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View Full Version : Odd story about former Reds reliever Frank Williams



BCubb2003
08-24-2007, 05:04 PM
He's homeless in Vancouver, B.C., lives in a shelter, and uses a baseball card as I.D.

http://www.canada.com/topics/sports/story.html?id=f59bb2b3-1964-4e2b-b220-f202d75dce57&k=93376&p=1

cincinnati chili
08-24-2007, 06:10 PM
What a happy, happy story.

But in all seriousness, great find. Thanks for sharing.

BoydsOfSummer
08-24-2007, 07:23 PM
Frank was an "almost nasty boy". I have several of those cards he's holding if he runs out.

MrCinatit
08-24-2007, 07:34 PM
During his Cincinnati years, as a young member of the bullpen, Williams said he even placed bets for Rose.

Uh...yikes.
A rather depressing story. What got me, though, is he is still being paid $120,000/year. He said a lot of that is being taken from a divorce...seems like a costly divorce.

Hap
08-24-2007, 07:55 PM
Pete Rose over-used him.

Joseph
08-24-2007, 08:11 PM
Wow....seems if this is whats going on though, as much as I hate to say it, there is more to the story. He's got to have some strong mental issues. If not he'd at least be able to get a job as a pitching coach somewhere.

He's at least embraced this lifestyle or something. You just can't be 'right' and in a situation like that and have any sort of connections like he surely still has in baseball if he wanted them.

KronoRed
08-24-2007, 08:11 PM
Pretty sad tale

Eric_Davis
08-24-2007, 10:09 PM
Nice story. It sounds like he understands his situation and is trying to make the best of it in a city he feels comfortable living at.

harangatang
08-24-2007, 10:57 PM
Whenever you think you're having a bad day, just read that story. Wow.

Always Red
08-25-2007, 06:55 AM
Nice story, and Frank Williams is a survivor if nothing else. I remember him being a heck of a relief pitcher.

$120K a year seems kind of high for a guy who played 6 years? It's hard to find info about MLB pensions, but you always hear players talking about the magical 10 years of service. I'm thinking about Browning's book, where he said he'd do anything to get that 10 years in. I'm guessing another level of pension kicks in at that service level?

Anyone know? :dunno:

Always Red
08-25-2007, 01:41 PM
$120K a year seems kind of high for a guy who played 6 years? It's hard to find info about MLB pensions, but you always hear players talking about the magical 10 years of service. I'm thinking about Browning's book, where he said he'd do anything to get that 10 years in. I'm guessing another level of pension kicks in at that service level?

Anyone know? :dunno:

Here's what I could find: http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2007/03/18/SPG90ONG6U1.DTL&type=printable


MLB

Year established: 1947

Formula: No specific per-year formula; payments based on service time in major leagues and also linked to salary level (for players in 1970 or later); players divided into four classes, based on their last season of active major-league service.

Vesting requirement: One day since 1980, though players need 43 days of service to begin accruing pension money (vesting minimum previously was four years)

Normal retirement age: 62 for players who retired in 1970 or later, 65 for players who retired in 1969 or earlier

Long-ago player: A 10-year veteran whose last season occurred between 1946 and '65 receives an estimated annual payment of $52,500.

Today's player: A 10-year veteran whose last season occurred in 1992 or later will receive an estimated annual payment of $175,000, the maximum allowed by law, starting at age 62.

Interestingly, the Dodgers did a huge favor to Brett Tomko and kept him on their active roster until Thursday, which gave him exactly 10 years of service time, and qualified him for the maximum pension. All in all, not a bad career for Mr. Tomko, eh?

http://sports.yahoo.com/mlb/blog/mlb_experts/post/Five-Dodgers-take-stock-of-what-s-left?urn=mlb,42947

(Wells was standing right next to Tomko during this exchange...)


The Dodgers have 10 days to trade Tomko or give him his unconditional release.

Tomko: "I hope the (general manager Ned Colletti) can get me to another team and not let me sit around and rot. I'll go home and start throwing at the local high school field. I don't know what to do first, it's uncharted territory."

Wells: "You've got to find a catcher."

The Dodgers kept Tomko on the roster through Thursday, allowing him to reach 10 years of major league service time and guaranteeing him the maximum pension.

Tomko: "That was important. It's a good time for me. I'm ready for a new opportunity. And it's not like they brought in a chump to replace me."

Wells: "Yeah, they did."