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Ltlabner
10-02-2007, 10:38 AM
Have you ever thought about a mid-life carear change?

If so, how did you pull it off?

I enjoy what I do, and if push-came-to-shove I could do it for the rest of my life. However, the idea of changing up carears has been kicking around my mind for a while now, and the urge is getting stronger.

The main problem is what you would expect. I'd basically have to start over again both in terms of experience and money and I've been in my current carear for nearly 13 years. I can take a small hit to trade money for job satisfaction, however, I am the sole bread winner so I can't go nuts. In other words, I'm not quitting my job and going back to college to become a rodeo clown.

So, has anybody pulled off a carear change while maintaining a current job and not taking a massive financial hit? (I know I'm not asking for much).

Unassisted
10-02-2007, 11:02 AM
I left a good job and moved to a city with no jobs in my former field. I was able to do it because my wife got a great job opportunity in a lower-cost city that paid as much as we were both making when I had the old job. I still haven't caught up to what I was making before we moved, but our household income is still higher and I get to spend more time with the kids.

My dad's example is probably closer to what you're looking for. He changed careers from government employee to self-employed by working long hours at both for a few years until he had built up his business enough to quit the government job.

DTCromer
10-02-2007, 12:27 PM
I certainly hope you're not a teacher.

flyer85
10-02-2007, 12:45 PM
In other words, I'm not quitting my job and going back to college to become a rodeo clown..... how about a Lion Tamer?

Ltlabner
10-02-2007, 12:58 PM
I certainly hope you're not a teacher.

:confused:

Oh...is that a clever jab at my spelling skills?

1.5 years and 4800 posts and it's just now dawning on you that I can't spell for crap? Wow. Certainly hope your not someone paid to be observant. Trust me, I've already removed myself from consideration on jobs such as proof-reading, editing or spelling-B judge.

Ltlabner
10-02-2007, 01:04 PM
... how about a Lion Tamer?

Only if I can get an internship with this guy....


http://karwanphotos.com/images/Celebraties/GuntherWilliams.jpg

WVRed
10-02-2007, 01:13 PM
:confused:

Oh...is that a clever jab at my spelling skills?

1.5 years and 4800 posts and it's just now dawning on you that I can't spell for crap? Wow. Certainly hope your not someone paid to be observant. Trust me, I've already removed myself from consideration on jobs such as proof-reading, editing or spelling-B judge.

If you want to get a better paying job, you might want to consider college. Of course, you would have to get past English 101 and 102.:)

Btw, the post is meant as a jab, not to offend.;)

Ltlabner
10-02-2007, 01:15 PM
If you want to get a better paying job, you might want to consider college. Of course, you would have to get past English 101 and 102.:)

Btw, the post is meant as a jab, not to offend.;)

Trust me, my spelling skills improve dramatically once I start getting paid for a task. If Redszone paid me what I make at the job, I'd double and triple check everything.

But my original question isn't really about making more money, its about switching carears to something more satisfying, without wrecking the family finances. Frankly, making more money is the least of my worries.

Roy Tucker
10-02-2007, 01:33 PM
LtlAbner, I have to say, when I saw the title of this thread, my first thought was "I hope it doesn't involve spelling". I normally don't comment, but you have to admit, this one just begs for it.

I have no words of wisdom on career changing. I have on what I call "the golden handcuffs", i.e. they pay me too much to consider switching careers. And, I am the sole ox pulling a very large cart behind. Once I shed some of the burden off my cart (i.e. money-sucking children), I may consider a switch. But that ain't for a while.

nate
10-02-2007, 01:45 PM
Well, the male "exotic dancer" gig might not work out with the name "Ltlabner"...

Ahem.

But, consider things that are currently "hobbies" or "interests". Is there anything related to those that could be turned into a potential career?

flyer85
10-02-2007, 01:51 PM
Well, the male "exotic dancer" gig might not work out with the name "Ltlabner"...Maybe his Indian name is Hung-Lika-Horse ... you never know.

vaticanplum
10-02-2007, 01:54 PM
Have you ever thought about a mid-life carear change?

If so, how did you pull it off?

I enjoy what I do, and if push-came-to-shove I could do it for the rest of my life. However, the idea of changing up carears has been kicking around my mind for a while now, and the urge is getting stronger.

The main problem is what you would expect. I'd basically have to start over again both in terms of experience and money and I've been in my current carear for nearly 13 years. I can take a small hit to trade money for job satisfaction, however, I am the sole bread winner so I can't go nuts. In other words, I'm not quitting my job and going back to college to become a rodeo clown.

So, has anybody pulled off a carear change while maintaining a current job and not taking a massive financial hit? (I know I'm not asking for much).

I just want to point out that the longer you wait, the harder it will become to switch. Your monetary needs and familial obligations (am I correct in thinking you don't have kids yet?) are only going to grow, not lessen. If you feel strongly about it, don't wait.

Explore your options. See what's out there. compare it to what you currently do on all counts, all obligations taken into consideration, but in the end make your decision based on what makes you happy (while also considering what's good for your family). I'm getting older and more jaded by the second, but I still subscribe to the theory that life is short and you have to do what makes you happy. Some people are wired upon the notion that your job doesn't need to be a fulfilling part of your life, that work is just work. These people can leave work at work and aren't brought down by work that doesn't fulfill them. Other people only trick themselves into believing they're wired that way. The fact that you're even kicking around the idea of a career change makes me think you don't fall into the former category. And if that's the case, you need work that makes you happy, and you're going to need it even more as time goes on. You can always learn to live on less money (really), but it's much more difficult to turn unfulfilling work into fulfilling work.

M2
10-02-2007, 04:11 PM
Two things people have said to me come to mind here:

1. Think about what you really enjoy and then do that. That's probably where you'll be the most successful.

2. The one common trait of people who own really nice summer homes seems to be that they all own their own businesses.

Taken together, it would seem that there are rewards to be had for taking a risk. For my part, I can attest that I'm at a point where I could stand to listen to that advice as well. Comfort is nice, but it's better to be striving for something.

stevekun
10-02-2007, 04:58 PM
my wife is doing this as we speak...she is going to school part time...its tough on her but I think it will be worth it for her to do something she really enjoys

TeamCasey
10-02-2007, 05:55 PM
I also have on the Golden Handcuffs. I made a HUGE mid-life career change while staying within the same company. This wasn't necessarily by choice, but that's another story. I don't know what kind of company you're with but there may be other opportunities there.

Ltlabner
10-02-2007, 05:56 PM
The fact that you're even kicking around the idea of a career change makes me think you don't fall into the former category. And if that's the case, you need work that makes you happy, and you're going to need it even more as time goes on. You can always learn to live on less money (really), but it's much more difficult to turn unfulfilling work into fulfilling work.

You make some really good points. I agree that we can live on less, no doubt about that. But there are some limits. Could we cut our expendatures by 10%...probably just about overnight. Could we suddenly live on $9.00/hour. Not a chance without radical change (that would definatley not result in happyness!!)

But you are perceptive. I can do just about anything as a job, but I do get bored quickly if it isn't something that is really satisfying.

Problem is (1) figuring out what would be really satisfying (2) having that something actually pay the bills (3) making the switch...which definatley tests your willingness to take risks.

BRM
10-02-2007, 06:03 PM
Problem is (1) figuring out what would be really satisfying (2) having that something actually pay the bills (3) making the switch...which definatley tests your willingness to take risks.

I've been stuck on 1 and 2 for a long while. I think I could make a switch rather easily if I could figure out 1 and 2. I feel your pain Abner. I'd love to make a career change myself but I have no earthly idea what I'd do.

westofyou
10-02-2007, 06:10 PM
I'm on my third career currently, first time I've worked for someone else in 15 years.

It's not bad.... no summer house, but it's nice to not have to think about work after 5 or on the weekend... though I still do.

Old habits are hard to break, plus I get creative at odd times and a 9-5 job doesn't always work for that approach.

pedro
10-02-2007, 06:12 PM
I've been doing the same thing since 1993 although I work for myself now.

I think about changing careers from time to time but it does seem sort of risky.

Ltlabner
10-02-2007, 06:16 PM
I've been stuck on 1 and 2 for a long while. I think I could make a switch rather easily if I could figure out 1 and 2. I feel your pain Abner. I'd love to make a career change myself but I have no earthly idea what I'd do.

That sums up my situation nicely. I don't even know where to begin, really. Well, at least we're not alone, eh?


I think about changing careers from time to time but it does seem sort of risky.

Yea, and when it comes down to it, despite all of my internet bravado, I'm pretty risk adverse. As I said, I can stomach a lifestyle change, cutting back some reasonable amount on the income, etc. But to put everything we own into a business just so I can be "satisfied" is way more than I can tollerate.

GAC
10-02-2007, 09:05 PM
It if works, and you're happy with it, then don't mess with it. ;)

Degenerate39
10-02-2007, 09:32 PM
Well, the male "exotic dancer" gig might not work out with the name "Ltlabner"...

But "nate" would work just fine. The Naked Nate or The Naughty Nate could be your stage name

Strikes Out Looking
10-02-2007, 10:04 PM
I tried to figure out a new profession (I'm an attorney) but I couldn't figure out what I wanted to be when I grow up, but 4 years ago I did go from working a comfortable government job to starting my own practice (being from the government, I started with 0 clients).

So what you may want to do is to see if there are other jobs or ways of working in what your field is now that you can transition to that may be more satisfying. For instance, while I'm still a lawyer, I know have to sell my practice, write articles and do other things that are non-legal and are fairly satisfying.

vaticanplum
10-02-2007, 10:47 PM
Given your three steps and what other people have said, Abner, I'd focus on finding something you love. Have a "career change" in the back of your head as a motivator but don't worry too much about it until you hit on something you really want to do -- and THEN focus on turning it into a viable career. That will be a better motivator and will make you more likely to find ways to make that thing financially and in all other ways feasible. Don't make a change for the sake of a change (that's a shot in the dark -- it can be great but it can also be disastrous), but do make a concerted effort to find something you love. Try new things, take a look at your interests and look for things that relate to them. Then make it a career.

redsmetz
10-02-2007, 11:33 PM
I've been in business for myself for over 28 years, since I was 24. It's had its ups and downs, but it's in an industry that has seen significant changes since 1980 (a year after I started in business); more so since 1995. I've raised three kids on what I made and for much of the time my wife only worked part-time as the kids were growing up. I learned my business from old-timers (I'm in transportation/trucking) and have become fairly expert at it. But business has changed so dramatically in these last three decades.

I never finished college and I sometimes wonder about going back, but don't have any idea what I'd want to study or what that would entail. I love the flexibility of being my own boss, and it was especially great when the kids were in school since I was free to take part in that, but there are days when I think it sure would be nice for someone to hand me a paycheck.

I like what many have said on this thread though. Find what you love and then see what can come along (or you can make into something) in that area. Good luck.

MWM
10-02-2007, 11:45 PM
I decided to make a career change about 4 years ago. I wasn't miserable and was doing OK, but it wasn't fulfilling at all. But the change I wanted to make required a masters degree. It was the best decision I could have made. I'm now in a career I really enjoy and have no regrets.

15fan
10-03-2007, 09:44 AM
I'm at the opposite end - I got into my current line of work right out of college and it happened to be a good fit. The upside is that I can retire at age 52 and start drawing a guaranteed pension for life. That's when I'll think about changing careers and trying something different.

My advice is that if you think you might like to do something different that would involve a different / advanced college degree - look for a job at a university near you. Most of the time, they have education benefits such that you can go for free. It means working full-time and going to school a couple nights a week, but it keeps the income coming in, gives you some work experience, and will allow you to finish your school program without the debt that a lot of folks rack up going to school.

dman
10-23-2007, 11:20 PM
I'm at the opposite end - I got into my current line of work right out of college and it happened to be a good fit. The upside is that I can retire at age 52 and start drawing a guaranteed pension for life. That's when I'll think about changing careers and trying something different.

Same here. Not only do I enjoy what I'm doing, but the benefits of my job are too good to think about a career change. I guess for me I like security in what I do, and Abner one thing I would suggest is if you do take this step, I'd at least try to ensure that whatever I went into has a good chance of surving all of the economic ups and downs that we face in this day and age.

MartyFan
10-24-2007, 12:58 AM
I left radio after 15 years working around the country and gaining some amount of success and transitioned into stand up comedy 5 years ago.

How to make the change? decide what you really want to do and what really matters to you...then work like heck..don't let anyone else or yourself stop you.