PDA

View Full Version : Thoughts about Dice-K



KoryMac5
03-27-2007, 12:53 PM
After seeing the much hyped Diceman yesterday, I was hoping to get some thoughts from those of us who saw the game.

My thoughts: Good fastball nice location, nasty breaking stuff, must have 5 or 6 different pitches. I do think a lot of his breaking pitches were balls yesterday leading to the five walks and a high pitch count. I think fastball hitters will have some success against him if they can lay off the breaking stuff. Overall I think he will win a lot of games for the Sox if he can those breaking balls closer to the zone.

Johnny Footstool
03-27-2007, 01:27 PM
I've read that his fastball is pretty live -- the mystical "gyroball" that Pedro Martinez has been unknowingly hurling for years.

Joseph
03-27-2007, 01:27 PM
My first thought, and this is in no way a shot at you Kory, is that I really dislike the 'Dice-K' moniker, I'd prefer the journalists and E-SPiN would just spell it Daisuke. It's not hard to spell out at all.

As for his ability. He seems to be the real deal and I don't think the Red Sox will feel like they over paid ala the Yankees and Hideki Irabu a few years ago.

Redsland
03-27-2007, 01:43 PM
He looked good. Slow, deceptive motion. He nearly balks about three times per pitch. Good velocity. Late break.

OnBaseMachine
03-27-2007, 02:14 PM
He impressed the heck out of me. My projections for him go like this: 200 innings, 210 strikeouts, 1.20 WHIP, 3.15 ERA.

flyer85
03-27-2007, 02:25 PM
He pitches similarly as the other japanese starters that have came over. They will not give in and are willing to walk batters. They are anti-"pitch to contact".

Always Red
03-27-2007, 02:28 PM
I thought he looked great; I watched on MLB.com (ok, I was actually working, but did watch when the boss wasn't paying attention), and then watched again last night on FSN (my wife thinks I am crazy).

He was a little out of the strike zone yesterday, not wild (that would be Hansen), but not pinpoint. I think if he can locate those 4 or 5 different pitches of his in the strike zone, along with the 95 mph fastball, he's going to be very tough. He definitely knows what he is doing out there.

The most interesting thing is going to be how his body responds to the American game. There was a very nice write up in SI about this. In Japan, pitchers throw much more than American pitchers do. It's not unusual to have 200 pitch bullpen sessions, 300 foot tossing session to warm up, and to throw from the mound the day after starts, in Japan. Much less arm trouble there, also. BUT, they also use 6 man rotations, and there is no baseball on Mondays (not sure why?) so essentially, starting pitchers go once a week.

With as much mileage as his arm has on it, the Red Sox obtained an MRI. It was totally, absolutely pristine. No sign of any wear or tear. Some men are just meant to be pitchers, some are not, even if they have the right stuff (pun intended).;)

Bobby Valentine manages a team in Japan now, and he is convinced that MLB clubs handle pitching incorrectly, both in their conditioning and handling. This is directly opposed to the "there are only so many bullets in the arm (popularly attributed to Dr. Frank Jobe)" theory that's been around in the states since the mid-70's.

Previous Japanese pitchers who did well in Japan have faded quickly here in the US. It could be due to a number of things- deeper lineups here, more games, different training, or just bad luck.

blumj
03-27-2007, 02:28 PM
I've seen him several times this spring, and, being a Sox fan, I'm probably the least impartial observer you'll get an answer from here. From what I've seen, he was having something of an off day yesterday, his location on all his pitches has been better than that. Hitters still seem a bit baffled by him, that effectively wild thing he had working yesterday won't last too long once they get used to seeing him, but he has so many quality pitches to choose from that it's hard to see how he won't be at least fairly successful if he's healthy. I don't know how anyone could be worthy of the level of hype he's getting without even having thrown a pitch in the majors yet, but he sure does look like a quality, major league caliber, pitcher to me. And all the gyroball mystique nonsense is a lot of fun.

KoryMac5
03-27-2007, 02:34 PM
I thought he looked great; I watched on MLB.com (ok, I was actually working, but did watch when the boss wasn't paying attention), and then watched again last night on FSN (my wife thinks I am crazy).

He was a little out of the strike zone yesterday, not wild (that would be Hansen), but not pinpoint. I think if he can locate those 4 or 5 different pitches of his in the strike zone, along with the 95 mph fastball, he's going to be very tough. He definitely knows what he is doing out there.

The most interesting thing is going to be how his body responds to the American game. There was a very nice write up in SI about this. In Japan, pitchers throw much more than American pitchers do. It's not unusual to have 200 pitch bullpen sessions, 300 foot tossing session to warm up, and to throw from the mound the day after starts, in Japan. Much less arm trouble there, also. BUT, they also use 6 man rotations, and there is no baseball on Mondays (not sure why?) so essentially, starting pitchers go once a week.

With as much mileage as his arm has on it, the Red Sox obtained an MRI. It was totally, absolutely pristine. No sign of any wear or tear. Some men are just meant to be pitchers, some are not, even if they have the right stuff (pun intended).;)

Bobby Valentine manages a team in Japan now, and he is convinced that MLB clubs handle pitching incorrectly, both in their conditioning and handling. This is directly opposed to the "there are only so many bullets in the arm (popularly attributed to Dr. Frank Jobe)" theory that's been around in the states since the mid-70's.
Previous Japanese pitchers who did well in Japan have faded quickly here in the US. It could be due to a number of things- deeper lineups here, more games, different training, or just bad luck.

Sox are only going to have him throw 40 to 60 pitches next time out. I definitely don't think he will be used to that.

bucksfan2
03-27-2007, 02:39 PM
I think Dice-K will have success his first year in the bigs. Most japanese pitchers do. However I think in his second year he will face some troubles. When the league gets more accustomed to him he will struggle. I still want to see if he will bounce back from the struggles or kind of fade off like a Nomo.

jojo
03-27-2007, 02:50 PM
He's the perfect pitcher with no weaknesses.

Here's a summary of several scouting reports that I also posted in the game thread yesterday:

Matsuzaka has four plus pitches:

1. Four-seam fastball: 90-94 mph range/average movement/superb command (65)

2. 2-seam fastball: 89-91 mph range/excellent movement-sinks, and can cut to either corner (60/65)

3. Curve ball: 77-80 mph/devastating movement (70)

4. Changeup: deceptive speed AND movement (55/60)

Matsuzaka has plus velocity.

Matsuzaka understands how to pitch/set up hitters.

Matsuzaka has a rubber arm...

5DOLLAR-BLEACHERBUM
03-27-2007, 03:15 PM
Jim Rome said on his show today that Dice-k was the best story in baseball this year. See. Hamilton, Josh. Rome is a joke if you ask me, I will never get back the five minutes of his show I listened to because he was talking baseball. It was like listening to David Spade talk about bodybuilding.

jojo
03-27-2007, 03:28 PM
Jim Rome said on his show today that Dice-k was the best story in baseball this year. See. Hamilton, Josh. Rome is a joke if you ask me, I will never get back the five minutes of his show I listened to because he was talking baseball. It was like listening to David Spade talk about bodybuilding.

I understand what where you're coming from but Hamilton is most likely going to be a 5th outfielder on a team most are projecting to be a bottom feeder in the central. Matsuzaka could very likely be a CY winner who pitches in the world series.

Hamilton has alot of resume building to do this season to keep his story intriguing to nonreds fans IMHO...

REDREAD
03-27-2007, 03:43 PM
Much less arm trouble there, also. BUT, they also use 6 man rotations, and there is no baseball on Mondays (not sure why?) so essentially, starting pitchers go once a week.


Bobby Valentine manages a team in Japan now, and he is convinced that MLB clubs handle pitching incorrectly, .

I guess Ray Knight was ahead of his time when he did the 6 man rotation.
:)

Sadly, since so many players are basically "short term " investments by clubs, I doubt MLB changes, even if the above theory was proven.

dougdirt
03-27-2007, 06:31 PM
My impressions on Matsuzaka are this....

He is Bronson Arroyo with more heat on his fastball, and maybe a little more movement.