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Cyclone792
03-26-2007, 01:29 AM
Samuel Adams has around two dozen or so flavors of beer, and in recent years their popularity has started to grow. In fact, the amount of awards Samuel Adams has won worldwide for their beers is astonishing. As a proud beer drinker myself, I've gotten into the Samuel Adams collection a bit, and I was curious to see if any 'zoners have tried and liked or disliked any of the many Samuel Adams beers.

One very interesting tidbit on Samuel Adams is that around two-thirds of all their beer is brewed in Cincinnati in the Hudepohl-Schoenling brewery.

Here's their full beer list ...

Samuel Adams Boston Lager
Sam Adams Light


Samuel Adams Seasonal
Samuel Adams White Ale (available late Jan. to April)
Samuel Adams Double Bock (available late Jan. through March)
Samuel Adams Summer Ale (available April through Aug.)
Samuel Adams Octoberfest (available late Aug. through Oct.)
Samuel Adams Winter Lager (available Nov. through Jan.)
Samuel Adams Old Fezziweg Ale (available Nov. through Jan.)
Samuel Adams Cranberry Lambic (available Nov. through Jan.)
Samuel Adams Holiday Porter (available Nov. through Jan.)


Samuel Adams Brewmaster's Collection
Samuel Adams Boston Ale
Samuel Adams Cherry Wheat
Samuel Adams Cream Stout
Samuel Adams Hefeweizen
Samuel Adams Pale Ale
Samuel Adams Scotch Ale
Samuel Adams Black Lager
Samuel Adams Brown Ale
Samuel Adams Honey Porter


Samuel Adams Brewer Patriot Collection
Samuel Adams George Washington Porter
Samuel Adams Traditional Ginger Honey Ale
Sameul Adams James Madison Dark Wheat Ale
Samuel Adams 1790 Root Beer Brew


Samuel Adams Extreme Beers
Samuel Adams Utopias (limited release)
Samuel Adams Chocolate Bock (limited edition)
Samuel Adams Millennium (single brew of 3,000 bottles)
Samuel Adams Triple Bock (available year round)
Samuel Adams Imperial Pilsner (2005 harvest limited release)
Samuel Adams Hallertau 24 (550 gallons brewed w/limited availabilty at the Samuel Adams brewery in Boston)

I've never had quite a few of these beers just due to never seeing them. The Brewer Patriot Collection is a new release from last year that I've yet to see, and some states (including Ohio) won't even sell their Extreme Beers due to the high alcohol content.

IMO, Sam Adams Light is far-and-away the best "light" beer I've ever had, and it has a taste that's richer and fuller than most of the non-light beers I've had. Even if you despise light beer, I say give Sam Adams Light a shot. It's really that good.

Samuel Adams Octoberfest is outstanding, and I wish they brewed that year round. I may have to stock up on a large inventory of Octoberfest when it comes back out again in the fall.

Personally, I also love draft beer, and Samuel Adams offers the Boston Lager plus some of their seasonal beers on draft, including White Ale, Summer Ale, Octoberfest and Winter Lager. I've seen quite a few bars and restaurants include the Boston Lager on draft, and I like it quite a bit out of the keg. I've been trying to track some local places that have some of the seasonal brews on draft. Last week I ran into a bar in Mason that had White Ale on draft, and it was nothing short of outstanding. The Summer Ale seasonal should be out soon, and I'm definitely looking forward to trying that on draft as well.

One warning though: drink the Samuel Adams Cranberry Lambic at your own risk. It only took me one swig of a Cranberry Lambic to know that I never wanted to drink that beer again.

919191
03-26-2007, 09:38 AM
I agree with you on the Cranberry Lambic. A few years ago here a local bar had a supply of Triple Bock. It was served in smaller bottles and was 6 or 7 dollars a bottle I think. Holiday Porter and Double Bock are 2 of my all time favorites. The same bar that dad Triple Bock serves Double Bock on tap a few years back. It changed my life!

Right now I am drinking PBR. Yeah PBR. I don't have a drinking problem- I work 12 hour night shifts and this is evening in my world.

RFS62
03-26-2007, 09:47 AM
Haven't tried any of the variations, but I really like their Boston Lager.

Redhook
03-26-2007, 10:14 AM
IMO, Sam Adams Light is far-and-away the best "light" beer I've ever had, and it has a taste that's richer and fuller than most of the non-light beers I've had. Even if you despise light beer, I say give Sam Adams Light a shot. It's really that good.

Samuel Adams Octoberfest is outstanding, and I wish they brewed that year round. I may have to stock up on a large inventory of Octoberfest when it comes back out again in the fall.

Personally, I also love draft beer, and Samuel Adams offers the Boston Lager plus some of their seasonal beers on draft, including White Ale, Summer Ale, Octoberfest and Winter Lager. I've seen quite a few bars and restaurants include the Boston Lager on draft, and I like it quite a bit out of the keg. I've been trying to track some local places that have some of the seasonal brews on draft. Last week I ran into a bar in Mason that had White Ale on draft, and it was nothing short of outstanding. The Summer Ale seasonal should be out soon, and I'm definitely looking forward to trying that on draft as well.

Huge fan of Samuel Adams. It's my second favorite brewing company, behind Great Lakes, but I drink Sam a lot more because it's more affordable. I usually buy a 12-pack from Kroger's.

I've actually never had the Light version. I usually get the Lager. Sometimes I'll get the Boston Ale which is pretty good. I love the Octoberfest too. I kind of wish they offered that year round. The Winter Lager is also good.

A great place, locally, to get Sam Adams on draft is a place called Logo's. Logo's is off of Blue Ash road just south of Cross County Highway. It's a low-key sports bar. They serve huge pints of Sam on draft for $2.75. I think the pints there are 22 or 24 ounces. They're huge. It's a great deal. The only downside to Logo's, IMO, is that they still allow smoking in there. Not that big of a deal, but I hope it ends soon.

SunDeck
03-26-2007, 10:22 AM
Jim Koch, the owner of SA is actually from Cincinnati. His family has been in the brewing business for a long time and he changed careers to start SA. He had his beer brewed by contract at other breweries that had excess brewing capacity, but both big breweries and microbreweries used the contract brewing against SA, saying that it wasn't really a brewery. This is, of course, all BS because the beer was always brewed according to Koch's family recipe and under the strict control of qualified brewmasters, but competition for marketshare being what it is, you can't blame the other breweries for trying to use this against SA.
Anyway, so Koch needed a brewery of his own so he bought Hudepohl Schoenling, which were also a contract brewer at the time for SA.

westofyou
03-26-2007, 10:26 AM
Sam's is a good mass produced beer, and as SD said they have an interesting history, especially in the world of big brewers.

I've had probably 9 or 10 of the listed, most of it good, none too memorable.

We're spoiled out here when it comes to beer, way spoiled.

Redlegs23
03-26-2007, 10:40 AM
I've just recently gotten into Sam Adams, and I really enjoy the Boston Lager. Looking forward to the Octoberfest.

vaticanplum
03-26-2007, 10:45 AM
I had no idea that a lot of Sam Adams was brewed in Ohio. I have several Yankee-fan friends who refuse to drink it on the basis of it being a Boston beer. They will be very pleased to hear this.

westofyou
03-26-2007, 10:47 AM
They serve huge pints of Sam on draft for $2.75. I think the pints there are 22 or 24 ounces. They're huge.

Probably 20 oz Imperial Pints

United Kingdom, Commonwealth of Nations (Imperial)
1 pint = 20 fluid ounces = 568.26125 ml ≈ 568 ml
1 pint = 4 gills (this was the legal definition although in some areas a gill of milk or beer is referred to as a half-pint; elsewhere a gill was the ⅓ pint of milk given free to school children)

United States
1 pint (wet) = 16 fluid ounces = 2 cups ≈ 473 ml
1 pint (dry) = 550.6104713575 ml ≈ 551 ml
1 pint (metric) = 500 ml (informally)

Although the Scottish pint is equal to three Imperial pints, if you request a pint in a Scottish pub you will only be served the usual 20 ounces.

Chip R
03-26-2007, 10:55 AM
I love their Cherry Wheat beer.

Johnny Footstool
03-26-2007, 11:00 AM
Sam Light doesn't belong in the same category as other light beers. It's actually a craft brew with a nice malt and a bit of hop. You don't notice the "light"-ness. Good stuff.

Boston Lager is decent on tap. I can't stand drinking it out of the bottle, though -- too hoppy and bitter.

The brown ale is nothing spectacular. I'll drink Newcastle instead.

The black lager tastes pretty much like a light porter. Too much coffee flavor for my liking.

I used to love the cherry wheat back in the 90's, but it seems like they changed something about it in recent years, and now all I taste when I drink it is cough syrup.

I really appreciate what Sam Adams is trying to do -- introduce a variety of styles and flavors to the American mass market. If I was just starting to explore the world of beer, I'd be on board with everything they make.

Yachtzee
03-26-2007, 01:32 PM
My cousin is a brewer for Sam Adams in Cincinnati. Sometimes he hooks me up with a six-pack of something they're testing out. I got to try the hefeweizen before it hit the shelves. I like Sam Adams a lot. It's my go-to beer when I'm at a bar that doesn't have more interesting beers on tap. Not to say SA isn't interesting, but I can get that at the grocery store and I know what it tastes like. If I can try out something new on tap, I'll go for that.

SunDeck
03-26-2007, 02:07 PM
Sam's is a good mass produced beer...


"Mass producued" really doesn't mean a whole lot. Prior to the advances made by Budweiser, Pabst, Schlitz and Miller in the 1800's many beers were quite inconsistent. The thing that made these four beers so popular (aside from the fact that they were appealing to the growing taste of americans for a much lighter product) was the fact that a Bud bought in New Orleans tasted exactly the same as one bought in St. Louis. What they brought to the industry was rigid adherence to the principles of brewing, consistency and cleanliness. And they did it on a very large scale.

Koch understands that same principle- beer doesn't have to be brewed in some tiny brewery to be high quality; it just has to be brewed by people who care about what they are doing with the best ingredients.

Incidently, the breakthrough that Budweiser made in the US was in discovering how to create a light "bohemian" style brew, similar to that brewed in south central Europe at the time, but without using the same kinds of barley, which were nearly impossible to import in sufficient quantities. American six row barley was very difficult to brew a lighter beer with. The breakthrough was in also using rice malt and although this was a departure from traditional brewing the beers were nonetheless heralded back in old Europe, and in 1878 "Budvar" (Busch's first Bohemian Lager) won a gold medal at the Paris Exposition.

This info all comes from:
Ambitious Brew: The Story of American Beer
By Maureen Ogle

Great read on the american brewing industry.

WebScorpion
03-26-2007, 02:13 PM
I've tried their Winter Lager, Boston Ale, and Oktoberfest beers. I liked all three...I think I've only had the Boston Ale on draft. The cherry and cranberry things violate one of my primary rules of alcohol consumption. Fruits are for Wine and Grains are for Beer. :D I wouldn't say any of their beers are my favorites, but they are high on my list of bottled beers available nationwide. I travel quite a bit, and the locally brewed beers are usually my preference. When I'm home, I like a Molson or Moosehead if I'm in the mood for a lighter brew, but mostly I just drink Guinness. :beerme:

westofyou
03-26-2007, 02:14 PM
Great read on the american brewing industry.

Yep, read it too.

My beer snob mentality aligns a beer as mass produced if it finds its way to bottles, and definitely if I can buy it in an airport.

But that's me

SunDeck
03-26-2007, 02:24 PM
Yep, read it too.

My beer snob mentality aligns a beer as mass produced if it finds its way to bottles, and definitely if I can buy it in an airport.

But that's me

Right on.

I haven't been buying much in the last year now that I'm keeping myself supplied with ale. It makes a difference when you can keep it at the same temp and when you can trust the aging.

BuckeyeRed27
03-26-2007, 02:37 PM
I do like Sam Adams, but its not nearly as good as Samuel L. Jackson.

IT'LL GET YOU DRUNK!!!

westofyou
03-26-2007, 02:39 PM
Right on.

I haven't been buying much in the last year now that I'm keeping myself supplied with ale. It makes a difference when you can keep it at the same temp and when you can trust the aging.

Yes it does, I find that I like the local guys who have proved to me they are consistent, they like to play with the hops around here, but I've pinned my flag on the local guys IPA, it's hoppy and about 5.7%... pedro likes the bigger version, it's less bitter, bigger buzz 6.8 % Three of those can give you a headache and get the wife mad at your less then charming nature.

Yachtzee
03-26-2007, 06:07 PM
Right on.

I haven't been buying much in the last year now that I'm keeping myself supplied with ale. It makes a difference when you can keep it at the same temp and when you can trust the aging.

I don't have the space in my house at the moment for homebrewing (if I could ever get rid of some junk in the basement I would), but there's a place in the Cleveland area called The Brew Kettle that let's you brew your own. I called last week to set up an appointment, but they're booked through August already.

DoogMinAmo
03-26-2007, 07:27 PM
Sam Adams needs to open a microbrewery/ restaurant like Great Lakes has in Ohio City, in Cincinnati. Get Christian Moerlein to follow suit, and with some subsidized microbreweries along with the reopening of the Barrelhouse as a pub, and maybe even another Great Lakes; Cincinnati could have a great brewery district.

BoydsOfSummer
03-26-2007, 07:49 PM
I drink more Sammy than anything. I've had ten of those listed. I really like the Cherry Wheat and Hefewiezen. Old Fizziwig was pretty good. The light beer is outstanding for a light.

pedro
03-26-2007, 07:54 PM
I like Sam Adams quite a lot and if I still lived back east I'd probably drink more of it. As it is I don't drink it a whole lot b/c most of the beer I drink is on tap and there are just so many more choices out here. Portland is pretty much "Beer Heaven".

M2
03-26-2007, 08:14 PM
Sam Adams needs to open a microbrewery/ restaurant like Great Lakes has in Ohio City, in Cincinnati. Get Christian Moerlein to follow suit, and with some subsidized microbreweries along with the reopening of the Barrelhouse as a pub, and maybe even another Great Lakes; Cincinnati could have a great brewery district.

They used to have one in downtown Boston, but it didn't stick. The space was a bit cramped and supposedly the food was only so-so. It also didn't brew on premises, which was a bit of a problem.

I'm a huge Sammy fan. Boston Lager does everything my tastebuds want from a beer. I'm a big fan of microbrews, but I've rarely had one as good as Sammy Lager. It may be the Heinz Ketchup of beer.

Lambics can be hit and miss. Done right it should taste like a fruity champagne. Done wrong and it's like drinking a fruit roll-up. I haven't had the Cranberry Lambic, so I don't know where that one falls on the scale. If you're looking for a "beer" then you'll probably be put off by a lambic.

The Sammy Triple Bock is interesting. It tastes more like a brandy. In fact, I recommend using a snifter for it.

pedro
03-26-2007, 08:16 PM
They still have the brewpubs in the airport there in Boston?

ghettochild
03-26-2007, 08:19 PM
boston lager is great stuff, i don't like it as much as i like shiner bock though.

GAC
03-26-2007, 09:05 PM
I likethe Boston Lager and Sam Adams Light. I really haven't tried any of the rest.

Lately I've been drinking different variations of Great Lakes, as well as Christian Moerlien.

Anyone ever had Yuengling, which is out of Pennsylvania, and is the oldest beer brewery in the U.S.?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuengling

DoogMinAmo
03-26-2007, 09:12 PM
I likethe Boston Lager and Sam Adams Light. I really haven't tried any of the rest.

Lately I've been drinking different variations of Great Lakes, as well as Christian Moerlien.

Anyone ever had Yuengling, which is out of Pennsylvania, and is the oldest beer brewery in the U.S.?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuengling


I have a sixer in my fridge right now, it is one of my favorite beers.

Yachtzee
03-26-2007, 09:15 PM
Sam Adams needs to open a microbrewery/ restaurant like Great Lakes has in Ohio City, in Cincinnati. Get Christian Moerlein to follow suit, and with some subsidized microbreweries along with the reopening of the Barrelhouse as a pub, and maybe even another Great Lakes; Cincinnati could have a great brewery district.

I've heard rumors that Christian Moerlein wants to get brewery space in Cincinnati. The Hofbrauhaus in Newport is also a brewery. However, although the original intent was to have it be self sufficient, it has proven so popular that the brewery lacks the capacity to fill its own needs, so they have to import more from Germany. Before the riots in Over The Rhine a while back, another German brewery, I think it was Ayinger or Paulaner, was contemplating a beer hall/brewery in Cincinnati to compete with Hofbrauhaus.

Cincinnati has a couple of beer festivals in Oktoberfest and Bockfest. I hope the city can translate that into some more microbreweries. I think a good spot for one would be the to-this-date-mythical Banks project.

cincinnati chili
03-26-2007, 11:53 PM
I had no idea that a lot of Sam Adams was brewed in Ohio. I have several Yankee-fan friends who refuse to drink it on the basis of it being a Boston beer. They will be very pleased to hear this.

A couple years back, M2 and I toured a microbrewery in South Boston called Harpoon (http://www.harpoonbrewery.com/). They were more than happy, when pressed, to point out that Sammy is brewed in Cincinnati.

They claim that the Sam Adams angle was purely a marketing ploy.

It seems to have worked.

Redhook
03-27-2007, 12:14 AM
Sam Adams needs to open a microbrewery/ restaurant like Great Lakes has in Ohio City, in Cincinnati. Get Christian Moerlein to follow suit, and with some subsidized microbreweries along with the reopening of the Barrelhouse as a pub, and maybe even another Great Lakes; Cincinnati could have a great brewery district.

That'd be awesome if that happened. Cincinnati had something like that when Mainstreet Brewery was downtown and Watson Brother's in Blue Ash off of Pfeiffer. I only went to Mainstreet once, but I went to Watson's all the time. Watson's made it's own beer in the restaurant. I'm still upset it's shut down. Apparantly, from what I've heard, the owner's were skimming off the top and not paying bills. A damn shame. Because the location and the quality of the product was outstanding. I doubt it'll ever open again.

paintmered
03-27-2007, 12:30 AM
A couple years back, M2 and I toured a microbrewery in South Boston called Harpoon (http://www.harpoonbrewery.com/). They were more than happy, when pressed, to point out that Sammy is brewed in Cincinnati.

They claim that the Sam Adams angle was purely a marketing ploy.

It seems to have worked.

It's a widely held misconception from what I've seen. When I was in Boston for an interview a few months ago, I went to the pub with a few of the other interviewees. One of them (from Kansas) got a sammy and commented on how it was probably fresher considering the location. He was shocked to find out it wasn't brewed in Boston.

M2
03-27-2007, 12:43 AM
They still have the brewpubs in the airport there in Boston?

There's bars, but no one's brewing on the premises as far as I'm aware.

Nice to see Yuengling get a mention. My dad's family comes from northeast Pennsylvania, so I grew up with Yuengling in the fridge. After Schmidt's closed down, Yuengling was basically all that was left in terms of local beer in Philly. I once went on an impromptu beer expedition on the way from the Shenandoahs to New York. Wound up touring the Yuengling brewery in Pottsville and the Stroh's plant in Allentown (which was glorious, one of the most spectacular buildings I've ever seen). Good times.

paintmered, Sam Adams does have a brewery in Boston, but it only produces a small amount of the company's total product. They mostly come up with the initial recipes there and brew a few of the limited editions.

Cyclone792
03-27-2007, 01:00 AM
That'd be awesome if that happened. Cincinnati had something like that when Mainstreet Brewery was downtown and Watson Brother's in Blue Ash off of Pfeiffer. I only went to Mainstreet once, but I went to Watson's all the time. Watson's made it's own beer in the restaurant. I'm still upset it's shut down. Apparantly, from what I've heard, the owner's were skimming off the top and not paying bills. A damn shame. Because the location and the quality of the product was outstanding. I doubt it'll ever open again.

Watson Brother's was also a place that served minors, at least during the times I was there. Who knows if that was an aberration or the norm, and I'm not sure if they were ever caught.

Thanks for the heads up on Logo's. I had never heard of the place, but that's a great price for 20oz Sammy's on draft. Most of the places I've been to charge quite a bit more for a 20ish ounce Sammy on draft.

SunDeck
03-27-2007, 07:32 AM
I don't have the space in my house at the moment for homebrewing (if I could ever get rid of some junk in the basement I would), but there's a place in the Cleveland area called The Brew Kettle that let's you brew your own. I called last week to set up an appointment, but they're booked through August already.

That is SUCH a cool idea!
I'm moving into a new house in two weeks, so I have pretty much packed up all the supplies. It will take a while just to get things back in order so I probably won't have any brew until late April. Had I planned better, I would have had a batch bottled for the move.

:bang:

BoxingRed
03-27-2007, 07:59 AM
Nice to see Yuengling get a mention. My dad's family comes from northeast Pennsylvania, so I grew up with Yuengling in the fridge. After Schmidt's closed down, Yuengling was basically all that was left in terms of local beer in Philly. I once went on an impromptu beer expedition on the way from the Shenandoahs to New York. Wound up touring the Yuengling brewery in Pottsville and the Stroh's plant in Allentown (which was glorious, one of the most spectacular buildings I've ever seen). Good times.

Yuengling is actually quite common here in Columbia, South Carolina. Most places have it on tap and in bottles now. At my Publix, it is distributed by the Miller distributer. I have been told, since they expanded, that most of it is now brewed in Florida. Not sure if that is true.

As for Sammy, I have a 12 of the White Ale in my fridge now. It's very refreshing, especially since we have already reached summer-like temps here.
I also enjoy Octoberfest and Winter Lager. I always thought the Light was trying too hard, if that makes any sense.

Anyone been able to find the collection of homebrews they have been advertising? Apparently the alcohol content is too high on some of the beers to be sold in SC.

GAC
03-27-2007, 09:03 AM
Yuengling is actually quite common here in Columbia, South Carolina. Most places have it on tap and in bottles now. At my Publix, it is distributed by the Miller distributer. I have been told, since they expanded, that most of it is now brewed in Florida. Not sure if that is true.

It may no longer be true, since they are expanding their distribution areas, but isn't it mainly still only available in Pa. and certain southeastern states? I have yet to find it here in central Ohio. My buddy always brings some back whenever he's in Pa.

RFS62
03-27-2007, 10:00 AM
Yuengling is very popular and very available in South Florida. You see it on tap a lot. It's my second favorite, behind Sammy.

gonelong
03-27-2007, 10:46 AM
Yuengling is very popular and very available in South Florida. You see it on tap a lot. It's my second favorite, behind Sammy.

My neighbor's in-laws are from Pennsylvania and bring him "Yinzers" whenever they come out. I like quite a bit. I, however, have unconditional love for beer so I am not known for my discerning tastebuds. I don't care for Olympia (its the water!) and wheat beers. Everything else is in BIG trouble. :laugh:
:beerme:

I don't know of anywhere in Ohio where you can purchase it, though I haven't been to a jungle-jims ... I know they have all sorts of things there.

GL

Johnny Footstool
03-27-2007, 10:58 AM
One of them (from Kansas) got a sammy and commented on how it was probably fresher considering the location. He was shocked to find out it wasn't brewed in Boston.

I had a Budweiser in St. Louis once. It didn't taste any fresher.

westofyou
03-27-2007, 11:00 AM
I had a Budweiser in St. Louis once. It didn't taste any fresher.

Bud was the first big boy to have breweries around the country to insure of their beers freshness in outside markets.

Still tastes like water and gives me a chemical headache.

Yachtzee
03-27-2007, 12:19 PM
I've had plenty of Yuengling in my day. I like it better than Rolling Rock, which had an odd flavor I didn't like (didn't they supplement the barley malt with corn?). Yuengling's a good beer to drink if your other choices are Bud or Miller. It's also not too heavy, so it's good on a hot day. I'd rate it somewhere between a Sam Adams and the Major US breweries. Probably somewhere around a good Canadian lager.

As far as Bud or Miller goes, I have a friend who works at AB in Columbus. He never drinks Bud on draft unless it's from his own tap. It's his belief that Bud causes so many hangovers because bar owners don't clean out their tap lines often enough and it results in unpleasant microorganisms to grow in the lines. Thus he only drinks bottled Bud when out at the bars.

I remember when Great Lakes first started selling kegs to bars, they actually had people run routine inspections at various locations to ensure they were cleaning their lines properly. I don't know if they still do it, but when they first offered their beer on tap at the Jake, they were so concerned about quality in those days that they actually sent out people to the Jake to clean the lines themselves. The philosophy was that so many people would get their first exposure to Great Lakes at the Jake that they wanted to make sure it wasn't a bad one.

Cyclone792
03-27-2007, 01:23 PM
I don't know of anywhere in Ohio where you can purchase it, though I haven't been to a jungle-jims ... I know they have all sorts of things there.

I always completely forget about Jungle Jim's, probably because I never literally drive past it, but it's easily close enough to me to warrant a trip over there. If you're in the Cincy area, Party Source down in Bellevue, KY is another decent place to look for different beers, and being in Kentucky they may have a few beers that can't be found in Ohio.

I've been picking up most of my Sammy at Bigg's locations since they usually have around a half dozen varieties in six-packs as well as some of the 12-pack mixes.

Kroger's beer selection is an absolute disgrace.

BoxingRed
03-27-2007, 02:35 PM
As far as Bud or Miller goes, I have a friend who works at AB in Columbus. He never drinks Bud on draft unless it's from his own tap. It's his belief that Bud causes so many hangovers because bar owners don't clean out their tap lines often enough and it results in unpleasant microorganisms to grow in the lines. Thus he only drinks bottled Bud when out at the bars.


Great advice. I almost never drink tap beer. I wouldn't trust most bartenders to wash my car, much less keep taplines clean. The microscopic beasties that make you sick love to feed on the stuff left over in tap lines.

DoogMinAmo
03-27-2007, 02:37 PM
Yeungling can not be bought ANYWHERE in Ohio, including Jungle Jims, which is a travesty.

Roy Tucker
03-27-2007, 03:52 PM
I've been picking up most of my Sammy at Bigg's locations since they usually have around a half dozen varieties in six-packs as well as some of the 12-pack mixes.



Yep, Biggs usually has Sam Adams in various configurations plus a fairly decent selection.

Wild Oats has a good selection of beer as well. Plus, since my daughter works there, we get a 15% discount. :beerme:

If you go there (Deerfield store) and Jen is your cashier, say hi.

And let me be clear about one thing... I like beer.

pedro
03-27-2007, 04:05 PM
Great advice. I almost never drink tap beer. I wouldn't trust most bartenders to wash my car, much less keep taplines clean. The microscopic beasties that make you sick love to feed on the stuff left over in tap lines.

I almost never drank draft beer when I lived back east.

Almost no one drinks bottled beer out here. (at least in Bars/Pubs). Almost everywhere you go they serve in glass pints too, none of that plastic cup stuff.

westofyou
03-27-2007, 04:13 PM
The only bottle beer I drink is Bridgeport Ale or Sierra Nevada.

I like the feel of a pint and the copper hue.

RFS62
03-27-2007, 04:40 PM
Sam Adams in a frosted mug, baby.

westofyou
03-27-2007, 04:45 PM
Sam Adams in a frosted mug, baby.

Frosted Mugs are a no-no in the beer circuit, in fact most beers aren't as cold as you'd expect (from our past upbringing) and many a bartender has laughed at our request for a few more degrees south on the IPA.

With that mentioned I forwarn you warm beer haters... stay away from the offerings that are "Cask" or "Hand Pumped" Beers.

RFS62
03-27-2007, 04:49 PM
Frosted Mugs are a no-no in the beer circuit, in fact most beers aren't as cold as you'd expect (from our past upbringing) and many a bartender has laughed at our request for a few more degrees south on the IPA.



Wow, the "beer circuit".

I had no idea.

I guess my dream of turning pro is a little further removed than I'd originally thought.

:beerme:

deltachi8
03-27-2007, 05:01 PM
Still tastes like water and gives me a chemical headache.

I am no beer snob, but coul dnot agree more with this.

Speaking of Yuengling, their light is not half bad. In the Buffalo area, Labatt is the beer you see most of and the one I will tend to order if nothing else seems interesting.

919191
03-27-2007, 05:15 PM
There is nearby bar that also houses a small pizza joint nearby. Once while waiting for my pizza I sat at the bar and ordered a Harp. I love Harp. It was some kind of buck draft night or something on domestics, so due to the volume, I guess, they served it in a plastic cup. Disgraceful. Now I just get a domestic in a bottle to avoid that situation.

westofyou
03-27-2007, 05:16 PM
Wow, the "beer circuit".

I had no idea.

I guess my dream of turning pro is a little further removed than I'd originally thought.

:beerme:

The beer circuit is to be avoided, they are something out of Lord of the Rings.

pedro
03-27-2007, 05:20 PM
There is nearby bar that also houses a small pizza joint nearby. Once while waiting for my pizza I sat at the bar and ordered a Harp. I love Harp. It was some kind of buck draft night or something on domestics, so due to the volume, I guess, they served it in a plastic cup. Disgraceful. Now I just get a domestic in a bottle to avoid that situation.

I like Harp too, although they made fun of me for drinking it in Ireland.

Johnny Footstool
03-27-2007, 05:49 PM
I like Harp too, although they made fun of me for drinking it in Ireland.

I met some sales reps from our British office in a local bar. They made fun of me for drinking Newcastle.

They were drinking Bud and Corona.

pedro
03-27-2007, 05:57 PM
I met some sales reps from our British office in a local bar. They made fun of me for drinking Newcastle.

They were drinking Bud and Corona.


IIRC, Newcastle is made for the export market. Kind of like St Pauli Girl

Chip R
03-27-2007, 05:59 PM
I like Harp too, although they made fun of me for drinking it in Ireland.


Maybe it wasn't just cause you were drinking Harp. ;)

SunDeck
03-27-2007, 06:01 PM
I met some sales reps from our British office in a local bar. They made fun of me for drinking Newcastle.

They were drinking Bud and Corona.

I think anyone who makes fun of another person's beer choice deserves a slap.

That, or you probably could have made fun of their teeth.

pedro
03-27-2007, 06:05 PM
Maybe it wasn't just cause you were drinking Harp. ;)

actually they call it "harpish" after some local toilet cleaning product.

Johnny Footstool
03-27-2007, 06:09 PM
IIRC, Newcastle is made for the export market. Kind of like St Pauli Girl

They said it's what hobos drink in England. Then they took big gulps of clear-bottled skunk water (Corona) and proclaimed it "lovely."

It was all part of a painfully transparent and ultimately futile attempt to needle the "gun-totin', Bush-lovin' American" (me). If they only knew...

Of course, I've talked to other, nicer Brits who have said they enjoy Newcastle and Guinness.

pedro
03-27-2007, 06:11 PM
They said it's what hobos drink in England. Then they took big gulps of clear-bottled skunk water (Corona) and proclaimed it "lovely."

Of course, I've talked to other, nicer Brits who have said they enjoy Newcastle and Guinness.

Although Newcastele is clear bottled too I do like it.

For my mexican beer dollar I prefer Tecate or Dos Equis

Johnny Footstool
03-27-2007, 06:17 PM
IIRC, Newcastle is made for the export market. Kind of like St Pauli Girl

Wikipedia says it's available in England, but over half of the annual production gets shipped to the US, where it's the #1 imported beer.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newcastle_Brown_Ale

pedro
03-27-2007, 06:17 PM
Wikipedia says it's available in England, but over half of the annual production gets shipped to the US, where it's the #1 imported beer.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newcastle_Brown_Ale

I would have never guessed that.

westofyou
03-27-2007, 06:22 PM
I would have never guessed that.

In Newcastle, the beer is often called 'Dog' (or simply 'Broon'). The 'Dog' name comes from the euphemism "I'm going to walk the dog" or "I'm going to see a man about a dog" - meaning "I'm going to the pub"

Johnny Footstool
03-27-2007, 06:35 PM
I would have never guessed that.

It is wikipedia, so take it with a grain of salt.

pedro
03-27-2007, 06:37 PM
It is wikipedia, so take it with a grain of salt.

I find wikipedia to be generally as accurate as anything else. but duly noted.

TeamCasey
03-27-2007, 06:59 PM
Bud was the first big boy to have breweries around the country to insure of their beers freshness in outside markets.

Still tastes like water and gives me a chemical headache.


Budweiser gives me a headache too. Wasn't sure why.

pedro
03-27-2007, 07:07 PM
Budweiser gives me a headache too. Wasn't sure why.

I've heard that it's because of it being rice based but I don't know if that has any basis in fact. Maybe I should drink a bunch of Kirin to find out.

westofyou
03-27-2007, 07:13 PM
Budweiser gives me a headache too. Wasn't sure why.


Beer is sort of the "odd man out" in research, perhaps because it's long been considered a blue-collar drink and perhaps not a lot of research scientists drank the stuff anyway. The potential for a beer to produce a hangover might indeed have more to do with the preservatives and adjunct chemistry used to make the stuff than the alcohol content itself. Carbonation also speeds alcohol absorption, which fuels the ability of beer, champagne and drinks blended with carbonated mixers to produce hangovers. Complicating the issue further still, each individual has a different rate at which their body metabolizes congeners. This is why (perhaps) some people get a classic "Budweiser headache" (even after one beer), and others aren't affected at all by the swill.

http://www.anchoragepress.com/archives/document44e4.html

vaticanplum
03-27-2007, 07:50 PM
The beer circuit is to be avoided, they are something out of Lord of the Rings.

The great love of my life who hasn't the faintest clue he's the love of my life is a beer dude (which is just so appropriate). He's an actor but he takes care of the beer for two serious beer-snobbish bars in New York and crap, do those people take their beer seriously. And they all KNOW each other. I have been deeply in love with him since I was nineteen. And I'll tell you what, surrounding freaks notwithstanding, it's nice being perpetually, unrequitedly in love with a beer freak, because he takes such care in picking out a beer for you and he immediately knows your palate so intimately that when he gets SO excited about giving you a beer and looks deep into your eyes and says, "Try this, you are going to love these hops," it can easily be construed as "Look at the way I'm looking at you, I cannot even believe how much I adore you, let's go get a puppy" if you stuff some cotton in your ears.

I saved the bottle from the first beer he ever bought me, called Delirium tremons. It has pigs on it, it's very cute, and stands as a strong (8.5%!) testament to our love.

Anywho.

Second mistaken beer birthplace of the thread: I thought Yeungling was an upstate New York beer. I used to work up there in the summers and people drink it like crazy there; I guess I just assumed that's where it came from. It's semi-commonplace in New York City too -- not REALLY common, but not at all hard to find if you want it.

Yachtzee
03-27-2007, 07:53 PM
Although Newcastele is clear bottled too I do like it.

For my mexican beer dollar I prefer Tecate or Dos Equis

I like Negra Modelo myself.

As far as the English go, I noticed that my wife's blue collar cousins prefer Budweiser or Corona or Stella Artois. Unfortunate considering the wonderful pints available on tap at many English Pubs.

pedro
03-27-2007, 07:53 PM
The great love of my life who hasn't the faintest clue he's the love of my life is a beer dude (which is just so appropriate). He's an actor but he takes care of the beer for two serious beer-snobbish bars in New York and crap, do those people take their beer seriously. And they all KNOW each other. I have been deeply in love with him since I was nineteen. And I'll tell you what, surrounding freaks notwithstanding, it's nice being perpetually, unrequitedly in love with a beer freak, because he takes such care in picking out a beer for you and he immediately knows your palate so intimately that when he gets SO excited about giving you a beer and looks deep into your eyes and says, "Try this, you are going to love these hops," it can easily be construed as "Look at the way I'm looking at you, I cannot even believe how much I adore you, let's go get a puppy" if you stuff some cotton in your ears.

I saved the bottle from the first beer he ever bought me, called Delirium tremons. It has pigs on it, it's very cute, and stands as a strong (8.5%!) testament to our love.

Anywho.

Second mistaken beer birthplace of the thread: I thought Yeungling was an upstate New York beer. I used to work up there in the summers and people drink it like crazy there; I guess I just assumed that's where it came from. It's semi-commonplace in New York City too -- not REALLY common, but not at all hard to find if you want it.

"let's go get a puppy"

:laugh: :laugh:

pedro
03-27-2007, 07:58 PM
I like Negra Modelo myself.

As far as the English go, I noticed that my wife's blue collar cousins prefer Budweiser or Corona or Stella Artois. Unfortunate considering the wonderful pints available on tap at many English Pubs.

That's actually what I was thinking about as opposed to Dos Equis.

I used to work in a mexican restaurant and we drank quite a few of those after work.

GAC
03-27-2007, 08:10 PM
The beer circuit is to be avoided, they are something out of Lord of the Rings.


I partied with them guys once. All they ever did was go on and on about this hottie named Snow White.

http://www.neilmoffatt.co.uk/Images/Paintings/7Dwarfs.jpg

GAC
03-27-2007, 08:19 PM
When I lived in Spain quality beer was a hard thing to come by. They're hung up on their wine I guess (you can't drink the water). They had Cruz Campo and San Miquel. Down right nasty stuff. You wanted to put a gun to your head the next day. They had a couple American beers like Budweiser and Miller, but they used formaldehyde as a preservative in it. So if you died from a drinking binge they didn't have to do an autopsy to presevere you.

We did find Skol at numerous inns and taverns. Looking at our choices then, it was premium. :lol:

The best beer ever

http://40ouncebeer.com/extrapicts/generic.jpg


:beerme:



St Paulie Girl is another beer that I didn't care much for.

DoogMinAmo
03-27-2007, 10:45 PM
The great love of my life who hasn't the faintest clue he's the love of my life is a beer dude (which is just so appropriate). He's an actor but he takes care of the beer for two serious beer-snobbish bars in New York and crap, do those people take their beer seriously. And they all KNOW each other. I have been deeply in love with him since I was nineteen. And I'll tell you what, surrounding freaks notwithstanding, it's nice being perpetually, unrequitedly in love with a beer freak, because he takes such care in picking out a beer for you and he immediately knows your palate so intimately that when he gets SO excited about giving you a beer and looks deep into your eyes and says, "Try this, you are going to love these hops," it can easily be construed as "Look at the way I'm looking at you, I cannot even believe how much I adore you, let's go get a puppy" if you stuff some cotton in your ears.

I saved the bottle from the first beer he ever bought me, called Delirium tremons. It has pigs on it, it's very cute, and stands as a strong (8.5%!) testament to our love.

Anywho.

Second mistaken beer birthplace of the thread: I thought Yeungling was an upstate New York beer. I used to work up there in the summers and people drink it like crazy there; I guess I just assumed that's where it came from. It's semi-commonplace in New York City too -- not REALLY common, but not at all hard to find if you want it.

You would think someone would remember the first beer bottle that they saved from the love of their life was actually spelled Delirium Tremens. :mooner:

They sell the stuff at the Bier Markt here in Ohio City next to the Great Lakes Brewery, both are fun places to go and throw some down.

Why did I give up beer for lent again?

cincinnati chili
03-27-2007, 11:06 PM
I find wikipedia to be generally as accurate as anything else. but duly noted.


Sinbad disagrees with you (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17638311/). Wikipedia can be a great starting point for retrieving info. But more and more false entries are popping up there.

pedro
03-28-2007, 03:06 AM
Sinbad disagrees with you (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/17638311/). Wikipedia can be a great starting point for retrieving info. But more and more false entries are popping up there.


what about the voice of geddy lee
how did it get so high?
i wonder if he speaks like an ordinary guy?
(i know him and he does!)

and you're my fact-checkin' cuz

Ravenlord
03-28-2007, 05:49 AM
i guess i'm a huge minority...i find Sam Adams rather bland and weak. i was sorely disappointed with it off the draft and out of the bottle.

GAC
03-28-2007, 09:00 AM
i guess i'm a huge minority...i find Sam Adams rather bland and weak. i was sorely disappointed with it off the draft and out of the bottle.

I think they taste pretty good after the 12th one. :beerme:

nycredsfan
03-28-2007, 09:17 AM
The beer circuit is to be avoided, they are something out of Lord of the Rings.

Your description seems to be pretty accurate judging by the pictures in this article (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/28/dining/28pour.html?ref=dining?8dpc). And Beeradvocate.com is one of the best sites on the internet.

This article requires a login, so for those without, here is a picture from it:

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/03/28/dining/28beer600.1.jpg

M2
03-28-2007, 04:21 PM
i guess i'm a huge minority...i find Sam Adams rather bland and weak. i was sorely disappointed with it off the draft and out of the bottle.

Now that's a criticism I've never heard on Sammy. It's got about the most gusto you're ever going to get in a lager.

I'm taking a wild guess here, but you sound like a man who enjoys a pint of bitter. I'm a big Fuller's fan myself.

RFS, WOY, I noticed the mugs get frostier as you head south. Since most beers, at least the fuller bodied ones, come from northern climes, that's a big reason why they aren't served ice cold.

So, while I prefer a warmer beer and you can definitely taste more when it's not frosty, I fully understand where a cold one evokes a visceral thrill in hot climate. Heck, I used to pound the Mickey's when I lived in Virginia.

pedro
03-28-2007, 11:06 PM
This is one of my favorite beers. they're going to start bottling it next year.

Laurelwood Brewing Company
Free Range Red is a rich copper-colored ale with loads of fresh hop flavor. Medium in body the caramel sweetness blends wonderfully with the smooth hop flavor creating a balanced, super drinkable beer. This beer is brewed with 100% Organically-grown malts.

Awards
GOLD MEDAL World Beer Cup 2004

Comments from the Head Brewer:
Chad: "This beer is Laurelwood. Organic, hoppy but balanced, and super drinkable. Free Range Red is by far our most popular beer."

Alcohol Content: 5.9%
IBUs: 60
Original Gravity: 14 Plato
Terminal Gravity: 3.0 Plato
Malt: Organic 2-Row, Organic Crystal
Hops: Cascade

Cyclone792
03-28-2007, 11:27 PM
That sounds like a real good beer, pedro. I'm going to have to give a look around for it once it comes out in bottles.

Over the past few days, I made a point to stop at both Jungle Jim's and Party Source, and let me say that if anyone loves beer, those are definitely places that shouldn't disappoint you as far as overall selection. I can easily see myself walking out with at least a half dozen different beers every time I walk in one of those two places. Hopefully one of them will stock the beer pedro recommends when it comes out in bottles.

I did pick up a few of the different Sammy Adams varieties that I hadn't remembered trying in the past. I enjoyed their Honey Porter tonight.

Description: Introduced as a member of the Winter Classics Mix Pack in 2004, Samuel Adams® Holiday Porter with its rich malt complexity has become a favorite among our winter seasonal brews. In total, five varieties of malted barley are used in the brewing process including a variety of German malt called Carafa®. The Carafa® gives our Holiday Porter its smooth, roasted malt character. Add generous portions of imported hops to the mix and one has a brew that is both robust and high in drinkability.

Brewing: Samuel Adams® Holiday Porter is brewed using East Kent Goldings and Fuggles, traditional British ale hops, as well as the German Noble Hop Spalt Spalter. It is dry hopped using the Goldings to give an even more authentic British hop character in both aroma and flavor. A small portion of flaked oats are also added to the brew’s complex blend of malt flavors. The oats help round off any roughness from the highly roasted malts and add a touch of silkiness to the finish.

Characteristics: Deep, rich, and roasty malt balanced with Traditional English Ale Hops and a touch of noble hop.

Color: Deep ruby black
Original Gravity: 16 Plato
Alcohol: 5.8% ABV
Malt Type: Two Row Pale, Caramel 60, Munich 10, Carafa malt, and Flaked Oats
Hops: Fuggles, East Kent Goldings, and Spalt Spalter

vaticanplum
03-28-2007, 11:47 PM
I had a Sam Adams Boston Lager tonight. I checked the label which said that it was "brewed by the Boston Beer Company, Boston and Rochester, NY" and also mentioned visiting Sam Adams in Boston. Not a word of Ohio. I feel betrayed.

Chip R
03-28-2007, 11:59 PM
Several months ago, I went down to the Party Source and was looking at all the beers they had there. I spotted on called Babe Ruth Beer or Babe Ruth Ale or something like that. Next time I went down there they didn't have it. I looked on line for it but didn't find anything. I kind of wish I had bought a bottle of it now.

bucksfan
03-29-2007, 12:07 AM
Sam (Boston Lager) is one of my favorites also. It was probably the 1st beer beyond the Miller Lite/Budweiser/Natural Light college world that grabbed me and said "I'm better". I also dig the Light version, Old Fezziwig, Honey Porter and several of the others. But, especially now as the wamer weather encroaches, I tend to back off on the Sam and go for the lighter stuff a little more frequently. Dunno why, just seems like I should.

Yachtzee
03-29-2007, 12:27 AM
I had a Sam Adams Boston Lager tonight. I checked the label which said that it was "brewed by the Boston Beer Company, Boston and Rochester, NY" and also mentioned visiting Sam Adams in Boston. Not a word of Ohio. I feel betrayed.

Depends on where the beer came from. If you're drinking it in Cincinnati, I would find that odd. Up here in Cleveland the bottles always say "Boston, MA and Cincinnati, OH." It all depends on where that particular batch was brewed. On Budweiser labels, they have a code that tells you where that particular bottle of Bud was made.

pedro
03-29-2007, 12:32 AM
I just had two "C-Notes" from the New Old Lompoc brewery. they have a pub called "the hedge house" about 200 yards from my house. It's very hoppy but once you're hooked it's over.

http://www.newoldlompoc.com/hhhousehome.html

NoCalRed
03-29-2007, 01:34 AM
I just had two "C-Notes" from the New Old Lompoc brewery. they have a pub called "the hedge house" about 200 yards from my house. It's very hoppy but once you're hooked it's over.

http://www.newoldlompoc.com/hhhousehome.html

Sounds pretty good. Here I got one for ya from the Russian River Brewery http://www.russianriverbrewing.com/pages/beers/plinytheelder.html. Just had my growler filled aahh the hops.

Oh and as far as this quote
Portland is pretty much "Beer Heaven". if you change that to the Northwest then I'll agree. :beerme:

As far as Sam Adams I don't buy much mainstreem beer anymore, but the last sammy I had I believe had passed it's experation date and I haven't had the guts to try again.

pedro
03-29-2007, 01:40 AM
Sounds pretty good. Here I got one for ya from the Russian River Brewery http://www.russianriverbrewing.com/pages/beers/plinytheelder.html. Just had my growler filled aahh the hops.

Oh and as far as this quote if you change that to the Northwest then I'll agree. :beerme:

As far as Sam Adams I don't buy much mainstreem beer anymore, but the last sammy I had I believe had passed it's experation date and I haven't had the guts to try again.

Gotta love those growlers. :)

Ravenlord
03-29-2007, 06:01 AM
Now that's a criticism I've never heard on Sammy. It's got about the most gusto you're ever going to get in a lager.

I'm taking a wild guess here, but you sound like a man who enjoys a pint of bitter. I'm a big Fuller's fan myself.

in basic order:

Newcastle (brown ale)
Blue Moon (wheat ale)
Blue Moon Pumpkin Ale
Heineken Dark Lager
Sierra Nevada (pale ale)
Honey Brown (lager)
JW Dundee's Amber Stout
Jack's Pumpkin Ale
Molson Canadian (lager)
Heineken (lager)
Winter's Bourban Cask Ale (wheat ale)
Sierra Nievada Celebration Ale
PBR

of course, all other alcohols are at a loss when compared to celebratory mead.

pedro
03-29-2007, 05:55 PM
in basic order:

Newcastle (brown ale)
Blue Moon (wheat ale)
Blue Moon Pumpkin Ale
Heineken Dark Lager
Sierra Nevada (pale ale)
Honey Brown (lager)
JW Dundee's Amber Stout
Jack's Pumpkin Ale
Molson Canadian (lager)
Heineken (lager)
Winter's Bourban Cask Ale (wheat ale)
Sierra Nievada Celebration Ale
PBR

of course, all other alcohols are at a loss when compared to celebratory mead.

We got my B-I-L some mead when he married my sister. I thought it was disgusting.

Ravenlord
03-29-2007, 05:57 PM
We got my B-I-L some mead when he married my sister. I thought it was disgusting.

was it a rubber cork?

Matt700wlw
03-29-2007, 06:25 PM
I thought this was a football thread

pedro
03-29-2007, 08:10 PM
was it a rubber cork?

Long time ago. can't remember.

It was very sweet.

westofyou
03-29-2007, 08:49 PM
was it a rubber cork?

Yes it was

Ravenlord
03-29-2007, 09:08 PM
Yes it was

then it was "mead." the same way that Eric Milton is a Major League pitcher.

pedro
03-30-2007, 02:31 AM
then it was "mead." the same way that Eric Milton is a Major League pitcher.

what's the distinction?

Ravenlord
03-30-2007, 03:30 AM
what's the distinction?

can't really tell you, except i've never had good mead with a synthetic cork.

mead is sweet, so very wonderfully sweet. especially when served hot.

pedro
03-30-2007, 03:55 AM
can't really tell you, except i've never had good mead with a synthetic cork.

mead is sweet, so very wonderfully sweet. especially when served hot.

didn't try it hot. that makes it sound more appealing.

WebScorpion
03-30-2007, 11:06 AM
Oh and as far as this quote

Portland is pretty much "Beer Heaven".
if you change that to the Northwest then I'll agree. :beerme:



Of all the places I've ever been, I'd have to say Germany (when it was called 'West Germany') would be beer heaven. Of course, America seems to have adopted my favorite beer habit of the Germans...establishing 'local' breweries all over the country! My favorite thing when I was in Germany was to get whatever the local breweries beers were. Mmmm...beer. I'd say my favorite was a pilsner brewed by Licher which I got in a couple different places, but it was always clean, clear, and smooth. I had some Eisbock in Frankfurt that was deadly...I have no idea what the alcohol content was but two glasses made it almost impossible to stand up and I was weighing in around 225 at the time. My favorite beer of all time is from Holland though. It's called Brand and it comes in a ceramic bottle with a regular cap (not the ceramic/rubber flip-top cap like Grolsch) Dang, I'm getting thirsty! :beerme:

Ravenlord
03-30-2007, 02:50 PM
didn't try it hot. that makes it sound more appealing.

greatest drink ever coming in from the cold.

also, most people have their frige set low enough to suck the taste out of mead. 50*-70*F are optimal for 'cold' consumption.