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gonelong
06-16-2006, 10:38 AM
In this thread we detail a bit about the what, where, and how to attend a Reds game - Hotels, activities, where to eat, etc.

If you are visiting this site and are a fan located in/around another MLB city, please feel free to read over the write-up for your city and put your $.02 in!

I was wondering if we couldn't do the same for the rest of the parks in the league. Have 4-5 people adopt a park, find out what they can and put it together.

Hotels/Taxi:

Game Parking:

Tickets/Seats: How to acquire, what to get.

What to see/do/eat at the ballpark.

What to see/do/eat in the city.


Once we have one done we could then post it on another Team's message board and get confirmation.



chase Field (http://www.redszone.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1223777&postcount=42) jmcclain19
Atlanta Braves Turner Field Open
Baltimore Orioles Camden Yards Open
Boston Red Sox (http://www.redszone.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1028409&postcount=6) Fenway Park dabvu2498
Boston Red Sox (http://www.redszone.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1223878&postcount=43) Fenway Park M2
Chicago Cubs Wrigley Field Open
Chicago White Sox U.S. Cellular Field Open
Cincinnati Reds (http://www.redszone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=31267) GAPB Completed
Cleveland Indians (http://www.redszone.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1030882&postcount=12) Jacobs Field KittyDuran/In Progress
Cleveland Indians (http://www.redszone.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1223944&postcount=44) Jacobs Field Yachtzee
Colorado Rockies Coors Field Open
Detroit Tigers (http://www.redszone.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1030882&postcount=12) Comerica Park Heath
Florida Marlins (http://www.redszone.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1031019&postcount=22) Dolphin Stadium oneupper
Houston Astros Minute Maid Park Open
Kansas City Royals Kauffman Stadium Open
LS Angels of Anaheim Angel Stadium Open
Los Angeles Dodgers Dodger Stadium Open
Milwaukee Brewers Miller Park tripleaaaron
Minnesota Twins Metrodome Open
New York Mets (http://www.redszone.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1030867&postcount=9) Shea Stadium In Progress
New York Yankees (http://www.redszone.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1030867&postcount=9) Yankee Stadium In Progress
Oakland Athletics McAfee Coliseum Open
Philadelphia Phillies Citizens Bank Park Open
Pittsburgh Pirates (http://www.redszone.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1026452&postcount=4) PNC Park Gonelong/In Progress
St. Louis Cardinals New Busch Stadium Open
San Diego Padres (http://www.redszone.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1030900&postcount=16) PETCO Park Red Leader
San Francisco Giants AT&T Park Open
Seattle Mariners Safeco Field Open
Tampa Bay Devil Rays Tropicana Field Open
Texas Rangers Arlington Open
Toronto Blue Jays Rogers Centre Open
Washington Nationals (http://www.redszone.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1031067&postcount=23) RFK Stadium registerthis


AAA: Louisville
AA: Chattenooga
High A: Sarasota
Low A: Dayton
Rookie: Billings
Spring Training (http://www.redszone.com/forums/showpost.php?p=1223498&postcount=40)



Additional Information about these parks:
http://travel.ballparksofbaseball.com/

If you would like to take the lead on a park, PM me and I'll add them to the list. If you would like to help with a park, PM the person listed above.

Once we have as much input as we are likely to get ... I'll compile all these into one new thread with each park as its own post. I'll then put a list in the first post with links to each park so it'll be neat and clean.

Thanks,

GL

tripleaaaron
06-16-2006, 01:58 PM
I am going to Milwaukee in August, I can do that park after that time, unless anyone else covers it by then, all the other parks I've been to I wouldn't necessarily be able to report on, has been over 5 years.

registerthis
06-16-2006, 02:04 PM
I'll be happy to do RFK, GL...when did you want this?

gonelong
06-16-2006, 02:20 PM
Pittsburgh Pirates PNC Park

Edit: This information from Pirates message boards ...

==================
= PNC Park, Pittsburgh
==================
Nightlife:
For the < 30 Crowd
North Shore (Right around PNC Park) - several bars around, many of which are quite new. You'll have no problem locating them, most of them are on, or within a block of, the same corner by the LF enterance to the ballpark

The Strip District - http://www.neighborsinthestrip.com/index.html
a little pricier and more nightclubbish than barish, you'll pay a cover to get in many of the places. This is where athletes that visit our city tend to get themselves in trouble.

For the 30+ Crowd:
Station Square - : http://www.stationsquare.com/tourism.htm
used to be nothing but a touristy mall. You can still check out the mall area and be dazzled by the number of black and gold stores (this is a Steeler fan's dream, mostly), but there is now a nightlife over by the Hard Rock Cafe.

The South Side - http://www.southsidepgh.com/index_new.htm
this is, IMO, more like Pittsburgh drinkin. Its more laid back, you'll find dive bars as well as nicer places and you can walk from bar to bar to bar all night long (mostly cover-free) without hitting all of them.


What to absolutely not miss in the city.
Duquesne Incline: http://www.incline.cc/

Local Flavor: Primanti's sandwhich: http://www.primantibros.com/

You can take a river boat to PNC?
Water taxi service to PNC Park and Steelers Stadium is available on game days from The Boardwalk (and Carnegie Science Center for PNC Park).

Booking a Tour of the Park:
Call (412) 325-4700 or 1-800-BUY-BUCS ext. 4700

Children/Students - $4.00 per person
Seniors (55+) - $4.00 per person
Adults - $6.00 per person
Groups of 25 and over - $4.00 per person*

bucknutdet
06-16-2006, 11:00 PM
NY Yankees/Mets:

Hotels: Stay in Manhattan, anywhere else is a bit of a risk, use Priceline or similar website (FYI, they are expensive). Taxi's to the game.. you can't afford it.

Game Parking:
LOL, if you haven't driven in the City before, don't even attempt it. Parking prices, LMAO, even funnier. For the Yankees take the subway, the B/D from Rock Center, but be careful. To the Mets, take the 7 from Grand Central & pray you can catch the express.

Tickets:
For the Mets you shouldn't have a problem, but for good seats you may have to scalp. The Yankees may be a different story. But trying on the website is a good place to start. As for good seats, you probably don't have enough money.

What to eat at Ballpark:
You're in NYC, eat the Pizza or the Dogs. While you wont' be able to afford the beers at $8, they sure look tasty. Of course they have the rest of the average tasting ballpark food as well.

What to do/eat in the City:
It's New York, you can do anything you want. Most of the food is good too. The list of good places to eat would be endless.

Disclaimer: (This was compiled slightly in gest, while somewhat factual, it might not be completely accurate, but comes from my few of years of NYC experience. For a more complete list a more "seasoned" New Yorker would be more helpful, then again, probably not, they'll tell you to 'eff off. )

:bowrofl: :)

dabvu2498
06-17-2006, 10:06 PM
This is based on what my 3 years in Boston was like 5-8 years ago and then a couple trips back in the last 3 years, so some of my info may be a little off.

Hotels/Transportation: priceline.com is your best bet just about anywhere. Make sure your hotel is within walking distance of a T (MBTA subway) station. My dad liked staying at the Tage Inn in Somerville for a reasonable price, but that was when I had a car in town and could drive, pick him up and go to the T station. The Inn at Harvard will occaisionally run some decent deals in the summer if they are not hosting any conferences.

DO NOT rent a car or plan on driving anywhere in town unless you enjoy testing chaos theory. There are no painted lines on the roads, very few street signs and very few people willing to help an out-of-town motorist. From my experiences driving there, there is one rule of the road: Person with the biggest cajones wins. (This rule also applies to pedestrians.)

A word about the T. Almost every sight/event worth seeing in Boston is accessible by the T. Fenway=4-5 blocks. Old North Church=6-7 blocks. etc, etc, etc. DO NOT think you can drive/park in Boston. The T safe (usually clean), fairly simple, tokens are 1.25 now (I think you can buy a tourist pass), and runs 5AM-2AM.

In the 35-40 games I went to at Fenway, I never once drove or was driven, so I don't even know how to tell you to do it. In fact, I never noticed a lot around the park that wasn't a permit lot. Take the Green Line (B,C, or D) to Kenmore Station and follow the signs and the crowd.

Game Parking: See above.

Tickets/Seats: How to acquire, what to get. What to get??? Hmmm... GET IN THE BUILDING!!! The only seats I would truly avoid are any marked "obstructed view" unless you feel like making out with an iron post for 3-4 hours -- choose SRO's instead. I would also caution against the RF Grandstand seats. LF's are not so bad. But choose the bleachers over either of these options. Infield Grandstand seats can be hit-or-miss depending on how far back they are and the positioning of posts. Anything in the Loge or Field Level is fine, but you better roll deep. The Roof Boxes (not Monster) can be had for a decent price sometime, but don't give you the true Fenway flavor.

How to acquire? Roll deep. Ebay is full of scalpers and a few regular folks selling tickets. Most true RS fans with season tickets will only sell to others of a like mindset. This means not you.

If you really want to go, you'll pay and thus, go ahead and pay for something decent. Scalpers can be found all along the route from Kenmore to the park.

What to see/do/eat at the ballpark. See it all. Get there early at least once and just walk around until the gates open. Check out all the goodie shops around the park as well as the chicken on a stick and sausage vendors. Visit the Ted Williams monument. When you enter the seating area, come up through the tunnel around Aisle 127. You may pass Johnny Pesky, in uniform, near the entrance to the RS clubhouse on the "concourse" back there. Stand over the dugout and chat up the guys as they come in and out of the dugouts. Go shag balls out in the bleachers during BP. The ushers pretty much let you have free run of the place (except the Monster) during BP -- take advantage. Enjoy the best baseball experience in the US. Cheer like crazy, jeer like crazy. Sing along with Sweet Caroline. (Varitek named his daughter Caroline, by the way.) Hope the Sox lose once sometime in your trip so you can learn new curses. Hope they win once so you can hear Tessie/Dirty Water.

Eats -- Roll deep. If it's chilly, get Legal Seafood clam chowder. My old man couldn't believe it was true. It is. Everything else is pretty standard fair. (Eat a chicken on a stick or a vendor sausage before the game -- they're still there after as well.) There is a large new concessions area down behind the RF grandstand/bleachers that I didn't really take the time to check out closely.

What to see/do/eat in the city. This is where I might fall short in my review. As a struggling young student, I was limited in my choce of eats. There are a variety of places near Quincy Market (downtown) that are worth investigating. The Harvard area also provides a goodly number of fairly inexpensive and diverse eateries. There's a vibrant Chinatown accessible by the Orange Line. Also, if you enjoy Italian, you must take a foray into the North End. The restaurants there tend to change names quite a bit, but try any of them. To stay in business in North End (Green or Orange Line -- Haymarket Station), you've got to be good! There are also a decent number of options around the ballpark. The Cask'N'Flagon is a bar catering to Sox patrons. (Not sure if they do food or not.) There are a couple of sports-themed restaurants/bars (and trendy-hipster nightclubs) on Landsdowne, behind the Monster. There are also some chain-food type options in Kenmore Square, near the station.

As far as what to see/do. Buy a book. It's only 15 bucks and it'll save me a lot more typing.

As you maybe can tell, I love Boston. Being from the South/Midwest, I was intimidated when I first arrived. My hillbilly accent did not help. Soon enough, I found out it really didn't matter. The people there are genuine, hard-working Yankees and they respect the same, no matter where you're from. And they got me to adopt their team. See, I (and most of us on this board) are passionate about the Reds. But there aren't a whole lot of us. That's why we need support groups like this one. For Sox fans, every subway car and Dunkin Donuts is a support group, because the whole region loves the Sox the way I love the Reds.

In summary, go to Boston! Go Reds! Go Sox!

redsfanva
06-17-2006, 11:19 PM
This site might help out with some cities:

http://travel.ballparksofbaseball.com/

gonelong
06-20-2006, 10:07 AM
Completely. Shameless. Bump.

Heath
06-20-2006, 10:27 AM
After spending a few weeks (as recently as last summer) in NYC - I'll have to go "wikipedia" and edit the below about the Big Apple.

Hotel - any hotel in Manhatta would be fine - be prepared to shell it out (avg $200/night or more) No Days Inn next to the airport or in the 'burbs around here. Best way to go - stay with family or friends if you can do it.

Transportation. Use the subway. Its $2 a ride or $20/weekend for unlimited rides. Its the best way to get to the game bar none. Everyone else uses it, why not you. The 7 line takes to you from Grand Central to the Willets Point/Shea. If you want to go to Yankee, take the Green 4 line to the 161st/Yankee. NOTE-There is no subway from LaGuardia airport. You must taxi to Manhattan.

Tickets - you would be surprised how easy tickets can be gotten. You can get Mets tickets anytime. Yankees are pretty easy except for Red Sox tickets. Go online at the teams website. You will pay decent money, but the best seats are already gone. In Shea, I'd sit in the second tier (I think its $25-30/ticket. At Yankee, get what you can get. If you sit in the bleachers, you can not get to the other parts of the stadium AND there is no adult beverages.

Restaraunts - Shea's in the middle of parking lots, the airport, and a subway platform surrounded by Queens. Eat at the Park. Yankee is in an older neighborhood of South Bronx - I'd recommend eating before you hit the subway. Yankee does have some neat older bars around the Stadium. (And it is THE Stadium. The Mets play at Shea.) If you want Yankee atmosphere, eat at Mickey Mantle's on 59th, south of Central Park and over by Columbus Circle. Its pricey - but very nice place to eat. Also, the hot dog stands in lower Manhattan/Financial districts are fantastic. (especially the Sabrett's stand - try it with kraut and spicy mustard)

New Yorkers are relatively harmless - just don't stare at people.

BTW - if you are trying to see the Mets & the Yankees, you need to schedule a week vacation - they don't play the same days. Rule of thumb-if the Mets are in town, the Yankees are away.



NY Yankees/Mets:

Hotels: Stay in Manhattan, anywhere else is a bit of a risk, use Priceline or similar website (FYI, they are expensive). Taxi's to the game.. you can't afford it.

Game Parking:
LOL, if you haven't driven in the City before, don't even attempt it. Parking prices, LMAO, even funnier. For the Yankees take the subway, the B/D from Rock Center, but be careful. To the Mets, take the 7 from Grand Central & pray you can catch the express.

Tickets:
For the Mets you shouldn't have a problem, but for good seats you may have to scalp. The Yankees may be a different story. But trying on the website is a good place to start. As for good seats, you probably don't have enough money.

What to eat at Ballpark:
You're in NYC, eat the Pizza or the Dogs. While you wont' be able to afford the beers at $8, they sure look tasty. Of course they have the rest of the average tasting ballpark food as well.

What to do/eat in the City:
It's New York, you can do anything you want. Most of the food is good too. The list of good places to eat would be endless.

Disclaimer: (This was compiled slightly in gest, while somewhat factual, it might not be completely accurate, but comes from my few of years of NYC experience. For a more complete list a more "seasoned" New Yorker would be more helpful, then again, probably not, they'll tell you to 'eff off. )

:bowrofl: :)

vaticanplum
06-20-2006, 10:38 AM
NOTE-There is no subway from LaGuardia airport. You must taxi to Manhattan.

There is a bus though that goes right from all terminals the airport, the M60. It takes you into Manhattan (hence the "M") and also to the N/R subway line in Queens. Pretty easy and only $2 vs. a $35 base cab fare. I'm extremely cheap when it comes to transportation, though, unless I've been drinking.

Heath's right-- in general, always fly into LaGuardia if you can; it's much closer and more accessible to everything than JFK or Newark.

Red Leader
06-20-2006, 10:44 AM
I was just at Petco for 3 games last week so I'll take that and do a write-up soon.

Heath
06-20-2006, 10:46 AM
also - for the Interleague days - here are Detroit and Cleveland.

DETROIT -

Transportation - You have three options, your car, your car, and maybe your car. Oh, and you can use the Detroit People Mover. More on that later.

Hotels - Comerica is kinda off to the side of Downtown Detroit. There are some in the suburbs and you can park. Or, you can stay downtown at the Ren Center. The Ren Center Marriott has ticket deals all the time. Plus, you can have your car parked and you can take to People Mover to Comerica. The People Mover is an electric trolley that circles the city. It's a .50 per ride and it drops you off 2 blocks from Comerica at Grand Circus.

Parking - There is parking EVERYWHERE. The Tigers website has a parking map. The closer to the park, the more expensive. Best deal I have found was $10 for the parking garage in Left Center field next to Ford Field. Some people have parked for free up there, but I don't know where they are, and if its worth it. My opinion is, what's $10 to make sure your car is back where you parked it if you are plunking down $200 on your trip anyway?

Restaraunts - Hockeytown Cafe' is a block away. There's a Dog Stand in the stadium. Also - if you get really hungry for home, there's a Big Boy stand & a Montgomery Inn in Comerica. And Little Caesar's Pizza. Lots of Little Caesar's.

Tickets - Yes. Plenty. Sometimes, they even have "Internet 1/2-off" Tickets. Not a bad seat, except the Outfield seats are WAY out.

GIK might think I am nuts, and I hate the "School Up North", but every year I go to a Tigers game. Its worth it. It's a fun park to go to.


CLEVELAND -

HOTELS - Stay at the airport in the burbs - Don't get me wrong, the downtown hotels are nice, but parts of downtown think they are cosmopolitan and their prices reflect it. The Hyatt downtown does have hotel/ticket deals.

PARKING - all over the place - Can't miss them. There are parking garages just to east of 9th Street for $5.

TRANSPORTATION - Take your car. I-71 to I-90 to E. 9th St. Follow Signs (or light towers).

FOOD - Park has some interesting options. Best one is a KIDS menu - $1 for popcorn, $1 for drink, $1 for candy. Great for families. Normal ballpark fare - including microbrews from Great Lakes Brewery in the outfield. A few scattered watering holes across the street.

TICKETS - well, if this was about 5 years ago, I'd tell you to forget it. Now, you can walk up to the gate and get whatever you want. Be prepared. The 500 level seats are WAY high. You feel you looking DOWN from the Goodyear blimp.

Heath
06-20-2006, 10:48 AM
There is a bus though that goes right from all terminals the airport, the M60. It takes you into Manhattan (hence the "M") and also to the N/R subway line in Queens. Pretty easy and only $2 vs. a $35 base cab fare. I'm extremely cheap when it comes to transportation, though, unless I've been drinking.

Heath's right-- in general, always fly into LaGuardia if you can; it's much closer and more accessible to everything than JFK or Newark.

The nice thing about JFK and Newark is the train will connect you to subway and then the sky's the limit.

I forgot about the M60. I took it once. Duh.

Heath
06-20-2006, 10:49 AM
I was just at Petco for 3 games last week so I'll take that and do a write-up soon.

I vote for a RedsZone.com roadie to San Diego.... :D :laugh:

Heath
06-20-2006, 10:51 AM
Vatican needs to do the Wrigleyville/Comiskey...err...US Cellular experience.

Red Leader
06-20-2006, 11:15 AM
Ballpark: Petco Park
- San Diego Padres
-Opened: April 8, 2004
-Capacity: 42,445
-Cost: $449.5 Million
-Dimensions: 334-L, 367-LC, 396-C,
385-RC, 322-R
-Address: 19 Tony Gwynn Way
San Diego, CA 92112

Hotels: There are a ton of hotels downtown (one right next to the ballpark even) and a couple hundred more in nearby suburbs if you wish to stay out of the city. This is SoCal, so all are pretty expensive. Plan on spending $125+ night, but more likely close to $200.

Game Parking: One of my complaints about going to a Pads game. There is downtown parking in open lots, but it will likely cost you $12-$20 and then you still have 1/2 - 1 mile walk to the stadium. There is parking at the Convention Center across the Pacific Hwy for $7 and it is only a 1/4 mile from there to the ballpark, but those spaces go fast. If you do park downtown at the open lots, you can hop aboard a trolley for another $1.50 or so to ride to a stop about 1 block from the stadium.

Tickets: Most tickets are fairly well priced. Best value has to be the bleacher seats in RCF for $5. They have a "beach" in that area for the kids to play (make sure you bring shovel and pale). There really isn't a bad seat in the house. The outfield seats offer a nice view of the entire stadium, and lower and upper infield seats offer a nice view of the park as well as downtown San Diego (most of which is still under contstruction). From the concourse on the upper levels you can view more of downtown San Diego, Coronado, Coronado Bridge, and the ocean, among other things.

If you are going for more than one game, I would highly suggest sitting in the bleachers for one game out in RCF and the beach area. A lot of fun. There is also a "Park at the Park" area behind the stadium. It's a grassy area that you pay $5 for entrance to and can watch the game through the OF fence, or watch on a jumbotron on the back of the stadium. There is also a miniature field behind LF that if you go to the "Park in the Park" you can play on so bring bat, ball, gloves, and the youngsters to play a quick game. I tried to get tickets to sit atop the Western Supply Building, but found those are season tickets and you would have to know someone that owns them to get up there, that's a shame as I'd imagine those seats offer a tremendous view.

As for eating, eat before the game. The food inside the park is NOT very good and is expensive. $15 for a cheeseburger, fries and a coke. $4.50 for CrackerJacks. There are plenty of restraunts in downtown San Diego and in the Gaslamp district to eat before the game. You'll likely pay the same price, but get a much nicer meal. The one nice food option in the stadium is the Friar Grill behind the RF seats out by the Park in the Park. They have peanut butter and jelly, hot dogs, burgers, and chicken nuggets all for $1-$2, but you have to be shorter than the Friar to eat there. I think he's around 54" high. So that's a nice feature for the kid that won't eat 10 minutes before the game, but is starving when they get through the turnstile (I know, I have one of those...)

As for the city, there is tons to do. SeaWorld San Diego; San Diego Zoo; Marine and Navy airbases (including Miramar-Top Gun for those that lived in the 80's); Torrey Pines Golf Course (home to the 2008 U.S. Open) is about 1/2 hour away; the Gaslamp district (where most everyone goes after Hells Bells plays and Trevor closes out a game) is where the bars are at. All ages flock to the Gaslamp; Mission Beach, Pacific Beach, and Ocean Beach are all relatively close to downtown for those that like to see the ocean and surf.

Overall, I really liked the stadium. Beautiful views and beautiful weather and the seats are angled toward the mound, so no straining your neck to see. All seats offer a good view of the whole field. 3rd base upper terrace seats are mostly in the shade for day games if you want out of the sun. Hells Bells playing while Trevor walks in is something every baseball fan should experience in person. It sent chills up my back, they really go crazy, still, after all of these years.

vaticanplum
06-20-2006, 11:24 AM
Ok I'll give it a shot...I still feel like a stranger in this town though so other chicagoans might have better "inside info".

Hotels: no clue. But in general, Chicago is set up as follows: central area: tourist stuff, business, loop and Michigan Avenue, Wrigley to the north, Comiskular to the south (both still in the city, but not in the high-rise central area). So you can stay at a nice hotel in the middle -- Westin, InterContinental, etc. -- pay some more money but be in a nice place and centrally located. Or you can stay closer to one of the ballparks and probably save some dough and stay at a place like the Days Inn on Clark and Diversey which is closer to Wrigley etc.

In general, the North Side (where Wrigley is) is pretty yuppified and safe; the South Side (where Cellular is) is much rougher. Directly surrounding the ballpark it's fine, and the university of Chicago and a couple of good museums down there, but I would generally steer clear of hotels on the South Side.

Transportation: You can bring a car here and manage ok, but I'd avoid taking it to the ballparks. The Cell has decent parking, but getting out can be a pain. Wrigley parking is disastrous. They're putting up a new presumably hideous parking tower in the next few years, but for now, stick to the subway. It's actually very easy -- there's one line for both stadiums, the red line. The stops are Addison for Wrigley and 35th-Sox for Cellular. These stops are VERY CLEARLY MARKED as the ballpark ones and since the train is aboveground it's impossible to miss them. Obviously the direction you're taking the train depends on where you're coming from, but in most cases it will be north to Howard for Wrigley and south to 95th for Comiskular. You can cab it if you want, but the subway is cheaper, faster and generally easier given game crowds. The red line runs all night.

(note: The el DOES GO UNDERGROUND in the middle of the city. You are NOT UNDER ATTACK.)

Tickets: The best thing to do in either case, in my opinion, is to go to the ballpark. You save all the service fees and I've had much better luck getting seats in cases when I've been told on the phone there were none. But if you're coming from out of town, do get them ahead of time because both these parks sell out often these days. White Sox operate through Ticketmaster. Cubs, being the pristine and unique organization that they are, have their own ticket service and you can reach them at 1-800-thecubs. They're very helpful, but again, I've had some trouble getting what I've wanted over the phone in the past. Wrigley also releases standing room tickets the day of every game; standing is fine, but get there EARLY to buy them. Scalpers abound at both stadiums and there's also a stub hub office right by Comiskular if you want to go that route. If you buy scalped tickets, you can usually get a pretty good deal if you wait until just after the game has started.

Food: Comiskular food is much, much better than Wrigley. Beers are pretty reasonable in both places; you can drink in the bleachers at either stadium (you can't at Yankee), but they do not sell beers IN the bleachers at Wrigley, you have to get up and get it. I don't usually eat meat but I did have a chicago dog once for the ballpark experience and it was delightful. A chicago dog means tomatoes, onions, relish, and...I dunno, other stuff. Mustard I think.

Night stuff: Comiskular: the famous white Sox bar is Jimbo's, and it's good mix of South Side roughness with just enough neighborhood and team gentrification to make you feel safe. Catcher's is another one, and so is Schaller's, though I've never been to either. These are all pretty close to the stadium; again, I wouldn't venture too much afield.

As far as Wrigley goes, if you are a self-loathing individual in a white baseball cap or a tube top, you will feel right at home in any of the basquillion bars around Wrigley. The place is basically one giant watering hole. You can find decent people at any one of these places -- the Cubby Bear, Hi-Tops -- but you have to make bodily contact with roughly 80,000 people to find them and it's usually not worth it. The two good bars up there are the Gingerman, on Clark north of Wrigley, and Guthrie's, on Addison west of Wrigley. These are crowded after games too, but a better crowd. Do not, under any circumstances, patronize the Raw Bar on Clark near the Metro. They do bad things to their fish as well as to their employees. I know.

As for Chicago, there's plenty to do, and guidebooks and friends will probably help you with that better than I can, but feel free to ask any questions if you want.

MaineRed
06-20-2006, 12:22 PM
I can add some more about Boston/Fenway.

As was mentioned, being around a T is key. We once stayed at the Seaport Hotel and it was very nice but there was no public transportation so unless we wanted to pay for a cab, we had to walk forever to get to T stop. There are lots of hotels in the city limits and most of them would be fine, depending on your price range and most are within walking distance of public transportation.

As far as hotels, I can recommend the Holiday Inn at Government Center, the NE Medical Center Doubletree and Club Quarters in the heart of downtown. All of these would be in the $100-200 range. Most of the hotels above that price range are very, very nice, at least on the outside and in pictures on the internet. I've never gained enough courage to throw down the cash to stay in some of the nicer hotels in Boston. The Long Warf Marriot would be a great place to stay but it is very pricey.

One place that I have stayed that I would not recommend unless you are looking for the cheapest place in Boston just to have a place to crash is the Shawmut Inn, located directly across from the Fleet Center (Celtics, Bruins). Its a long way from Fenway but there is easy access to the T. The Shawmut Inn is just a little dumpy and the TVs don't even get ESPN. YIKES!

Little Italy is a must on a visit to Boston. Pizzeria Regina has the best pizza in town (maybe anywhere). If I am going anywhere near Boston (I live 4-5 hours away) I make sure to go into the city to eat there. Its that good. Another favorite is Mike's Pastry, also located in Little Italy. Cannolis that need to be eaten while sitting down.

Faneuil Hall is also a must. Lots of good food and neat shops. The best thing to do to see most of the old parts of the city is to follow the Freedom Trail. I forget how long it is but it meanders through the cobblestone streets and takes you to 25 or so landmarks, like the Old North Church, Paul Revere's house, famous burial grounds, the USS Constitution and much much more. The best thing about the Freedom Trail is that you can do it on your own time. You don't have to go in a group or anything like that. You can shop, eat and check out the city as you just walk around, following the red path.

If you have kids you can go to the Childrens Museum, the New England Acquarium or the Science Museum. They also run Harbor Cruises and Whale Watch Tours from the Acquarium.

One must for anyone is a Duck Boat Tour. These are amphibious vehicles that used to belong to the US Army that have been transformed into tour boats/buses. They drive around the streets giving the best guided tour of Boston and then they take a spin through the Charles River. On the trip I was on they even let the kids drive the boat if they wanted to. If you go to Boston, do the Duck Boat Tour. You'll notice them all over the city. We usually do before we even find the hotel on arrival. They are everywhere and very fun.

Boston is an awesome place. A mondern city wrapped around and within one of America's oldest. The Big Dig Project is mostly down to the finishing touches and that has really opened the city up. If not for the darn Red Sox, Boston would be perfect.

letsgojunior
06-20-2006, 12:34 PM
I concur with the poster above who stated that the best ways to Shea/Yankee are via the subway (4 and 7 trains). I would NOT recommend driving in the city, especially if you're staying in Manhattan. With insane cabbies and alternate one-way streets, it's a good way to cry behind the wheel (so I've heard).

Also, I'll take Denver and Seattle on this list if no one wants them.

Red Leader
06-20-2006, 12:38 PM
Also, I'll take Denver and Seattle on this list if no one wants them.

Lucky!!

http://www.theage.com.au/ffximage/2004/11/10/napoleon_dynamite_narrowweb__200x277.jpg

I've always wanted to go to those two stadiums but have yet to make it to either...

vaticanplum
06-20-2006, 12:43 PM
I think that driving in New York -- and most major cities, for that matter -- is much easier than it's made out to be. It's parking and the cost surrounding it that is the nightmare.

oneupper
06-20-2006, 01:08 PM
MIAMI


I've only lived in the Miami area for 3 years, but visited frequently before that. RAMP101 should probably chip in, but I'm going to give it a go:

STADIUM

First thing you must realize is that the stadium (it aint a ballpark) is NOWHERE near DOWNTOWN. It's located close to the border of Dade and Broward counties and is within walking distance of NOTHING. So first thing you want to figure out is if baseball is you number one activity or its nightlife or something else.
The stadium is right off the turnpike and that's usually the best way to get there.


Transportation

RENT A CAR. There is no other way to get around greater Miami. Public transportation is not very good and taxis are expensive and scarce. If you aren't old enough to rent a car, I am so sorry.
There is plenty of parking at the Stadium itself. They charge you $5 per car, IIRC and you just leave it in a space or on the grass somewhere. Still, on busy days it pays to be early.

Hotels

Goes to the first point. What are you here for? If its for the baseball and you want to stay near the park, there aren't many choices. The only thing I can really think of is the Seminole Hard Rock Cafe Resort and Casino. Other options could be the Rennaisance in Davie or west of Ft Lauderdale.

If you want to stay in Downtown Miami (for Business) or South Beach (for the night life), be prepared to bear the up/downtown traffic. From South Beach its easily a 30-60 min drive to the stadium on a Friday evening (and be prepared for traffic on the way back.

If you want the nightlife...South Beach. I'm too old for that stuff, so I can't help much. Most of it is expensive. There used to be a lot of little motels on the beach, but most have disappeared to make way for condos.

If you want beach...try further north. South beach is nice, but you're paying for the night life. As far North as Deerfield Beach leaves you close enough to the stadium. Boca Raton might be a bit far (accessible by Turnpike, though).

Casa de Oneupper is unfortunately booked solid. Lots of friends and family from South America and other parts.

Tickets

I've bought them through ticketmaster, at the booth and from the hawkers. It all works. Walk up crowds can be big and the other day I couldn't get infield boxes at the stadium because Pedro was pitching (and there were plenty of seats available when I checked online).
I'm an older dude with some money, so I go to the IF boxes or Club Level. Not sure how much you can move around if you get the cheaper stuff.

Food

I haven't seen anything other than dogs, nachos,etc...at the park (ramp?). Not very healthy stuff. Be prepared to ask if something is spicy or not.
The best places to eat in Miami are in Coral Gables. I am not really impressed and most of it expensive. However, my wife likes Cacao which serves Venezuelan "noveau cuisine". You can also try Joes stone crab (South Beach) which is a South Florida icon.

Night Life

Like I said, I'm kind of past that, but South Beach supposedly is it (unless you want to stay with the Seminoles and their Casino). BTW that Seminole CASINO is not a real casino...no house games, just slots and poker tables.
In any case, be careful, Latin women are VERY SEXY. I married one and she keeps me awfully busy.

What to see/do.

This is a Tourist Desination. Lots of stuff.
Cruise ships. You can take a day trip to the Bahamas or a week cruise though the Caribbean.
Parks. Parrot Jungle, Monkey Jungle. Miami Seaquarium (aint what it used to be, though).
With kids you'll probably be aware that Orlando is a 3-4 hr drive away via the Turnpike. I've done it in a day (back and forth) but that's tiresome.

REDS

Will be here Sept 26-28. Could be important. It would be nice to get a group together.

registerthis
06-20-2006, 01:31 PM
OK, here's my crack at D.C. I know there are a number of DC-area posters here (help me out here, PickOff) so they may add to what I'm about to put down. Anyway, here goes...

STADIUM: RFK Stadium is much like the other "cookie cutters" that came up in the 60s and 70s--a concrete bowl, built to be a multi-use venue, and practically no character at all. There is a lot of foul territory, so getting seats in the lower box level--though an excellent view--doesn't necessarily mean you'll get to hear the first baseman chatting with the runners. Tickets are very easy to come by--games very rarely sell out, so your best bet is to either purchas ethem at the box office that day, or grab some scalpers tickets--they're usually sold at or below face value.

Getting to the stadium is very simple, whether you're coming by car or train. The easiest method, particularly if you're on a subway line, is to take the Metro. RFK is located at the "Stadium/Armory" stop off of the Blue and Orange lines. You can transfer to either line from the Red Line at the Metro Center station, or from the Green and Yellow lines at L'Enfant Plaza. If you're coming by car, take 395 South if coming in from Maryland, or 395 North if coming in from Virginia, and follow the signs to RFK--it's very well marked. There's plenty of parking available near the stadium, but with the Metro accessibility, taking the train is strongly encouraged.

WHERE TO EAT: Not anywhere near the stadium. If it's simply food and drink you're looking for, you can subsist off of the various food vendors that have set up along the walkway from the Metro Station to the stadium. Of course, you can also go the in-stadium concessions route (Try the Dominic's Italian Sausages.) However, if it's a restaurant/bar/club you're looking for, you won't find it near RFK, which is located in the middle of several (not so pleasant) inner-city neighborhoods.

On your way to the stadium, along the Blue and Orange Lines, the closest stop with any amount of restaurants and bars is Eastern Market. Get off at the station and head down Pennsylvania Ave. towards the Capitol, and along Pennsylvania and 8th St. are numerous restaurants serving every type of food. I'm partial to La Plaza on Pennsylvania for Tex-Mex food, but that is just me. In central DC, you'll find an assortment of restaurants and bars in the Penn Quarter area (Archives/Navy memorial stop on the Green Line), Gallery Place/Chinatown (on the Red, Green and Yellow lines), Farragut North and DuPont Circle (Red Line). Farther afield, there are some excellent restaurants in the Woodley Park and Cleveland Park neighborhoods, in Ballston and Rosslyn in Virginia, and in Bethesda, Maryland.

WHERE TO STAY: Since I live here, I'm not really capable of giving specific hotel recommendations. However, realize that, being a major tourist destination, hotels in central D.C. tend to be very expensive. If saving money is your thing, your best bet is to search out a chain hotel in the Maryland or Virginia suburbs--there's no shortage of them. If you're planning on taking the metro to the game and to tour D.C., make certain that your hotel is at least within walking distance of a Station.

NIGHTLIFE: Contrary to conventional thinking, there's no shortage of places to have a great night out in D.C. It's not New York, but there's plenty going on just the same. Georgetown, of course, is always fun with plenty of bars and nightclubs to satisfy all tastes. However, Georgetown--and corresponding Washington Harbour--get extremely crowded on weekends. There's no metro stop here, so you're best bet is to take a cab. DuPont Circle IS metro accessible, and features and array of nightclubs and bars ranging from quiet hotel piano bars to flamboyant gay clubs. Many of the best are located a block or two off of the Circle, so wander through the neighborhood a bit before deciding on one (I can personally recommend the Topaz Bar on N St.) The U St. neighborhood, which used to be an absolute dump, has come up a lot in recent years. There are plenty of bars and ethnic restaurants in the area, but its true callign card is the number of jazz clubs--half a dozen--scattered along a 4 block area. The best is Bohemian Caverns, the former hangout of Duke Ellington. Look for the Ellington Mural as you get off the Metro. Adams-Morgan is as close to New York as you'll get in D.C.--it's rowdy and noisy, but can also be a lot of fun. You can metro to Cleveland Park or U St. and make the 20 minute walk to the neighborhood, or you can cab there. DON'T DRIVE, you will never find a place to park.

Finally, if you get the chance, visit the Hotel Washington--located at 15th and Penn--and grab a drink on their rooftop terrace. The view is unsurpassed.

Old Towne Alexandria, VA and Bethesda also offer some pleasant after-hours entertainment in a quieter environment. There's no Metro to Old Towne.

SEEING THE SITES: There's really too many to mention. if you've never been to D.C. before, you should do the obligatory monument tour along the mall. (My personal favorite is the Jefferson.) If you're looking to tour the White House--good luck. Tours are essentially reserved for school and larger tour groups, so if you're with friends or family, it won't happen. Walk down Pennsylvania Ave (a new pedestrian walkway runs right next to the White House) and visit the Visitor's Center for the next best thing. You can tour the Capitol Building with same-day timed entry tickets, but you need to get them early. They're usually gone by 10 am. The National Archives are worth a visit, to see the originl COnstitution and Declaration of Independence, plus other historical curiosities.

If you're the Museum type, you could spend months here. The Smithsonian--particularly the Air and Space, American History and Natural History museums--are all top notch. The National Gallery of Art, the Corcoran, the Renwick and the Phillips Collection are all outstanding art galleries. Additionally, the Museum of American Art and the National Portrait Gallery are re-opening in July, they're worth a look. Some off-the-beaten-path museums which I can personally vouch for include the DAR Museum, the Octagon House (a museum devoted to architecture), the National Building Museum (the building itself is gorgeous) and the fantastic Spy Museum (better than the FBI tour) are all worthy. If you're here with family, the National Zoo is a must visit. Also, to save the time on a trip up the Washington Monument, visit the old Post office Pavillion on pennsylvania, where you can eat lunch and travel to the top of the 350 foot tower for a great view.

If shoppign is your thing, you can't go wrong in DuPont, Georgetown, Gallery Place or Old Towne Alexandria. For those who enjoy the outdoors, you can rent kayaks in Washington Harbor along the Potomac. You can also rent bikes and do one of the many bike trails in the area (the Capital Crescent Trail and the River Trail down to Alexandria are two of my faves. be sure to stop and watch the planes come into National Airport if you take the River Trail.)

Also, a moonlit walk down the National Mall can't be beat.

Finally, I would be remiss if I didn't urge a tour of the National Cathedral. The structure is breathtaking, and the tour immensely interesting. While you're there, be sure to pay particular attention to the Great Choir area, where a certain poster will be getting married in September. :)

Well, there you go. Hope it helps. like I said, if others in the DC area want to correct me, or make some additions, feel free. I'd also like to point out that DC has a reputation as being a somewhat unsafe city, and while there are neighborhoods to avoid--to be sure--much of the city has or is currently being revitalized, so many areas that were once dangerous are now not so much so. Just take simple precautions, stay in populated areas and near tourist sites, and you'll be fine. And if you come into the city for a game, be sure to contact me, I'm always up for a trip out to RFK. :D

vaticanplum
06-20-2006, 01:46 PM
That is superhandy as I am going to DC (and hopefully RFK) next month. Thanks very much for all the details.

KittyDuran
06-20-2006, 01:47 PM
I'll give a shout-out to deltachi to help out w/Cleveland since he'll be there this weekend as well (and probably DT - I'll be in the burbs...:( ).

Red Leader
06-20-2006, 01:51 PM
Can we add write-ups for Sarasota, Billings, Dayton, Chatanooga, and Louisville as well in this thread? I can create another one in the minor league forum if need be, or copy them over, but I think it'd be nice to put it in this thread as well. Thanks.

KittyDuran
06-20-2006, 03:02 PM
Can we add write-ups for Sarasota, Billings, Dayton, Chatanooga, and Louisville as well in this thread? I can create another one in the minor league forum if need be, or copy them over, but I think it'd be nice to put it in this thread as well. Thanks.Has anyone been to Billings? :) I can write up something for Dayton. I went to a Lookouts game but stayed in Pidgeon Forge not Chattanooga. Sarasota could have two entries, one for ST and other for the regular High A season. Only been to 3 Louisville games :( .

deltachi8
06-20-2006, 03:03 PM
Ill work on stuff for Cleveland as I will be there this weekend and a little on Detroit and Toronto.

Red Leader
06-20-2006, 03:29 PM
Has anyone been to Billings? :)

I know I haven't. Surely there has to be someone that at least visits this site from Montana....

Here's the address for the stadium:

Cobb Field
901 N. 27th St
Billings, MT 59101

registerthis
06-20-2006, 03:38 PM
Here's the address for the stadium:

Cobb Field
901 N. 27th St
Billings, MT 59101

There are 27 streets in Billings?

Red Leader
06-20-2006, 03:42 PM
There are 27 streets in Billings?

No, but there must be 27 in Montana, which is still a surprise to me.

KronoRed
06-20-2006, 04:23 PM
They must combine and count with the Dakotas

gonelong
06-20-2006, 04:24 PM
Can we add write-ups for Sarasota, Billings, Dayton, Chatanooga, and Louisville as well in this thread? I can create another one in the minor league forum if need be, or copy them over, but I think it'd be nice to put it in this thread as well. Thanks.

Damn fine idea.

I am going to add Spring Training as well.

GL

OldXOhio
06-20-2006, 04:43 PM
I'll be happy to do one for the Oklahoma City and Tulsa ballparks as well. I know a lot of you probably have big plans to vacation here this summer.

Heath
06-20-2006, 04:50 PM
I covered a little bit of Cleveland on page one - if you want to add to it or want me to delete it - let me know.

gonelong
06-20-2006, 04:56 PM
I covered a little bit of Cleveland on page one - if you want to add to it or want me to delete it - let me know.

We'll let this thread perculate for a few weeks and then I'll work on pulling all the information together. No need to delete anything.

GL

gonelong
06-26-2006, 11:15 PM
bump one more time. I'll start working on consolidating these next week.

GL

gonelong
07-24-2006, 01:26 PM
bump one more time. I'll start working on consolidating these next week.

GL

Hooo boy was that a gross miscalculation.

I have let this get away from me a bit, but its still on my TODO list. Unfortunately its on the bottom of a long list as of today. You will eventually see this completed, though it may be weeks or months before I get a chance to.

GL

KoryMac5
07-25-2006, 05:04 PM
I'm heading down to Baltimore for a family function and I know Camden is very accesible I will try and do a write up when I get back on the 10th or so.

gonelong
01-08-2007, 03:25 PM
Spring Training in Sarosota

Medford:
Crescent Beach (Siesta Key, just south of downtown) has been named as one of the top white sand beaches in the world based upon that amount of quartz crystal content (like 98&#37; which means the sand never gets hot during the middle of a 100 degree July day).

There are a million dinning areas depening on what your looking for. Phillipi Creek is one of my favorites. Its just outside or Siesta Key on route 41 - tamiami trail. Kind of a "homey-down to earth" kind of place w/ paper towels as napkins. Great stuffed flounder and clam chowder. Siesta Key itself has several good stops.

Broken Egg is in the village for breakfast (its the place that Dick Vitale always pimps during broadcast, and yes he is there as often as he says he is.) Lobster Pot, also in the village is nice. A couple of fun bars are around that area as well if you're looking for some night life.

St Armands circle near downtown sarasota has several good restaurants. Patrick's is a nice sportsbar. If you're there over St. Paddy's day, I imagine they'll have some activities going on.

Then there is also the slew of national restuarants as well as places that started out local to the tampa-sarasota market and evenutually made their way north (Bone Fish grille, Hooters & First Watch).

Ringling Brothers meusem is near the airport if you have small kids, or Jungle Gardens. I haven't been to either in years, so I don't know if they're worth it or not. Busch Gardens is just up the road. Golf is abundant. I can't really help you w/ tourist attractions as most of what I've done is sit on the beach, and go out to eat while down there. You can always rent a boat and cruise the intercoastal waterways. Or go deep sea fishing.

I hope some of that helps. Enjoy your trip.

creek14: You'll probably see some of the team on any given night at Daquari Deck on Siesta Key.

chett: Right behind the ballpark in Sarasota is Gus' 12th Street Cafe. It's been a couple years since I've been there. It's a real small place, good food. Open for breakfast & lunch. The waitress says the ball players eat breakfast there. It might be something to check it out. If you do, let me know.

Cedric: Munroe's in Sarasota is great food and pretty good price.
Busch Gardens in Tampa is awesome, nothing you probably haven't heard.
I've seen and talked with Marty and Joe at Mel's diner.

vaticanplum
01-08-2007, 10:13 PM
Wow, I forgot that I lived in chicago.

jmcclain19
01-08-2007, 11:01 PM
GL - I guess I missed this thread earlier - If it's alright with you I'll take my hometown.

Also - i'm not sure if you'd be interested, but I wouldn't mind doing a write up if anyone was interested in coming out to Arizona for ST.

Chase Field

The Reds visit Phoenix for the Arizona home opener, April 9th, 10th & 11th.

The Home of the Arizona Diamonbacks is located right at Jefferson & 7th in downtown Phoenix. It's just a block away from the Suns US Airways Arena and right across the Street from Phoenix Civic Plaza. There is immediate parking directly north of the stadium at Washington & 7th (FYI - Washington & Jefferson are both 1 way streets) - which was $10 in 2006. There is also baseball parking available just north of the Arizona Science Center at Monroe & 5th. If memory serves it was $5 - and I've never had a problem parking there - a nice deal if you don't mind walking a little bit.

As far as getting to the stadium from another location - make no mistake about it, Phoenix is a commuter town. There is no central transportation system to speak of, so plan on either renting a car, or hitching a ride with friends if you're not staying within walking distance. Scottsdale & Tempe are probably the best bet if you're automobile enabled - you're talking between 15 & 20 miles to get to each cities' downtown areas, but both areas offer plenty of hotel options and the chance to see a little bit better sights than you would in Downtown Phoenix. Not to mention both downtowns are close to freeway access so the commute to BOB isn't bad at all. Tempe has Mill Avenue, Tempe Town Lake & ASU among others, Scottsdale has Old Town, the cultural district and all kinds of World Class resorts.

Once you get in the ballpark. Some highlights.

The 2001 World Series Trophy, along with memorbilia, and a constantly playing highlight video, can be seen just inside of the West Entrance to the stadium. The Kiosk is just outisde the entrance to the main Dbacks gift shop on the Ground level. That Gift Shop always seems to have some intersting stuff for sale - they've had a wide range of game used/broken baseball bats from former & current Dbacks, as well as the occasional other team's players. It will be funny this year, as the shop has had an entire clearance section dedicated to Randy Johnson merch for 2 years that will be able to shift back into the mix once again.

Go check out the pool, I'm not a fan, but it's different than what you'll see at any other park, so walk on out and take a look. Friday's Grill is also in LF, so if you are in town on a non-game day, swing by and go have a meal there. They will let you out on the porch to check out the stadium while it's empty, that's always a popular trip with my friends who come over the winter.

Acquiring Tickets - First off - Scalping is legal is Arizona, so that is a potenially excellent outlet to get some game time deals from scalpers who just want to unload that night's seats. Scalpers have to stay across the street from the ballpark, but you will see them all over as you walk up to the stadium. But Arizona last year only had two series that sold any tickets of great numbers, the opening and closing weekends (Opening Day & Gonzo's last home series). Otherwise, there are thousands upon thousands of empty seats every night. Also - the Dbacks have two sections, in the far upper right field & upper left field deck, that are dedicated to Game Day Only sales. They were just $1 each (I don't know what the prices are now) but they are easily the best ticket purchase deal out there.
So try MLB.com's ticket office first. Then Team Box Office on site, then the scalpers.
EDIT: I just realized that the Reds this year are the Dbacks home opener, so tickets may be a little bit harder to come by, but not by much. For reference, in 2006 the 1st game sold 37k tickets, the following two sold 18k. Also, if RJ pitches in either the 2nd or 3rd game, I'd expect a big spike in ticket sales for that game. Something to keep in mind.

Eating at the ballpark - give "Big Dawgs" a shot - it's just outside the Team Gift Shop, and there is only one in the ballpark. We're talking monster sized hotdogs - themed for just about every major league city. My wife insists on getting one every time I take her to a game. You can also sneak into the Diamondlevel if you want something different than normal Ballpark fare - they've got a handful of places up there that aren't anywhere else in the park. Other than that, Panda Express, Subway, Little Caesars, Ben & Jerrys and others are all over the place so you have your pick.

Some things I would see if I came to town.
Take a road trip and go see the Grand Canyon. It's about 200+ miles to get to the South Rim, and it's $25 per car to get in the park, but I would recommend that to every AZ visitor without hesitation. There isn't a picture in the world that can do the GC justice, I humbly submit that's the most pictureesq place in the country.
In town - I already mentioned the Tempe & Scottsdale downtowns. If you're a sports stadium Buff - take the I-10 West and go out to Glendale and check out the new Cardinals football/Coyotes Hockey area, which is turning into quite the destination. There is a mall, a huge movie theater and a Cabelas now all within walking distance of both facilities.
The Desert Botanical Gardens is a short trip from BOB and worth a peek.

Also - one other note. Even in April it will be hot here. Luckily this year the Reds miss the hotest part of the year, but in the past 3-4 seasons, the Reds have been here in June, and you can get stunned by the 110 degree heat in the middle of the day.

And feel free to PM me if you're going to be in town for the game. There is always a good smattering of Reds fans at the Reds series, I always try to attend all three and love meeting up with and having a pregame drink with fellow Redszoners.

M2
01-09-2007, 12:19 AM
Here's some Boston additions:

Tickets: It's all scalpers these days. Seriously, if you're coming to see the Sox play, put a $100 worth of mixed bills in your pocket (just for the ticket) and learn the seating chart before you go because you want to make damn sure you're not sitting very far back with an obstructed view. If you know you're going months in advance then you can try tickets through the team site, but the games sell out almost instantly. On a hot day make sure you stop at the variety store on Brookline Ave. before you go into the park and buy one of the big bottles of water there. You're allowed to carry it into the park, where the water prices are criminally high.

Hotels: Though it's nothing fancy, the Beacon Townhouse Inn (http://www.beacontownhouseinn.com/) is near Fenway, it's generally well-kept and it's affordable. The Hotel Buckminster (http://www.bostonhotelbuckminster.com/) in Kenmore Square is supposedly clean these days. The Kenmore area has undergone a makeover (I say not for the better, I liked it when it was dirty), so it's possible the Buckminster has taken to washing its sheets. A scan through the TripAdvisor ratings shows it to be a real mixed bag. Some folks feel they got a great deal in a great location, others toss around the word "disgusting."

One thing you don't want to do it stay anywhere that's not on the T. Don't rent a car. In fact, when in Boston pretend cars do not exist. The T now costs $2.00 a pop, though you can order a $7.00 day pass or $15.00 week at the MBTA (http://www.mbta.com/fares_and_passes/passes/) site before you go.

Food: Here's where 20 years of me living in the area pays off for you. There's a gem of a pizza/Italian place three blocks from Fenway called Canestaro's (http://www.canestaros.com/). It's affordable, it's got outdoor seating. It's never overcrowded. In fact, despite it's proximity to Fenway, you feel like you're in some random neighborhood well off the beaten path. The best Thai food in the United States can be found another two blocks away at The Brown Sugar Cafe (http://www.brownsugarcafe.com/) (the one on Jersey St.). It's also affordable, though it's not a secret, so it might not be easy to get a table. In the Fenway neighborhood there's also a solid North Carolina vinegar-based barbecue restaurant called The Linwood Grill (http://www.linwoodgrill.com/).

The food at the park itself has picked up in recent years. Yawkey Way has been turned into a baseball food court, as has the area behind the RF bleachers. You can get a decent hot dog or sausage and peppers at the park these days. There's even some more exotic stuff like Cuban sandwiches and soul food.

Though, instead of getting soul food at the park, you could just go to Bob the Chef's (http://www.bobthechefs.com/) and get it from the source. Great food there. And the best hot dog in Boston can be found at Spike's (http://www.spikesjunkyarddogs.com/), which has opened up a spot on Boylston St. within walking distance of Fenway.

A few other food suggestions:

Don't go to Legal Seafood. It's a chain without an ounce of local flavor. If you want seafood, head out to the harbor and go to No-Name Restaurant. That's it's real name and, no, it doesn't have a Web site. It's the real deal and it won't hit you too hard in the pocket.

Over in Brookline, about two miles from Fenway, there's a two great cheap eats places of note (actually there's a bunch, but two will do for the purposes of this discussion). Michael's Deli, on Harvard St. near Beacon, serves up some of the best and biggest corned beef sandwiches on the planet. Boca Grande, on the corner of John and Beacon, serves up some seriously awesome burritos, authentic stuff, not the ground beef and lettuce monstrosities that get passed as burritos in most places.

Best Chinese food in Chinatown, IMO, is the New Shanghai (http://www.newshanghaiboston.com/). The scallops in black pepper sauce are exceptional.

There's the entire North End for Italian food. One of the best spots there is an establishment called Galleria Umberto on Hanover St. It's only open for lunch and they run out of food every day. It's all pizza, calzone and panini and it's all delicious. Doors open at 11 a.m. and don't wait till noon. For dinner there's Giacomo's on Hanover Street, Euno on Salem St., Carmen in North Square and Taranta on Hanover St. Though they aren't cheap by any means.

Though a German restaurant may not be what someone from Cincinnati is looking for on a vacation, Jacob Wirth's (http://www.jacobwirth.com/) is my favorite downtown restaurant.

And if you're in town with money to burn and want to treat someone to the best meal they'll ever eat, there's L'Espalier (http://www.lespalier.com/). No joke, they've got butter that's so good it'll make you tear up. I don't even like butter.

Attractions: The Museum of Fine Arts, Museum of Science and Aquarium are all fine, but I'm partial to the Gardner Museum (http://www.gardnermuseum.org/). If you're in town during the summer, I highly recommend taking a day to see the Harbor Islands (http://www.bostonislands.org/). The Esplanade along the Charles makes for a nice walk as well. If you like history, the Freedom Trail is pretty cool too, particularly the U.S.S. Constitution (http://www.ussconstitution.navy.mil/) at the Charlestown Navy Yard, though you'll need to foot a cab fare to get there (or at least most people who've hoofed it over to the yard wish they had taken a cab). Best window shopping is on Newbury St. and, being a college town, the used book stores throughout the city are excellent.

Yachtzee
01-09-2007, 01:10 AM
Must have missed this the first time around. I'll add some to Heath's write-up on Cleveland, since I've been in the area for much of my life.




CLEVELAND -

HOTELS - Stay at the airport in the burbs - Don't get me wrong, the downtown hotels are nice, but parts of downtown think they are cosmopolitan and their prices reflect it. The Hyatt downtown does have hotel/ticket deals.



Actually, I've heard you can get some deals through Hotwire or Priceline for downtown hotels, but I've never stayed downtown, so I'll have to take others' words for it. The only issue with staying near the airport is that it can smell kind of funky being so close to the Ford Plant. Also, the airport is where they've put most of the Gentlemen's clubs. However, driving is fairly easy here compared to other places, so don't feel like its necessary to stay downtown. If you don't have a car here, stay downtown. The airport area is a bit of a drive to downtown, so the cab fare may rack up. One area you might think of is staying on the East Side in a place near Shaker Square or Coventry if you like to shop at quirky shops and get some local flavor. You can then take the RTA downtown.




PARKING - all over the place - Can't miss them. There are parking garages just to east of 9th Street for $5.



Definitely true. Avoid the Gund Arena/Jacobs Field parking deck, as it is expensive and has weird entrances into the stadium. We actually had to walk down two levels with my 80-year-old grandfather because the only entrance we had on our level was restricted to "club level patrons." Gee, can't we just walk through to the elevator? The answer was "no." If someone needs assistance, it's best to drop them off at the gate behind home plate, because it seems like the people there are the only ones equipped to think independently. Avoid the hassle of the Jake Parking Deck and save yourself some cash by parking a few blocks down.




TRANSPORTATION - Take your car. I-71 to I-90 to E. 9th St. Follow Signs (or light towers).



As I noted earlier, driving is easy. However, if that's not an option (you're flying in and don't want to rent a car), the RTA (light rail) works pretty well. Some people actually park at an RTA stop for free and take the RTA downtown. However, since you can still find $5 parking downtown, or at least you could last season, why bother?




FOOD - Park has some interesting options. Best one is a KIDS menu - $1 for popcorn, $1 for drink, $1 for candy. Great for families. Normal ballpark fare - including microbrews from Great Lakes Brewery in the outfield. A few scattered watering holes across the street.



The Jake has quite a selection, but my favorite pre-game meal can be found at Panini's Grille, right down the street from the Jake on Huron. Grilled sandwiches with coleslaw and french fries on the sandwich. Similar to Primanti Bros. in Pittsburgh, but way better in my opinion.

After the game, they've got some bars and restaurants in the Gateway District, or you could head north to the Warehouse district for some of the trendier clubs. The downtown area also features some chains, like Alice Cooperstown, the Hard Rock, and House of Blues. Peabody's, now on E. 21st, is a music club with a variety of bands.

If you want to know what's happening in Cleveland when you plan your visit, be sure to check out this site: http://www.clevescene.com/.




TICKETS - well, if this was about 5 years ago, I'd tell you to forget it. Now, you can walk up to the gate and get whatever you want. Be prepared. The 500 level seats are WAY high. You feel you looking DOWN from the Goodyear blimp.

Tickets really aren't that hard to come by now, unless it's a big game. The Yankees games on the weekend often sell out, and the interleague games with the Reds sometimes do too. But these days you may even be able to buy Opening Day tickets up to a few weeks before the game.

OesterPoster
01-09-2007, 02:18 PM
Awesome information provided already, but if anyone could add anything new about Wrigley, I'd appreciate it. Any new stuff to be concerned about? Where would you park & ride the train if we're driving up from Ohio the day of the Reds/Cubs game on August 16th? I was planning on an attempt to buy tickets through the Cubs ticket office when tix go on sale February 23rd, but are there recommendations for where or where not to sit?

On second thought, I'll probably just pick up tickets from Stubhub. Lots of options available, so any specific seats to avoid?

gonelong
03-05-2007, 10:38 AM
bump - we have a lot of new members so I thought I'd bump this to see if anyone wants to add anything.

Chavez Ravine anyone ?
http://www.redszone.com/forums/showthread.php?p=1255725#post1255725

GL

Joseph
03-05-2007, 10:42 AM
bump - we have a lot of new members so I thought I'd bump this to see if anyone wants to add anything.

Chavez Ravine anyone ?
http://www.redszone.com/forums/showthread.php?p=1255725#post1255725

GL

We're [and by we're I mean the wife and I] going to California in May and hoping to see a Reds Dodgers game while there. I'll be sure to do a write up if we do go.

Chip R
08-02-2007, 06:55 PM
Anybody have any suggestions for Philly? I'm going to a game there on the 22nd for the last leg on my East Coast tour.

Cyclone792
08-02-2007, 07:09 PM
Anybody have any suggestions for Philly? I'm going to a game there on the 22nd for the last leg on my East Coast tour.

Looks like the Dodgers will be the visiting team. Not that you would anyway, but just know not to wear anything Dodger related, and don't wear anything blue.
I wouldn't recommend wearing Reds stuff either. In fact, you're best off going in non-blue plain clothes if you want to be left alone.
Whatever cheesesteak joint is in center field - it used to be Geno's, but I believe they were replaced by another cheesesteak joint - make sure that's your appetizer, main course, and dessert. If you want to bring a stash of cheesesteaks back to Cincinnati for me, I won't complain. Prov/wit-out, please. ;)
Parking is ungodly expensive, and since the stadium is in a sports complex surrounded by parking lots, there's not much getting around that expense.
If Pat Burrell is starting left field that night, it's worth it to sit field level in the left field corner to hear the abuse Burrell takes.
When the Dodgers are warming up pitchers, stroll over to right-center to the concourse above their bullpen. You'll witness some serious heckling there as fans are just a few feet above the visitor's pen.

Highlifeman21
08-02-2007, 07:42 PM
Anybody have any suggestions for Philly? I'm going to a game there on the 22nd for the last leg on my East Coast tour.

1. Where are you staying?

2. Who's with you?

3. Do you have a budget?

4. How much time do you have for the City of Brotherly Hate, aka any points of interest you might want to take in?

5. Do you already have tickets?

6. If so, where are they?

7. Any dietary concerns?

8. How's your bladder?




------

There were reasons for this survey. In reverse order....

8. Phillies Phans are ruthless everywhere. Including bathrooms. Especially bathrooms. Avoid making eye contact. Avoid clearing your throat during your trip to the bathroom.

7. If you're looking for all the tastes in the ballpark, left CF to dead CF is the place. Great BBQ in dead CF, and you have to make a trip to Tony Luke's in left CF. That's where Cyclone got his 6 cheesesteaks in 2 games last year. The year before, Genos had a stand in left CF, and I think between the 6 of us that went, we put down almost 40 of them in 2 nights. If you're serious about cheesesteaks, I'll walk you through how to order. There's a certain cadance and lingo you need to know, or else you're immediately identified as a foreigner. Also, don't ask for mayo for your cheesesteak. Huge no no. I used to love mayo on mine when I lived in Cincy. First time I asked for mayo on mine once in Philly changed that.

If you have a weak stomach and or can't handle truckloads of grease, then I would avoid anything except the hotdogs at Citizens Bank BP. The pretzels are pretty safe too. And excellent with their version of stadium mustard.

6 and 5. If you have tickets already, hopefully you didn't pay too much. You'll be able to move around the stadium nicely to get lower without much hassle, especially in the OF corners. This is particularly helpful if you want to listen to the LF area give Pat Burrell all kinda hell. I honestly would recommend getting as close to Pat Burrell as possible when going. It's an education, so to speak. You think there's some Dunn hatred on RedsZone and at the ballpark from time to time? It pales in comparison to the nightly abuse Burrell gets from the Phillies Phaithful.

If you don't have tickets, I promise walk up will be available, although double check they aren't doing a stupid giveaway. If they are, then I hope you have advance tickets. If you're looking for scalpers, then your best bet is the parking lot at Lincoln Financial Field. You're gonna drop at least $10 to park there, and possibly as much as $20, but it has a better exit path once you get back to your car. Very easy to get back to 95, which will take you almost anywhere you want in the Philly area. For whatever reason, I think there's a boundary limit for scalpers in Philly and or maybe the Commonwealth of Penn., so the Linc must be far enough away.

4. I would recommend hitting up Pat's and Genos. Very easy to find off Washington Ave in South Philly. The crossroads, IIRC, are Passayunk Ave, and 7th or 8th. There's a lot of one way streets, so you'll have to weave back and forth. There's plenty of parking around that area, but not always as much availability. Still, going to Pat's and Genos is a must. You need to get a steak from each one and make up your mind which is better. If you prefer Pat's, keep it to yourself. Your kind isn't well liked around these parts.

I would also recommend going through Old City, which is where all of the super old historical stuff is. Walking around Independence Hall is always fun, and you can check out the cool flags in that area that signify how we grew as a nation. That is if you're into the historical stuff, like I am. Also, you need to check out Ben Franklin's gravesite. It's across the street and one block towards the Delaware River from the Constitution Center. It's also directly across the street from the US Mint. I can't remember street names for the life of me right now.

I would also recommend driving over to the Art Museum (that building at the top of the steps that Rocky made famous) and checking out the beautiful architecture along Ben Franklin Pkwy. Near the Art Museum, there is a neat old prison that does tours, if you're into that sorta thing. I would also suggest taking a drive along boathouse row which is Kelly Dr, IIRC, which is the street leading away from the Art Museum heading North.

If you're into Findlay Market, then you're gonna love Reading Terminal Market. It's across the street from the Convention Center. National Treasure was partly filmed in the Reading Terminal.

If you're into more sites, feel free to ask, those are a few off the top of my head.

3. Philly ain't cheap. One of the SEPTA radial lines goes down to the Athletic Complex, but good luck finding a train that runs on time heading down there. The only reliable SEPTA train is the R-1, just b/c it goes to and from the airport. SEPTA isn't as affordable as it may seem, especially if you have to change trains @ 30th St. Station. It's a big hassle, IMO, but a public transportation option, if that's your thing.

2. Hopefully you don't have more than 4 people, or else you're gonna find navigating pricey, and a pain in the ass. If it's more than 4, good luck, you'll need it.

1. If you already have a hotel booked, then disregard this. If not, hopefully this helps. You're going to find your best deals IMO up in Bensalem. It's just off 95, which leaves you no more than a 30 min trip down to the stadium. It may even be less time than that.

MississippiRed
08-02-2007, 10:13 PM
I know I'm from Mississippi, but I do travel a bit. I highly recommend Steve's Prince of Steaks (you'll need a car to get to the one I went to in Northeast Philly). Here is the website:
http://www.stevesprinceofsteaks.com/

You can do a Google search for Steve's to see the many excellent reviews.

I also really enjoyed the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Excellent collection. Plan to spend at least 1/2 a day.

Stewie
08-03-2007, 08:48 AM
[list]

Parking is ungodly expensive, and since the stadium is in a sports complex surrounded by parking lots, there's not much getting around that expense.


You can park for free over in FDR Park (across Broad St. from the Spectrum). You'll have a little bit of a walk, but the combination of free parking and an easy, relatively traffic-free exit make the walk worth it. Occasionally, they will charge to park in FDR, but I can't remember the last time I paid to park there for a Phillies game. Eagles games are a different story.

Chip R
08-03-2007, 09:19 AM
1. Where are you staying?

Haven't booked a hotel yet


2. Who's with you?

Me, myself and I


3. Do you have a budget?

Yes



4. How much time do you have for the City of Brotherly Hate, aka any points of interest you might want to take in?


Coming in from NYC in the morning and leaving the next day.



5. Do you already have tickets?

6. If so, where are they?


Nope.


7. Any dietary concerns?

I don't like broccoli.



8. How's your bladder?


Well, I don't need Depends, if that's what you're asking. ;)

------


There were reasons for this survey. In reverse order....

8. Phillies Phans are ruthless everywhere. Including bathrooms. Especially bathrooms. Avoid making eye contact. Avoid clearing your throat during your trip to the bathroom.

7. If you're looking for all the tastes in the ballpark, left CF to dead CF is the place. Great BBQ in dead CF, and you have to make a trip to Tony Luke's in left CF. That's where Cyclone got his 6 cheesesteaks in 2 games last year. The year before, Genos had a stand in left CF, and I think between the 6 of us that went, we put down almost 40 of them in 2 nights. If you're serious about cheesesteaks, I'll walk you through how to order. There's a certain cadance and lingo you need to know, or else you're immediately identified as a foreigner. Also, don't ask for mayo for your cheesesteak. Huge no no. I used to love mayo on mine when I lived in Cincy. First time I asked for mayo on mine once in Philly changed that.

If you have a weak stomach and or can't handle truckloads of grease, then I would avoid anything except the hotdogs at Citizens Bank BP. The pretzels are pretty safe too. And excellent with their version of stadium mustard.

6 and 5. If you have tickets already, hopefully you didn't pay too much. You'll be able to move around the stadium nicely to get lower without much hassle, especially in the OF corners. This is particularly helpful if you want to listen to the LF area give Pat Burrell all kinda hell. I honestly would recommend getting as close to Pat Burrell as possible when going. It's an education, so to speak. You think there's some Dunn hatred on RedsZone and at the ballpark from time to time? It pales in comparison to the nightly abuse Burrell gets from the Phillies Phaithful.

If you don't have tickets, I promise walk up will be available, although double check they aren't doing a stupid giveaway. If they are, then I hope you have advance tickets. If you're looking for scalpers, then your best bet is the parking lot at Lincoln Financial Field. You're gonna drop at least $10 to park there, and possibly as much as $20, but it has a better exit path once you get back to your car. Very easy to get back to 95, which will take you almost anywhere you want in the Philly area. For whatever reason, I think there's a boundary limit for scalpers in Philly and or maybe the Commonwealth of Penn., so the Linc must be far enough away.

4. I would recommend hitting up Pat's and Genos. Very easy to find off Washington Ave in South Philly. The crossroads, IIRC, are Passayunk Ave, and 7th or 8th. There's a lot of one way streets, so you'll have to weave back and forth. There's plenty of parking around that area, but not always as much availability. Still, going to Pat's and Genos is a must. You need to get a steak from each one and make up your mind which is better. If you prefer Pat's, keep it to yourself. Your kind isn't well liked around these parts.

I would also recommend going through Old City, which is where all of the super old historical stuff is. Walking around Independence Hall is always fun, and you can check out the cool flags in that area that signify how we grew as a nation. That is if you're into the historical stuff, like I am. Also, you need to check out Ben Franklin's gravesite. It's across the street and one block towards the Delaware River from the Constitution Center. It's also directly across the street from the US Mint. I can't remember street names for the life of me right now.

I would also recommend driving over to the Art Museum (that building at the top of the steps that Rocky made famous) and checking out the beautiful architecture along Ben Franklin Pkwy. Near the Art Museum, there is a neat old prison that does tours, if you're into that sorta thing. I would also suggest taking a drive along boathouse row which is Kelly Dr, IIRC, which is the street leading away from the Art Museum heading North.

If you're into Findlay Market, then you're gonna love Reading Terminal Market. It's across the street from the Convention Center. National Treasure was partly filmed in the Reading Terminal.

If you're into more sites, feel free to ask, those are a few off the top of my head.

3. Philly ain't cheap. One of the SEPTA radial lines goes down to the Athletic Complex, but good luck finding a train that runs on time heading down there. The only reliable SEPTA train is the R-1, just b/c it goes to and from the airport. SEPTA isn't as affordable as it may seem, especially if you have to change trains @ 30th St. Station. It's a big hassle, IMO, but a public transportation option, if that's your thing.

2. Hopefully you don't have more than 4 people, or else you're gonna find navigating pricey, and a pain in the ass. If it's more than 4, good luck, you'll need it.

1. If you already have a hotel booked, then disregard this. If not, hopefully this helps. You're going to find your best deals IMO up in Bensalem. It's just off 95, which leaves you no more than a 30 min trip down to the stadium. It may even be less time than that.


Thanks, Highlifeman. I know it's not a Reds game but if anyone in the area would like to go to the game with me, PM me and we can hook up.


You can park for free over in FDR Park (across Broad St. from the Spectrum). You'll have a little bit of a walk, but the combination of free parking and an easy, relatively traffic-free exit make the walk worth it. Occasionally, they will charge to park in FDR, but I can't remember the last time I paid to park there for a Phillies game. Eagles games are a different story.

Stewie, how long of a walk is that? I don't know how familiar you are with Cincinnati but I usually park downtown and walk to GAB from there and that's not a problem with me.

Thanks for the suggestions, all. :)

rdiersin
08-03-2007, 09:24 AM
Looks like the Dodgers will be the visiting team. Not that you would anyway, but just know not to wear anything Dodger related, and don't wear anything blue.
I wouldn't recommend wearing Reds stuff either. In fact, you're best off going in non-blue plain clothes if you want to be left alone.


I went to two of three games when the Reds were in town and also one other game where the Phillies played the Tigers. I wore my Adam Dunn hat one night, without incident. Also I noticed a lot of Reds shirts, jerseys, and hats. Interestingly on the first night I went the crowd was great. Nobody seemed to be harassing anyone, (and no Reds fans egged them on either). The second night was an entirely different crowd with the people in my row yelling down at Jr. the entire night. It was like one night was family night and the other was drunk night. (Though there weren't any extras on either night).




Whatever cheesesteak joint is in center field - it used to be Geno's, but I believe they were replaced by another cheesesteak joint - make sure that's your appetizer, main course, and dessert. If you want to bring a stash of cheesesteaks back to Cincinnati for me, I won't complain. Prov/wit-out, please. ;)


Forget the cheesteak and go to Tony Luke's by left field and get the roast pork sandwich with broccoli rabe.



Parking is ungodly expensive, and since the stadium is in a sports complex surrounded by parking lots, there's not much getting around that expense.


And getting out of the parking lot is the worst of it. If you are staying downtown Chip, try the Broad Street line subway.



If Pat Burrell is starting left field that night, it's worth it to sit field level in the left field corner to hear the abuse Burrell takes.
When the Dodgers are warming up pitchers, stroll over to right-center to the concourse above their bullpen. You'll witness some serious heckling there as fans are just a few feet above the visitor's pen.



That's actually where we sat, in right center, right above the bullpen. Its actually a pretty cool setup. Though, the heckling is obvious.

rdiersin
08-03-2007, 09:25 AM
DP

Roy Tucker
08-03-2007, 09:26 AM
You think there's some Dunn hatred on RedsZone and at the ballpark from time to time? It pales in comparison to the nightly abuse Burrell gets from the Phillies Phaithful.


When I got out into the professional world, I started going to other stadiums to watch ballgames. One of the first games I saw was at Fenway when the Red Sox played the Yankees. This was about 1984.

I sat out in RF, just beyond the Pesky Pole. Dave Winfield was playing RF for the Yankees then. I was a white-bread midwest guy who had grown up going to Crosley and Riverfront. By and large, Cinci fans are fairly mild and that was the behavior I was used to. Kid-friendly place. Openly shouting obscenities was highly frowned upon. Heckling consisted of "you stink".

Boy did my eyes ever get opened up. Or maybe I should say my ears. I had never heard fans get on a player like that in my life. No topic was off-limits. His momma (and something about donkeys), his parentage, his sister and sailors, the seagull incident, and his overall character was brought into question. I'd never heard such vile stuff. Lots of it was hilarious. But it was like the first time at a comedy club and hearing blue humor. XXX heckling. And Winfield gave it right back. Told more than one fan to go do an anatomically impossible act. And IIRC, the Yankees blew out the Sox. So the last few innings, Winfield was just giving it to some fan like I can't believe. My midwest brain was never the same.

rdiersin
08-03-2007, 09:31 AM
When I got out into the professional world, I started going to other stadiums to watch ballgames. One of the first games I saw was at Fenway when the Red Sox played the Yankees. This was about 1984.

I sat out in RF, just beyond the Pesky Pole. Dave Winfield was playing RF for the Yankees then. I was a white-bread midwest guy who had grown up going to Crosley and Riverfront. By and large, Cinci fans are fairly mild and that was the behavior I was used to. Kid-friendly place. Openly shouting obscenities was highly frowned upon. Heckling consisted of "you stink".

Boy did my eyes ever get opened up. Or maybe I should say my ears. I had never heard fans get on a player like that in my life. No topic was off-limits. His momma (and something about donkeys), his parentage, his sister and sailors, the seagull incident, and his overall character was brought into question. I'd never heard such vile stuff. Lots of it was hilarious. But it was like the first time at a comedy club and hearing blue humor. XXX heckling. And Winfield gave it right back. Told more than one fan to go do an anatomically impossible act. And IIRC, the Yankees blew out the Sox. So the last few innings, Winfield was just giving it to some fan like I can't believe. My midwest brain was never the same.

See, the heckling of Jr I found was not that funny. It was lame. The whole time I sat there I wanted to stand up and say if you are going to heckle the guy at least do it right and be somewhat original or funny. I've seen better heckling in knothole.

Stewie
08-03-2007, 10:04 AM
Stewie, how long of a walk is that? I don't know how familiar you are with Cincinnati but I usually park downtown and walk to GAB from there and that's not a problem with me.



It's maybe a 10 minute walk, at most. Definitely not more than walking from downtown to GAB. You have to cross Broad St., and then the parking lot that used to be the Vet, and CBP is on the other side. And if you aren't taking 95N out of the stadium complex, you won't get caught up in traffic.

Luckily for you, the 22nd isn't a promotional day. If you have the unfortunate pleasure of being there for one of the frequent college nights, or dollar dog nights, things can get ugly. Then there is the rare instance when a dollar dog night lands on the same night as college night. It's sort of a "perfect storm" of obnoxious-ness. Honestly, I know Philly fans have a bad reputation (most of it deserved), but I don't see how it is any worse than anything you'll witness in New York or Boston. I'd tend to think that random Wednesday night game against the Dodgers won't bring the low-lifes out to CBP, but you never know.


Also, don't ask for mayo for your cheesesteak. Huge no no. I used to love mayo on mine when I lived in Cincy. First time I asked for mayo on mine once in Philly changed that.

As a native Philadelphian, I die a little inside every time my non-Philadelphian girlfriend puts mayo on a cheesesteak. It's bad enough getting a cheesesteak from Penn Station, but putting mayo on it is just too much.

Chip R
08-03-2007, 10:09 AM
It's maybe a 10 minute walk, at most. Definitely not more than walking from downtown to GAB. You have to cross Broad St., and then the parking lot that used to be the Vet, and CBP is on the other side. And if you aren't taking 95N out of the stadium complex, you won't get caught up in traffic.

Luckily for you, the 22nd isn't a promotional day. If you have the unfortunate pleasure of being there for one of the frequent college nights, or dollar dog nights, things can get ugly. Then there is the rare instance when a dollar dog night lands on the same night as college night. It's sort of a "perfect storm" of obnoxious-ness. Honestly, I know Philly fans have a bad reputation (most of it deserved), but I don't see how it is any worse than anything you'll witness in New York or Boston. I'd tend to think that random Wednesday night game against the Dodgers won't bring the low-lifes out to CBP, but you never know.

As a native Philadelphian, I die a little inside every time my non-Philadelphian girlfriend puts mayo on a cheesesteak. It's bad enough getting a cheesesteak from Penn Station, but putting mayo on it is just too much.


Thanks, Stewie. I don't like mayo anyway so I'll be fine.

M2
08-03-2007, 10:17 AM
Anybody have any suggestions for Philly? I'm going to a game there on the 22nd for the last leg on my East Coast tour.

1) The cheesesteaks at the Tony Luke's at the ballpark are nowhere near as good as some you can get in the city. If you want a representative cheesesteak I recommend not getting one there. Also beware that the line at the ballpark TL's can be massive. There's a decent beer selection at the park with a number of different stations with different taps.

2) Do NOT go to Pat's or Geno's. They're about the two worst cheesesteaks in the city (Geno's gets my vote for the worst, the steak is rubbery and the bread is sub-par). I haven't been to the place Mississippi Red suggested, but it sounds like the exact sort of place that does a killer cheesesteak. There's also a place on Snyder Ave. in South Philly named John's Roast Pork that does a killer pork sandwich.

3) Phillies fans won't get on you overly much for wearing out-of-town baseball gear. Out-of-town football gear is another story, particularly Cowboys, Redskins and Giants gear.

4) Don't bother with the waterfront unless there's some special going on down there. It's pretty boring otherwise.

5) The colonial landmarks in the city are a must-see. It's pretty heady standing int he room where they signed the Declaration of Indpendence.

6) The Museum of Art and Academy of Natural Sciences are first-rate museums. The zoo's pretty good too.

7) Center city has gotten somewhat cosmopolitan over the past decade and there's lots of cool little shops, watering holes and eateries there.

8) South Street is the funky area of the city. It's not quite as Bohemian as it was 20 years ago, but it's still the place to go to get pierced and buy novelty condoms.

9) If you're staying in the city, don't drive to the game. Take the subway. You can take the Broad Street line down to the Pattison stop and it lets you off right at the ballpark. Also, if you're going to fly out of Philly, the regional transit authority, SEPTA, goes right to the airport. It's exceedingly convenient.

10) Doesn't sound like you're going to have time to get yourself dinner there, but if you did, it's hard to go wrong getting Italian down in South Philly.

11) If it's hot and you're walking around, get water ice (pronounced "wooder" ice in the local vernacular). There's still some places that do it hand-shaved style, though I don't know where they're located these days (though along the Italian Market on 9th street there's got to be something).

vaticanplum
08-03-2007, 07:02 PM
1) The cheesesteaks at the Tony Luke's at the ballpark are nowhere near as good as some you can get in the city. If you want a representative cheesesteak I recommend not getting one there. Also beware that the line at the ballpark TL's can be massive. There's a decent beer selection at the park with a number of different stations with different taps.

2) Do NOT go to Pat's or Geno's. They're about the two worst cheesesteaks in the city (Geno's gets my vote for the worst, the steak is rubbery and the bread is sub-par). I haven't been to the place Mississippi Red suggested, but it sounds like the exact sort of place that does a killer cheesesteak. There's also a place on Snyder Ave. in South Philly named John's Roast Pork that does a killer pork sandwich.

In my experience, the best cheesesteaks are at the at the stands outside at 3 in the morning. There are two of them quite near each other that are always packed...ok, for all I know, that narrows down to 20 spots in the city, but it's quite a scene. I haven't tasted them myself as I don't like them, but I'm always dragged there with my friends in Philadelphia and they know their cheesesteaks.

On a side note, I really love Philadelphia. Never lived there but I've spent a good amount of time there over the years and I think it's one of the most underrated cities there is. Colorful, diverse and full of people who love fun, albeit not always manners.

Highlifeman21
08-04-2007, 07:18 AM
1) The cheesesteaks at the Tony Luke's at the ballpark are nowhere near as good as some you can get in the city. If you want a representative cheesesteak I recommend not getting one there. Also beware that the line at the ballpark TL's can be massive. There's a decent beer selection at the park with a number of different stations with different taps.
2) Do NOT go to Pat's or Geno's. They're about the two worst cheesesteaks in the city (Geno's gets my vote for the worst, the steak is rubbery and the bread is sub-par). I haven't been to the place Mississippi Red suggested, but it sounds like the exact sort of place that does a killer cheesesteak. There's also a place on Snyder Ave. in South Philly named John's Roast Pork that does a killer pork sandwich.

8) South Street is the funky area of the city. It's not quite as Bohemian as it was 20 years ago, but it's still the place to go to get pierced and buy novelty condoms.

10) Doesn't sound like you're going to have time to get yourself dinner there, but if you did, it's hard to go wrong getting Italian down in South Philly.


If you find yourself on South Street, you gotta go to Jim's. I would recommend that as my #2 steak in Philly, behind Geno's. There's also this place called Mama's off of City Line Ave, but it's not convenient to anything. I equate South Street to Short Vine in Cincy. Definitely a different walk of life down there, but good people, for the most part.

For a steak at the ballpark, I recommend Tony Luke's. But, if you pick Tony Luke's, their Roast Pork is near-legendary. It's a work of art.

I'm trying to remember the awesome italian joint in South Philly just a block or two north of the Italian Market. I gotta look it up... Villa di Roma. It's on 9th Street. Freakin' awesome. Words cannot describe this food.