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WMR
10-18-2007, 02:21 PM
'Second Earth' found, 20 light years away

Scientists have discovered a warm and rocky "second Earth" circling a star, a find they believe dramatically boosts the prospects that we are not alone.

The planet is the most Earth-like ever spotted and is thought to have perfect conditions for water, an essential ingredient for life. Researchers detected the planet orbiting one of Earth's nearest stars, a cool red dwarf called Gliese 581, 20 light years away in the constellation of Libra.

Measurements of the planet's celestial path suggest it is 1 times the size of our home planet, and orbits close to its sun, with a year of just 13 days. The planet's orbit brings it 14 times closer to its star than Earth is to the sun. But Gliese 581 burns at only 3,000C, half the temperature of our own sun, making conditions on the planet comfortable for life, with average ground temperatures estimated at 0 to 40C. Researchers claim the planet is likely to have an atmosphere. The discovery follows a three-year search for habitable planets by the European Southern Observatory at La Silla in Chile.

"We wouldn't be surprised if there is life on this planet," said Stephane Udry, an astronomer on the project at the Geneva Observatory in Switzerland.

Two years ago, the same team discovered a giant Neptune-sized planet orbiting Gliese 581. A closer look revealed the latest planetary discovery, along with a third, larger planet that orbits the star every 84 days. The planets have been named after their star, with the most earthlike called Gliese 581c. The team spotted the planet by searching the "habitable zone".

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2007/apr/25/starsgalaxiesandplanets.spaceexploration

KronoRed
10-18-2007, 02:23 PM
Lets go.

Johnny Footstool
10-18-2007, 03:47 PM
Just 10 short years ago, my college astronomy teacher told us that we didn't have any hard proof that planets existed outside of our solar system. We theorized that planets were everywhere, but we hadn't actually seen evidence of them.

Strikes Out Looking
10-18-2007, 03:49 PM
What I really want to know is, in this bizarro earth, is there a discussion about trading Adam Dunn?

WMR
10-18-2007, 03:50 PM
What I really want to know is, in this bizarro earth, is there a discussion about trading Adam Dunn?

BA w/ RISP is the end all be all to any statistic and their "supreme leader" is a poofy haired fancy boy.

KronoRed
10-18-2007, 03:52 PM
What I really want to know is, in this bizarro earth, is there a discussion about trading Adam Dunn?

On this Earth Adam Dunn wins the triple crown every year and the Reds are 5 time defending champs

Johnny Footstool
10-18-2007, 03:53 PM
What I really want to know is, in this bizarro earth, is there a discussion about trading Adam Dunn?

Yes, but Bizzaro Adam Dunn is a 5'6", 145 pound defensive shortstop.

RichRed
10-18-2007, 04:03 PM
Yes, but Bizzaro Adam Dunn is a 5'6", 145 pound defensive shortstop.

...who hates hunting.

KronoRed
10-18-2007, 04:04 PM
...who hates hunting.

and loves ground outs

LoganBuck
10-18-2007, 04:04 PM
Yes, but Bizzaro Adam Dunn is a 5'6", 145 pound defensive shortstop.

Conversely Bizarro Juan Castro's OPS is 1.150 and he is their homerun king.

IslandRed
10-18-2007, 04:05 PM
The planet is the most Earth-like ever spotted and is thought to have perfect conditions for water, an essential ingredient for life.

... so far as we know.

Rojo
10-18-2007, 04:26 PM
[B][SIZE="5"]
Measurements of the planet's celestial path suggest it is 1 times the size of our home planet, and orbits close to its sun, with a year of just 13 days.

Wow, that's gotta make Christmas shopping a pain.

Puffy
10-18-2007, 04:30 PM
Wow, that's gotta make Christmas shopping a pain.

RFS would be 2,872 years old on that planet.

KronoRed
10-18-2007, 04:32 PM
RFS would be 2,872 years old on that planet.

What do you mean That planet?

Roy Tucker
10-18-2007, 04:44 PM
Gliese 581 sounds like a teen band name.

camisadelgolf
10-18-2007, 04:48 PM
Conversely Bizarro Juan Castro's OPS is 1.150 and he is their homerun king.
On this Bizarro planet, did Juan Castro have to pass up Tuffy Rhodes to become homerun king?

Caveat Emperor
10-18-2007, 05:36 PM
Its cool and all, but 20 light years may as well be 20 billion, considering the impossibilities involved in space travel over that kind of distance.

Wouldn't be ironic if they discovered life on one of these planets and we were forever unable to go there and see it?

WMR
10-18-2007, 05:43 PM
Its cool and all, but 20 light years may as well be 20 billion, considering the impossibilities involved in space travel over that kind of distance.

Wouldn't be ironic if they discovered life on one of these planets and we were forever unable to go there and see it?

I'm sure travel over these types of distances will be made possible over the next few hundred years. The technological progress of humanity has been too steady and increasing at too rapid of a pace for it not to.

WMR
10-18-2007, 05:43 PM
Unfortunately, only Ted Williams will get to see it.

KronoRed
10-18-2007, 06:31 PM
I'm sure travel over these types of distances will be made possible over the next few hundred years. The technological progress of humanity has been too steady and increasing at too rapid of a pace for it not to.

One word, Wormhole

SunDeck
10-18-2007, 06:33 PM
I'm not sure I believe anyone who doesn't know that Chile is not in Europe.


Researchers claim the planet is likely to have an atmosphere. The discovery follows a three-year search for habitable planets by the European Southern Observatory at La Silla in Chile.

wheels
10-18-2007, 06:54 PM
I'm not sure I believe anyone who doesn't know that Chile is not in Europe.

It's run by a group of European scientists.

It's like those buildings in other countries where Americans hang out. American Embassies. Doesn't mean they exist in America.

RFS62
10-18-2007, 08:04 PM
Puffy would be dating Tralfamidorian sheep there.

SunDeck
10-18-2007, 08:07 PM
It's run by a group of European scientists.

It's like those buildings in other countries where Americans hang out. American Embassies. Doesn't mean they exist in America.


An American Embassy is sovereign territory of the United States. Until the host country decides to take it over, of course.

Raisor
10-18-2007, 08:57 PM
Puffy would be dating Tralfamidorian sheep there.

How is that different then here?

RFS62
10-18-2007, 09:53 PM
How is that different then here?


Good point.

Hi Ho.

vaticanplum
10-18-2007, 09:55 PM
... so far as we know.

Bingo.

That argument always baffles the crap out of me. It's completely cyclical and thus makes me dizzy.

Raisor
10-18-2007, 10:05 PM
Isn't Earth 2 home of the Justice Society of America? At least Pre-Crisis?

<nerd></nerd>

Falls City Beer
10-18-2007, 10:12 PM
Bingo.

That argument always baffles the crap out of me. It's completely cyclical and thus makes me dizzy.

What argument?

That water is necessary for the existence of life?

I guess I see what you're saying--but can conditions really be so different on other planets from the ones we can create here on earth to test viability/sustainability of life? Anything's possible, that's true, but absent any new findings to shake the belief that water and life are inextricable, I guess you just have to roll with it.

vaticanplum
10-18-2007, 10:56 PM
What argument?

That water is necessary for the existence of life?

I guess I see what you're saying--but can conditions really be so different on other planets from the ones we can create here on earth to test viability/sustainability of life? Anything's possible, that's true, but absent any new findings to shake the belief that water and life are inextricable, I guess you just have to roll with it.

The life we know requires x, y and z.

I just think it's very arrogant to say that what makes our life viable and sustainable is the same thing that makes all life viable and sustainable. I dunno, maybe other planets have different periodic tables.

GAC
10-18-2007, 10:59 PM
What happens if they discover their telescope wasn't really pointing out in space, but was mistakenly pointed at Podunk, Indiana where signs of life have yet to be found, though the conditions exist for it?

paintmered
10-18-2007, 11:02 PM
The life we know requires x, y and z.

I just think it's very arrogant to say that what makes our life viable and sustainable is the same thing that makes all life viable and sustainable. I dunno, maybe other planets have different periodic tables.

Scientists have found the same elements all over the universe.

Maybe they should have prefaced their statement by saying, "Carbon-based life...".

Falls City Beer
10-18-2007, 11:03 PM
The life we know requires x, y and z.

I just think it's very arrogant to say that what makes our life viable and sustainable is the same thing that makes all life viable and sustainable. I dunno, maybe other planets have different periodic tables.

Anything's possible, new stuff appears all the time.

paintmered
10-18-2007, 11:05 PM
Anything's possible, new stuff appears all the time.

Unless there's a different structure of the atom, then the only new stuff remaining are atoms with more and more sub-atomic particles. Then we get crazy-sounding unstable elements like unununium (pronounced OON-OON-OON-E-UHM).

It doesn't matter where it's located. If there's an atom consisting of a single proton and a single electron, it's hydrogen. Likewise with the entire periodic table.

Falls City Beer
10-18-2007, 11:08 PM
Unless there's a different structure of the atom, then the only new stuff are atoms with more and more sub-atomic particles. Then we get crazy-sounding unstable elements like unununium (pronounced OON OON OON E UHM).

It doesn't matter where it's located. If there's an atom consisting of a single proton and a single electron, it's hydrogen. Likewise with the entire periodic table.

I wasn't speaking to the issue of chemistry, or physics specifically. I know that laws governing matter are basically the same the universe through. I was intimating what you were talking about earlier--that some non-carbon-based lifeform may exist.

Remote, obviously. But I guess it's possible.

paintmered
10-18-2007, 11:10 PM
I wasn't speaking to the issue of chemistry, or physics specifically. I know that laws governing matter are basically the same the universe through. I was intimating what you were talking about earlier--that some non-carbon-based lifeform may exist.

Remote, obviously. But I guess it's possible.

Absolutely. Let your imaginations wander as to what that creature would look like.

WMR
10-18-2007, 11:17 PM
Absolutely. Let your imaginations wander as to what that creature would look like.

http://www.cbc.ca/gfx/topstory/sports/baker1109.jpg

vaticanplum
10-18-2007, 11:30 PM
Absolutely. Let your imaginations wander as to what that creature would look like.

Ok, I'm not talking about little green men. I'm talking, I guess, about the possibility of "non-carbon based" life in any form, some kind of undiscernable equivalent of plant or something -- something living, something that survives and grows and reproduces.

This is not something to which I give a huge deal of thought. I just think that life as we define it is pretty much confined to this planet's definition, that's all.

KronoRed
10-18-2007, 11:30 PM
Don't we WANT it to be life like us? life that's different would frighten and confuse us, and we'd probably try and shoot at it ;)

WMR
10-18-2007, 11:33 PM
Don't we WANT it to be life like us? life that's different would frighten and confuse us, and we'd probably try and shoot at it ;)

http://www.clubdesmonstres.com/martainsrafphoto1p.jpg

"We've still got 2 out of 3 branches of gov't, and that ain't bad!"

Caveat Emperor
10-19-2007, 12:31 AM
It doesn't matter where it's located. If there's an atom consisting of a single proton and a single electron, it's hydrogen. Likewise with the entire periodic table.

Except (and I realize I'm batting way out of my league here), isn't it theorized that the vast majority of the universe is filled with Dark Matter? I have to imagine that screws with things.

LoganBuck
10-19-2007, 07:41 AM
On this Bizarro planet, did Juan Castro have to pass up Tuffy Rhodes to become homerun king?

No He passed Bizarro Duane Kuiper, and he was praised for his use of performance enhancing substances. Of course on Bizarro Earth drinking DrainO boosts performance.

Highlifeman21
10-19-2007, 07:42 AM
Bingo.

That argument always baffles the crap out of me. It's completely cyclical and thus makes me dizzy.

Would that make you a dizzy broad?

GAC
10-19-2007, 09:06 AM
If it's Terran life forms then I can live with that.

And this could really change the structure of the U.N. :lol:

Strikes Out Looking
10-23-2007, 04:48 PM
Ok, I'm not talking about little green men. I'm talking, I guess, about the possibility of "non-carbon based" life in any form, some kind of undiscernable equivalent of plant or something -- something living, something that survives and grows and reproduces.

This is not something to which I give a huge deal of thought. I just think that life as we define it is pretty much confined to this planet's definition, that's all.

Call me shallow, but I for one am hoping that all life on that planet are hot women.

BoydsOfSummer
10-23-2007, 04:52 PM
I bet our God can beat up their God.

KronoRed
10-23-2007, 04:53 PM
Call me shallow, but I for one am hoping that all life on that planet are hot women.

No Men? wouldn't they all be dead in a generation? ;)

Slyder
10-23-2007, 11:28 PM
No Men? wouldn't they all be dead in a generation? ;)

They wander the universe in search of prisoners to take home for Snoo Snoo.

KronoRed
10-24-2007, 12:10 AM
They wander the universe in search of prisoners to take home for Snoo Snoo.

Isn't it, DEATH by snoo snoo? ;)

RedsBaron
10-24-2007, 07:30 AM
Its cool and all, but 20 light years may as well be 20 billion, considering the impossibilities involved in space travel over that kind of distance.

Wouldn't be ironic if they discovered life on one of these planets and we were forever unable to go there and see it?

No problem. Zefrem Cochrane will invent warp drive in 2063, Vulcans will almost immediately make "first contact" with Earth, and we will be on our way. Live long and prosper. ;)

GAC
10-24-2007, 08:14 AM
Its cool and all, but 20 light years may as well be 20 billion, considering the impossibilities involved in space travel over that kind of distance.

Wouldn't be ironic if they discovered life on one of these planets and we were forever unable to go there and see it?

Kinda like me hoping to get to California someday (before it falls off the map). ;)

Johnny Footstool
10-24-2007, 12:16 PM
It's Jodie Foster's father.

traderumor
10-24-2007, 12:37 PM
Call me shallow, but I for one am hoping that all life on that planet are hot women.Shallow. :p: