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Mainspark
08-09-2007, 07:17 PM
ST. LOUIS (AP) — Cardinals utility player Scott Spiezio is voluntarily entering a treatment program for a substance problem that the team did not specify.
Spiezio, who has relished a hard-rocking image through his 12 seasons in the major leagues, was placed on the restricted list Thursday and will be paid while he undergoes treatment. He has not played since Sunday.
St. Louis manager Tony La Russa would not say what substances were involved or where the treatment will take place. La Russa said the team learned of the problem Wednesday night, and expected that Spiezio “absolutely” will return this season.
Before Wednesday’s game, La Russa said he believed Spiezio had been hampered by a minor medical concern.
“I wasn’t sure until yesterday that there was something besides a virus or a bug or whatever,” La Russa said.
Spiezio, who played a big role as the Cardinals won last year’s World Series, is hitting .272 this season with three homers and 27 RBIs in 184 at-bats.

Chip R
08-09-2007, 07:27 PM
They've got a nice little substance abuse culture going on over there.

vaticanplum
08-09-2007, 07:47 PM
Hopefully the treatment program has a no facial hair policy.

savafan
08-09-2007, 07:56 PM
Color me, like a little red goatee, not surprised.

RedsManRick
08-09-2007, 08:30 PM
Hate to stereotype, but hardly a surprise.

harangatang
08-10-2007, 02:30 AM
Let's see here, LaRussa, Hancock, and now Spiezio in trouble with alcohol and/or drugs. The Cardinals have some serious problems that need to be addressed to protect their organization and the people who come into contact with them. LaRussa and Hancock could've easily killed someone else in their DUI situations and we all know what unfortunately happened with Hancock. It's truly tragic.

cincrazy
08-10-2007, 02:38 AM
At least Spiezio is taking the steps to seek help. Whether it works or not, who knows. But I hope for his sake, and for many in MLB, that him seeking help can be the beginning of preventing what happened to Hancock.