PDA

View Full Version : Jackie Robinson



flyer85
04-24-2007, 01:00 PM
after honoring his legacy over the past week I have really been humbled by what an incredible feat he performed. He was carrying the burden for an entire people and he was hounded by many wishing his failure. He didn't just triumph, but did it magnificently. He avoided an ugly incident and had a HOF career. I wonder if the huge burden he carried contributed to his health problems and untimely death at an early age. He carried the dual burden of attempting to succeed on the field while not responding to the insults and taunts he was subjected to. I think most would have wilted under the pressure, thankfully he did not.

Kudos to one of the great Americans of the 20th century.

Sea Ray
04-24-2007, 03:55 PM
Jackie Robinson's feat actually helped integrate all sports, not just baseball, including college sports. He was the perfect guy for it. For instance Barry Bonds nor Ken Griffey Jr could have been Jackie Robinson. They would have gotten into fights, pouted etc. And this wasn't affirmative action either. This guy earned his promotion with his baseball talent.

Joseph
04-24-2007, 04:23 PM
Jackie Robinson's feat actually helped integrate all sports, not just baseball, including college sports. He was the perfect guy for it. For instance Barry Bonds nor Ken Griffey Jr could have been Jackie Robinson. They would have gotten into fights, pouted etc. And this wasn't affirmative action either. This guy earned his promotion with his baseball talent.

As baseball-centric as I can be at times, I still think that the number 42 should be retired across all sports and on all levels.

rotnoid
04-24-2007, 04:25 PM
As baseball-centric as I can be at times, I still think that the number 42 should be retired across all sports and on all levels.

That's not a bad idea. Jackie's impact on not just sports, but American culture as a whole was gigantic. He was forging ahead over a decade before what we know as the Civil Rights Movement began in earnest. He was a true pioneer.

hebroncougar
04-24-2007, 05:04 PM
Jackie Robinson's feat actually helped integrate all sports, not just baseball, including college sports. He was the perfect guy for it. For instance Barry Bonds nor Ken Griffey Jr could have been Jackie Robinson. They would have gotten into fights, pouted etc. And this wasn't affirmative action either. This guy earned his promotion with his baseball talent.

I think it may be fair to say, there might not be affirmative action without Robinson's actions.

westofyou
04-24-2007, 05:09 PM
Jackie Robinson's feat actually helped integrate all sports, not just baseball, including college sports. He was the perfect guy for it. For instance Barry Bonds nor Ken Griffey Jr could have been Jackie Robinson. They would have gotten into fights, pouted etc. And this wasn't affirmative action either. This guy earned his promotion with his baseball talent.

As far as pro sports go Marion Motley predates Jackie as the post war integrator and Fritz Pollard predates both of them. But baseball was on a bigger stage then. However Jackie didn't go it alone in 1947, 4 other black men played MLB that season.

Sea Ray
04-24-2007, 05:35 PM
However Jackie didn't go it alone in 1947, 4 other black men played MLB that season.

Are you sure about that? So far as I know, Larry Doby and Hank Thompson were the only other black players in 1947.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_first_black_Major_League_Baseball_players_ by_team_and_date

If the Jackie Robinson experiment hadn't gone well, those other guys would not have joined the league 3 months later.

dabvu2498
04-24-2007, 05:49 PM
Are you sure about that? So far as I know, Larry Doby and Hank Thompson were the only other black players in 1947.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_first_black_Major_League_Baseball_players_ by_team_and_date

If the Jackie Robinson experiment hadn't gone well, those other guys would not have joined the league 3 months later.

Dan Bankhead and Willard Brown also played in 47. They're not on your list because they were not the first blacks signed to play with their teams (Brooklyn and the Brownies), respectively.

westofyou
04-24-2007, 05:59 PM
Are you sure about that? So far as I know, Larry Doby and Hank Thompson were the only other black players in 1947.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_first_black_Major_League_Baseball_players_ by_team_and_date

If the Jackie Robinson experiment hadn't gone well, those other guys would not have joined the league 3 months later.

http://www.redszone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=56985

Sea Ray
04-24-2007, 06:28 PM
Dan Bankhead and Willard Brown also played in 47. They're not on your list because they were not the first blacks signed to play with their teams (Brooklyn and the Brownies), respectively.

That's interesting. I didn't know that. Good move on the part of the Dodgers to add some support for Jackie. I was wondering if the Dodgers added more, thus not being a part of the Wiki list.