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RedsFan75
06-26-2007, 04:52 PM
http://www.redszone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=59710

Basically the question that user Jim Fazio asked was...

What would it take for you to stop liking the Reds and have another as your favorite team?

I know we discuss what team we're going to cheer on during the Playoffs and Series when the Reds are out of it... but would there be something that might cause you to stop being a Reds fan?

As for me... Well..

I started following the Reds when I was 6, didn't understand baseball as much as I would later come to love, but it was 1966 and Crosley field and the Reds makes quite an impression on a young boy. Later when the Orioles ripped my heart out I learned to dislike a team. (Same can be said of the Dodgers etc... :) ) but with the history of following the team, it would have to be a pretty monumental event to cause me to forgo supporting my beloved, Reds.

Anyway, thought it might be a good discussion point.

JaxRed
06-26-2007, 04:57 PM
Nothing would

lollipopcurve
06-26-2007, 05:03 PM
No chance. It's in the marrow.

Sea Ray
06-26-2007, 05:05 PM
If you're still a Reds fan after these 21st Century teams here in Cincinnati then you're hooked for life.

StillFunkyB
06-26-2007, 05:06 PM
$10 million dollars. You pay me that much cash, I'll hate just about anything.

That's the only thing I can think of.

deltachi8
06-26-2007, 05:18 PM
Intersting, on the Sports Station this morning in Buffalo, they had a similar topic.

I don't think I would ever change, but I can't say that the thought doesn't enter my mind from time to time (say when Castro is pinch hitting for oh, I dunno, say Hamilton...)

Johnny Footstool
06-26-2007, 05:19 PM
I lived through the disaster of '82 and kept liking the Reds, although my interest did wane a bit. So nothing would make me hate them.

membengal
06-26-2007, 05:21 PM
Ditto. Survived the Russ Nixon years and the Paul Householder experience, I can survive this.

westofyou
06-26-2007, 05:26 PM
Nothing parts two rivers met

Liz Phair

37red
06-26-2007, 05:30 PM
You know StillFunkyB, for 10 million I could pretend to even like the Yankees, but my blood will always run Reds red. Give me the bucks, I take us all out to a game and we discuss it there.

traderumor
06-26-2007, 05:32 PM
I love baseball, watch it or listen every chance I get, but the Reds will always be the only team I care about if they win or lose. I would say that is most likely to never change since they have been the only MLB team I have ever rooted for since I was 7--its 35 years later. If I can survive the 90s Bengals, this is nothing.

RichRed
06-26-2007, 05:40 PM
I lived through the disaster of '82 and kept liking the Reds, although my interest did wane a bit. So nothing would make me hate them.

Word.

Yachtzee
06-26-2007, 05:55 PM
I think that if pushed far enough, I would probably follow my dad and stop following baseball. For him, the '94 strike was the tipping point. He may go to games on occasion if someone has a ticket for him, but he went from following the Reds religiously to not even caring any more after the strike. He knows Junior is on the team, but if you asked him to name who is on the roster, he might be able to list 2 or 3 and that is it.

He did ask me who was managing the Reds these days. I told him Jerry Narron, a disciple of Gene Mauch. He said, "Oh boy, I bet he does that 'righty-lefty' and 'lefty-righty' crap all the time." Made me chuckle. :)

BuckWoody
06-26-2007, 06:01 PM
Nothing parts two rivers met

Liz Phair
I think that's the longest quote you can use for Liz Phair lyrics and still keep it acceptable on a "family" board. ;)

I can't foresee anything ever changing my love for the Reds. I stuck with the Bengals through the suckitude of the 90's so I have an understanding as to how to persevere through the tough times.

dabvu2498
06-26-2007, 06:07 PM
The lives of my wife and child... or a significant, significant amount of money

MartyFan
06-26-2007, 08:18 PM
If Marge Schoot didn't chase me away no amount of losing would ever bother me enough to see me lose loyalty to the team.

camisadelgolf
06-26-2007, 08:22 PM
Even if the Reds relocated, I'd root for them (at least as long as they are players on the team I still want to root for). However, I'd imagine that after the team relocated, over time, I'd start rooting for a favorite minor league team like the Dragons or maybe even the Steam or Freedom or something.

GoReds
06-26-2007, 08:34 PM
Grew up with the Reds in the 70s complete with the Topps baseball cards (had 4 Johnny Bench cards and was the baddest kid on the block).

If I didn't love the Reds, I don't think I'd love baseball.

chicoruiz
06-26-2007, 08:38 PM
I was going to say that some kind of major character issue on their part might get me to switch, but heck, I made it through the manager canoodling with gamblers, so I guess the grave is the only end for me and the Reds.

Bad baseball definitely wouldn't do it; I've built up an immunity...

SandyD
06-26-2007, 09:02 PM
I was a baseball fan before I became a Reds fan, but the Reds were the first team I really followed.

Expansion team in my area? That'd be a tough one.

Mario-Rijo
06-26-2007, 09:33 PM
Even if the Reds relocated, I'd root for them (at least as long as they are players on the team I still want to root for). However, I'd imagine that after the team relocated, over time, I'd start rooting for a favorite minor league team like the Dragons or maybe even the Steam or Freedom or something.

That was what I was going to suggest, but I would not follow them at that point unless they were forced to leave. Why that would ever happen I couldn't conceive but that would be it.

If they chose to leave man I wouldn't know what to do. Probably as Yachtzee said and just quit following Major League ball.

But 10 Million wouldn't do it, although I might tell who was offering it that it would. :devil:

MWM
06-26-2007, 10:03 PM
Nothing. If Marty Brenneman hasn't driven me from loving the Reds, nothing will. Although, if they somehow picked up Barry Bonds (or if Cristiano Ronaldo somehow became a baseball player and came to the Reds :evil: ), I think I'd take temporary leave of rooting for them. But that's an impossibility.

edit: someone else mentioned relocaion. If the Reds moved from Cincy, not only would I stop rooting for them, but I'd probably come to despise them like I now do the Cubs.

pedro
06-26-2007, 10:11 PM
Relocation would do the trick.

(unless, of course, they moved to Portland)

RedsBaron
06-26-2007, 10:13 PM
Yeah, maybe relocation. I've been a Reds fan since 1966 and I do not expect that to change.

SandyD
06-26-2007, 10:28 PM
The Reds are my only tie to the area, but relocation would weaken my loyalty.

pedro, what if an expansion team moved to Portland? You'd have a team you could actually go see regularly ... in their home park ... and they'd be part of the community and all that.

It would be hard not to get caught up in it eventually.

pedro
06-26-2007, 10:30 PM
The Reds are my only tie to the area, but relocation would weaken my loyalty.

pedro, what if an expansion team moved to Portland? You'd have a team you could actually go see regularly ... in their home park ... and they'd be part of the community and all that.

It would be hard not to get caught up in it eventually.

If an expansion team moved to Portland I would root for them, just as I rooted for the Braves when I lived in Atlanta. Regardless, the Reds are and always will be my favorite team.

westofyou
06-26-2007, 10:41 PM
pedro, what if an expansion team moved to Portland? You'd have a team you could actually go see regularly ... in their home park ... and they'd be part of the community and all that.

That would be great, and it would be even better when the Reds came to town and kicked their rears.

The_jbh
06-26-2007, 11:00 PM
There is nothing that would make me stop following the reds/liking the reds... however getting a new favorite team would be possible... I am pretty entrenched in Cincinnati Sports (HUGE Bengals fan as well as a red... and i moved to cincinnati in 1992...) Geography could potentially make me gain a new favorite team to follow. Say I were to move to Boston and live there for an extended period of time... I'd likely get sucked into the Red Sox fever... I'd still watch the Reds in the box scores every night though...

SandyD
06-26-2007, 11:00 PM
I'd like to think it would be the same for me. I just think over time, it would become harder to hang on to that loyalty to a team I could "never" see live, when there was a team right there.

If I lived in a city that was a candidate for an expansion team ... I'd hope for an AL team, so it wouldn't be such a big deal.

Now, I don't think moving to an existing major league city or having an existing major league team relocating nearby would have the same affect.

westofyou
06-26-2007, 11:02 PM
I'd like to think it would be the same for me. I just think over time, it would become harder to hang on to that loyalty to a team I could "never" see live, when there was a team right there.

Shoot, I watched the Giants and the A's regularly for 20 years, but I still followed the Reds.

KronoRed
06-26-2007, 11:05 PM
I'll agree with the relocation comment, if I relocated I'd still be a Reds fan, I'm not learning another teams history all over again :)

Red in Chicago
06-26-2007, 11:12 PM
Shoot, I watched the Giants and the A's regularly for 20 years, but I still followed the Reds.

Similar with me. I've had the Cubs and Sox in my backyard for over 40 years, but never been a fan of either. I've always hated the Cubs and Wrigley Field. I can tolerate the Sox, but I don't care for AL baseball and their announcers are unbearable to listen to. Give me the Reds 8 days a week.

Big Klu
06-26-2007, 11:13 PM
There is nothing that would make me stop following the reds/liking the reds... however getting a new favorite team would be possible...

If a family member or former student/player became a big-leaguer, then I would have to follow his team. (One of my students, who also played for me, is going to play at the collegiate level. He is undoubtably the best player I have coached or coached against. Although it is a long shot, there is a possibility that he could play professionally. He has already promised me tickets if he makes it to the Show, so I would have to follow his team! :D )

But I would still be a Reds fan, too.

RedFanAlways1966
06-26-2007, 11:15 PM
Nothing. I have requested to be buried in REDS clothing.

SandyD
06-26-2007, 11:20 PM
Similar with me. I've had the Cubs and Sox in my backyard for over 40 years, but never been a fan of either. I've always hated the Cubs and Wrigley Field. I can tolerate the Sox, but I don't care for AL baseball and their announcers are unbearable to listen to. Give me the Reds 8 days a week.


I think an expansion team would be something different, tho. Just speculating. But then, I've never lived in a major league city at all, so I really can't say.

bucksfan
06-26-2007, 11:41 PM
My 1st thought is "nothing" but the exception may be only if there are rampant serious character issues on the team (I mean like 90% of the team) - I've said before I like to at least kinda like most of the guys I root for - and then they re-locate somewhere else. That combination may do it for me (but only if they were playing badly for 20 year consecutively also!). I have grown to like the Tigers in my 18 years up hear in the home of their farm team...but all that said, I grew up "Reds and Buckeyes" and cannot imagine being anything else.

Yachtzee
06-26-2007, 11:41 PM
My family moved from Western OH to Indians Territory in NE Ohio when I turned 8. I have never waivered from the Reds to the Indians. As much as I admire the ability of their current front office to find and develop talent, I don't think I could ever feel for the Indians the way I do for the Reds.

Cyclone792
06-26-2007, 11:42 PM
The only thing that could ever make me think about it is if the Reds relocated. But considering they just built themselves a new stadium, that's out of the picture for a long while, I'm sure.

This is a tangent and sort of a different topic altogether, but one very small fear I have is of the Reds never winning another World Series again for a long, long time. Many people on here were old enough to appreciate the 1990 World Series team, and some others even old enough to appreciate the Big Red Machine and their glory. Not me, though. I was only eight-years-old in 1990 and had little comprehension of what the Reds winning the World Series meant. I was far too young for that team to be thought of as "my team," as in a team I could cherish for years.

I'm 25 now, and the Reds team I've "cherished" was the 1999 bunch who didn't even make the playoffs. It's sad when I think about it, but the recent stretch of losing just wears thin.

One thing I would just absolutely love to have - and fear I may never have if the Reds go down the road of the Cubs (and formerly the Red Sox and White Sox) - is a Reds World Series victory sometime in my life when I'm able to appreciate the totality of it. Something clicked in me while watching the 2004 playoffs and seeing what it meant to Red Sox fans watching their team finally win a World Series. Then it happened again in 2005 with the White Sox and their fans. With the exception of the extreme elderly, those teams had entire fan bases who were caught up in the joy and excitement of seeing their team win its first World Series in their lifetime.

Every spring, no matter how hopeful or bleak the new season's outlook is, a small little glimmer inside of me says let this be the year. Let this be the year the Reds can win the World Series and I can finally enjoy what so many other Reds fans could enjoy in 1919, or 1940, or 1975, or 1976, or 1990. Since the inception of the World Series itself, the Reds have never gone more than 25 years without winning a championship.

They'll already be at 18 years next season during this current stretch.

WVRedsFan
06-27-2007, 12:55 AM
I couldn't change. I've got 46 years invested in this team.

pedro
06-27-2007, 02:26 AM
The only thing that could ever make me think about it is if the Reds relocated. But considering they just built themselves a new stadium, that's out of the picture for a long while, I'm sure.

This is a tangent and sort of a different topic altogether, but one very small fear I have is of the Reds never winning another World Series again for a long, long time. Many people on here were old enough to appreciate the 1990 World Series team, and some others even old enough to appreciate the Big Red Machine and their glory. Not me, though. I was only eight-years-old in 1990 and had little comprehension of what the Reds winning the World Series meant. I was far too young for that team to be thought of as "my team," as in a team I could cherish for years.

I'm 25 now, and the Reds team I've "cherished" was the 1999 bunch who didn't even make the playoffs. It's sad when I think about it, but the recent stretch of losing just wears thin.

One thing I would just absolutely love to have - and fear I may never have if the Reds go down the road of the Cubs (and formerly the Red Sox and White Sox) - is a Reds World Series victory sometime in my life when I'm able to appreciate the totality of it. Something clicked in me while watching the 2004 playoffs and seeing what it meant to Red Sox fans watching their team finally win a World Series. Then it happened again in 2005 with the White Sox and their fans. With the exception of the extreme elderly, those teams had entire fan bases who were caught up in the joy and excitement of seeing their team win its first World Series in their lifetime.

Every spring, no matter how hopeful or bleak the new season's outlook is, a small little glimmer inside of me says let this be the year. Let this be the year the Reds can win the World Series and I can finally enjoy what so many other Reds fans could enjoy in 1919, or 1940, or 1975, or 1976, or 1990. Since the inception of the World Series itself, the Reds have never gone more than 25 years without winning a championship.

They'll already be at 18 years next season during this current stretch.

Part of me feels like the Reds are merely charting a course towards consistent non offensiveness. By this I mean that sometimes it appears their goal is to shoot for a structure where they can consistently win 85 games a year and keep the bodies coming to the park on a projectable level. If that is the sole plan then you're right, it might be a good long while before the Reds have a team catch the wave like the 1990 team did. Or it might be next year. You never know. That's why we watch, isn't it?

To me, the big X factor is Castellini and his ownership group, because until the Reds are really "close" and there is a difference maker available, we won't know if he's "in or out" so to speak. We've all been sitting at the table for 18 months now and I really don't think we know what type of player Castellini is. He hasn't been extravagant up to this point, but he certainly hasn't been cheap either.

Now, we can all question the intelligence behind the extensions and signings of Wayne Krivsky, and whether Castellini ought to be listening to the guy in the first place, but the way the Reds have operated since the new ownership group took over has led me to believe that either the GM (Krivsky) has the budgetary discretion to make the moves he sees fit or ownership is open to adding liability to the bottom line at the suggestion of baseball operations. This hasn't always been the case in the past and I'd like to think that it might bode well in the future even if 18 months into it, the Reds are struggling mightily.

After all, even Steinbrenner took 3 years to get the Yankees to the world series and I don't think anybody can really say that in December of 2005 they expected the Reds be contending in 2007, regardless of who the GM and Manager were.

My ultimate feeling on Krivsky is that I'd let him work out his contract, but if the Reds aren't more obviously in a position to be consistently successful after 2008 then I'd look to replace him.

Obviously, I know that a lot of people aren't that patient, and honestly I can understand the frustration. But I really believe that it's important for mid/lower market teams such as the Reds to give the impression that their ownership is both patient and realistic (in addition to well funded) or the they'll never attract good management candidates at any level.

In my opinion, Jerry Narron (and to a lesser extent, Wayne Krivsky) is what happens to an organization when they don't have a good reputation within the league. Personally I want the Reds to have better options in the future.

So, assuming that the Castellini group is in for the foreseeable future, my main concern is they create an environment that is attractive to the best employees and I just don't believe that firing Wayne Krivsky at this point gives that impression.

Narron on the other hand.......

chicoruiz
06-27-2007, 08:38 AM
Nothing. I have requested to be buried in REDS clothing.

Careful... Krivsky may come to the visitation and sign you for the bullpen...

TeamCasey
06-27-2007, 08:44 AM
Geography.

When I lived in New York I rooted for the Yankees.

texasdave
06-27-2007, 09:50 AM
Relocation wouldn't work for me. I root for the Sacramento Kings just because one time, long ago, they were the Cincinnati Royals.

RedsFan75
06-27-2007, 10:07 AM
My relocation has no effect on my passion of the Reds, before internet it was much harder to follow them though.

I was living in New Mexico in the few years leading up the the 90 WS. So in 89 I would be the only Pickup in the Mall parking lot with a Reds bumper sticker, but suddenly at the end of the 1990 season, there were several Reds stickers in the mall parking lot. :) Although living in Albuquerque and going to the Dukes games did serve to lessen my Dodger hatred. (I can't find my baseball card of Hershiser in his Dukes uni though)

If a relocation affected me, It would be the Reds Relo, but living where I do, what team could my allegiance shift to... I suppose the Lexington Legends. :)

deltachi8
06-27-2007, 11:10 AM
One thing I would just absolutely love to have - and fear I may never have if the Reds go down the road of the Cubs (and formerly the Red Sox and White Sox) - is a Reds World Series victory sometime in my life when I'm able to appreciate the totality of it. Something clicked in me while watching the 2004 playoffs and seeing what it meant to Red Sox fans watching their team finally win a World Series. Then it happened again in 2005 with the White Sox and their fans. With the exception of the extreme elderly, those teams had entire fan bases who were caught up in the joy and excitement of seeing their team win its first World Series in their lifetime.

I was 21 during the 1990 run and in college. I remember having my Reds jersey on after the game 4 victory, being high fived at the bar and the bartender buying me a drink - all in upstate NY. One can live off that feeling for a long, long time.

This past year, I saw a community (myself included) completely invested in the Buffalo Sabres - to a degree I have never seen before. I invested in season tickets, my son had my put up the playoff signs in our window at home, everywhere you looked it was blue and gold....then the Senators showed they were a better team and it was over in 5 quick games. It hurt. The ride ended and now it's just looking forward to next year. i still have many great memories of the season, but I know they will fade pretty quick.

Thats when I realized how lucky I was to have been through 1990 with the Reds, because when your team, one you are invested in with heart and soul, actually does win it all, that feeling just doesn't fade away in a month...it goes on and on and on...

Unassisted
06-27-2007, 11:22 AM
I relocated away from the Reds almost 20 years ago now. I still follow them.

Moving the team to the American League would do it for me. I don't pay attention to AL teams, so moving the Reds to the American League would be like moving them to the MLS or the NHL as far as I'm concerned.

When I lived in Wisconsin, I paid zero attention to the Brewers while they were in the AL. I didn't attend one of their games until they switched to the NL. I have never attended an Indians game and the only game I've ever attended in an AL stadium was an interleague game between the Twins and the Reds in the Metrodome.

Team Clark
06-27-2007, 11:30 AM
A high ranking position with another team! LOL! Seriosuly I don't think anything could take the Reds out of my heart. It's not just the Reds but the memories of going to Opening Day with my Mom, the '99 playoff game with my Dad. '87 ST meeting my heroes. I could go on and on just like many poster's here. It's part of my DNA.

KronoRed
06-27-2007, 11:44 AM
Geography.

When I lived in New York I rooted for the Yankees.

Even..the Cubs? :devil:

M2
06-27-2007, 12:57 PM
I've been a fan since 1972, always from afar. So relocation wouldn't bother me. They could move to Timbuktu and it wouldn't really change anything from my perspective.

Though, as I get older I find I don't care about certain things that mattered intensely to me when I was younger. I used to be a huge Washington Redskins fan, a complete fanatic. Eventually I got bored by the NFL and I stopped caring about the Redskins.

Baseball never bores me, but I could switch allegiance to another club if it really caught my fancy. I've had a strong fan connection to Reds teams of the past, but that's the past and life is short. I root for the current club, but I certainly don't care like I did seven years ago. Obviously if the Reds had been a better team over that stretch, I might not feel that way. The big disconnect for me is franchise doesn't play the athletic brand of baseball that made me a Reds fan in the first place.

Anyway, being 100% there for your family and friends is what matters. Total allegiance to a baseball franchise? Not so much.

red-in-la
06-27-2007, 02:21 PM
When I first moved to SoCal, there was little to no technology available to follow the Reds.

Anyway, between approx. 1982 and 1989, I didn't follow baseball at all.

Then, the internet and the new Bungals stadium made me interested in the Reds and the Bungals again.

Roy Tucker
06-27-2007, 03:17 PM
Relocation would do it. Particularly if it was a bitter move.

I was as big of a Browns v1.0 fan as you'd ever find. Huge. Now, I hate the Baltimore Ravens and I really don't care about Browns v2.0 (and the NFL for that matter). I have gotten back my Sunday afternoons though.

Generally speaking, the older I get, the less sports matter to me. There is always next year and every team has its ebb and flow. I think I'm happier for it.

M2
06-27-2007, 03:36 PM
Generally speaking, the older I get, the less sports matter to me. There is always next year and every team has its ebb and flow. I think I'm happier for it.

I'm finding the same thing. It's a nice disposable diversion, but I wouldn't want to invest myself emotionally in it the way I have in the past. That's actually the biggest impediment to switching to a new favorite team from my perspective. Why would I care that much about another team? It's a lot less hassle to keep being a Reds fan.

RichRed
06-27-2007, 03:41 PM
I used to be a huge Washington Redskins fan, a complete fanatic. Eventually I got bored by the NFL and I stopped caring about the Redskins.


We need you back, M2. Though I can understand why you left.

RedsBaron
06-27-2007, 03:46 PM
Generally speaking, the older I get, the less sports matter to me. There is always next year and every team has its ebb and flow. I think I'm happier for it.

Me too. I'm still a Reds fan, but the Reds are not nearly as important to me as when I was 12, or 21. I was very happy when the 1990 Reds won the World Series, but that Series win did not mean nearly as much to me as the World Championships of 1975 and 1976.
When the Reds won in 1975-76, they did it primarily with players that I had grown up idolizing since before I was even a teenager. I had "lived and died" with guys like Rose, Perez and Bench for nearly a decade by then.
The 1990 title was won when I was 35, older than most, maybe all, of the players on the Reds.
As a 12 or even 21 year old I could idolize a major league baseball player. I find it hard to idolize someone younger than I am, and I find it pretty well impossible to idolize guys young enough to be my children. I may respect them, admire their athletic gifts, cheer them on, but it just isn't the same as when I was younger.

RANDY IN INDY
06-27-2007, 03:51 PM
Me too. I'm still a Reds fan, but the Reds are not nearly as important to me as when I was 12, or 21. I was very happy when the 1990 Reds won the World Series, but that Series win did not mean nearly as much to me as the World Championships of 1975 and 1976.
When the Reds won in 1975-76, they did it primarily with players that I had grown up idolizing since before I was even a teenager. I had "lived and died" with guys like Rose, Perez and Bench for nearly a decade by then.
The 1990 title was won when I was 35, older than most, maybe all, of the players on the Reds.
As a 12 or even 21 year old I could idolize a major league baseball player. I find it hard to idolize someone younger than I am, and I find it pretty well impossible to idolize guys young enough to be my children. I may respect them, admire their athletic gifts, cheer them on, but it just isn't the same as when I was younger.

That pretty much sums it up for me too, RedsBaron. I was 14 and 15 when the Reds won in '75 and '76 and I had watched that team battle from '68 on. The 1990 Series was not nearly as much fun for me, although it came after a time when the Reds hadn't done much and it was exciting to see them back on top. Good post!:beerme:

RedsManRick
06-27-2007, 04:01 PM
I moved away from Ohio in June of 1990, when I was 8. I moved in to the heart of Pirate county. I've moved 6 times since then. Yes, I was a Reds fan initially because that's who they showed the highlights of on the news and who they talked about in the newspaper when I was scanning box scores as a 5 year old. Being a fan of a team is rarely an intellectual exercise. I didn't sit down, decide what qualities I wanted in a team, and then find the team that fits those. The Reds were my team because they were there. I like them because I've liked them. It's really no more complicated than that.

You shouldn't expect some sort of return on your investment of fandom. Fandom is it's own reward and expectations should it ends there. Sometimes you get rewarded with winning seasons and championships. Sometimes not. For me, it's about having a community of people cheering for the same 25 guys. If they lose a lot, I might complain more, but I won't become less of a fan. The enjoyment from their success comes as a result of the depth of my commitment. If were to bandwagon to whatever team fit some set of criteria at the moment, it would cease being enjoyable. It would become an intellectual exercise. But I can do that AND be a fan of the Reds. I like what Billy Beane and Mark Shapiro do with their teams. But I cheer for the Reds.

I don't cheer for them because they're from Cincinnati and Cincinnati is somehow "the best". I don't cheer for them because they represent the realization of what a team should be. I cheer for them because I cheer for them and will continue to do so as long as they exist.

Big Klu
06-27-2007, 04:06 PM
It's all a matter of perspective. I was only 5 and 6 when the Reds won the World Series in 1975 and '76--too young to understand and appreciate it. But I was a 20-year-old college junior in 1990, and that World Series meant so much to me! I went to my first-ever Reds road game that post-season--Game 4 of the NLCS in Pittsburgh. I have to thank my college roommate Karl for that one. I had just come home from class (around 4:00) and told him that a guy in my morning class was going to Pittsburgh for the game, and I thought that was so cool! He said, "Why don't we go?" (He was from Naperville, IL and was a Cubs fan, but he enjoyed baseball.) I said, "The game starts in a little over four hours!" He said, "So? I can get us there." I said, "We don't have tickets!" He replied, "We'll get them when we get there. You shouldn't miss this." So I did what was up to that point (and may still be) the most spontaneous thing I have ever done, and went to Three Rivers Stadium on a warm October evening. It was the greatest and most exciting game I have ever been to--rivaled only by the first game I ever went to.

Red in Chicago
06-27-2007, 04:18 PM
Geography.

When I lived in New York I rooted for the Yankees.

My life would be so much easier if I could base my loyalty based on geography:p:

bucksfan
06-27-2007, 05:11 PM
My 1st thought is "nothing" but the exception may be only if there are rampant serious character issues on the team (I mean like 90% of the team) - I've said before I like to at least kinda like most of the guys I root for - and then they re-locate somewhere else. That combination may do it for me (but only if they were playing badly for 20 year consecutively also!). I have grown to like the Tigers in my 18 years up here in the home of their farm team...but all that said, I grew up "Reds and Buckeyes" and cannot imagine being anything else.

I am not sure why (or how) I quoted myself. I think this is a sign to get back to work.

dfs
06-27-2007, 05:21 PM
I stayed through the strike.
I stayed through Ray Knight.
I stayed through Bob Boone.

....At this point it isn't voluntary. It's just part of who and what I am.

15fan
06-27-2007, 05:22 PM
My life would be so much easier if I could base my loyalty based on geography:p:

I picked the city I live in because it was the only city on the face of the earth where my favorite baseball team and my college came to play every year.

(Don't let Mrs. fan know that - she thinks it was because of job opportunities, climate, proximity-or lack thereof - to family, etc.)

Then Bud Selig announced divisional play. 9 baseball games a year went to 3. And then because of conference expansion, my school's football team only comes to town once every 5 years :thumbdown though basketball still comes every year.

(At least I think that's right.)

I'll echo what the others have said above. I still root for the teams & want them to do well. But they occupy less time for me as I've aged. Job, wife, kid, house, etc. all take priority. On the rare occasion that I get to watch a game (either in person or on the tube), I think I appreciate it more. Both for the rare opportunity to do something fun, as well as for putting it in a much bigger context of balls/strikes, touchdowns, and 3 point baskets.

And as for rooting for the Reds, I was a fan in '82 when they lost 101 games. I was a fan during the entire Marge regime, during the Tony Perez firing, during Pete's decade+ of denial, as well as some absolutely atrocious baseball during the past 6 seasons. If that kind of stuff won't drive me away, I'm not sure anything will.

Always Red
06-27-2007, 07:58 PM
Born and raised on the west side of town, I've been through the best of times ('70-'79) as a teenager, and been through the worst of times (early to mid-'80's).

I've been lucky and I've suffered, both as a fan of this team.

I'll be here until I'm not here!

In the mid-80's I moved to Chicago, for graduate school. I went to a bunch of games at Wrigley, as I lived about a mile north of there (Buena Park), and loved it, but could not force myself to root for the Cubs. I wound up being a White Sox fan, and got to go to about 5-6 games at Old Comiskey, which was the most magical dump I have ever been to. I still follow the Sox, and root for them when and if the opportunity arises.

Spitball
06-27-2007, 08:14 PM
I spent most of my youth on Boston's North Shore (Topsfield), but I had two stints in Cincinnati (Finneytown and Indian Hill). I've stuck with both teams through the thick and the thin.

TeamCasey
06-27-2007, 08:44 PM
Even..the Cubs? :devil:

Never !!!!!!!

KronoRed
06-27-2007, 10:55 PM
Never !!!!!!!

Dodgers? :devil:

OldRightHander
06-27-2007, 11:29 PM
The only thing worse would be to cheat on my wife, and I don't play on doing either.

remdog
06-28-2007, 12:10 AM
RedsBaron & Randy:

Your comments are right on the mark with me except that I'm a few years older than you two. The '75/'76 Reds were the best team(s) I've ever witnessed but the '72 team is nearest and dearest to my heart. 1972 was the year I moved to Cincinnati and even though I'd followed the team since '56 there now was an intimatcy that came from living in 'the city'.

My first awareness of baseball was in 1954 because the Indians were in the World Series and we lived in Cleveland. I was 8 years old. It was cool; it piqued my interest in what this game was all about and I remain an Indians fan (as a seconary team) to this day. However, Cincinnati and the Reds had a different appeal---they were in Ohio but they were 'far away, removed, played in a different league', somehow they were 'exotic'. :) They had vests, they had muscles, they had a ballpark that wasn't impersonal. They hit home runs. They rocked!

I postponed a honeymoon to watch the Reds lose the seventh game of the '72 WS. The wife is gone but the Reds remain. Having said that, I too find myself spending less and less time on sports (of all kinds). That has been going on for about 30 years now but I still enjoy a good baseball game. Personally, even if it's a Reds game, these days I'd rather go out and particpate than watch on TV. I still play a competitive game of tennis in my age group and that brings me great joy---I'll sit on the couch and watch a game when it's the only choice I have.

I'll be a Reds fan till I die but it is a vastly different fervor than it was 30 years ago.

Rem

RedsBaron
06-28-2007, 07:55 AM
RedsBaron & Randy:

Your comments are right on the mark with me except that I'm a few years older than you two. The '75/'76 Reds were the best team(s) I've ever witnessed but the '72 team is nearest and dearest to my heart. 1972 was the year I moved to Cincinnati and even though I'd followed the team since '56 there now was an intimatcy that came from living in 'the city'.



The Reds loss to the A's in game seven of the 1972 World Series was the most devastating and shocking Reds defeat I have ever experienced. After the Reds had rallied to beat the Pirates in the NLCS, I assumed that a World Series victory was assured over that weirdly uniformed bunch of inferior players from Oakland. After all, the Pirates and Reds had had the two best records in baseball, the Reds had won the season series from Pittsburgh 8-4, and had just conquered the Pirates in the NLCS, thanks in large part to one of the most dramatic home runs in Reds history. I can still replay images from the 1972 World Series in my mind. It was a shocking, bitter, disappointing defeat.
The 1975-76 Reds are the ones dearest to my heart, and yes, in part because they won it all. But it was important to me that they won it largely with guys that I had watched develop in the majors over the prior decade. I became a Reds fan in 1966-in that season only Rose was an established star. I had watched Perez, Bench, Nolan, and Carroll all become key members of the Reds in the late 1960s, followed by Concepcion and Gullett in 1970, Morgan, Billingham and Geronimo in 1972, and Griffey in 1973. Foster was new as a regular in 1975, although he'd been around since 1971, and Eastwick and McEnaney were rookies, but for the most part the the 1975 Reds were made up of guys I had long cheered for, sharing in victories and defeats for years. They were the guys whose baseball cards I collected as a kid, whose photographs had hung on my bedroom wall.
I can remember watching, alone in my apartment in Durham, the Reds game four victory over the Yankees in 1976, completing a World Series sweep, with a bit of melancholy. "Doom and gloom" predictions were being made about the effects of the new era of free agency upon baseball, and I realized that several of the key Reds were on the wrong side of 30, so I had a sense that this was the peak. It was. The Reds have never been as great since that time, and I became an adult, and the Reds were never quite as important to me as they had been in my youth.

RFS62
06-28-2007, 08:21 AM
Relocation would do it. Particularly if it was a bitter move.

I was as big of a Browns v1.0 fan as you'd ever find. Huge. Now, I hate the Baltimore Ravens and I really don't care about Browns v2.0 (and the NFL for that matter). I have gotten back my Sunday afternoons though.

Generally speaking, the older I get, the less sports matter to me. There is always next year and every team has its ebb and flow. I think I'm happier for it.


My situation exactly. I could never imagine giving up on the Browns and the NFL. Now, they're a distant memory and I couldn't care less about either.

dfs
06-28-2007, 11:02 AM
Dodgers? :devil:
I lived in southern california during the mid 80's. Following the dodgers was not that bad because of Vin Scully. I can't say I ever really rooted for them, but they were the first team my wife paid attention to.

Scully is what Marty could have been. Instead of being charming and folksy and entertaining, Marty has just become bitter and spiteful.

remdog
06-28-2007, 11:16 AM
I live in southern california during the mid 80's. Following the dodgers was not that bad because of Vin Scully. I can't say I ever really rooted for them, but they were the first team my wife paid attention to.

Scully is what Marty could have been. Instead of being charming and folksy and entertaining, Marty has just become bitter and spiteful.

I 'root' for the Dodgers and Angels in the sense that they are interesting teams and give me the chance to prolong the season.

Great comp between Vin and Marty. :clap:

Rem