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BuckeyeRed27
04-24-2007, 07:11 PM
http://www.zeenews.com/articles.asp?aid=367459&ssid=27&sid=ENV


Now all we need is to be able to travel at the speed of light and we could see what's up in 20 short years. Still a pretty exciting discovery if you are into that sort of thing.

rotnoid
04-24-2007, 07:54 PM
Road trip?

KronoRed
04-24-2007, 07:59 PM
Road trip?

I'll bring the nachos.

remdog
04-24-2007, 08:34 PM
Bud will want to have Opening Day there within the next three years. :rolleyes:

Rem

creek14
04-24-2007, 09:06 PM
Wonder if it is PC to use more than one square of TP per *visit* there?

guttle11
04-24-2007, 09:08 PM
Al Gore invented it.

BoydsOfSummer
04-24-2007, 09:21 PM
Algore says we'll all have to move there in 10 years.



“Liquid water is critical to life as we know it and because of its temperature and relative proximity, this planet will most probably be a very important target of the future space missions dedicated to the search for extra-terrestrial life. On the treasure map of the Universe, one would be tempted to mark this planet with an X,” added Xavier Delfosse, a member of the team from Grenoble University, France.

Oh, sure, Xavier. Why not mark it with a Y or even a Z? Huh...huh?

BUTLER REDSFAN
04-24-2007, 10:45 PM
so, for you DC fans does that make us Earth-1 or Earth-2??

WebScorpion
04-25-2007, 03:43 PM
Now that we've found them, I wonder if they've found us yet... :alien:

Caveat Emperor
04-25-2007, 03:54 PM
Stupid question (I'd make it poll, but I don't feel like starting a new thread):

The only way anyone ever sets eyes on this planet is if scientists figure out some form of faster-than-light (or light-speed) propulsion or method of travel.

Will mankind ever achieve the ability to travel faster than the speed of light? If you think so, do you think soon (say, within 100 years) or far off in the future?

redsfanmia
04-25-2007, 04:26 PM
Stupid question (I'd make it poll, but I don't feel like starting a new thread):

The only way anyone ever sets eyes on this planet is if scientists figure out some form of faster-than-light (or light-speed) propulsion or method of travel.

Will mankind ever achieve the ability to travel faster than the speed of light? If you think so, do you think soon (say, within 100 years) or far off in the future?

Its just a matter of time, they do have it on the Melinium Falcon.

Roy Tucker
04-25-2007, 05:02 PM
Stupid question (I'd make it poll, but I don't feel like starting a new thread):

The only way anyone ever sets eyes on this planet is if scientists figure out some form of faster-than-light (or light-speed) propulsion or method of travel.

Will mankind ever achieve the ability to travel faster than the speed of light? If you think so, do you think soon (say, within 100 years) or far off in the future?

Time travel and faster than light travel are joined at the physics hip. Current theory hypothesizes that worm holes can be used to do both. Implementation is an exercise left up to the student :)

But a lot of very hairy and bleeding-edge math and physics are being argued by guys like Stephen Hawking as to whether or not this is even within light years of being theoretically possible.

I like to keep up on this stuff (and things like string theory) just to satisfy a base curiousness but I barely understand it on a very cursory level and have a very amateur knowledge of it.

Whether or not it's even possible will maybe be deduced in 25-50 years. I'd give it actually happening a 50-50 shot in the next 100 years. The problem is, the more we find out, the more we understand we really don't know anything.

Johnny Footstool
04-25-2007, 05:35 PM
Stupid question (I'd make it poll, but I don't feel like starting a new thread):

The only way anyone ever sets eyes on this planet is if scientists figure out some form of faster-than-light (or light-speed) propulsion or method of travel.

Will mankind ever achieve the ability to travel faster than the speed of light? If you think so, do you think soon (say, within 100 years) or far off in the future?

The Wikipedia entry on FTL Travel is pretty pessimistic about the idea.

It's a fairly easy read, BTW.

OldRightHander
04-25-2007, 06:14 PM
I don't know much on the theoretical end, but if you just consider the things we have today that would not have been thought possible 100 years ago, it boggles the mind to try to envision the advances 100 years in the future. Who knows?

paintmered
04-25-2007, 06:16 PM
The Wikipedia entry on FTL Travel is pretty pessimistic about the idea.

It's a fairly easy read, BTW.

So is NASA's take on it.

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/glenn/research/warp/warpstat.html

sonny
04-25-2007, 07:48 PM
Well, the sooner we get there, the sooner we can pollute it.

Johnny Footstool
04-26-2007, 10:41 AM
So is NASA's take on it.

http://www.nasa.gov/centers/glenn/research/warp/warpstat.html

NASA's site was very well-written and explained in fairly simple terms.

Caveat Emperor
04-26-2007, 11:07 PM
NASA's site was very well-written and explained in fairly simple terms.

Its a well done site with a very good explanation.

NASA's stance is "everything we know about the universe right now says this is impossible" -- I figure, at best, we know as close to nothing about the universe as you can know without hitting straight 0. So, I still think there is still room to figure this out.

RFS62
04-26-2007, 11:08 PM
Hawking's "A Brief History of Time" is also a great read.

WMR
04-26-2007, 11:36 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riley_Martin

Friend Martin has already been there and done that.

WMR
04-26-2007, 11:39 PM
Anyone ever read about John Titor?

I missed it while it was occurring, but it's interesting to read about...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Titor

Degenerate39
04-27-2007, 12:55 PM
Anyone ever read about John Titor?

I missed it while it was occurring, but it's interesting to read about...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Titor

I love reading about Titor. Such a brilliant hoax.

SunDeck
04-27-2007, 01:11 PM
Time travel and faster than light travel are joined at the physics hip. Current theory hypothesizes that worm holes can be used to do both. Implementation is an exercise left up to the student :)

But a lot of very hairy and bleeding-edge math and physics are being argued by guys like Stephen Hawking as to whether or not this is even within light years of being theoretically possible.

I like to keep up on this stuff (and things like string theory) just to satisfy a base curiousness but I barely understand it on a very cursory level and have a very amateur knowledge of it.



Then please tell me why they call them worm holes. Are they slimy? Doesn't sound like anything I'd want to get into.

oneupper
04-27-2007, 01:12 PM
http://www.zeenews.com/articles.asp?aid=367459&ssid=27&sid=ENV


Now all we need is to be able to travel at the speed of light and we could see what's up in 20 short years. Still a pretty exciting discovery if you are into that sort of thing.

If I remember my relativity well, once you approach the speed of light time "slows down" in the craft as compared to the "stationary" observer (let's say Earth).

Depending on your speed...you can make it there and back, without a problem. Just be prepared to see your grandchildren tell you "get off my lawn".

Roy Tucker
04-27-2007, 02:29 PM
Then please tell me why they call them worm holes. Are they slimy? Doesn't sound like anything I'd want to get into.

Giant intergalactic worms go through them.

One of them is named Fred.

klw
04-27-2007, 02:48 PM
Does their Adam Dunn strike out too much as well? :D

SunDeck
04-27-2007, 02:49 PM
Giant intergalactic worms go through them.

One of them is named Fred.

Are you sure you're not a scientist?