If they fall head first into a toilet and their feet come off the ground, chances are pretty good they're not going to be able to get themselves out, or even lift their heads out of the water. Sounds crazy, and it may not happen too often, but kids have drowned in toilets that way.

Not with the toilets they sell nowadays. There's not enough water in there to wet a stamp, much less drown a kid.

redsfanfalcon
03-18-2007, 07:17 PM
I am the proud mom of a 9 mth old little girl who just learned how to crawl, and is finding out that she can explore now. So, my husband and I need to do the dreaded babyproofing in our house. This is our first child, so we haven't had to do this before. I know the basic things that need to be done, such as cabinet & drawer locks, outlet covers, door knob covers, toilet locks, etc. But, I was hoping that maybe some experienced parents may be able to offer some advice on things that they have come across that the average person may not think of. Also, if you have any recommendations of specific brands or types of locks, etc that work best, I would be very appreciative. A bit more info that may be useful....we have a single story house, so there are no stairs to deal with....we do not have a pool...no pets.

thanks!

Our son is 9 months old too...maybe we could do a prearranged Reds marriage? :)

creek14
03-18-2007, 07:35 PM
woy tried to flush a pillow down the toilet.

I love it when pedro and woy tattle on each other. :laugh: :thumbup:

I'm just glad my sister isn't a baseball fan. :help:

GAC
03-18-2007, 08:27 PM
Our kids are teens now, but when they were babies we had those doorway gates all over the place. As well as those locking devices on all lower cabinet doors. We even bought one of those interlocking playpens where you could add/takeway sections, depending on the size you wanted.

Barbwire along the top is also useful.

I always wondered why they haven't come up with one of those invisible fences for kids, like they have for pets. ;)

Funny story....

We had those doorway gates that had the adjustable tension bars on both the top and bottom. Our oldest boy was always trying to climb over them, yet failed. But after awhile we discovered he was somehow getting over them, and we couldn't figure out quite how he was doing it. Until we caught him one day. It seems he would lie on his back and use his feet to kick the bottom of the gate until it swung free, leaving the top still attached (like those pet entrances). He then could crawl right under it.

I had to laugh. It was rather ingenious. ;)

But it is almost impossible to FULLY baby-proof your home. You recognize possible hazards and do the best you can. I would recommend putting cleaning supplies, and other harmful products, in upper cabinets though and out of their reach.

But the only sure-fire way to baby proof your home is by not having any. :mooner:

bucksfan
03-18-2007, 09:08 PM
Others have given very good and familiar advice. I think the most accurate, though, is Roy's comment that they will still find something you had not thought about in a million years!

The gates and doorknob covers worked well for us as far as limiting access. Had the cabinet locks too. We actually gave her one section of kitchen cabinets she could play in so she'd be content in there with mom.

None of this stuff is better than the actual supervision though. I wasn't what I'd call a paranoid dad, but I watched her pretty closely or made sure someone else was.

The plexiglass idea worked well for us too, Johnny. Our problem was that our tv/DVD player sits in an armoire that has to be open to use the contents. Well that pretty much opens those contents up for anything a kid wants to do to those contents. But I cut a sheet of plexiglass just the width to slide down the front of the unit, yet be retained by the front rim pieces. The remotes worked right thru it and we could hardly notice it. In fact I bet we left it up 6 months longer than we had to just because we forgot about it!

oneupper
03-19-2007, 06:22 AM
Our probelme was that our tv/DVD player sits in ...!

Reminded me of another issue: VCRs (if you still have one). My daughter loved to put her little hands in the VCR slot. There are locking covers for that, so we got one.

GAC
03-19-2007, 08:02 AM
And grandpa did what? Whatever it was, I'll bet it was different than what you'da done to one of your own kids.

I've had my kids mark up each other with markers.

And out the phone up and away from their reach. My oldest boy, from age 2 to around 5, had a fixation with 911. I'm upstairs taking a shower one day and when I get out I see red lights outside the front of the house. So I run downstairs with a towel wrapped around me and see several fireman and an ambulance at my front door.

Needless to say I couldn't find my son who was in hiding. ;)

Roy Tucker
03-19-2007, 08:11 AM
Reminded me of another issue: VCRs (if you still have one). My daughter loved to put her little hands in the VCR slot. There are locking covers for that, so we got one.

My son put a PB&J sandwich in the VCR slot whereupon the VCR happily ingested it.

That was also the last act of it's VCR life. Also nearly the last act of my son's life.

GAC
03-19-2007, 08:21 AM
My son put a PB&J sandwich in the VCR slot whereupon the VCR happily ingested it.

That was also the last act of it's VCR life. Also nearly the last act of my son's life.

Don't get me started on VCRs :lol:

No one could tear apart, repair, and put a VCR back together faster then I. Thanks to the kids. And some of the crap I found stuffed in there simply amazed me. I'd turn around and look at a kid and say "How in the $$#@! did you get that to fit in there?"

MrsHammer
03-19-2007, 10:06 AM
Our son is 9 months old too...maybe we could do a prearranged Reds marriage? :)



Hehe...my husband says she can't even date until she's 30. :laugh:

Thanks for the great tips, everyone. There were a few things mentioned that I had not thought of. Now, I feel a little better prepared to go out and make some purchases.

zombielady
03-19-2007, 10:55 AM
Put your cleaning products and poisons and stuff on a closet shelf, or high cabinet. Cover your plugs, and put anything breakable that you care about away. And keep the bathroom door closed at all times. You'd be surprised at what a toddler can flush... keys... credit cards... the checkbook! Other than that... Keep a close eye! Because childproof cabinet locks are a laugh! The only person who will not be able to get into them is you! Your kid'll be able to figure out how to bypass any childproofing before you are even finished installing it!

15fan
03-19-2007, 12:06 PM
not so much babyproofing, but for the imminent toddler-proofing...

we had a lock on our front door that was one of those levers that you flip (from the inside) to unlock the door. i had to change the lock to a key lock on both sides because the kiddo got terribly close one time to flipping the lock & opening the door. we also put chain locks on each exterior door (as well as the door to the basement) as a backup precaution.

we've been fortunate in that our kid has always had a pretty good sense that there were things around the house that were ok for her to touch / play with / do, and others that were most definitely not ok for her.

Hollcat
03-19-2007, 12:29 PM
Anytime you think you are stepping away from something (a hot curling iron for instance) for just a moment, baby proof the area first. You never know when a phone call or doorbell ring will take you away longer than you think and you will forget about what you were stepping away from. We had to endure 45 minutes of screaming in pain from a curling iron burn knowing how bad a burn hurts, especially to a 18-month old just because we overlooked something. After that we had to bandage his hand for two weeks until it healed.
Also make sure to watch for kitchen knives that may have been left laying on a counter or near the sink, my 4 year old son used one to open a bag of chips not to long ago. Luckily he didn't have to spend time on the DL for that one but it would be so easy for a little one to hurt themselves in that manner.

Door knob covers are great. My 4 year old still can't figure them out.

gonelong
03-19-2007, 12:50 PM
Door knob covers are great. My 4 year old still can't figure them out.

I think my boy was about 2 years old when he began opening up the door to let visitors out of the house because they couldn't figure out the door knob covers. :bang:

They were the kind you had to squeeze the knob on both sides or they'd just spin. He figured out that if he hung on them it would contact the knob and open the door.

We eventually just took them off.

GL

SunDeck
03-19-2007, 01:00 PM
Anytime you think you are stepping away from something (a hot curling iron for instance) for just a moment, baby proof the area first.

That's about the most perfect advice there could be. Being mindful of the fact that you have a little kid helps you to keep things safe. You will start noticing all kinds of things, many of which are very subtle. Turning the handle on the frying pan in towards the wall, moving an enticing glass object at grandma's house well out of temptation's range, etc.

redhawkfish
03-19-2007, 06:10 PM
I have four daughters ranging in age from 9-15. Every one has covered the basics, but we got rid of our coffee table after our first constantly would hit her head when she got mobile. Kitchen islands are also a pain with their sharp corners with toddlers. Good luck and enjoy it. I constantly hoped for them to get bigger, but now miss the "early" years!

SunDeck
03-19-2007, 07:20 PM
I have four daughters ranging in age from 9-15. Every one has covered the basics, but we got rid of our coffee table after our first constantly would hit her head when she got mobile. Kitchen islands are also a pain with their sharp corners with toddlers. Good luck and enjoy it. I constantly hoped for them to get bigger, but now miss the "early" years!

We had some friends who had a son at about the same time we did. They were nuts with the babyproofing. There was plexiglass and padding everywhere; the coffee table looked like a pool table.

They also wanted to show us the birth video- which is why I say "we had some friends..."

creek14
03-20-2007, 04:21 AM
Anytime you think you are stepping away from something (a hot curling iron for instance) for just a moment, baby proof the area first. You never know when a phone call or doorbell ring will take you away longer than you think and you will forget about what you were stepping away from. We had to endure 45 minutes of screaming in pain from a curling iron burn knowing how bad a burn hurts, especially to a 18-month old just because we overlooked something. After that we had to bandage his hand for two weeks until it healed.
Also make sure to watch for kitchen knives that may have been left laying on a counter or near the sink, my 4 year old son used one to open a bag of chips not to long ago. Luckily he didn't have to spend time on the DL for that one but it would be so easy for a little one to hurt themselves in that manner.

Door knob covers are great. My 4 year old still can't figure them out.
This is true, you can baby proof everything and still have a problem. Once when creek jr was about 2.5, mr creek was getting ready to read jr a bed time story. Dad went into jr's room with a cup of hot tea, he set it on the dresser and turned to go get something. I was walking in the room. In just that second, jr grabbed the HOT tea and tried to take a drink (it was a like a slow motion movie as we both tried to grab him in time). We didn't make it and he spilled the tea all over the front of his sleeper (luckily none on his face/mouth). I grabbed him and got cold water on him as fast as I could to stop the burning. One 911 call, ambulance ride, and several hours in the ER later, we brought him home with 2nd degree burns on his chest.

What a nightmare. That was 8 years ago and it still makes me sick (and feel guilty).

GAC
03-20-2007, 08:04 AM
It's a wonder my kids are still alive or not permanently scarred thanks to Dad.

Rule #1: when walking your child in the stroller, ALWAYS strap them in. I didn't once and hit an uneven sidewalk. Dumped 1yr old Aaron right out and on his face on the pavement. Try hiding that from the wife. Boy did I catch hell!

Rule #2: when grocery shopping, always strap the kid into the shopping cart seat. Same kid - same results.

Roy Tucker
03-20-2007, 08:45 AM
It's a wonder my kids are still alive or not permanently scarred thanks to Dad.



I am reminded of one time when I was pushing one of our kids on a swing when they were pretty little. Like maybe 2.

I wasn't paying total attention to what I was doing (some other child was hollering at me for a peanut butter and banana sammich or something) and got to pushing the swing a little hard.

Next thing I know, I've made one push extra hard. At the apex of the swing, child and swing seat separate. She sails through the air unencumbered several feet above the ground. Her feet go completely over her head and her small child body does a nice inverted loop. I can still see it to this day, sunlight in her hair, pink shoelaces pointing up, and the look on her face (dad? is this right?). Her feet go *up* and over her head and she returns to a sitting position as the loop gracefully completes. I can still see it to this day, all in slow motion.

She lands on her diaper padded butt with a great whomp. She gives me that look like "I'm either going to cry or laugh, I haven't made up my mind which". Thinking fast, I say "wasn't that fun sweetie" and pick her up with a "wheeee". She starts uncertainly laughing like "OK bub, I'll go along with this but I'm not totally sold".

My wife must have seen a flash of child out of the corner of her eye. She pokes her head out the back door and hollers "everything OK?".

I return "everything's fine honey, don't worry".

It's a miracle all my children survived.

GAC
03-20-2007, 08:59 AM
Rule #3: Child walkers

http://keralanext.tolshop.com/v1/product_images/sha13_large.jpg

Are to be used only on the first floor. My wife had one of our kids with her up on the second floor of our old apartment. We had a gate over the stair entrance, but somehow my wife didn't re-fasten it when she went upstairs with the kid. She got distracted (I think doing laundry), and the kid is at the top of the stairs in this walker. I fortunately happened to look up and see him and Neon Deion couldn't move so fast as I did at that moment.

It was now my turn to give the wife the dickens. ;)

I didn't like the walkers because it just mobilized these little house wreckers. They were flying all over the place, and getting into just about anything.

Anyone from the older generation remember those popcorn popper thingys that had a handle and when the kid pushed it around it had the balls inside that popped? It made some noise.

My Mom told me that I wore 3-4 of those things out. She loved them because as long as she could here those balls poppin' she knew I was alright. But she knew if it stopped she had to go find me because I was probably into something. ;)

GAC
03-20-2007, 09:03 AM
Anyone ever use one of those walking harnesses, like a dog walker, on their kids? We didn't. I hated them, and hated seeing people use them on their kids. Did you also take them outside and tie them to a tree in the backyard? ;)

http://www.cartoonstock.com/lowres/jca0023l.jpg

SunDeck
03-20-2007, 09:08 AM
I never used one. Just didn't seem right. The only place I would ever have been tempted has been at the Children's museum in Indy, where my boy runs wild.

We dress them in bright colors and I put a note in his shoe with my cell phone number on it. The notes have gone unused so far, probably because the bright colors work so well.

Red Leader
03-20-2007, 09:12 AM
Almost all of those child walkers are now required to have a base wider than any doorway entrance so kids can't go from room to room in them. So anything new you buy should be safe. Not saying you shouldn't keep your eyes on your kid when they are in one, but you shouldn't have to worry about them going from room to room or down the stairs. Unless you have extra wide stairways like we do. :bang:

vaticanplum
03-20-2007, 09:13 AM
Anyone ever use one of those walking harnesses, like a dog walker, on their kids? We didn't. I hated them, and hated seeing people use them on their kids. Did you also take them outside and tie them to a tree in the backyard? ;)

Actually, when my gramma was a kid growing up in New Richmond, they used to tie all the little kids to the porch when it flooded (including the flood of '37, but much more often than just that) so they could play outside but wouldn't drown. Probably not a fool-proof method, but in this case it worked. Of course, my gramma's nuts, albeit in a very charming way.

My mother often threatened to put me on a leash. She never did it, but looking back, I can see where she was coming from. I was extremely hyperactive as a child, into everything and in twelve places at once. If I had to raise me, I think I would have put myself up for adoption before age 5.

SunDeck
03-20-2007, 09:24 AM
Almost all of those child walkers are now required to have a base wider than any doorway entrance so kids can't go from room to room in them. So anything new you buy should be safe.

That's the trouble these days- how will kids ever learn to be safe without there is a little bit of true, limb threatening danger in their toys? It's all just wrap your kid in rubber and rounded edges anymore; we're creating a generation of softies and kids too dumb to not stick their fingers where they don't belong.

Roy Tucker
03-20-2007, 09:34 AM
Something else to remember. Not everyone's house is kid-proofed. Take extra care when your child is at someone else's home.

When my son was little, we were out looking at new homes.

I had given my car keys for him to play with and turned him loose. You'd think it would be hard for kids to get into trouble in a completely empty house, eh? We're talking to the realtor when I notice Zach sticking a key into a wall plug. Zot!!!

We found out where the breaker box was for that home. Also, that the soot from a electrical flash won't wipe off walls. We passed on the house. That key is still to this day a little bent.

Red Leader
03-20-2007, 09:48 AM
That's the trouble these days- how will kids ever learn to be safe without there is a little bit of true, limb threatening danger in their toys? It's all just wrap your kid in rubber and rounded edges anymore; we're creating a generation of softies and kids too dumb to not stick their fingers where they don't belong.

Yeah, why do people constantly baby their babies? :dunno:

;)

Roy Tucker
03-20-2007, 09:53 AM
Yeah, why do people constantly baby their babies? :dunno:

;)

Or as I often say to my kids, "children, quit acting like children".

GAC
03-21-2007, 08:41 AM
It's good for kids to grow up learning about skinned knees, cuts, and bumps on the head. When I think of all the stuff we three boys use to do growing up it's a wonder none of us were maimed for life.

We use to love to go around to new house builds and play on the dirt mounds, build forts, and then have dirt clod fights. And one of us would usually get nailed in the head and run home screaming to rat on the other two. And that is when the other two had to get their stories straight.

And think of all the different types of playground equipment we use to play on that now, all of a sudden is deemed unsafe. I go to playgrounds anymore, and besides swings, there isn't much there. Everything has to be so educational these days. And it was back then to..... I learned that if you fell off the monkey bars or tried to jump off the merry go round when it was going to fast, you're probably gonna scrape something up. That's what Bactine and bandaids were for. ;)

Yachtzee
03-21-2007, 09:17 PM
Rule #3: Child walkers

http://keralanext.tolshop.com/v1/product_images/sha13_large.jpg

Are to be used only on the first floor. My wife had one of our kids with her up on the second floor of our old apartment. We had a gate over the stair entrance, but somehow my wife didn't re-fasten it when she went upstairs with the kid. She got distracted (I think doing laundry), and the kid is at the top of the stairs in this walker. I fortunately happened to look up and see him and Neon Deion couldn't move so fast as I did at that moment.

It was now my turn to give the wife the dickens. ;)

I didn't like the walkers because it just mobilized these little house wreckers. They were flying all over the place, and getting into just about anything.

Anyone from the older generation remember those popcorn popper thingys that had a handle and when the kid pushed it around it had the balls inside that popped? It made some noise.

My Mom told me that I wore 3-4 of those things out. She loved them because as long as she could here those balls poppin' she knew I was alright. But she knew if it stopped she had to go find me because I was probably into something. ;)

I didn't realize they still made those things. I remember our family doctor advised us against the walkers because kids have a tendency to crash them into things and the last thing you want is for your pride and joy to crash it into the entertainment center and end up with a TV on his or her head.

zombielady
03-22-2007, 11:00 AM
That's the trouble these days- how will kids ever learn to be safe without there is a little bit of true, limb threatening danger in their toys? It's all just wrap your kid in rubber and rounded edges anymore; we're creating a generation of softies and kids too dumb to not stick their fingers where they don't belong.

I agree, that's why I said keep a close eye and move what you don't want broken!

I mean what's childhood without a few trips to the ER. Sheesh, I was on a first name basis with all of the ER docs and nurses by the time I was 4! 'Course I was a daredevil in those days.... no amount of childproofing coulda stopped me.

Also.. the chicken pox vaccine! :bang: I had chicken pox, it sucked, but it wasn't life altering and traumatic!

macro
06-19-2007, 12:49 PM
We've used the door handle covers and they're still effective on our soon-to-be-four-year-old.

Is there anything similar for storm door handles? We don't like to keep the main doors closed all the time, especially during summer when we're in-and-out a lot, but he knows how to unlock the storm doors and make his way out. The only solution I can think of is to install a hook lock near the top of the door. Has anyone come up with anything better?