PDA

View Full Version : New York City for a day



ABEsolutely
04-16-2007, 02:00 PM
So I'm going to be in NYC for a day (April 28th). I tried writing down what I didn't want to miss, but since I've never been there before, I thought I'd see what RedZoners suggest. What should I try to get to (using public transportation) while there?
Thanks

Heath
04-16-2007, 02:16 PM
You need at least two.

ABEsolutely
04-16-2007, 02:34 PM
I know. I'd like to stay a week, but all we've got is 1 day. I have a subway map. Wow--much more complex than DC's.
But what do I absolutely HAVE to hit?

paintmered
04-16-2007, 02:36 PM
I know. I'd like to stay a week, but all we've got is 1 day. I have a subway map. Wow--much more complex than DC's.
But what do I absolutely HAVE to hit?

I'd say Times Square should be your No. 1 spot if you want the NY experience. In two-three hours, you can see all of it and even hit up some of the stores there.

The Statue of Liberty/Ellis Island is very cool, but it will kill too much of your time and you won't be able to see much else of the city if you go there.

The subways are definitely the way to get around the city.

ABEsolutely
04-16-2007, 02:42 PM
I'd say Times Square should be your No. 1 spot if you want the NY experience. In two-three hours, you can see all of it and even hit up some of the stores there.

The Statue of Liberty/Ellis Island is very cool, but it will kill too much of your time and you won't be able to see much else of the city if you go there.

The subways are definitely the way to get around the city.

Cool. Good to know. I figured the Statue of Liberty would take too much time. I'm sure I can get a good picture of it from somewhere else without having to actually ferry over there.
We're being dropped off in Rockefeller Center at 7am or so. We're planning on getting an all-day subway pass, but I can't find out when the pass starts for the day. In DC, you couldn't use it until 9:30. I'm sure we could walk around there until we can use our passes.

Heath
04-16-2007, 02:42 PM
All seriousness - take the Red 1 Subway Line (South Ferry). Get off the subway, walk to the Staten Island Ferry - the Ferry comes within photo distance of the Statue of Liberty on the right hand side. Get off the ferry, turnaround, and take the ferry back to Manhattan. Lady Liberty is on the left.

ABEsolutely
04-16-2007, 02:43 PM
...especially if there's much to do around there. Times Square is pretty close to Rockefeller Center isn't it?

Heath
04-16-2007, 02:43 PM
Subway passes go to 3am the following morning after you've broken it in.

go to mta.info for NYC subway info.

Heath
04-16-2007, 02:44 PM
...especially if there's much to do around there. Times Square is pretty close to Rockefeller Center isn't it?

Rockefeller is at 48-52, Times Square is at 42-44

ABEsolutely
04-16-2007, 02:46 PM
All seriousness - take the Red 1 Subway Line (South Ferry). Get off the subway, walk to the Staten Island Ferry - the Ferry comes within photo distance of the Statue of Liberty on the right hand side. Get off the ferry, turnaround, and take the ferry back to Manhattan. Lady Liberty is on the left.

What's on Staten Island? Anything worth seeing? I see there's a blue line that goes the length of the island.

ABEsolutely
04-16-2007, 02:49 PM
Yeah, so I think we're going to be overwhelmed for one day. We should sleep well on the ride home.
2 more questions:
-Is the Empire State Building worth it?
-Central Park - is there a "best" part of it?

edabbs44
04-16-2007, 02:56 PM
What's on Staten Island? Anything worth seeing? I see there's a blue line that goes the length of the island.

There is nothing on SI worth your time. I guess, since you have limited time, you should hit the spots where your interests lie.

Food: Make reservations now if you want to go to a really good restaurant.

Museums: Tons of great museums.

Historical Sights: Wall Street, Ground Zero, Statue of Liberty

Shopping: 5th Avenue, SoHo

Ethnic: Little Italy, Chinatown

Touristy Stuff: Empire State Building, Times Square, Grand Central, Rock Center, Central Park

Sports: Yankees/Red Sox on the 28th

OSUmed2010
04-16-2007, 03:00 PM
Go to Yankee stadium. They play Boston that day, so tickets may be hard to come by. You don't have to watch the whole game.They're building a new stadium soon, so you should check it out before it's gone. It's definitely worth a look around because all of the history tied up to that place.

ABEsolutely
04-16-2007, 03:06 PM
Thanks for the help guys. I definitely thought about Yankee Stadium and even Shea. Thankfully my wife loves baseball too (and the Reds--yes I know I'm fortunate) and she's OK with whatever. If I happen to get to that game, I'm sure I'll be the only one with Reds stuff on.
She also likes nice restaurants, so I'll definitely take your suggestion seriously, edabbs.

ABEsolutely
04-16-2007, 03:09 PM
There is nothing on SI worth your time. I guess, since you have limited time, you should hit the spots where your interests lie.

Food: Make reservations now if you want to go to a really good restaurant.

Museums: Tons of great museums.

Historical Sights: Wall Street, Ground Zero, Statue of Liberty

Shopping: 5th Avenue, SoHo

Ethnic: Little Italy, Chinatown

Touristy Stuff: Empire State Building, Times Square, Grand Central, Rock Center, Central Park

Sports: Yankees/Red Sox on the 28th

Sounds good (minus the shopping--I'll just go ahead and forget to mention the shopping to the wife)

chicoruiz
04-16-2007, 04:10 PM
Maybe you and the wife could spend a bit of time down on Canal Street haggling with the shop owners for knock-offs. Much more interesting than sitting around at Bloomingdale's waiting for her to finish.

I don't know if it would be on my one-day list, but the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, up by Columbia, is a pretty amazing place. The Statue of Liberty would actually fit inside it...

edabbs44
04-16-2007, 04:28 PM
Thanks for the help guys. I definitely thought about Yankee Stadium and even Shea. Thankfully my wife loves baseball too (and the Reds--yes I know I'm fortunate) and she's OK with whatever. If I happen to get to that game, I'm sure I'll be the only one with Reds stuff on.
She also likes nice restaurants, so I'll definitely take your suggestion seriously, edabbs.

Some others:

St Pat's, Greenwich Village, seeing a Broadway show, having a near-death experience in a taxi.

George Anderson
04-16-2007, 04:38 PM
Some others:

St Pat's, Greenwich Village, seeing a Broadway show, having a near-death experience in a taxi.

This thread is very timely as we are planning a trip to NY to see Yankee Stadium before they tear it down.

As far as Broadway shows, are there shows during the day or are they always at night?? We plan on going to two night games so Broadway shows during the day would work best.

Also we are staying very close to Times Square, any tips on good restaurants or pub type bars close by??

paintmered
04-16-2007, 04:40 PM
This thread is very timely as we are planning a trip to NY to see Yankee Stadium before they tear it down.

As far as Broadway shows, are there shows during the day or are they always at night?? We plan on going to two night games so Broadway shows during the day would work best.

Also we are staying very close to Times Square, any tips on good restaurants or pub type bars close by??

I think there are matinees only on Saturday (possibly Sunday too).

15fan
04-16-2007, 04:41 PM
If you've only got 1 day, and the Yankees are at home, that's a must. If you're going to be in the Bronx for a ball game, the Bronx Zoo is right up there with the San Diego Zoo IMO. In fact, that's what I'd do - take care of the Bronx in one trip, and worry about Manhattan or the other boroughs another time.

If you want to take in Manhattan, The Metropolitan Museum of Art is killer. Unlike most other museums in the US, you can't see it all at once. Pick a couple of sections and spend some time in them. If you try to see "everything" at once, you'll burn too much time and short change yourself.

Haven't been to MoMA since it moved.

I'd die a happy man if I never set foot in Times Square again. Having said that, there's a 1/2 price ticket booth that sells day-of theater tickets. If you just want to see "a show" and not a specific show, that's a cheap alternative.

I'd skip Wall Street. Not much to see or do around there.

Edit: I think Central Park is a bigger deal for New Yorkers than it is for the rest of the country. If you live anywhere else, you've probably got plenty of parks, trees and greenspaces. The view of Central Park (as well as all of the other views) from the Empire State Building can be interesting. But by itself, Central Park doesn't do a whole lot for me. If you want to go for a run or rollerblade or something, then maybe. Otherwise, it's not that different from your city's main park.

ABEsolutely
04-16-2007, 04:42 PM
Maybe you and the wife could spend a bit of time down on Canal Street haggling with the shop owners for knock-offs. Much more interesting than sitting around at Bloomingdale's waiting for her to finish.

I don't know if it would be on my one-day list, but the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, up by Columbia, is a pretty amazing place. The Statue of Liberty would actually fit inside it...

The Canal Street thing actually sounds like a good time! I think knockoffs are cool, and who doesn't like haggling?


St Pat's, Greenwich Village, seeing a Broadway show, having a near-death experience in a taxi.

Haha. I think we'll stick to the subway. Maybe that's not the greatest idea either. Oh well...

paintmered
04-16-2007, 04:44 PM
I'd die a happy man if I never set foot in Times Square again. Having said that, there's a 1/2 price ticket booth that sells day-of theater tickets. If you just want to see "a show" and not a specific show, that's a cheap alternative.

When I was there (back in 2002) the line for this ticket booth was rediculously long. I doubt it has changed much since.

George Anderson
04-16-2007, 04:45 PM
Also any good watering holes around Yankee Stadium and is Mickey Mantle's restaurant worth the trip???

NYMoose
04-16-2007, 04:55 PM
This thread is very timely as we are planning a trip to NY to see Yankee Stadium before they tear it down.

As far as Broadway shows, are there shows during the day or are they always at night?? We plan on going to two night games so Broadway shows during the day would work best.

Also we are staying very close to Times Square, any tips on good restaurants or pub type bars close by??

For Italian, Carmine's on 44th is excellent, http://www.carminesnyc.com/

Chip R
04-16-2007, 05:01 PM
This thread is very timely as we are planning a trip to NY to see Yankee Stadium before they tear it down.



Definitely since I'm going there this summer.

Yachtzee
04-16-2007, 05:07 PM
The Canal Street thing actually sounds like a good time! I think knockoffs are cool, and who doesn't like haggling?



Haha. I think we'll stick to the subway. Maybe that's not the greatest idea either. Oh well...

Canal Street, Washington Square, Bleeker St., St. Marks, SoHo, TriBeCa, Chinatown,...all good. Times Square is kind of boring after you get over the whole "Hey, I'm in Times Square" feeling. But if I could get tickets to the Yankees game, I would be there first.

pedro
04-16-2007, 05:10 PM
Personally I prefer Washington Square & Central Park to Times Square, which IMO is just a big tourist trap.

pedro
04-16-2007, 05:18 PM
The Cloisters are pretty damn cool too....

The Cloisters is the branch of the Metropolitan Museum of Art dedicated to the art and architecture of the European middle ages. The Cloisters is located in New York City, specifically Fort Tryon Park near the northern tip of Manhattan island on a hill overlooking the Hudson River. The Cloisters include the museum building and the adjacent 4 acres (16,000 m²).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Cloisters

edabbs44
04-16-2007, 05:24 PM
This thread is very timely as we are planning a trip to NY to see Yankee Stadium before they tear it down.

As far as Broadway shows, are there shows during the day or are they always at night?? We plan on going to two night games so Broadway shows during the day would work best.

Also we are staying very close to Times Square, any tips on good restaurants or pub type bars close by??

Send me a PM George with all your questions.

edabbs44
04-16-2007, 05:24 PM
I think there are matinees only on Saturday (possibly Sunday too).

It might depend on the show...I thought some Wed shows were matinees.

edabbs44
04-16-2007, 05:31 PM
Definitely since I'm going there this summer.

PM me also Chip if you need any recommendations. I work in Manhattan so I know some of the areas of NYC pretty well.

Heath
04-16-2007, 05:38 PM
What's on Staten Island? Anything worth seeing? I see there's a blue line that goes the length of the island.

The only thing on SI worth seeing is the return exit sign back to the ferry.

edabbs44
04-16-2007, 05:39 PM
The only thing on SI worth seeing is the return exit sign back to the ferry.

:laugh: :laugh: :laugh:

That was awesome.

oneupper
04-16-2007, 07:10 PM
I was in NYC w/family for a few days in spring break.

My two bits: Statue of Liberty...good but takes the whole day. Security Checks were Murder.
Empire State: didn't make it...lines too long..2hrs Plus. More security checks.

Rockefeller Center has an observation tower. Try that.
Sony Building 55th/Madison tour and or NBC studios tour...alternatives for a
few hours.

Theater: if you can get to TKTS (46th and broadway)...get some 50% off tickets and see a show...THAT day. Wicked is sold out..but there are plenty of other shows (We saw three...enjoyed all).

http://www.sonywondertechlab.com

Betterread
04-16-2007, 08:07 PM
I have been to NYC many times for a day. I like to take an early train in, walk around with my traveling companion(s) to compare NY experiences, see a matinee program (you'd be surprised by how many early theatre performances, music events, etc. are scheduled) or go to a museum for a few hours, eat dinner at one of the incredible restaurants (budget and location are usually the determining factors) and then get a drink at either an old haunt or a new place I've read about. Take the last train you can to get home and savor the time you spent in this great city.

Go to the "Goings on about town" section of the most current New Yorker to see who's playing at Carnegie Hall, Alice Tully Hall, The Beacon Theatre, Blue Note (whatever type of music you like will have a fascinating venue in New York).
The Cloisters are a great destination, as is the Guggenheim, Brookyn Museum, Cooper-Hewitt National design museum, the Frick Collection.

Chip R
04-16-2007, 08:19 PM
I have been to NYC many times for a day. I like to take an early train in, walk around with my traveling companion(s) to compare NY experiences, see a matinee program (you'd be surprised by how many early theatre performances, music events, etc. are scheduled) or go to a museum for a few hours, eat dinner at one of the incredible restaurants (budget and location are usually the determining factors) and then get a drink at either an old haunt or a new place I've read about. Take the last train you can to get home and savor the time you spent in this great city.


Where do you take the train in from?

vaticanplum
04-16-2007, 08:26 PM
So I'm going to be in NYC for a day (April 28th). I tried writing down what I didn't want to miss, but since I've never been there before, I thought I'd see what RedZoners suggest. What should I try to get to (using public transportation) while there?
Thanks

What are your interests; what do you like to do and what is important to you? How does a big good meal compare to an afternoon at a museum to nature? Do you like to walk a lot or would you prefer a bunch of things to do in a concentrated area? Is it important to you to see in person the famous parts of New York that you've seen on TV, or do you prefer things a little off-the-beaten-path and neighborhood-y? Who will be with you? I could probably give you a lot of suggestions in any case, but there is so much to do in New York City and a day is such a short time that if you really want to make the most of your experience, you really have to lay out what's most important to you. One man's Empire State Building is another man's old-school Italian pizza joint in Brooklyn. They're both well worthwhile, but with only a day you're going to have to choose.

FYI, Abesolutely, the day pass starts when you use it. It expires sometime the next day, like 4 am or something (much later than you'll probably be using it). So, buy it at 6 am and it's good for 22 hours; but it at 11 pm and it's good for five.

cincinnati chili
04-16-2007, 09:46 PM
I agree with the people who said to research your own interests, go on the web and pursue what you like.

For example, if you like needlepoint, there's probably a needlepoint museum, or a ball-and-thread gallery of some sort. It's a huge city.

For example, my wife had relatives who immigrated into the city and lived as very poor people in the garment district. So, for us, the Lower East Side Tenament museum was fascinating. Some others might say, wtf would you go there?

I do think that Times Square is a must see. Preferably at night for the lights and stuff, esp. if you've never been to Vegas, Tokyo, Hong Kong, or somewhere with that many lights (which I have not).

I rarely disagree with Pedro on this board, but I would NOT recommend the Cloisters museum for a one-day trip unless that's your thing (see my first paragraph). Don't get me wrong, it's really cool. I lived in the neigborhood, and used to go to concerts (gregorian chants, etc.) there. However, the neighborhood, quite frankly, scares the living crap out of the average tourist. And even if you're brave about it, it's kind of out of the way of the other stuff you'll probably do (hour subway ride from the Ferry to Staten Island; 30-40 minutes or so from midtown).

In some ways I feel the same way about Yankee Stadium and the Bronx Zoo. If you've got just one day, Manhattan has PLENTY. No need to mess with the boroughs.

I agree about the doing Staten Island ferry. It's a great view of the city and is a cheap way to get a good look at the Skyline and the Statute of Liberty from reasonably close.

You won't be too far from the 9-11 stuff when you get off the boat back from Staten Island.

If you want to blow a lot of money on one meal, I'm partial to the Gramercy Tavern.

pedro
04-16-2007, 09:51 PM
you're probably right about the cloisters chili. we used to blow off high school and go into the city and that was one of our favorite places to go. then again, I was 16 and very stupid.

vaticanplum
04-16-2007, 10:11 PM
For example, my wife had relatives who immigrated into the city and lived as very poor people in the garment district. So, for us, the Lower East Side Tenament museum was fascinating. Some others might say, wtf would you go there?

I love the Lower East Side Tenament Museum. That was a real stop-gap place for me to take people when they visited. Really cool that you had kind of a connection to it too.

That's a neat little part of Manhattan to see -- weird mix of old squallor (especially when you've just left the museum and are feeling all immigranty) and new hipsterdom. Some great bars around there and good places to eat too. Schiller's Liquor Bar is a relatively new good foodie place; that's very close. There's also a restaurant near Max Fish called Grilled Cheese, which serves many types of Grilled Cheese and only many types of grilled cheese.

Apart from the Tenament Museum and maybe Schiller's, these are not things I'd recommend for a day trip...but it gives you and idea of the specificity of the things out there.

Betterread
04-16-2007, 11:04 PM
you're probably right about the cloisters chili. we used to blow off high school and go into the city and that was one of our favorite places to go. then again, I was 16 and very stupid.

A friend of mine from NY at my HS told us about it and we did the same thing. Great spot, it was a little scary though at the time. It is fine to visit now. You should visit it next time.
Chili is entitled to his opinion, but the New York restoration project really cleaned up the area in the middle/late 90s. Just as Times Square was cleaned up (to me it is so reductive and materialistic now - blech), many other parts of NYC were invested in and regained their former glory.

edabbs44
04-16-2007, 11:07 PM
If you have money to burn and want to hit a phenomenal restaurant...two words: Il Mulino. Not sure if you can still get reservations. And if you can, it will only be at 5 or 10 or awful hours like that. But it is a great eating experience.

Betterread
04-16-2007, 11:30 PM
Where do you take the train in from?
I went to HS and College in different counties north of NYC, had an old girlfriend in western Connecticut, and another old girlfriend in Bergen County, NJ. Still have family in Connecticut and New York. So I Took the train in for the day from those different points.

Mutaman
04-17-2007, 12:23 AM
This is helpful. I've lived in Manhattan for about 30 years and I haven't been to most of these places. Sounds like fun. I'd stay away from Times Square though, all tourists and Bridge and Tunnel people.

I'd be careful around the Empire State Building too:


http://www.nydailynews.com/news/2007/04/14/2007-04-14_lawyer_dies_in_empire_suicide_horror.html

MaineRed
04-17-2007, 12:54 AM
and is Mickey Mantle's restaurant worth the trip???

I would say no. Nothing special about the place and the prices are outrageous.

MaineRed
04-17-2007, 01:16 AM
So I'm going to be in NYC for a day (April 28th). I tried writing down what I didn't want to miss, but since I've never been there before, I thought I'd see what RedZoners suggest. What should I try to get to (using public transportation) while there?
Thanks

How about a handsome cab ride around Central Park? I bet the wife would love it and I think they only take you around for 20-30 minutes. There are tons of them available on Central Park South.

Times Square is a must. Just to take it in. Buy something off a street vendor, duck into a store that interest you, grab a slice. Whatever.

The ferry idea sounded good. Make sure to visit the WTC site if you get down to that end of NYC.

ABEsolutely
04-17-2007, 09:17 AM
What are your interests

Baseball, of course, and I guess mostly the touristy things. I've done the normal tourist spots in other cities and been disappointed in some, so I was just trying to get a feel for what's can't-miss (especially since I only have a day).


I do think that Times Square is a must see. Preferably at night for the lights and stuff, esp. if you've never been to Vegas, Tokyo, Hong Kong, or somewhere with that many lights (which I have not).
...
In some ways I feel the same way about Yankee Stadium and the Bronx Zoo. If you've got just one day, Manhattan has PLENTY. No need to mess with the boroughs.

We're meeting back at the Marriott Marquis at 8pm. It looks like there are still some cheap seats for the Yankee game (3:55pm). We'd really like to catch the game. You don't think we should try?



I'd be careful around the Empire State Building too:

http://www.nydailynews.com/news/2007/04/14/2007-04-14_lawyer_dies_in_empire_suicide_horror.html

Yikes--I'll keep my head up..


How about a handsome cab ride around Central Park? I bet the wife would love it and I think they only take you around for 20-30 minutes. There are tons of them available on Central Park South.

Times Square is a must. Just to take it in. Buy something off a street vendor, duck into a store that interest you, grab a slice. Whatever.

The ferry idea sounded good. Make sure to visit the WTC site if you get down to that end of NYC.

Thanks for your suggestions

Rex Argos
04-17-2007, 10:51 AM
Two summers ago, my family went to NYC as part of a Northeast road trip. We were in NYC for 24 hours, and here's how we played it. Keep in mind that my two kiddos were 7 and 8 at the time, so that limited some of our choices.

1 PM: Drove into New Jersey, stopped off at Ellis Island/Statue of Liberty. Round trip on the ferry took about 3 hours. Couldn't get into the Statue, because all the tickets had been given for the day. Kind of a bummer.

4 PM: Drove our blue Saturn into Manhattan. Only car on the island that wasn't a Yellow Cab. Only English speaker as well--most drivers were very familiar with their horn, however. A little noisy, extremely stressful.

5 PM: Crashed at our Days Inn digs in Manhattan. Fairly small, about $225 for the night--but the room came with a discount for the parking garage across the street. Only $25 for overnight parking!

6 PM: Headed for the subway, and up to the Bronx for Yankees/D-Rays. Bleacher seats are $12 (and you could bring in your own food), and the natives were extremely kind (much to my relief) once they saw the kids. Looked on us as a bit of a curiousity, since we were Reds fans. Casey Fossum dominated the Pinstripers (shockingly).

10 PM: Returned to Manhattan on the subway. Not a bad trip.

8 AM: Hiked to the Empire State Building at its opening. Short lines in the morning, but the haze kinda killed any opportunities at great photography. Still very cool.

10 AM: Subwayed a few blocks to Central Park for a walk around. Gorgeous.

11:30 AM: Raced back to the Days Inn, just in time for the noon check out.

12:30 PM: Had lunch at a deli, just outside the hotel. $5.50 for a sandwich, drink, and chips. That's a great deal.

All in all, had a great time. And ended any stereotypes I had about New Yorkers. Very friendly and helpful. Even walking around Manhattan late at night, I never felt unsafe. Go, but leave the car somewhere!

ABEsolutely
04-17-2007, 01:05 PM
Well it looks like the Yankees game is out. The NYC trip is THIS weekend, not next. I just found out today. I'm glad I asked. And I'm glad I mentioned this a week early (or so I thought).

It sounds like a great time, Rex, but we're kind of hoping to get as many little trips like this in BEFORE kids. I've been pretty sheltered in my lifetime. Trips to Cincinnati to see the Reds were always huge. Then we got married a year-and-a-half ago and have been taking small getaways to see more of the country (at least the eastern half) before the kids come along. We've been to Pigeon Forge, West Palm Beach, DC, and now NYC. San Francisco's the #1 spot on my list, but I think that will have to wait a long while...

cincinnati chili
04-17-2007, 07:55 PM
Go, but leave the car somewhere!


This is the BEST piece of advice on the thread, and I thought it went without saying. Do not drive into Manhattan.

vaticanplum
04-17-2007, 09:11 PM
Baseball, of course, and I guess mostly the touristy things. I've done the normal tourist spots in other cities and been disappointed in some, so I was just trying to get a feel for what's can't-miss (especially since I only have a day).

Well, just to give a shout-out to some beautiful landmarks that people haven't mentioned: Grand Central Station (not much to do around it but chain restaurants and stuff, but beautiful to see), Trinity Church downtown, St. Patrick's Cathedral, Washington Square Park (someone did mention this, but it bears repeating; in beautiful weather it's incomparable, and a nice area to walk around as well, with little shops and a couple of old side streets that look like old France; also close to Two Boots Pizza which is an institution), the Public Library (if there's one great building in New York that ALL TOURISTS miss, it's the Library -- with the famous lions outside -- every corner breathtakingly beautiful and FREE, and right next to Bryant Park), the Boathouse at Central Park, Union Square for the street performers alone, and the Theater district.

As far as baseball goes...if the Yankees are away, the Mets are in town. Shea is nearly as great an experience as Yankee Stadium is; the fans are great, and it's a quick shot into Flushing on the 7 express train. If you can't make it, though, I'd still stop in some of the Yankees club stores. You can find neat little trinkets there, and it's fun to ogle the more expensive stuff :) There are about four or five of them -- on in Times Square and my old last-minute ticket purchase place on 59th between Park and Lexington, I think (very close to Fifth Avenue shopping).

I think the Empire State building is worth it, just get there early. I'm in agreement with those who say the Staten Island Ferry because it's a great (and, again, free) way to see the Statue of Liberty. It can be time-consuming, but plan ahead so as not to wait for the ferry and you should be able to squeeze it in. The best way to see the Statue of Liberty, in my opinion, is to go to Brooklyn and walk up and down the Brooklyn Promenade. The neighborhood is gorgeous (all those old brownstones) and vibrant, and the view of the Statue, the skyline and the brooklyn Bridge (which ends there) is incomparable. But you likely won't have time for that unfortunately. Brooklyn is quite a destination in itself -- Coney Island, Prospect Park, the Brooklyn Museum, the Brooklyn Historical society, the neighborhoods, the pizza...someday maybe :)

edabbs44
04-17-2007, 11:34 PM
Well, just to give a shout-out to some beautiful landmarks that people haven't mentioned: Grand Central Station (not much to do around it but chain restaurants and stuff, but beautiful to see), Trinity Church downtown, St. Patrick's Cathedral, Washington Square Park (someone did mention this, but it bears repeating; in beautiful weather it's incomparable, and a nice area to walk around as well, with little shops and a couple of old side streets that look like old France; also close to Two Boots Pizza which is an institution), the Public Library (if there's one great building in New York that ALL TOURISTS miss, it's the Library -- with the famous lions outside -- every corner breathtakingly beautiful and FREE, and right next to Bryant Park), the Boathouse at Central Park, Union Square for the street performers alone, and the Theater district.

I guess I'm not "people"?;)


There is nothing on SI worth your time. I guess, since you have limited time, you should hit the spots where your interests lie.

Touristy Stuff: Empire State Building, Times Square, Grand Central, Rock Center, Central Park


Some others:

St Pat's, Greenwich Village, seeing a Broadway show, having a near-death experience in a taxi.

VP is right..there isn't much directly around Grand Central to do, but it is only a short walk from Times Square/Rock Center.

Also, there are some phenomenal restaurants in that area, not just chains. Sparks Steak House (where Gotti had Castellano killed, for any mafia historians), Smith & Wollensky, Capital Grille, Fresco by Scotto and a plethora of highly rated sushi places are all within walking distance.

vaticanplum
04-17-2007, 11:42 PM
I guess I'm not "people"?;)

I have a short-term memory :) especially when a lot of words are being thrown aroudn.

ABEsolutely
04-18-2007, 08:40 AM
Awesome.. thanks guys/gals. I'm printing this thread and studying it. I'll let you know how it all goes.
Your info is invaluable!