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Reds Fanatic
03-23-2007, 09:55 PM
2 good games going on now.

Butler hanging in with Florida has a one point lead with about 7 minutes left.
Georgetown has a one point lead on Vanderbilt with 12 minutes left.

Reds Fanatic
03-23-2007, 10:34 PM
Georgetown advances on a game winning shot with 2.5 seconds left.

Matt700wlw
03-23-2007, 10:35 PM
Wow.

Georgetown is my champion...they almost ruined my weekend.

joshnky
03-23-2007, 11:01 PM
How is it that everyone except Packer and Nantz saw Green walk on the last shot. I understand they have a difficult angle but don't they have TVs or at least the ability to watch it on the big screen. I was pulling for Georgetown but that walk was blatant.

guttle11
03-23-2007, 11:03 PM
How is it that everyone except Packer and Nantz saw Green walk on the last shot. I understand they have a difficult angle but don't they have TVs or at least the ability to watch it on the big screen. I was pulling for Georgetown but that walk was blatant.

It's not a travel. It's only a travel if your pivot foot touches the ground again before you shoot, or if you drag it first. As long as you go up from the spot, it's ok. It's the same thing as being allowed two steps on a running layup.

joshnky
03-23-2007, 11:07 PM
It's not a travel. It's only a travel if your pivot foot touches the ground again before you shoot, or if you drag it first. As long as you go up from the spot, it's ok. It's the same thing as being allowed two steps on a running layup.

Sorry but you're wrong.



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In basketball, traveling is a violation of the rules that occurs when a player holding the ball illegally moves one or both of his feet. Most commonly, a player travels by illegally moving his pivot foot or taking too many steps without dribbling the ball.

Gumbel, Davis, and Kellogg were all unanimous on this one. Green established his pivot foot and then picked it up to pivot on the other foot.

guttle11
03-23-2007, 11:09 PM
Sorry but you're wrong.



Gumbel, Davis, and Kellogg were all unanimous on this one. Green established his pivot foot and then picked it up to pivot on the other foot.

But it's still your pivot foot until it touches another point on the ground.



3. After coming to a stop and establishing a pivot foot:
a. The pivot foot may be lifted, but not returned to the floor, before the ball is released on a pass or try for goal;

http://www.coachesclipboard.net/Footwork.html
(http://www.coachesclipboard.net/Footwork.html)

The only thing that can be viewed differently is if the referees felt Green jumped. He didn't, and they didn't think he did. You are allowed to step off your pivot foot, though. They were wrong.

joshnky
03-23-2007, 11:13 PM
But it's still your pivot foot until it touches another point on the ground.

I see what you're saying now. Did he take the shot off his left foot and not set his right foot down again?

guttle11
03-23-2007, 11:17 PM
I see what you're saying now. Did he take the shot off his left foot and not set his right foot down again?

99% sure that's what happened.

joshnky
03-23-2007, 11:18 PM
It sure looked like he travelled but you could be right. I'll have to check out the replay again.

Reds Fanatic
03-23-2007, 11:54 PM
USC with a great first half have a 9 point lead on North Carolina.

OnBaseMachine
03-24-2007, 12:46 AM
USC on their way to choking away a 16 point second half lead on UNC.

OnBaseMachine
03-24-2007, 01:08 AM
North Carolina knocks off SC. Huge chokejob there. Probably worse than that of Tennessee.

guttle11
03-24-2007, 01:09 AM
It's like they just gave up when Gibson got his 4th foul. They weren't getting back on defense, and they were lagging around on offense.

Hoosier Red
03-24-2007, 10:21 AM
That USC choke job was crucial to my weekend. My wife would have stayed ahead of me had they won.

VR
03-24-2007, 11:39 AM
Ernie Kent did his best to overcome an 18 point lead for his team with 5 minutes left, but his team persevered despite his best efforts to blow the game....only letting the Rebs get within 2.

Matt700wlw
03-24-2007, 02:09 PM
I had a perfect night....a heat pounding night, but perfect!

:clap:

Yay for me!

bucksfan
03-24-2007, 10:36 PM
I just checked in on this thread. That was a walk, not even debatable. My wife and I were both yelling at it right when it happened. But the fact is sometimes things are missed in the course of a game. This was a big one, however.

dabvu2498
03-26-2007, 09:35 AM
Green traveled.

Just to update you on the condition of the three officials from that game:


EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J.-- Two college basketball officials were treated and released at St. Joseph's Hospital Friday night, while a third remained in serious condition, following an NCAA Tournament game at Continental Airlines Arena.

The three were rushed to the hospital after, coincidentally, all three swallowed their whistles in the final seconds of Georgetown's thrilling 66-65 victory over Vanderbilt. Doctors were able to extract the whistles from two of the three. But a hospital spokesperson said the whistle might have to be surgically removed from the third.

"It's certainly quite a coincidence that all three managed to swallow their whistles at approximately the same point during the game," said the spokesperson. "From all accounts, the officials had had no difficulties using their whistles up to that point."

Georgetown's Jeff Green sank a bank shot with 2.5 seconds left to give the Hoyas the win.

A doctor who refused to give his name said he had seen the syndrome before, especially when much is at stake in late-season college basketball games.

"We call it Whistle Ingestion Syndrome, or WIS," the doctor said. "It's a wonder more basketball officials don't asphyxiate themselves from it."

Specialists who have studied the syndrome have been baffled by it and have thus far been unable to pinpoint the cause.

"I don't know, maybe it's a reflex action," said Dr. Paul Thorax, a specialist with the National Center for Hoops-Related Respiratory Illnesses (NCHRRI). "These games get so exciting sometimes, maybe these officials just hyperventilate and end up inhaling too hard.

"Whatever the cause, it's a syndrome that perhaps we should take up with the NCAA."

Another NCHRRI specialist added that officials were statistically most vulnerable to the syndrome when officiating games in which a lower-seeded team was close to pulling off an upset of a team from a major media market.