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View Full Version : Schilling's bloody sock faked??



hebroncougar
04-26-2007, 11:44 AM
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/18328484/

According to O's announce Gary Thorne, Doug Mirabelli told him the famous "bloody sock" was painted, and not actual blood.

Chip R
04-26-2007, 11:51 AM
Yeah, I don't doubt that it was faked.

hebroncougar
04-26-2007, 11:52 AM
I just read the same story on NESN, and the Sox are going nuts screaming about it.

George Anderson
04-26-2007, 11:53 AM
Lets see, I am in the middle of pitching Game 6 of the ALCS and I am going to go make it a point to find a red marker to color my sock red and fool millions of people just so I look good on TV. :rolleyes:

Sorry, I dont buy it.

Always Red
04-26-2007, 11:54 AM
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/18328484/

According to O's announce Gary Thorne, Doug Mirabelli told him the famous "bloody sock" was painted, and not actual blood.

Mirabelli vehemently denied telling that to Thorne:


Mirabelli told The Boston Globe that Thorne's claim was a "straight lie."

"I never said that. I know it was blood. Everybody knows it was blood," Mirabelli said.

GullyFoyle
04-26-2007, 11:58 AM
Like someone would go to the effort..., ignoring the fact it would be very easy to test if it ever came to it...

Schilling is neither that vain nor dumb...

hebroncougar
04-26-2007, 12:03 PM
I think it's hilarious that's it's a big deal now. I have no idea if it's faked or not.

membengal
04-26-2007, 12:11 PM
Actually, I think Schilling is exactly that vain and dumb...

blumj
04-26-2007, 12:11 PM
http://gonewengland.about.com/od/nyattractions/ss/aabaseballhall_8.htm
Looks a lot more like old blood stains than paint or ink to me.

I wouldn't put it past Mirabelli saying something like that, though.

stevekun
04-26-2007, 12:15 PM
I honestly don't see what he could have gained by painting it. Who cares really

TeamSelig
04-26-2007, 12:16 PM
Just don't see a player putting fake blood on his sock...

MrCinatit
04-26-2007, 12:17 PM
Yeah....so, this alleged fake sock is kept in a museum of sorts, right? So, it's been under lock and key - so no one has tampered with it, right?
Unless Schilling found some ink with the exact same DNA as he does, I would think a test would put that to rest.

Razor Shines
04-26-2007, 12:17 PM
Just from looking at the difference in the two pictures makes me think it's blood. In the picture of his sock during the game the blood is a red color and the picture of the sock in the hall of fame the spot is a brown color. I guess he could have painted it brown after the game, but I have no problem believing his stitches were tearing.

I can't believe I just broke that down.

Johnny Footstool
04-26-2007, 12:17 PM
http://gonewengland.about.com/od/nyattractions/ss/aabaseballhall_8.htm
Looks a lot more like old blood stains than paint or ink to me.

I wouldn't put it past Mirabelli saying something like that, though.

Yep. Red paint, ink, or dye holds its color when it dries. Blood turns brown.

On a side note, I was in Tennis class with Doug Mirabelli (and former Phillies pitcher Tyler Green) at Wichita State. Mirabelli didn't say much -- I couldn't tell if he was aloof or just the quiet type. Tyler was pretty cool -- I had no idea he was such a big deal, so we just chatted about baseball and tennis.

UGADaddy
04-26-2007, 12:17 PM
Lets see, I am in the middle of pitching Game 6 of the ALCS and I am going to go make it a point to find a red marker to color my sock red and fool millions of people just so I look good on TV. :rolleyes:

Sorry, I dont buy it.

Agreed. This is a ridiculous claim. And the only reason that I can think of that anyone would believe it is that it must be an extremely slow news day. That was one of the greatest pitching performances in modern history. Hands down.

Always Red
04-26-2007, 12:22 PM
Just from looking at the difference in the two pictures makes me think it's blood. In the picture of his sock during the game the blood is a red color and the picture of the sock in the hall of fame the spot is a brown color. I guess he could have painted it brown after the game, but I have no problem believing his stitches were tearing.

I can't believe I just broke that down.

I think so, too. I've been around a lot of blood, and it looks like the real thing- you can see where the plasma portion (the lighter stuff on the edges) has separated from the red cells. That's tough to do with ink!

blumj
04-26-2007, 12:39 PM
Yep. Red paint, ink, or dye holds its color when it dries. Blood turns brown.

On a side note, I was in Tennis class with Doug Mirabelli (and former Phillies pitcher Tyler Green) at Wichita State. Mirabelli didn't say much -- I couldn't tell if he was aloof or just the quiet type. Tyler was pretty cool -- I had no idea he was such a big deal, so we just chatted about baseball and tennis.

Mirabelli has a rep of being pretty juvenile, tasteless, trying to be funny but taking it too far. I could easily see him trying to convince Thorne that Schilling faked the bloody sock as a gag a while back, and either totally forgetting he ever did it or just lying about it now. This isn't the first time he's been accused of saying something he's later denied, although I forget what it was about that time. I just think he's the type who says a lot of things he probably shouldn't, mostly trying to be funny.

Rex Argos
04-26-2007, 01:25 PM
Yeah....so, this alleged fake sock is kept in a museum of sorts, right? So, it's been under lock and key - so no one has tampered with it, right?
Unless Schilling found some ink with the exact same DNA as he does, I would think a test would put that to rest.

Saw it at the Hall of Fame a couple of summers ago. I didn't give any thought to testing it for paint.

REDREAD
04-26-2007, 01:41 PM
Maybe he deliberately cut himself and painted blood on it. :)

GullyFoyle
04-26-2007, 02:09 PM
Actually, I think Schilling is exactly that vain and dumb...

I think how vain Schilling is, might be open to debate, but I don't know of anybody who can say with a straight face that he is dumb.

membengal
04-26-2007, 02:17 PM
My face is straight.

blumj
04-26-2007, 02:22 PM
I think how vain Schilling is, might be open to debate, but I don't know of anybody who can say with a straight face that he is dumb.
He'd have to be really, really, dumb to imagine that he'd have to DO anything to get a blood stain going on his sock when he'd just had fresh sutures put in his ankle.

T7-niner
04-26-2007, 02:27 PM
Okay...Take this for what it's worth.

I heard this morning on Mike & Mike that Schilling gave the spikes to the HOF after the game. Not until sometime later the socks were sent to the Hall.

So, theoretically he could've painted / stained / or even deliberately cut himself and then sent them to Cooperstown.

I wouldn't put it past Schilling or any of the Red Sox to do something like that. Of course it just could be my hatred for the Sox & Yankees.

Chip R
04-26-2007, 02:27 PM
He'd have to be really, really, dumb to imagine that he'd have to DO anything to get a blood stain going on his sock when he'd just had fresh sutures put in his ankle.


No dressing on those sutures? No wrap? He must have been bleeding a gusher if he bled through all that onto his sock. I think he faked it to hype it up even more. And it worked.

T7-niner
04-26-2007, 02:30 PM
I think he faked it to hype it up even more. And it worked.

As if the Red Sox and Yankees need to hype anything....

They have ESPN for that.

GullyFoyle
04-26-2007, 02:34 PM
My face is straight.

examples please...

Yachtzee
04-26-2007, 02:42 PM
No dressing on those sutures? No wrap? He must have been bleeding a gusher if he bled through all that onto his sock. I think he faked it to hype it up even more. And it worked.

It doesn't have to be a gusher. I popped a suture once and bled through the dressing. Granted it wasn't that much. But then I wasn't pitching in a ballgame with constant movement causing friction on the dressing/sutures. Constant movement can keep reopening the wound and allowing more blood to escape. And of course there was the time I had ACL surgery and had a giant blood blister developed not far from the incision. If the incision had been on my ankle and the blister had popped, I could imagine my whole sock would have been bloody.

The amount of blood on the sock is entirely plausible. However, based on what I know of Curt Schilling, I could totally see him messing with the wound once it started bleeding and then adjusting his sock to make it more visible.

membengal
04-26-2007, 02:46 PM
examples please...

Why? Why do I owe you that? I find him to be completely ego-centered, to the point of being an egomaniac. I think he is so obsessed about being who he is that he would absolutely engage in that kind of abject PR fraud. It's my opinion. I have no problems, whatsoever, thinking that he engaged in that.

Are you asking if I have an IQ test for him? I do not. Are you asking if I can point to blog entries of his for misspellings etc.? What are you asking, exactly? Am I supposed to PROVE he's dumb to have an opinion that he is so? Sorry, I don't have to do that. My opinion is that he is so obsessed with being CURT that he can barely function otherwise.

For me, when he compared the "plight" of being away from his kids on Easter morning due to baseball travel with being a soldier in Iraq, that pretty much cemented it. That was from his blog a few weeks back.

Vain. AND. Dumb.

GullyFoyle
04-26-2007, 02:51 PM
Why? Why do I owe you that? I find him to be completely ego-centered, to the point of being an egomaniac. I think he is so obsessed about being who he is that he would absolutely engage in that kind of abject PR fraud. It's my opinion. I have no problems, whatsoever, thinking that he engaged in that.

Are you asking if I have an IQ test for him? I do not. Are you asking if I can point to blog entries of his for misspellings etc.? What are you asking, exactly? Am I supposed to PROVE he's dumb to have an opinion that he is so? Sorry, I don't have to do that. My opinion is that he is so obsessed with being CURT that he can barely function otherwise.

For me, when he compared the "plight" of being away from his kids on Easter morning due to baseball travel with being a soldier in Iraq, that pretty much cemented it. That was from his blog a few weeks back.

Vain. AND. Dumb.


So you have no way to substantiate your opinion.. thats fine. He appears to be dumb because he disagrees with you and doesn't act the way you want him to. I have no problem with that characterization if you don't.

Chip R
04-26-2007, 02:52 PM
Why? Why do I owe you that? I find him to be completely ego-centered, to the point of being an egomaniac. I think he is so obsessed about being who he is that he would absolutely engage in that kind of abject PR fraud. It's my opinion. I have no problems, whatsoever, thinking that he engaged in that.



I think it's kind of harsh to call it fraud. A lot of PR consists of half truths, propaganda and sometimes outright lies. I see it as similar to a pro wrestler cutting open his forehead with a razor to make it look like his opponent cut him open with a punch or kick. If it was a work, I think he did it not necessarily to hype the series but to hype himself. Before that series he was a very good pitcher who was having a great year. After that series he was a legend.

membengal
04-26-2007, 02:53 PM
I gave you an example there at the end. Anyone who compares being a baseball player with being a soldier in Iraq is dumber than a box of baseballs. Beyond dumb.

Return to your hero worship of the fraud as you wish. Whatever makes you happy.

GullyFoyle
04-26-2007, 03:20 PM
I gave you an example there at the end. Anyone who compares being a baseball player with being a soldier in Iraq is dumber than a box of baseballs. Beyond dumb.

Return to your hero worship of the fraud as you wish. Whatever makes you happy.

You assume a lot. I don't particularly care for Schillling and do find him egotistical to a degree but thats different than being dumb enough to fake the blood of an injury that is easily verifiable in order to get more kudos from the public..

GullyFoyle
04-26-2007, 03:30 PM
Anyone who compares being a baseball player with being a soldier in Iraq is dumber than a box of baseballs. Beyond dumb.

Not knowing how he is using the comparison and the context it was made in I wont say anything for certain, but I don't necessarily find this proof of being dumb.

...and before someone jumps on my allegiance to the troops, I have a brother there now.


(edit: I am also not saying I agree with the comparison just that I don't find it inherently dumb)

George Anderson
04-26-2007, 03:35 PM
Anyone who compares being a baseball player with being a soldier in Iraq is dumber than a box of baseballs. Beyond dumb.



Almost as dumb as a bunch of people arguing about a sock.:D

membengal
04-26-2007, 03:43 PM
I am not arguing about the fraudlent sock, I am discussing just how dumb Curt Schilling is...

paulrichjr
04-26-2007, 04:00 PM
I am not arguing about the fraudlent sock, I am discussing just how dumb Curt Schilling is...

I just don't see it. Ego (Check - He has a huge ego)
Pete Rose - Dumb (A tremendous amount of proof not to mention listening to him talk on shows like Jay Leno prove it)
Curt Schilling(where is the proof? - He is articulate and to hear some on this site he is smart enough to paint his socks red to make himself a legend - In fact he was then able to color them the same color as dried blood or even better he left the bandages slightly open so he could bleed on his sock knowing that he would pitch one of the greatest games in the history of the World Series and become a legend and...this is insane)

Curt Schilling is a lot of things including a great pitcher but a dumb guy who made up the bloody sock thing - he is not. (He is not a hero of mine either...)

KYRed
04-26-2007, 07:00 PM
For some reason I fund it funny that people actually think he went to all the trouble to fake this, not to mention that the socks looks to have dried blood on it, and not paint or dye.

Perhaps a few disagree with his politics, and that makes him dumb? I sure haven't seen any other stated reason to explain that line of thinking. I can see the vain part, but other than that...

griffeyfreak4
04-26-2007, 07:23 PM
If it was a work, I think he did it not necessarily to hype the series but to hype himself. Before that series he was a very good pitcher who was having a great year. After that series he was a legend.

Schilling pitched an absolutely outstanding game. Period. Ok, no argument there. The fact that Schilling did pitch such an outstanding game, with an injury like that, makes it unbelieveable.

Whether or not the cut bled through to the sock, IRRELEVENT. He would've been a legend whether or not there was blood on the sock.

I can't even believe this is an argument. I refuse to believe anyone is that arrogant, and no, I don't think Schilling is that dumb.

jojo
04-26-2007, 09:07 PM
Looks a lot more like old blood stains than paint or ink to me.

Looks like corn syrup, water, corn starch and red dye #41 to me.... but hey, I think baseball was better theater when the Sox were jinxed....

:cool:

Always Red
04-26-2007, 09:24 PM
.... but hey, I think baseball was better theater when the Sox were jinxed....



I liked the BoSox much better back then myself...

nate
04-27-2007, 09:13 AM
Here's (http://38pitches.com/2007/04/27/ignorance-has-its-privileges/#more-76) what Curt has to say about it:

westofyou
04-27-2007, 10:59 AM
http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20070426&content_id=1931740&vkey=news_mlb&fext=.jsp&c_id=mlb


Thorne says he was wrong about sock



BALTIMORE -- Every journalist's nightmare was played out Thursday for broadcaster Gary Thorne, who awoke to find out that he had become the story he had been trying to cover. Thorne, who calls games for the Mid Atlantic Sports Network, found himself in a controversy over comments he made about Curt Schilling during Wednesday's game between the Orioles and Red Sox.

Thorne said on the air that Boston catcher Doug Mirabelli had told him that the blood on Schilling's sock during the 2004 American League Championship Series was fake, more a publicity stunt than badge of courage. One day later -- after another chat with Mirabelli -- Thorne attempted to stifle the furor by admitting that he was wrong.

"He said one thing, and I heard something else," said Thorne of the earlier conversation, which happened a year or two ago. "I reported what I heard and what I honestly felt was said. Having talked with him today, there's no doubt in my mind that's not what he said [and] that's not what he meant.

"He explained why in the context of the sarcasm and the jabbing that goes on in the clubhouse, [and] that I understand. I took it as something serious, and it wasn't."

The story had such legs because it dealt with an anecdote that instantly became a legend. Schilling's right sock had red spots on it during Game 6 of the ALCS, and the substance was assumed to be blood. Schilling had to undergo a minor procedure to pitch in that game, and his performance helped vault the Red Sox to the World Series.

His sock showed similar markings in Game 2 of the World Series, and that garment is now on display at the National Baseball Hall of Fame. If the substance on the sock had actually been paint -- or anything else -- it would've significantly diluted one of the biggest stories surrounding Boston's first World Series championship since 1918.

"I'm disappointed it happened because I have to come here and answer questions about it," said Boston manager Terry Francona. "It was actually one of the most miraculous performances I've ever been around. It's disappointing because there's going to probably be a faction of people who want to believe it. And it's not true."

"Everybody knows that was on that team that that Curt Schilling sock had blood on it," Mirabelli said Thursday. "There's never been a doubt in any of the players' minds. I think it's unfortunate that some of the naysayers out there try to discredit what Curt Schilling did those in those weeks that he pitched with that ankle.

"I think that's the biggest story here -- that he went out there for a team and helped us win games at way less than 100 percent [with] the surgery and the stitches."

Kevin Millar, a current Oriole and former Red Sox, tried to settle the question once and for all. When reporters approached him Thursday, he quickly blurted out, "It was blood," before he was asked a question. Millar went on to say that he was surprised it came up so far after the fact, but not that it became a major news item in Boston.

"No, I'm not surprised. It's normal [in Boston]," he said. "I don't know exactly what was said because I was playing the game, but it's quite silly to be a serious statement. You don't want to use the word 'heroic' with everything going on in our country right now, but it was 100 percent blood. What Schilling did for us that night was awesome.

"We witnessed Dr. Morgan and our training staff in the training room doing the surgery."

Similar testimonies came in from other former teammates. Doug Mientkiewicz, the Yankees' first baseman and another member of Boston's title-winning team, said that he had also witnessed the surgery in question.

"The fact that you sit there and watch a guy get his ankle cut open, it's pretty gross," he said. "You go into the trainer's room and you're used to seeing dislocated fingers, dislocated shoulders. You see a pretty nice bruise once in a while. You don't see an Exacto knife going to a human being's skin, but all of a sudden, there it is."

So where did the confusion come in? Thorne met with Mirabelli on Thursday to try to hash out exactly where the misunderstanding took place, and they both seemed satisfied after their face-to-face encounter.

"As he was walking away, [Thorne] asked me, 'How about the bloody sock?' " said Mirabelli, recounting the initial incident. "And this was a year later, after the World Series. And he said that I said, 'Yeah, we got a lot of publicity out of that.' And that was it. That was all that he could recall me saying. And he said that he just assumed that's what I meant, that it was all a publicity stunt. By no means was that what I meant."

"I didn't say something I didn't believe. I would never do that," added Thorne. "I feel bad the whole thing happened because I don't want to disparage him or Schilling or Terry [Francona] or anybody else. I wasn't looking for a story. I didn't want something to come out of this. But when it came today, I was flabbergasted by it.

"That why the most important thing for me today was talking to Doug. I wanted a one-on-one with him so he knew what I said, why I said it [and] what our conversation had been before."

Mirabelli also said that Thorne seemed upset about the snafu and was willing to do what he could to clear it up.

"He wasn't trying to throw anybody under the bus," Mirabelli said. "In his mind, that's what he thought I meant. It's hard to get that meaning out of those words he told me, but that's what he went with."

At the end of the day, the No. 1 thing that came across was the respect Schilling's teammates have for him.

"He likes attention, but he doesn't like that much attention," Mientkiewicz said. "He did it for him, he did it for us, [and] he did it for the city. I know what it was. It wasn't nail polish."

"He's one of the players that's asked about the most, once you've played with him," said Millar. "Truly, and behind the scenes, Curt Schilling is a tremendous teammate. He's probably the one pitcher I'd take in any big-game situation, and he's probably the best big-game pitcher of our generation. The bottom line and the question was, 'Is it blood or paint?' It was 100 percent blood. I don't know how this became an issue three years later. Only in [Red] Sox Nation."

blumj
04-27-2007, 11:07 AM
And Millar wore a fake bloody sock last night, which I have to admit was pretty funny.

westofyou
04-27-2007, 11:12 AM
And Millar wore a fake bloody sock last night, which I have to admit was pretty funny.
That's the sort of thing that separates baseball from the pure corporate machine of NFL. Do that in the NFL and the story today is about the fine levied by the league against the player, in baseball it's filed in the "Hot Foots" and other fun pranks drawer and relished for its originality.

RFS62
04-27-2007, 11:19 AM
Well, there's only one thing to do now.

This story is far too important to just let die.

We're going to have to take a sample of the sacred sock and send it to the same outfit that tested the Shroud of Turin.

Anything less would be undignified.

The American public demands an answer.

And ESPN could sent Pedro Gomez with the sock to report on the day to day progress of the testing process.

I smell a ratings bonanza.

JaxRed
04-27-2007, 11:38 AM
And Millar wore a fake bloody sock last night, which I have to admit was pretty funny.

Tori Hunter should send him some Champagne !!

HumnHilghtFreel
04-27-2007, 11:43 AM
Here's (http://38pitches.com/2007/04/27/ignorance-has-its-privileges/#more-76) what Curt has to say about it:

I loved how he opened that, couldn't agree more.

There's no reason this should be in the news.

NJReds
04-27-2007, 12:06 PM
I remember way back when I joked in another thread about this, but only because of Curt's rep as an egomaniac. I don't really believe he'd fake it, and I can't believe that Thorne 1) believed it, and 2) went on the air with it w/out confirmation. Thorne is a complete idiot in this case.

GullyFoyle
04-27-2007, 01:27 PM
Looks like Schilling is offering 1 million to charity if someone wants to check the sock...

http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=2851147

I amazed the press has gotten tired of Anna Nicole Smith so fast... :rolleyes: