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westofyou
10-01-2007, 12:52 PM
http://www.ajc.com/sports/content/sports/braves/stories/2007/09/29/bravestbs_0930.html


End of an era for TBS, Braves, fans
For three decades, Braves games have been beamed around the country on TBS. They became America's Team but Sunday, America will watch for the last time.

By TIM TUCKER
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Published on: 09/30/07

All across America Sunday, thousands of people like Bill DeArmond of Winfield, Kan., will say goodbye to an old friend.

For three decades, they have watched the national telecasts of Braves games on TBS, turning Atlanta's baseball team into at least for a while "America's Team."


Today, America will watch for the last time.

The Braves' season finale at Houston marks the end of an era that began in 1977, when Ted Turner had the novel notion of bouncing his bad baseball team's games off a satellite to cable systems nationwide. Although Braves games will continue to be televised in Atlanta and much of the Southeast, the team no longer will be national programming on TBS a casualty of the evolution of the TV industry.

"A very important part of my life won't be there anymore," said DeArmond, a college professor who credits the distant team with helping him through personal tragedies.

As the number of channels and baseball teams available on television has exploded, the national audience for Braves games has eroded. From a peak rating of 4.9 in 1983, the national Nielsen cable rating for Braves games is down 84 percent, to 0.8 this season an average audience of 716,000 households. (The rating is the percentage of U.S. cable TV households tuned in on average.)

So like countless other TV shows of declining popularity, the Braves are being ... canceled.

"It's going to be hard, going to be a very emotional day," said longtime Braves broadcaster Skip Caray, who will call today's game with his broadcaster son, Chip Caray. "These [viewers], we've been a big part of their family. The connection is going to be severed, and it's going to be hard to say goodbye to them."

Meet three of them, from coast to coast:

In Cape Cod, Mass., Warren Gortze, 62, schedules his time around TBS' Braves telecasts. A lifelong fan whose father took him to games when the Braves were based in Boston, he still thinks "the wrong team left town." He is trying to get his grandchildren to disavow the Red Sox for the Braves, and that'll be harder, he frets, without the games on TBS.

In Kansas, DeArmond, 60, has been watching the Braves since his town got cable TV in 1978. He credits the Braves telecasts with helping him get through the horrible summer of 1997, when his mother and his wife died a week apart. "It was just unbelievable, losing the two most important people in your life in seven days, and you have to reach out and cling to something," he said. He'll watch today's game with both sadness and disgust. "TBS has no loyalty to their fans," he said.

And in northern California, Scott Roberts, 36, has been watching the Braves on TBS since age 8. He began watching for the same reason as many: "It was the only game on TV." Now, he has an 8-year-old son, Dylan, who watches with him. "Dylan's a big [Jeff] Francoeur and [Brian] McCann fan," Roberts said, "just like I was a big Dale Murphy, Glenn Hubbard fan." As he and his son watch today's finale, "I'll feel like I'm losing a major part of my own childhood."

'Quite a ride'

It began, like so many great ideas, on a napkin.

The Braves were flying back to Atlanta during the 1976 season when Turner, the team's rookie owner and cable TV pioneer, began diagramming.

"Ted was trying to show us how it could work how the signal could be sent from Atlanta to a satellite and then be beamed to cable systems all over the country," longtime Braves broadcaster Pete Van Wieren recalled. "We went, 'That's interesting,' but it was such a remote concept."

At the time, there was no ESPN, no Fox, no regional sports networks, no weeknight baseball on TV in most of the country, even in markets near major league teams. No local station had dared to go national, let alone one as obscure as Turner's WTCG (later renamed TBS).

"It was like being on the first wagon train west," Caray said. "We didn't know where we were going, but we were having a lot of fun getting there."

Soon, the Braves' broadcasters Van Wieren, Caray and Ernie Johnson Sr. realized America's Team had arrived.

"Ernie, Skip and I were having dinner in San Francisco, and somebody sent a drink over," Van Wieren said. "We looked over and the person waved, but we had no idea who he was. He walked over and said he was a San Francisco resident who had started watching our games on cable and enjoyed them. We thought, 'Wow, people really are watching these games!' "

"On the road," Caray said, "it got embarrassing in some ballparks because there would be more Braves fans than home team fans."

The city manager of Hilo, Hawaii, in Atlanta for a convention, presented flowers, macadamia nuts and a plaque to the Braves' broadcasters. A little town in Iowa erected a billboard proclaiming allegiance to the Atlanta team. And by the 1990s, when the Braves turned from perennial losers to perennial division champs, a nationwide Harris Poll named them America's most popular baseball team for seven consecutive years.

"It was quite a ride," Van Wieren said.

Along the way, baseball and television were radically transformed.

Baseball commissioner Bud Selig recalled recently that in the late 1970s, owners would rant against the Braves' telecasts invading their markets.

"There were many who felt it would be the death knell of our sport," Selig said. As it turned out, he said, the telecasts "played a great role in maturing the relationship between MLB and television."

In the 1990s, as part of a negotiation with TBS, baseball did require a reduction in the maximum number of national Braves telecasts to 90.

The Braves played a key role in sustaining the cable industry through its infancy.

"Without that [programming], a lot of cable systems would have died," said Terry McGuirk, at the time Turner's right-hand man and now the Braves' president. "I remember going over to Charleston one time, and the cable-system guy had, like, 15 VCRs playing tapes of really bad-quality stuff. Then all of a sudden, we arrive on the satellite with the Braves."

Said David Levy, president of Turner Sports: "The Braves will always have an important place in cable television history, no question."

Alas, history kept happening. Baseball games became ubiquitous on ESPN and ESPN2 and Fox and dozens of regional sports networks, then on the Internet and DirecTV. Once the only game in much of America, the Braves became just another team on television.

"If you started [televising one team nationally] today, with all the games available, it wouldn't work," Van Wieren said. "For the 30 years it was going on, especially the first 20, it was really special. But everybody moves on."

Evolving landscape

Atlanta native Tom Abernathy has lived all over the country since graduating from high school here Ohio, Philadelphia, the Pacific Northwest and, for the past 13 years, southern California. Everywhere he has gone, TBS has brought the Braves along.

"When I left Atlanta, I realized how important the Braves were in maintaining my lifeline, my connection, to the place I was from," said Abernathy, 39. "Whenever I'd call my grandparents or my mom back home, that's something we'd immediately talk about."

With TBS having gradually reduced its Braves telecasts, Abernathy has found other ways to watch the team. He subscribes to an MLB.com package that gives him access to telecasts of all major league games via the Internet. And he subscribes to MLB's "Extra Innings" package on DirecTV that offers up to 60 out-of-market games each week.

Next season, those packages will replace TBS as his lifeline to the Braves. It won't be the same, though. Sometimes he'll get the Braves' local broadcast and sometimes the opposing team's. "I hate watching other teams' broadcasts," he said.

TBS is not getting out of the baseball business. Starting this week, it will televise postseason games for the first time the four first-round playoff series, followed by the National League Championship Series.

Next year, TBS also will carry a league-wide package of 26 Sunday afternoon games.

In essence, TBS traded the Braves for the league-wide and post-season packages.

"This is just the next part of the evolution," Turner Sports' Levy said. "Even though Braves baseball has spanned across the country, it was heavily skewed in [the Southeast], and we as a company are a national cable network and needed to have properties that matched the portfolio and the brand."

None of which will comfort fans such as DeArmond in Winfield, Kan.

He recently wrote a letter to Caray, describing how much the Braves' national broadcasts have meant to him and criticizing TBS' decision to end them.

"Sadly, America's team has been consumed by American greed," he wrote.

"And so the love affair is over. ... Goodbye my friends. ... And we'll always have that magical year when we went from worst to first."

macro
10-01-2007, 01:25 PM
No tears from this fan. I still have bad memories of 1982, when all-of-a-sudden my area of Kentucky went from Reds Country to Braves Country overnight. The Reds lost 101 games, of course, and America's new darlings won the NL West. Braves fans started popping up everywhere, and that roll lasted into the late 90s. You'd go over to friends' houses, and those same TVs that used to show Reds games were tuned to WTBS, instead. Everyone today hates the way Cubs fans invade GAB, but it was similar at Riverfront in the past.

To this day, the Reds have never recovered the fanbase they lost in Kentucky and Tennessee (and probably other states, as well) to the Braves and Cubs in the 80s.

Chip R
10-01-2007, 01:32 PM
I dislike Bud Selig's reign as commissioner but to his credit, he has reined in the superstations.

cumberlandreds
10-01-2007, 01:33 PM
I watched a good chunk of their last game yesterday. It was kinda sad because I had watched Braves games on WTCG, then later WTBS, since about 1979. That year my cable company in the small town I grew up in(Cumberland Ky) added WTCG Channel 17 to its package. It was the first satellite channel added and it seemed miraculous to me that TV signals could be beamed through the sky to your TV set. I know I was very excited I could watch a MLB game nearly every night even though it was the lowly Braves. They were bad then too. With many 100 plus loss seasons. I should say having them come into my home every night never affected my Reds loyalty. When the Reds did come on through WLEX on the Reds network I would always watch them first. I grew to like the Braves announcers and consider them like old friends similar to Marty and Joe who come by to visit every night for about six months. Ted Turner was very much the pioneer in seeing that satellite TV would be a mainstay in TV viewing. While the owners were railing against him because he was invading their markets he was actually helping break baseball into a whole new statosphere of TV marketing that would lead to billions of dollars.

westofyou
10-01-2007, 01:33 PM
To this day, the Reds have never recovered the fanbase they lost in Kentucky and Tennessee (and probably other states, as well) to the Braves and Cubs in the 80s.

Thats' what happens when your owner is dropping market slices and turning away competing auto dealership advertising so that it doesn't affect their competing dealerships. Small time stuff to do when the competition is buying TV Stations and giving away the game for free.

Personally I loved the fact that TBS, WGN and WWOR all played their teams on TV all the time, it's what led to Extra Innings. Plus I was in the west and already out of Reds Country

Plus it's better to watch more than one team play the game throughout the year, some of the current Reds fans should try it sometime, they might just find out that some of the Reds problems are game wide problems too.

Chip R
10-01-2007, 01:40 PM
Before Extra Innings, if you were a fan of an out of market team, TBS, WGN and to a lesser extent, WOR were all that you had except for the occassional network game or ESPN. I didn't have cable till I graduated from college so when the Reds would be on TBS or WGN, if I was home I'd go over to my grandparents and watch the game over there and if I was up at school, I'd go to a local bar. Good times but with Extra Innings and the like, superstations are not good for teams who don't have them.

Falls City Beer
10-01-2007, 01:47 PM
Plus it's better to watch more than one team play the game throughout the year, some of the current Reds fans should try it sometime, they might just find out that some of the Reds problems are game wide problems too.

Cold comfort. If other teams "have" these problems, then the Reds have them "full-blown."

cumberlandreds
10-01-2007, 01:49 PM
Before Extra Innings, if you were a fan of an out of market team, TBS, WGN and to a lesser extent, WOR were all that you had except for the occassional network game or ESPN. I didn't have cable till I graduated from college so when the Reds would be on TBS or WGN, if I was home I'd go over to my grandparents and watch the game over there and if I was up at school, I'd go to a local bar. Good times but with Extra Innings and the like, superstations are not good for teams who don't have them.

Before 1990 ESPN didn't carry any MLB games. For me, in the 80's,it was great having TBS,WGN and about 50 Reds games that were carried via the Reds Network. It was kinda mini Extra Innings packages without the American League. The only time I would see an AL team was if they were on the Saturday Game of the Week or ABC's Monday Night Baseball. I think having these superstations carrying all these games really helped soldify me as a baseball fan.

top6
10-01-2007, 02:39 PM
To this day, the Reds have never recovered the fanbase they lost in Kentucky and Tennessee (and probably other states, as well) to the Braves and Cubs in the 80s.Well this seems like a golden opportunity to get some of those fans back. The Reds should be trying like heck to sign radio and TV deals in those areas.

Johnny Footstool
10-01-2007, 02:43 PM
Does this mean more "Alice" reruns on TBS?

Because I'd rather watch those than a Braves game.

westofyou
10-01-2007, 02:44 PM
Cold comfort. If other teams "have" these problems, then the Reds have them "full-blown."

Yep they're the pits, the worst, no one is as bad off as the Reds, they are the LA Clippers times the Arizona Cardinals to the power of the Chicago Blackhawks.

Chip R
10-01-2007, 02:48 PM
Does this mean more "Alice" reruns on TBS?

Because I'd rather watch those than a Braves game.


Well, kiss my grits!

Chip R
10-01-2007, 02:53 PM
Well this seems like a golden opportunity to get some of those fans back. The Reds should be trying like heck to sign radio and TV deals in those areas.


I could have sworn I read something in the Enquirer this morning about Phil Castellini saying that they hired a bunch of sales people and they are going to get people up in Columbus, Indy, Louisville and Lexington but I can't find it now. Maybe it was in Sunday's paper. :confused:

Falls City Beer
10-01-2007, 02:55 PM
Yep they're the pits, the worst, no one is as bad off as the Reds, they are the LA Clippers times the Arizona Cardinals to the power of the Chicago Blackhawks.

I don't think there have been many worse teams in baseball this decade than the Reds: the Royals, Pirates, D-Rays, Nats/Expos. Maybe the Orioles if you are just going back to 2000.

macro
10-01-2007, 03:01 PM
Well this seems like a golden opportunity to get some of those fans back. The Reds should be trying like heck to sign radio and TV deals in those areas.

They might make some progress, but with every team's games available to every house nationwide that can and is willing to afford it (not to mention all the free nationally televised games and the stuff that can be had from the Internet), the days of a franchise dominating a market based on geography are long gone.

Unassisted
10-01-2007, 04:48 PM
I watched more Cubs games than Braves games when the Superstations were at their peak. The GN broadcasts were far more entertaining with the wild card Harry Caray at the mic. Once Harry left this mortal coil, I only watched games on the superstations when they involved the Reds. Since I got MLB.TV a few years ago, watching Braves games on TBS seemed quaint, so I never did it anymore.

KronoRed
10-01-2007, 04:52 PM
Teams that win consistently will be dominating markets in the future

Roy Tucker
10-01-2007, 04:56 PM
Even thought he was a Braves announcer, I always liked Skip Caray.

http://www.ajc.com/braves/content/sports/braves/stories/2007/09/30/tbs_1001.html

Caray bids farewell to Braves watchers on TBS

By TIM TUCKER
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Published on: 09/30/07

The Braves' three-decade run as national programming on TBS ended with Sunday's game at Houston. During the nostalgic telecast, here's how longtime broadcaster Skip Caray said goodbye:

"The people all over the country who send you Christmas cards every year; the people who when dad passed, 5,000 of them sent notes or condolence cards; when I lost my brother the people all over the country who sent condolence cards as well — how do you thank those people and how do you say goodbye to those people? I don't know, but I'm trying to do it.

"You all must know how we feel and how I feel about you. You brought me back five years ago when they tried to bury me on television. The executives didn't [bring me back]; you did.

"... To all you people who have watched the Braves for these 30 years ... thank you. We appreciate you more than you will ever know. ... When we first came on the air on TBS, which was then WTCG, the big TV shows were M*A*S*H, Dallas, Laverne & Shirley, Happy Days and Charlie's Angels. We outlasted them all. The only one that beat us was 60 Minutes.

"We don't want to get all maudlin here, but thank you folks and God bless you. And we're going to miss you every bit as much as you miss us."

Caray plans to be back in the booth next season, working some games on Turner's Peachtree TV in Atlanta as well as radio.

VR
10-01-2007, 05:17 PM
Many a day in the late 70's/ early 80's I came down with an awful ill feeling at school just before gametime when the Reds were on WGN. Had to take the afternoon off, of course.

Living on the West Coast since the mid 80's.....TBS was a Godsend for seeing the Reds a ton of times every year...until that pesky division change. My life revolved around having the nights off or being near a tv when they were on.

LincolnparkRed
10-01-2007, 05:39 PM
I will always remember going to Chickamagua GA and having my great-grandmother tell me about this amazing kid named Dale Murphy that Atlanta had and then being able to go home and see him play in Dayton.

paulrichjr
10-01-2007, 05:56 PM
Well this seems like a golden opportunity to get some of those fans back. The Reds should be trying like heck to sign radio and TV deals in those areas.

This is already being done. Look at a map of Tennessee... I live just North (20 miles or so) from the Alabama/Mississippi line (in TN). The Reds are now being carried on my Fox Sports station as much as the Braves and Cardinals. Until 2006 I had never heard George Grande (I set you up for a joke here) speak but then for some reason the Reds became one of the main teams to be broadcast in Middle and parts of WestTN. It is awesome.

Rojo
10-01-2007, 05:58 PM
Personally I loved the fact that TBS, WGN and WWOR all played their teams on TV all the time, it's what led to Extra Innings. Plus I was in the west and already out of Reds Country

Used to circle the Braves, Mets, Cubs, Dodgers and Padres games on the Red's schedule. But I'd watch the Braves back then no matter who the played.

Rojo
10-01-2007, 06:00 PM
"This is just the next part of the evolution," Turner Sports' Levy said. "Even though Braves baseball has spanned across the country, it was heavily skewed in [the Southeast], and we as a company are a national cable network and needed to have properties that matched the portfolio and the brand."

Oh ick! Business-weasel talk. Maybe he can reinvent the wheel on his way to the low-hanging fruit.

BoydsOfSummer
10-01-2007, 08:42 PM
Personally I loved the fact that TBS, WGN and WWOR all played their teams on TV all the time, it's what led to Extra Innings. Plus I was in the west and already out of Reds Country

Yes sir...I watched a lot of baseball on those and was thankful for it. Heck, I even rooted a little for the Cubs back then when they were in the Eastern Division (yes, I said it).

toledodan
10-02-2007, 01:58 AM
first wrestling and now the braves? what is left for them to show? i know, reruns of "the heat of the night".

KronoRed
10-02-2007, 02:08 AM
first wrestling and now the braves? what is left for them to show? i know, reruns of "the heat of the night".

I just wish they would bring back The Man From UNCLE

traderumor
10-02-2007, 07:30 AM
Not only did TBS evolve into all the coverage we have now, but the announcers got to be uppity with the Braves' success. When they first came on, the Braves were awful and Skip Caray regularly poked fun at their play. Then, as the team improved, you would think by listening to them that they had always been a model franchise. Sort of like Patriots fans now.

GAC
10-02-2007, 08:00 AM
So what is the next "evolution" in MLB? The push to make everything pay-per-view?

They went after the super stations, so why not go after stations like FSN next?

I'm of course ecstatic that FSN broadcasts as many Red's games as they have (140+?). But I've always wondered why they do so? Is it simply because they broadcast regionally/locally, and therefore have a high viewing audience/market shares?

Unassisted
10-02-2007, 09:02 AM
I'm of course ecstatic that FSN broadcasts as many Red's games as they have (140+?). But I've always wondered why they do so? Is it simply because they broadcast regionally/locally, and therefore have a high viewing audience/market shares?
FSN does the games because their contract with the Reds lets them do it. They cover 140+ games because advertisers are attracted to the audience that watches Reds games and enough people watch that the money from advertisers is greater than the production cost and the per-game fee that FSN pays the Reds.

You should worry if FSN chooses to televise fewer games for reasons not related to their contract with the Reds. That would mean fewer people are watching (or fewer people that advertisers want to reach are watching) and that would definitely not be good.

Chip R
10-02-2007, 09:33 AM
So what is the next "evolution" in MLB? The push to make everything pay-per-view?

They went after the super stations, so why not go after stations like FSN next?

I'm of course ecstatic that FSN broadcasts as many Red's games as they have (140+?). But I've always wondered why they do so? Is it simply because they broadcast regionally/locally, and therefore have a high viewing audience/market shares?


The problem with the superstations is that they were cutting into the fan base of the other teams without compensating them. Instead of going to or watching Reds games, people would sit at home and watch Braves and Cubs games for pennies. And the other teams wouldn't share in the windfall the superstations made either. Now, if you want to watch Braves games here, you have to get Extra Innings which divvies up the money 30 ways. You can choose to sit at home and watch Braves games but at least the Reds are being compensated for it.

GAC
10-02-2007, 09:24 PM
The problem with the superstations is that they were cutting into the fan base of the other teams without compensating them. Instead of going to or watching Reds games, people would sit at home and watch Braves and Cubs games for pennies.

I understand all that; but that is not TBS's fault that fan's decided to stay home and watch the Braves, Cubs, or whoever, rather then go to their home team's games. Blame the advent of cable I guess.

Isn't FSN and other local networks doing the same thing? Fans in Cincy, as well as all over the Red's viewing area, can now get FSN right? So fans are staying at home and watching the games rather than going down to the ballpark? Especially if you've got a big screen TV, home theatre system, and it's in HD. ;)

I understand that FSN has a contract with the Reds; but is the "compensation" enough to offset the number of fans that are staying at home more and going down less?

westofyou
10-02-2007, 09:41 PM
I understand all that; but that is not TBS's fault that fan's decided to stay home and watch the Braves, Cubs, or whoever, rather then go to their home team's games. Blame the advent of cable I guess.

Actually before FSN existed and before ESPN did games is when the issue was a problem, the larger cities were able to take their market wider by the Superstations, BEFORE MLB even sat down and talked about it. By the time they did the other teams were vying for similar situations. Thus the little markets in the rust belt took the big hit, because they lost fringe fan bases in distant lands to a team that owned a TV Station while they didn't.

This issue like TBS showing Braves games is now dead, but it was a problem that helps explain why the Big Red Machine is a distant memory and the Braves won a zillion titles in a row, and why the Cubs can come to town and steal the Reds fans Skyline.

KronoRed
10-03-2007, 02:12 AM
Isn't FSN and other local networks doing the same thing? Fans in Cincy, as well as all over the Red's viewing area, can now get FSN right? So fans are staying at home and watching the games rather than going down to the ballpark? Especially if you've got a big screen TV, home theatre system, and it's in HD. ;)

I understand that FSN has a contract with the Reds; but is the "compensation" enough to offset the number of fans that are staying at home more and going down less?

People made the same argument way back when that putting games on the radio would hurt attendance, now it's accepted that every game is on the radio, it's good for the team and for growing the fan base, it should be the same for TV, I doubt very many people say "eh it's on the tube lets stay home" if people wanna go to a game they go, if it's not on TV they probably just watch something else instead, like the cubs on WGN ;)

GAC
10-03-2007, 08:21 AM
Actually before FSN existed and before ESPN did games is when the issue was a problem, the larger cities were able to take their market wider by the Superstations, BEFORE MLB even sat down and talked about it. By the time they did the other teams were vying for similar situations. Thus the little markets in the rust belt took the big hit, because they lost fringe fan bases in distant lands to a team that owned a TV Station while they didn't.

This issue like TBS showing Braves games is now dead, but it was a problem that helps explain why the Big Red Machine is a distant memory and the Braves won a zillion titles in a row, and why the Cubs can come to town and steal the Reds fans Skyline.

I see your point woy.

westofyou
10-03-2007, 09:55 AM
I see your point woy.

Example from the book "The Lords of the Realm" in 1986 there were 423 Baseball games on cable TV in Cincinnati, only 11% of them were Reds games.

Jpup
10-03-2007, 01:51 PM
all I can say is that it stinks because the games will not be in HD. There is nothing good about that.

Chip R
10-03-2007, 02:05 PM
I understand that FSN has a contract with the Reds; but is the "compensation" enough to offset the number of fans that are staying at home more and going down less?


The Reds have drawn ~2M people a year for the last several years. I think the last time they drew under 1.85M was in 1998. If FSN is keeping people from attending games to affect revenues significantly, they aren't doing a very good job of it. Drawing that many people for a team that hasn't sniffed .500 since 2000 isn't too shabby. Could they do better? No question about it. But Cincinnati has always been slow to turn out in large numbers for the Reds if they believe they are not going to contend. Look at 1999 compared to 1990. In 1999, they just came off of three lackluster seasons. They weren't expected to do much and they ended up winning 96 games which just barely pushed attendence over 2M. In 1990 they started off like a house afire and never looked back. They ended up drawing 2.4M that year because they started off so strong, the fans couldn't help themselves. Moral of the story is that if you want to draw well here you either have to be an elite team or you have to get off to a fabulous start.

BRM
10-03-2007, 02:10 PM
all I can say is that it stinks because the games will not be in HD. There is nothing good about that.

They are in HD if you have Directv.

Jpup
10-03-2007, 02:32 PM
They are in HD if you have Directv.

yeah, I know, but I don't and I am unable to get it. I will have it by opening day 2008 hopefully.

Reds Fanatic
10-03-2007, 06:06 PM
They are in HD if you have Directv.They are also on some cable systems now in HD. I know where I live Time Warner just added TBS-HD today.

deltachi8
10-03-2007, 09:24 PM
Personally I loved the fact that TBS, WGN and WWOR all played their teams on TV all the time, it's what led to Extra Innings. Plus I was in the west and already out of Reds Country

Plus it's better to watch more than one team play the game throughout the year, some of the current Reds fans should try it sometime, they might just find out that some of the Reds problems are game wide problems too.

:beerme:

Well said. Growing up where cable was not available, i was ever so jealous of my friends who could go home after school and watch a game on WGN and then later on TBS. I didn't care that they weren't my teams, i just cared that it was baseball.

oregonred
10-04-2007, 12:12 AM
WTBS not only impacted the balance of power in the NL over the past generation but it also altered the geographic balance of power in the region. TBS put the Atlanta area on the map in the early 80s. The Atlanta area became solidified as the defacto city of the south with sudden national exposure via the Braves telecasts and the popualtion exploded from small/midmarket size to a major market size in the next 25 years. TBS definitely played a role in putting the Atlanta area in hypergrowth mode since the the late 70's

Simply put, TBS was basically the nightly baseball network for about a 10 year period from 1980-1990. The Braves were on TV six nights a week and even in Cincinnati maybe half the away games total were shown on Channel 5.

RFS62
10-04-2007, 07:27 AM
Comcast added TBS HD the day before game one.

I'm very impressed so far with everything about the production and announcers.

TBS was a big part of my life too, away from Reds country for so long. Even if it meant watching the stinkin' Braves, it was baseball, and you got to see all the other teams too.

macro
10-04-2007, 10:04 AM
Despite my earlier comment about regretting what the superstations did to the Reds fanbase, I'll readily admit that it was nice to have those extra Reds games on TV. As oregonred pointed out, the Reds tv network never showed Reds home games, only road games, and only about half of those. It was great to be able to see some games from Riverfront on tv and to hear other teams' announcers' comments and perspectives of the Reds.

westofyou
10-04-2007, 10:09 AM
As oregonred pointed out, the Reds tv network never showed Reds home games, only road games, and only about half of those.

In 1956 (and probably more)they showed every away game on TV... I get the feeling that Howsam/Wagner pared that down a bit.

cumberlandreds
10-04-2007, 10:16 AM
In 1956 (and probably more)they showed every away game on TV... I get the feeling that Howsam/Wagner pared that down a bit.

They certainly did. Like Macro said they only carried about 40 to 50 games. Usually only one or two home games with one of those being opening day.

westofyou
10-04-2007, 10:18 AM
They certainly did. Like Macro said they only carried about 40 to 50 games. Usually only one or two home games with one of those being opening day.

So true.. I don't remember ever seeing a home game that wasn't opening day or the post season. I do have healthy memories of away games in Candlestick and the Astrodome, Enos Cabell and Count John Montafusco

Roy Tucker
10-04-2007, 10:25 AM
They are also on some cable systems now in HD. I know where I live Time Warner just added TBS-HD today.

I wondered about that. I had been watching the game on the regular TW TBS channel 6, surfed over to ESPN-HD, stumbled over TBS HD, and thought "hey, when did that get there". I thought I'd just been dense and hadn't noticed it before.