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Big Klu
06-28-2007, 12:34 AM
50 years ago (1957), a 7-1 win at Crosley Field vs. the Phillies.

Philadelphia
Richie Ashburn cf
Granny Hamner 2b
Ed Bouchee 1b
Harry Anderson lf
Stan Lopata c
Willie Jones 3b
Rip Repulski rf
Chico Fernandez ss
Don Cardwell p

Cincinnati
Johnny Temple 2b
Bob Thurman rf
Gus Bell cf
George Crowe 1b
Frank Robinson lf
Ed Bailey c
Don Hoak 3b
Roy McMillan ss
Hal Jeffcoat p


WP: Hal Jeffcoat (7-5)
LP: Don Cardwell (3-5)
HR: PHI - Harry Anderson (6). CIN - George Crowe (14), Hal Jeffcoat (3), Gus Bell (8).

remdog
06-28-2007, 12:41 AM
I've always thought the name 'Rip Repulski' was classic! He was sort of a '50's version of Wily Mo Pena. :)

Rem

Big Klu
06-28-2007, 12:52 AM
40 years ago (1967), a 7-5 loss at Crosley Field vs. the Dodgers.

Los Angeles
Wes Parker 1b
Ron Hunt 2b
Willie Davis cf
Ron Fairly rf
Jim Lefebvre 3b
Johnny Roseboro c
Len Gabrielson lf
Dick Schofield ss
Bill Singer p

Cincinnati
Chico Ruiz 2b
Vada Pinson cf
Tony Perez 3b
Deron Johnson 1b
Art Shamsky rf
Don Pavletich c
Lee May lf
Tommy Helms ss
Gary Nolan p


WP: Ron Perranoski (2-3)
LP: Ted Abernathy (2-3)
HR: LA - Jim Lefebvre (5), Johnny Roseboro (2). CIN - Lee May (6).

Big Klu
06-28-2007, 01:04 AM
35 years ago (1972), a 4-2 win at Candlestick Park in San Francisco.

Cincinnati
Pete Rose lf
Joe Morgan 2b
Bobby Tolan cf
Johnny Bench c
Tony Perez 1b
Joe Hague rf
Denis Menke 3b
Darrel Chaney ss
Ross Grimsley p

San Francisco
Bobby Bonds rf
Jim Howarth cf
Chris Speier ss
Willie McCovey 1b
Dave Kingman lf
Al Gallagher 3b
Tito Fuentes 2b
Dave Rader c
Don Carrithers p


WP: Ross Grimsley (5-2)
LP: Don Carrithers (2-5)
Sv: Tom Hall (5)
HR: CIN - Tony Perez (11). SF - Chris Speier (8).

remdog
06-28-2007, 01:13 AM
To comment on some of the others on that list:

Richie Ashburn: Great Centerfielder, terrific hitter, good speed. Really liked the guy even though he had little power.

Ed Bouchee: Left-handed hitter IIRC. Decent with the bat but a pretty good fielder.

Harry Anderson: Remember reading an article in Baseball Digest about him. Seems he was one of the players they were useing as an example of players that had better major league careers than their minor league careers.

Willie Jones: Willie 'Puddin' Head' Jones. Classic.

Don Cardwell: Without looking it up, didn't he also pitch for the Reds?

Johnny Temple: About as ill-tempered as someone can get but could play some ball. Punching Earl Lawson of the Enquirer stands out but he did make the All-Star Team for his playing ability (or 'cause Cincinnati fans stuffed the ballot boxes, I forget which. :laugh: )

Gus Bell: One of my all-time favorites. Could go get 'em in CF and when he hit the ball it stayed 'hit'. Josh Hamilton reminds me of a lefty version of Gus Bell.

George Crowe: I always had a fasination with George. Mind you, this was the '50's and the color barrier had been broken only a few years before. George was one of those guys that just looked like a ballplayer. No one computed OPS in those days, no one had zone rateings, but to an 11 year old kid that didn't know from black or white, this guy just had the personna of a ballplayer! I loved this guy. It's hard for me to come up with a comp for George but keep in mind that it's been 50 years since this lineup was posted.

Frank Robinson: There's nothing I can say that you don't already know. The complete player, maybe the best the Reds have ever had.

Ed Bailey: IIRC (without looking it up) he had a pretty good year in '57. Somehow I always favored Smokey Burgess though. I guess Smokey was the '50's version of Jose Valentin but I still liked him better than Ed. :laugh:

Roy McMillen: Sort of Gonzo without the bat but more reliable in the field than Gonzo has been this year.

Rem

Big Klu
06-28-2007, 01:14 AM
30 years ago (1977), an 11-4 win at Riverfront vs. the Giants.

San Francisco
Rob Andrews 2b
Derrel Thomas cf
Bill Madlock 3b
Jack Clark rf
Willie McCovey 1b
Vic Harris ss
Darrell Evans lf
Marc Hill c
Bob Knepper p

Cincinnati
Pete Rose 3b
Ken Griffey rf
Joe Morgan 2b
George Foster cf
Johnny Bench c
Dave Concepcion ss
Dan Driessen 1b
Ed Armbrister lf
Doug Capilla p


WP: Doug Capilla (1-0)
LP: Bob Knepper (1-2)
HR: SF - Jack Clark (8). CIN - Johnny Bench (17), Ken Griffey (7).

Big Klu
06-28-2007, 01:32 AM
I've always thought the name 'Rip Repulski' was classic! He was sort of a '50's version of Wily Mo Pena. :)

Rem

Rip hit .260 with 20 HR's and 68 RBI's in 1957.



To comment on some of the others on that list:

Richie Ashburn: Great Centerfielder, terrific hitter, good speed. Really liked the guy even though he had little power.

Ed Bouchee: Left-handed hitter IIRC. Decent with the bat but a pretty good fielder.

Harry Anderson: Remember reading an article in Baseball Digest about him. Seems he was one of the players they were useing as an example of players that had better major league careers than their minor league careers.

Willie Jones: Willie 'Puddin' Head' Jones. Classic.

Don Cardwell: Without looking it up, didn't he also pitch for the Reds?

Johnny Temple: About as ill-tempered as someone can get but could play some ball. Punching Earl Lawson of the Enquirer stands out but he did make the All-Star Team for his playing ability (or 'cause Cincinnati fans stuffed the ballot boxes, I forget which. :laugh: )

Gus Bell: One of my all-time favorites. Could go get 'em in CF and when he hit the ball it stayed 'hit'. Josh Hamilton reminds me of a lefty version of Gus Bell.

George Crowe: I always had a fasination with George. Mind you, this was the '50's and the color barrier had been broken only a few years before. George was one of those guys that just looked like a ballplayer. No one computed OPS in those days, no one had zone rateings, but to an 11 year old kid that didn't know from black or white, this guy just had the personna of a ballplayer! I loved this guy. It's hard for me to come up with a comp for George but keep in mind that it's been 50 years since this lineup was posted.

Frank Robinson: There's nothing I can say that you don't already know. The complete player, maybe the best the Reds have ever had.

Ed Bailey: IIRC (without looking it up) he had a pretty good year in '57. Somehow I always favored Smokey Burgess though. I guess Smokey was the '50's version of Jose Valentin but I still liked him better than Ed. :laugh:

Roy McMillen: Sort of Gonzo without the bat but more reliable in the field than Gonzo has been this year.

Rem

Bouchee and Anderson were both rookies in 1957. Both had good seasons--Bouchee hit .293 with 17 HR's and 76 RBI's, while Anderson hit .268 with 17 HR's and 61 RBI's.

No, I don't believe Cardwell ever pitched for the Reds.

Gus Bell hit lefty, but threw right-handed.

George Crowe also has drawn my interest in recent years. He is often overlooked because he was in between Ted Kluszewski and Gordy Coleman (two of the more popular 1B's in club history), but he had some pretty good years.

Big Klu
06-28-2007, 01:47 AM
25 years ago (1982), a 7-1 loss at the 'Stick in San Francisco.

Cincinnati
Eddie Milner lf
Ron Oester 2b
Dave Concepcion ss
Cesar Cedeño cf
Dan Driessen 1b
Johnny Bench 3b
Duane Walker rf
Dave Van Gorder c
Charlie Leibrandt p

San Francisco
Joe Morgan 2b
Johnnie LeMaster ss
Chili Davis cf
Jack Clark rf
Jim Wohlford lf
Darrell Evans 1b
Bob Brenly c
Tom O'Malley 3b
Renie Martin p


WP: Renie Martin (3-4)
LP: Charlie Leibrandt (3-2)
HR: SF - Joe Morgan (4), Darrell Evans (10).


Seeing Joe Morgan in the Giants lineup makes me sad. :(

Big Klu
06-28-2007, 01:53 AM
20 years ago (1987), a 4-2 loss at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles.

Cincinnati
Kal Daniels lf
Dave Concepcion 2b
Tracy Jones cf
Dave Parker rf
Buddy Bell 3b
Bo Diaz c
Nick Esasky 1b
Barry Larkin ss
Guy Hoffman p

Los Angeles
Dave Anderson ss
Steve Sax 2b
John Shelby cf
Pedro Guerrero lf
Mike Marshall rf
Mickey Hatcher 1b
Phil Garner 3b
Mike Scioscia c
Fernando Valenzuela p


WP: Fernando Valenzuela (7-5)
LP: Guy Hoffman (6-2)
HR: CIN - Buddy Bell (6). LA - Pedro Guerrero (16).

Big Klu
06-28-2007, 02:00 AM
15 years ago (1992), a 6-5 win at Riverfront vs. the Braves.

Atlanta
Deion Sanders cf
Terry Pendleton 3b
Ron Gant lf
David Justice rf
Sid Bream 1b
Damon Berryhill c
Mark Lemke 2b
Rafael Belliard ss
Tom Glavine p

Cincinnati
Reggie Sanders cf
Bip Roberts 2b
Barry Larkin ss
Chris Sabo 3b
Glenn Braggs rf
Hal Morris 1b
Billy Hatcher lf
Joe Oliver c
Tim Belcher p


WP: Norm Charlton (3-0)
LP: Mark Wohlers (0-1)
HR: ATL - Greg Olson (2). CIN - Chris Sabo (7).

Big Klu
06-28-2007, 02:08 AM
10 years ago (1997), a 12-6 loss at Riverfront (I refuse to call it that other name) vs. the Cardinals.

St. Louis
Royce Clayton ss
Ron Gant lf
Willie McGee cf
John Mabry rf
Danny Sheaffer 3b
Dmitri Young 1b
Mike Difelice c
Mike Gallego 2b
Fernando Valenzuela p

Cincinnati
Deion Sanders cf
Pokey Reese ss
Mike Kelly rf
Eduardo Perez lf
Terry Pendleton 3b
Joe Oliver 1b
Brook Fordyce c
Jeff Branson 2b
John Smiley p


WP: Mark Petkovsek (3-4)
LP: John Smiley (5-10)
HR: STL - Ron Gant (12).

Big Klu
06-28-2007, 02:15 AM
Five years ago (2002), a 3-2 loss at Busch Stadium in St. Louis.

Cincinnati
Todd Walker 2b
Aaron Boone ss
Sean Casey 1b
Adam Dunn lf
Juan Encarnacion rf
Russell Branyan 3b
Reggie Taylor cf
Corky Miller c
Chris Reitsma p

St. Louis
Fernando Viña 2b
Placido Polanco 3b
Jim Edmonds cf
Albert Pujols lf
Tino Martinez 1b
Edgar Renteria ss
Eli Marrero rf
Mike Matheny c
Jason Simontacchi p


WP: Jason Simontacchi (6-1)
LP: Chris Reitsma (3-6)
Sv: Jason Isringhausen (17)
HR: CIN - Juan Encarnacion (15).

cumberlandreds
06-28-2007, 06:49 AM
I've always thought the name 'Rip Repulski' was classic! He was sort of a '50's version of Wily Mo Pena. :)

Rem


How wold like to have Granny (Hamner) for a nickname? I assume that's a nickname and not his real name.:)

cumberlandreds
06-28-2007, 06:52 AM
To comment on some of the others on that list:

Richie Ashburn: Great Centerfielder, terrific hitter, good speed. Really liked the guy even though he had little power.

Ed Bouchee: Left-handed hitter IIRC. Decent with the bat but a pretty good fielder.

Harry Anderson: Remember reading an article in Baseball Digest about him. Seems he was one of the players they were useing as an example of players that had better major league careers than their minor league careers.

Willie Jones: Willie 'Puddin' Head' Jones. Classic.

Don Cardwell: Without looking it up, didn't he also pitch for the Reds?

Johnny Temple: About as ill-tempered as someone can get but could play some ball. Punching Earl Lawson of the Enquirer stands out but he did make the All-Star Team for his playing ability (or 'cause Cincinnati fans stuffed the ballot boxes, I forget which. :laugh: )

Gus Bell: One of my all-time favorites. Could go get 'em in CF and when he hit the ball it stayed 'hit'. Josh Hamilton reminds me of a lefty version of Gus Bell.

George Crowe: I always had a fasination with George. Mind you, this was the '50's and the color barrier had been broken only a few years before. George was one of those guys that just looked like a ballplayer. No one computed OPS in those days, no one had zone rateings, but to an 11 year old kid that didn't know from black or white, this guy just had the personna of a ballplayer! I loved this guy. It's hard for me to come up with a comp for George but keep in mind that it's been 50 years since this lineup was posted.

Frank Robinson: There's nothing I can say that you don't already know. The complete player, maybe the best the Reds have ever had.

Ed Bailey: IIRC (without looking it up) he had a pretty good year in '57. Somehow I always favored Smokey Burgess though. I guess Smokey was the '50's version of Jose Valentin but I still liked him better than Ed. :laugh:

Roy McMillen: Sort of Gonzo without the bat but more reliable in the field than Gonzo has been this year.

Rem

I looked up Cardwell on Retrosheet and he never played with the Reds. 1957 was his rookie season and he played through the 1970 season.
Thanks for insights on these players. It's always good to hear about players that were a liitle before my time. I never knew much about Crowe but you and Big Klu had some good insights on him.

cumberlandreds
06-28-2007, 06:53 AM
35 years ago (1972), a 4-2 win at Candlestick Park in San Francisco.

Cincinnati
Pete Rose lf
Joe Morgan 2b
Bobby Tolan cf
Johnny Bench c
Tony Perez 1b
Joe Hague rf
Denis Menke 3b
Darrel Chaney ss
Ross Grimsley p

San Francisco
Bobby Bonds rf
Jim Howarth cf
Chris Speier ss
Willie McCovey 1b
Dave Kingman lf
Al Gallagher 3b
Tito Fuentes 2b
Dave Rader c
Don Carrithers p


WP: Ross Grimsley (5-2)
LP: Don Carrithers (2-5)
Sv: Tom Hall (5)
HR: CIN - Tony Perez (11). SF - Chris Speier (8).

For those of you too young to remember,Darrel Chaney was the 70's version of Jaun Castro without the Internet chatter about him.

puca
06-28-2007, 08:18 AM
For those of you too young to remember,Darrel Chaney was the 70's version of Jaun Castro without the Internet chatter about him.

And without the guaranteed contract.

puca
06-28-2007, 08:20 AM
10 years ago (1997), a 12-6 loss at Riverfront (I refuse to call it that other name) vs. the Cardinals.

St. Louis
Royce Clayton ss
Ron Gant lf
Willie McGee cf
John Mabry rf
Danny Sheaffer 3b
Dmitri Young 1b
Mike Difelice c
Mike Gallego 2b
Fernando Valenzuela p

Cincinnati
Deion Sanders cf
Pokey Reese ss
Mike Kelly rf
Eduardo Perez lf
Terry Pendleton 3b
Joe Oliver 1b
Brook Fordyce c
Jeff Branson 2b
John Smiley p


WP: Mark Petkovsek (3-4)
LP: John Smiley (5-10)
HR: STL - Ron Gant (12).



Weird, I have no memory of Fernando Valenzuela pitching for the Cards.

redsmetz
06-28-2007, 08:30 AM
George Crowe: I always had a fasination with George. Mind you, this was the '50's and the color barrier had been broken only a few years before. George was one of those guys that just looked like a ballplayer. No one computed OPS in those days, no one had zone rateings, but to an 11 year old kid that didn't know from black or white, this guy just had the personna of a ballplayer! I loved this guy. It's hard for me to come up with a comp for George but keep in mind that it's been 50 years since this lineup was posted.

Baseball Reference compares him to


Ben Broussard (971)
Luke Easter (957)
Olmedo Saenz (947)
Steve Bilko (947)
Dave Revering (944)
Tony Horton (944)
Justin Morneau (944)
Nick Johnson (942)
Bubba Trammell (939)
Daryle Ward (939)

I'm not sure these are necessarily apt comparisons because Crowe didn't make the bigs until 1952 at the age of 29. I'm assuming he played some in the Negro Leagues prior to that, but I could be wrong. This was his best season, 1957, batting .271, 31 HR's, 92 RBI's in 133 games.

Here's his card with the Reds

http://www.vintagecardtraders.org/virtual/57topps/57topps-073.jpg

Heath
06-28-2007, 08:53 AM
For those of you too young to remember,Darrel Chaney was the 70's version of Jaun Castro without the Internet chatter about him.

yeah, but Darrel Chaney never PH for Perez, Bench, or May.

:D

MrCinatit
06-28-2007, 09:20 AM
Roy McMillen: Sort of Gonzo without the bat but more reliable in the field than Gonzo has been this year.

Rem

McMillen - Cardinas - Concepcion - Larkin. I have been long impressed with the long line of very good shortstops this club has had in its history.




Looking at the '87 box score, where Guerrero hit his 16th homer. I seem to recall, Pedro was one of those guys who seemed to absolutely own the Reds for quite a while.


Weird, I have no memory of Fernando Valenzuela pitching for the Cards.

His five game stint there was almost as long as his two game stint with the Angels a couple of years earlier. Both were rather unspectacular, and it was obvious the Fernandomania of old was long, long gone.
According to BaseballReference, he was released one month after he was traded to the Cardinals from San Diego.

remdog
06-28-2007, 10:05 AM
How wold like to have Granny (Hamner) for a nickname? I assume that's a nickname and not his real name.:)

I believe (once again, without looking it up) that his given name was Granville, or something like that. Sort of testing my memory here. ;)

Rem

Edit: Yep, Granville Wilbur Hamner

RichRed
06-28-2007, 10:14 AM
This was his best season, 1957, batting .271, 31 HR's, 92 RBI's in 133 games.


A breakout season at the age of 34. How often do you see that? Very interesting. Thanks, guys, for posting about George Crowe. I didn't know much about him.

Big Klu
06-28-2007, 11:33 AM
For those of you too young to remember,Darrel Chaney was the 70's version of Jaun Castro without the Internet chatter about him.

The 1975 team had two Castro-type players on the team: Chaney and Doug Flynn. And sometimes they both started at the same time! (4 times) :eek:

Big Klu
06-28-2007, 11:37 AM
Weird, I have no memory of Fernando Valenzuela pitching for the Cards.

Neither did I. I had to look it up first, then I remembered. His five-game tour in St. Louis was the final stop of his career.


We also have another obligatory Royce Clayton sighting in that game, this time hitting leadoff for the Cards.

Big Klu
06-28-2007, 11:58 AM
Something else that stands out about that 1957 game is that pitcher Hal Jeffcoat, in addition to pitching a complete-game four-hitter, also went 2-for-3 with a two-run homer, an RBI double, and a SAC bunt. The HR was his third of the season!

Jeffcoat hit .203/.267/.449/.716 with 4 HR's and 11 RBI's in 1957. He also had 3 doubles and a triple. He had played for six years as an OF with the Cubs before they converted him into a pitcher in 1954. After becoming a pitcher, he made only four more appearances in the OF the rest of his career--3 games with the Cubs in '54, and 1 game with the Reds in 1958.

redsmetz
06-28-2007, 12:57 PM
Something else that stands out about that 1957 game is that pitcher Hal Jeffcoat, in addition to pitching a complete-game four-hitter, also went 2-for-3 with a two-run homer, an RBI double, and a SAC bunt. The HR was his third of the season!

Jeffcoat hit .203/.267/.449/.716 with 4 HR's and 11 RBI's in 1957. He also had 3 doubles and a triple. He had played for six years as an OF with the Cubs before they converted him into a pitcher in 1954. After becoming a pitcher, he made only four more appearances in the OF the rest of his career--3 games with the Cubs in '54, and 1 game with the Reds in 1958.

Wow, that's really something. Other than Ruth (who did the reverse), can you think of someone who had half their ML career as a position player and then converted to pitcher?

cumberlandreds
06-28-2007, 01:15 PM
Wow, that's really something. Other than Ruth (who did the reverse), can you think of someone who had half their ML career as a position player and then converted to pitcher?

Dick Hall came up as outfielder for the Pirates,I think, and later converted to a pitcher. He was pretty good reliever for the Orioles at the end of his career. I don't know without looking it up how long he was an outfielder. I do have a baseball card of him when he was an outfielder and later as a pitcher for the Phillies and Orioles.

I just looked up Hall's records. He had 310 AB's in 1954 but was converted to a pitcher in 1955. So he only had one season as an outfielder before converting. I can't think of anyone else who falls into that category. I'm WOY could come up with a few though.

Big Klu
06-28-2007, 02:47 PM
Wow, that's really something. Other than Ruth (who did the reverse), can you think of someone who had half their ML career as a position player and then converted to pitcher?

Bucky Walters began his career as a 3B/2B with the Braves in 1931. In 1934, while playing for the Phillies, they converted him into a pitcher. (He played 80 games at 3B, 3 games at 2B, and pitched in 2 games. He also played in 23 games at 3B for the Red Sox that year.) In 1935, he was primarily a pitcher, pitching in 24 games, while playing 5 games in LF, 2 at 2B, and 1 at 3B. He was a pitcher for the rest of his career, making only a handful of appearances at other positions. (1 game at 2B and 1 game at 3B for the Phillies in 1936, 8 games at 3B for the Phillies in 1937, and 1 game in LF for the Reds in 1942.)

Mel Queen began his career as an OF for the Reds in 1964, and then was converted into a pitcher during the 1966 season. (He played 32 games in the OF and pitched in 7 games that season.) He was a pitcher for the remainder of his career, never making another appearance in the OF.

remdog
06-28-2007, 03:28 PM
Bob Lemon came up to the Indians as a 3rd baseman and outfielder in brief stints '41 and '42. He then went into the military and came back to Cleveland in 1946 primarily as a pitcher but he played a few games as an outfielder as late as both '46 and '47.

Ironically, if you've read this thread, his middle name was Granville. :)

Rem