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redsmetz
09-25-2007, 12:01 PM
In another thread about Dunn and Griffey and the writer from the DDN suggesting we've had enough of their losing ways, I jokingly mentioned three Cubbies in the same vein, Ron Santo, Ernie Banks and Billy Williams.

After mentioning Williams, I thought to myself that there was another fabulous outfielder from the 1960's. That got me looking at baseball-reference and the All Star games of those years to see all of the unbelievably good outfielders there were during those years. You can sandwich the decade with the likes of Richie Ashburn, Duke Snider and Stan Musial ending their careers and Reggie Jackson starting his (1967).

Hall of Famers

Hank Aaron
Willie Mays
Frank Robinson
Billy Williams
Roberto Clemente
Willie Stargell
Lou Brock
Orlando Cepeda
Al Kaline
Mickey Mantle
Carl Yaztremski
Reggie Jackson
Duke Snider
Richie Ashburn
Stan Musial
Ted Williams (ended career 1960)

Others

Vada Pinson
Tony Oliva
Jimmy Wynn
Matty, Felipe & Jesus Alou
Pete Rose (* S/B in Hall)
Curt Flood
Rocky Colavito

I'm sure I'm missing others, but wow, what a period to see some outfielders.

George Anderson
09-25-2007, 12:24 PM
Good list. You might also add Rocky Colavito and Roger Maris to that list and while he did retire in 1960, you might add Ted Williams to the list also.

redsmetz
09-25-2007, 12:33 PM
Just over a quarter of all outfielders in the HOF played some of their career in the 1960's.

RedsBaron
09-25-2007, 01:07 PM
Tommy Davis won back-to-back batting titles as a Dodger outfielder in 1962-63, and also lead the NL in RBI in 1962 with 153.
While not normally thought of as an outfielder, Harmon Killebrew primarily played the outfield for the Twins in 1962-64, and lead the AL in HRs all three seasons. The Killer is of course in the HOF.
Rico Carty wasn't much of a fielder, but he could hit, winning the NL batting title in 1970 with a .366 mark.
Tony Conigliaro became the youngest HR champion ever in 1965, leading the AL with 32 HRs at age 20. His career came to a tragic end without Tony C. reaching his promise.
Reggie Smith's near-HOF worthy career began as a rookie with the Red Sox in 1967.

LINEDRIVER
09-25-2007, 01:34 PM
BIG Frank Howard, at 6'7'' and 255 lbs, was a major bomb threat in his heyday with the Washington Senators. When playing for Washington from 1965-1971, he was also known as 'The Capital Punisher'. He cranked out 128 HR's and 306 RBI's from 1967-1969 while playing for an otherwise lousy Washington club. He led the AL with 44 homers in 1969, hit 48 HR's in 1969, and led the AL in 1970 with 44 homers.

I saw Frank Howard at Crosley Field in 1964 when he was with the Dodgers. I remember sitting in the grandstand up above homeplate and looking down at this GIANT of a guy in the pre-game warm-ups. He was from Columbus, Ohio and played at Ohio State. His sister was sitting near us and she was not a happy camper after over-hearing comments from surrounding fans that were made about her brother.

Of all the guys mentioned in this thread so far, I count that I've seen 20 of these names play at Crosley Field or Riverfront Stadium.
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redsmetz
09-25-2007, 02:35 PM
As folks keep adding names, it really does say how astounding the outfield play during that decade was.

LINEDRIVER
09-25-2007, 06:38 PM
Ah yes, ....Vada Pinson. The left-handed hitting Pinson first played for the Reds as a 20-year-old in 1958. His career took off in '59 when the 21-year-old led the NL with 131 runs scored and with 47 doubles. He also racked up 205 hits and hit .316 that year. The centerfielder was a fixture in the Reds' lineup thru the 1968 season. After the '68 season, he was traded to the Cardinals and named as the rightfield replacement for the retiring Roger Maris. He also played for the Angels, Indians and Royals. Pinson racked up 2757 hits from 1958 thru 1975.

I've posted these numbers before but while on the subject of 1960's outfield talent, take a look at these Vada Pinson numbers.

For a 9 year period,from 1959-1967, check out how Vada ranks, against ALL MAJOR LEAGUE players, including HOFers such as Aaron, Mays, Clemente, Killebrew, Cepeda, Kaline, Frank and Brooks Robinson, Ernie Banks and others.

from 1959 thru 1967
Hits number 1 with 1720,
Doubles number 1 with 306,
Triples number 1 with 96,
Games played number 1 with 1408,
Stolen bases 4th with 202,
Runs scored 4th with 898,
Extra base hits 4th with 576,
Total bases 4th with 2746,
Runs scored PLUS runs batted in, 5th with 1656.

Pinson also hit 180 HR's during this period and ranked 12th in RBI'S with 758.

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princeton
09-25-2007, 06:48 PM
every age has great outfielders, pitchers and first basemen

Reds are always gearing up for the "Golden Age of Utilitymen, National League DH's, and Middle Relievers"

westofyou
09-25-2007, 07:47 PM
Ah yes, ....Vada Pinson. The left-handed hitting Pinson first played for the Reds as a 20-year-old in 1958. His career took off in '59 when the 21-year-old led the NL with 131 runs scored and with 47 doubles. He also racked up 205 hits and hit .316 that year. The centerfielder was a fixture in the Reds' lineup thru the 1968 season. After the '68 season, he was traded to the Cardinals and named as the rightfield replacement for the retiring Roger Maris. He also played for the Angels, Indians and Royals. Pinson racked up 2757 hits from 1958 thru 1975.

I've posted these numbers before but while on the subject of 1960's outfield talent, take a look at these Vada Pinson numbers.

For a 9 year period,from 1959-1967, check out how Vada ranks, against ALL MAJOR LEAGUE players, including HOFers such as Aaron, Mays, Clemente, Killebrew, Cepeda, Kaline, Frank and Brooks Robinson, Ernie Banks and others.

from 1959 thru 1967
Hits number 1 with 1720,
Doubles number 1 with 306,
Triples number 1 with 96,
Games played number 1 with 1408,
Stolen bases 4th with 202,
Runs scored 4th with 898,
Extra base hits 4th with 576,
Total bases 4th with 2746,
Runs scored PLUS runs batted in, 5th with 1656.

Pinson also hit 180 HR's during this period and ranked 12th in RBI'S with 758.

.

Combine Vada's first 10 years with Roberto Clemente's last ten and you have a damn fine player...