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GAC
03-18-2007, 10:48 AM
My daughter got her driver's permit yesterday. ;)

She keeps reminding me to put on my seatbelt; but I tell her that is not prudent in case I need to ditch her and jump clear. :mooner:

But I've discovered I'm turning into my Dad when it comes to teaching my kids driving. I'm very thorough, and also a defensive driver. I don't trust any of YOU when I'm on the road.

She is actually doing pretty darn good though.

To be continued.....

jmcclain19
03-18-2007, 12:41 PM
Fantastic - another woman driver out on the road :p:

http://s133702574.onlinehome.us/pictures/blog/femaledrivers.jpg

http://www.funtoosh.com/f_images/w_drive_10.jpg

http://homepage.mac.com/dorlando/.Pictures/AMG_Blog_Photos/not_woman_drivers.jpg

GAC
03-18-2007, 09:33 PM
Funny stuff! :lol:

I don't like driving in a vehicle with my wife one bit. Not only does she speed, but I found out why I have to replace my brakes so often. She flies up to intersections/stop signs, and then almost slams the brakes. There are hand prints in the passenger side dash from me clutching it.

RedsBaron
03-19-2007, 07:31 AM
My 16 year old son, just a few days after that all important birthday, got his driver's license last Friday. My car insurance just went up a few thousand dollars a year. I'm sure the rise in my blood pressure exceeded the rise in my insurance costs.

Roy Tucker
03-19-2007, 08:28 AM
Must be the time of year. My 16 year old daughter is taking her driving test on Thursday. She has had her temps for about 6 months now and she is a pretty decent driver (for 16, that is). She should pass easily.

This is my second teenager on my insurance bill. Ages 16 and 17 are pretty pricey. Once they turn 18, keep up their grades, have no accidents or tickets, the rates start to decline a bit.

GAC
03-19-2007, 08:55 AM
My 18 year old son is very apprehensive about getting his driver's license. When he was 16 he said he wanted to wait a year, and he got no argument from me. He then spent the last year, while he was 17, recovering from two surgeries, so he wasn't able to get his license. He turned 18 last month and I told him the other day he needs to study the book to get his permit. I don't understand the boy. His grandparents gave him a really nice (and very clean) '98 Merc Sable last year when they went out and bought a new car, and it's basically sitting in the driveway. I drive it now and then just so it gets driven.

HumnHilghtFreel
03-19-2007, 08:12 PM
My 18 year old son is very apprehensive about getting his driver's license. When he was 16 he said he wanted to wait a year, and he got no argument from me. He then spent the last year, while he was 17, recovering from two surgeries, so he wasn't able to get his license. He turned 18 last month and I told him the other day he needs to study the book to get his permit. I don't understand the boy. His grandparents gave him a really nice (and very clean) '98 Merc Sable last year when they went out and bought a new car, and it's basically sitting in the driveway. I drive it now and then just so it gets driven.

I was sort of the same way. I was more scared of the responsibility than anything. I think I may have been one of the few teens who looked at it as a responsibility though:laugh:

GAC
03-19-2007, 09:19 PM
I was sort of the same way. I was more scared of the responsibility than anything. I think I may have been one of the few teens who looked at it as a responsibility though:laugh:

I think you hit it.... scared of the responsibility. My son doesn't like to involve himself in any behavior that involves risk. And he has seen many local teens here locally, who have been in some pretty bad accidents, and some have lost their lives. That bothers him.

I had a "heart to heart" talk with him tonight, and he's been studying the book.

Cyclone792
03-19-2007, 11:30 PM
My 16 year old son, just a few days after that all important birthday, got his driver's license last Friday. My car insurance just went up a few thousand dollars a year. I'm sure the rise in my blood pressure exceeded the rise in my insurance costs.

Did your car insurance really go up that much after adding him? That seems a bit high, though I'm not sure what kind of car he's driving and whether or not you guys have full coverage or not.

When I turned 16 in 1998, I drove a four cylinder sedan, and my insurance was around $900 a year with primarily liability. Granted, I did have a good student discount already deducted from that total. I maintained a clean driving record through my 18th birthday, and I was able to drop my insurance to around $775 a year after turning 18.

Right now, at age 24 and before the magical age 25 insurance cost drop, I pay $570 a year for insurance on another four cylinder sedan, though that's with liability and comprehensive only instead of full coverage.

One thing I'd suggest you guys stressing with your kids is making sure they keep their grades up, not only for obvious educational reasons, but also due to the nice good student discount on their car insurance if your insurance company provides that incentive. I graduated college two years ago, and I'm still receiving my good student discount with my insurance. I was able to keep it all the way through college, and when I graduated my insurance company told me I could keep the discount until my 25th birthday since I put up a 3.0+ GPA during my final quarter in school before graduation.

cincinnati chili
03-20-2007, 08:19 AM
Right now, at age 24 and before the magical age 25 insurance cost drop, I pay $570 a year for insurance on another four cylinder sedan



Don't move to metro Boston. Someone you're age with a perfect driving record would be looking at three times that.

Roy Tucker
03-20-2007, 08:55 AM
When I turned 16 in 1998, I drove a four cylinder sedan, and my insurance was around $900 a year with primarily liability. Granted, I did have a good student discount already deducted from that total. I maintained a clean driving record through my 18th birthday, and I was able to drop my insurance to around $775 a year after turning 18.


Those are about the same rates I saw when I added my son to our policy when he got his license at 16.

The sad thing was, that effectively doubled our insurance rates, i.e. my son and one car == my wife and I in 2 cars.

And like you mentioned, he kept his grades up, no tickets and no accidents (talking to other parents, he seemed in the minority here), and his rate was cut by about 40% at the age of 18.

One thing that we were a stickler for was he wasn't allowed to drive with friends in the car for 6 months after he got his license.

And we didn't just turn him loose the day he got his license. We pretty carefully increased the radius of where he could go and the traffic density he'd encounter. Too many people just hand the keys to their kids and say "good luck" and let them go wherever.

GAC
03-20-2007, 08:56 AM
Did your car insurance really go up that much after adding him? That seems a bit high, though I'm not sure what kind of car he's driving and whether or not you guys have full coverage or not.

Horses, minus the rig, are not cheap to insure in West Virginia. :mooner:

redsfan30
03-20-2007, 04:58 PM
Baron, if your premium went up as much as you say it did, you need to get ahold of your agent pronto. I see alot of teenaged drivers added to policies and there is no way it should go up that much unless as someone mentioned above, you've got him on a new sportscar or something like that.

SunDeck
03-20-2007, 05:47 PM
My dad taught me to drive like everyone out there was trying to kill me. It's a great technique.

There won't be any oil left when my kids are old enough to drive. They'll be asking me for the keys to the pod or something.

SunDeck
03-20-2007, 05:51 PM
His grandparents gave him a really nice (and very clean) '98 Merc Sable last year


And you think he doesn't want to drive because he's cautious? I guess there's an upside; they could have given him a white Buick Century...

Roy Tucker
03-20-2007, 06:03 PM
If she passes her test, my daughter will drive an immaculate 1993 Chevy Lumina.

It's got 32K miles on it and has been in a garage every day of its life. Driven by an aunt that just died and we inherited (God bless you Aunt Mary).

She averaged 2500 miles a year (church and grocery store were about it). I do that in 6 weeks.

SunDeck
03-20-2007, 06:15 PM
Roy Tucker is really Mike Brown.

KronoRed
03-20-2007, 07:09 PM
Roy Tucker is really Mike Brown.

Hey now!! don't go insulting Roy like that :devil:

SunDeck
03-20-2007, 07:20 PM
Hey now!! don't go insulting Roy like that :devil:

You're right. He couldn't be Mike Brown. Brown probably won't stop driving that Lumina for another five years.

GAC
03-20-2007, 08:59 PM
And you think he doesn't want to drive because he's cautious? I guess there's an upside; they could have given him a white Buick Century...

Nobody ever gave me a car. And this car was owned by old people. It is clean as a whistle. :mooner:

SunDeck
03-20-2007, 09:27 PM
Nobody ever gave me a car. And this car was owned by old people. It is clean as a whistle. :mooner:

Right, Dad.

Roy Tucker
03-21-2007, 09:42 AM
You're right. He couldn't be Mike Brown. Brown probably won't stop driving that Lumina for another five years.

Come back and talk to me when your kids turn 16 and you're trying to figure out how to add cars to the SunDeck fleet and pay for insurance while your kids are in college. We can have a real conversation then.

GAC
03-21-2007, 10:19 AM
My daughter got her first taste of night driving last night. I had to go pick her up at the high school due to science fair. She asked if she could drive home. I was somewhat apprehensive because not only was it night, but it was country driving with a lot of curvy, hilly roads. But I said OK because it's only about a 15 minute drive.

She was driving very cautiously, going about 30 mph most of the way, and it was a good thing because she came around a curve and there were two deer standing in the middle of the road. She came to a stop and I told her to flash her lights and honk her horn, and the deer took off. I then told her to creep slowly and keep a look out because more may be around. But she did good.

She also told me she hates driving with Mom. Mom is always yelling at her. :lol:

WebScorpion
03-22-2007, 09:58 AM
She also told me she hates driving with Mom. Mom is always yelling at her. :lol:

My daughter said the same thing when she was learning to drive. Her mom was constantly correcting her and screaming like their lives were at risk every moment while I sat back and tried to relax and only corrected major mistakes during the ride.

My daughter is seventeen now, has 3 speeding tickets, a suspended license, and bad grades. Not that I'm proud of any of those things, (though I'm still proud of her,) I just thought all the people that have real problem children might want to know they are not alone. ;)

GAC
03-22-2007, 10:08 AM
My daughter said the same thing when she was learning to drive. Her mom was constantly correcting her and screaming like their lives were at risk every moment while I sat back and tried to relax and only corrected major mistakes during the ride.

My daughter is seventeen now, has 3 speeding tickets, a suspended license, and bad grades. Not that I'm proud of any of those things, (though I'm still proud of her,) I just thought all the people that have real problem children might want to know they are not alone. ;)

My daughter loves school - I've had her checked for drugs too :mooner:

She's one of those kids that you loved to hate when you were in school.... solid grades, takes about every class available (and is good at it), volunteers for any and all committees, National Honor Society, sports, you name it.

Now as a Dad though, I am very proud of her. She starts her Junior year next year at JVS in Animal Management. She either wants to be a veterinarian or work somewhere in the field.

I have to sign her up for Driver's Ed; but she is also gonna have to take Dad's Ed when it comes to driving and maintenance of a car. :mooner:

SunDeck
03-22-2007, 10:11 AM
Come back and talk to me when your kids turn 16 and you're trying to figure out how to add cars to the SunDeck fleet and pay for insurance while your kids are in college. We can have a real conversation then.

I'm pretty sure the fleet will look a lot like this:

http://www.stlouisrickshaw.com/st_louis_rickshaw/DSCN1726-thumb.JPG

Roy Tucker
03-22-2007, 10:43 AM
Jen passed her driving test this AM. Took it at the Lebanon BMV.

While sitting there waiting while she was out taking the test, I listened to the lady taking phone calls. One person called to ask if that was where she took her boat pilot test. Yes, Lebanon is well-known as a seafaring port.

WebScorpion
03-22-2007, 12:12 PM
My daughter loves school - I've had her checked for drugs too :mooner:

She's one of those kids that you loved to hate when you were in school.... solid grades, takes about every class available (and is good at it), volunteers for any and all committees, National Honor Society, sports, you name it.



Sounds more like my second daughter. I have three daughters and they each seem to have received different parts of my persona. The first one has a thirst for life and couldn't care less about school. The second one has a thirst for knowledge and loves school, is the teacher's pet, etc. The third one apparently has a thirst for blood... YIKES! :eek:

GAC
03-22-2007, 08:01 PM
Sounds more like my second daughter. I have three daughters and they each seem to have received different parts of my persona. The first one has a thirst for life and couldn't care less about school. The second one has a thirst for knowledge and loves school, is the teacher's pet, etc. The third one apparently has a thirst for blood... YIKES! :eek:

My daughter is the middle child and "sandwiched" between two boys. I'm still trying to figure the two buys out. If it doesn't come with a joy stick that says Nintendo or Wii they want nothing to do with it. I sometimes feel like Jed Clampett trying to talk with Jethro.

paintmered
03-22-2007, 09:37 PM
Jen passed her driving test this AM. Took it at the Lebanon BMV.

While sitting there waiting while she was out taking the test, I listened to the lady taking phone calls. One person called to ask if that was where she took her boat pilot test. Yes, Lebanon is well-known as a seafaring port.

You take that one online. :)

WebScorpion
03-23-2007, 08:35 PM
My daughter is the middle child and "sandwiched" between two boys. I'm still trying to figure the two buys out. If it doesn't come with a joy stick that says Nintendo or Wii they want nothing to do with it. I sometimes feel like Jed Clampett trying to talk with Jethro.

That's because girls learn to communicate between the ages 1 and 2, but boys learn to communicate sometime in their 40's...if they're REEALLY smart. ;)

GAC
03-24-2007, 09:53 AM
That's because girls learn to communicate between the ages 1 and 2, but boys learn to communicate sometime in their 40's...if they're REEALLY smart. ;)

I just gave my oldest boy what for last night. He graduates this year (keeping fingers crossed there), and I got an email from one of his teachers that he was failing her class. Failing is bad enough, but he goes to JVS, and it's the class (field) -Information Technology - that he wants to major in at college next year.

I got a little upset at the teacher because the grading period ends Monday, and she gets ahold on me on Friday?? And this is not the first time this has happened. And I am getting sick and tired of hearing teachers tell me that they can't get the kids to turn in their assignments. Who is running our schools? He has assignments as far back as January that, according to her, have never been turned in. So why did you wait till almost April, and the end of the grading period, to notify me the parent? Really pees me off!

So I gave my son the dickens. But he showed me where a bunch of those lessons were completed and stored on the school's H drive for the teacher to review. He's in a laptop program where the school provides the kids with a laptop. So I told him that he has this weekend to go through and get whatever ones on that drive completed and show it to me. Most of them are short assignments. I'm then going to have a nice talk with that teacher and a few others at that school come Monday.

But I told my son that he can probably kiss college goodbye, because no school is gonna admit him with grades that are C's and D's. And what bugs me is that this is one intelligent kid. He has no initiative, no drive to want to excel opr do things that don't interest him. We've had these talks over and over again, and it's somehow not registering. It's almost like talking to a family pet where the animal just sits and stares back at you.

It reminds my of that scene from Caddy Shack where Ted Knight says "Well, the world needs ditch diggers too!" He may very well be doing that. ;)

WebScorpion
03-26-2007, 12:50 PM
It never ceases to amaze me how kids with the same genetic mix can have such completely different personalities. Your boy sounds like my 17-year old daughter. She's a dreamer and she loves to live in the moment, she has no clue what the future will bring and I really don't think she cares...yet. I watch and despair as she slowly closes one door after another on her future. She wants to be this or that depending on the moment, but she has pretty much destroyed her chances of going to any reputable college by failing classes and barely passing others. She seems to just want to get out of school and 'live', but I fear she has no idea what 'living' is like. She is extremely intelligent and works hard when her heart is in the work. It drives me completely crazy, but when I really think about it, that's just the way she is...it's not the way I would live my life, but then again, it's not my life it is HERS. She's a beautiful, fun-loving girl and she is just a blast to be around...really, I think she's going to have a great adventure of a life and she's going to enjoy every moment of it. So I just try to give her advice and enjoy being part of her life. I'll always be there for her and I make sure she knows that. She's my first child...the one who taught me what true unquestioning love is...I really didn't know what love was until I looked into her helpless little eyes 17 long years ago. Now, I just try to enjoy the gift that God gave me and understand the lessons he's trying to teach me through her. Sorry, didn't mean to get preachy, but I thought it might help you cope with the difficulties of dealing with your child/adult/teen. Every life is different, but we all get our share of pearls...try to appreciate the beauty as it passes through your life. :thumbup:

GAC
03-27-2007, 09:24 AM
Oh there's no doubt that I unquestionable love him.

And then there are times I'd unquestionably love to smack him upside the head. :p:

He's just so affable, with little care in the world. And that's probably due to the fact that he, like so many kids today, have so much, and have always had everything provided for him. It's like he thinks it's never gonna end, and he's never going to have to go out into the world and fend/provide for himself.

He's a darn good kid, and I've never really had any trouble with him, nor has he ever gotten in any. He's not going to do anything that might involve risk.

He has Asperger's Syndrome, which falls in the autism classification. He's a very intelligent kid. He just has a motivational problem at doing anything he doesn't like, or if he thinks it's just not worth pursuing.

But he actually has a girlfriend now -well, at least she calls the house every night for the last 6 months. He's decided he needs to get his driving permit, so I'm taking him out this weekend to do so. I think seeing his younger sister getting hers, and the fact she is a step ahead of him, kinda bugs him.

Whatever it takes to motivate the boy! :lol: