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Boss-Hog
10-20-2007, 12:44 PM
For those of you with high-definition TV's, particularly plasma or LCD, how did you go about calibrating yours? I have the Avia DVD, but it seems geared toward CRT's (not surprising since it was released in 1999) and I've always found using it to be confusing (just my opinion because plenty swear by it).

My TV is a 50" Panasonic PX75U plasma that I purchased back in August. Currently, I'm using the settings that were posted in the AVSforums thread for my TV, and they don't look bad, but I realize that each TV should be individually set given the unique lighting conditions in the room. I'm aware of the benefits of calibrating a TV, but I certainly don't want to pay the several hundred dollars I've seen quoted for a professional to do it. Does anyone have any advice on this? Thanks in advance.

Sea Ray
10-20-2007, 01:04 PM
I did mine by eye 'cause that's how it will be judged...by me. I don't know if one DVD is better than another. Mine was so far off out of the box that I had to adjust it from the service menu, not the user menu. I found myself tweaking it for months thereafter. Mine had a different set of settings for each input and you'll find that sources vary. For instance, ch 12 here in Cincinnati will tend to lean a little green/yellow. This is particularly noticeable if all three networks are running the same show like the President's State of the Union Address. So set it so the colors look good on the channels you watch most. The skin tones are key. Getting white people's skin tones accurate is the greatest challenge of a TV IMO. Make sure the TV is warmed up.

TeamBoone
10-20-2007, 01:54 PM
Mine was done by a technician for about $40... and it's perfect.

Boss-Hog
10-20-2007, 04:18 PM
Mine was done by a technician for about $40... and it's perfect.
That sounds reasonable enough to me - do you remember the company, by chance?

WMR
10-20-2007, 05:06 PM
You need to check the HD thread by Steel. He gave a web address there that tells you how to do it perfectly by yourself.

TeamBoone
10-20-2007, 05:18 PM
That sounds reasonable enough to me - do you remember the company, by chance?

It was a tech from Best Buy, but I think they offer the service to anyone, even if you didn't buy your television there.

After he set it up, he told me never ever mess with the settings. I haven't and it's still perfect.

Sea Ray
10-22-2007, 10:23 AM
The tech BestBuy sent to my house didn't know as much about the TV as I did. He just adjusted the colors by eye with the remote control. Obviously they still weren't right. A real professional calibration will take a tech about 8 hrs and he'll use bring about $1000 worth of equipment with him.

durl
10-22-2007, 10:59 AM
I use Video Essentials DVD. I have a Sony SXRD (basically LCos) and it worked great for me.

SteelSD
10-22-2007, 12:51 PM
"Digital Video Essentials: HD Basics" will be released on Blu-Ray as well as HD-DVD on October 30th. Oh, and don't confuse the new HD-DVD release with the much-maligned prior HD-DVD offering from 2005.

Oh, and just a note- I do not recommend that anyone attempt to access their service menu for calibration unless you are certain you know what you're doing. Sea Ray obviously did know what he was doing, but accessing that service menu voids your warranty. That's not good, especially if you screw something up while trying to calibrate from that menu.

Sea Ray
10-22-2007, 04:20 PM
[QUOTE=SteelSD;1485954
Oh, and just a note- I do not recommend that anyone attempt to access their service menu for calibration unless you are certain you know what you're doing.[/QUOTE]


Yes that falls into the category of "don't try this at home". For me it was a last resort. To make a long story short I called Best Buy and I called the manufacturer of my set and neither one could find someone who could do calibrations. Seriously, the guy they sent me was a local TV repairman who didn't know how to get into the service menu and just took 5 minutes adjusting the color to his eye just like any other TV fan could have done. It still wasn't right and finally he admitted that he doesn't do calibrations. I was tired of looking at "little green men" playing sports so I had to figure out how to do it myself.

TeamBoone
10-23-2007, 03:01 PM
The tech BestBuy sent to my house didn't know as much about the TV as I did. He just adjusted the colors by eye with the remote control. Obviously they still weren't right. A real professional calibration will take a tech about 8 hrs and he'll use bring about $1000 worth of equipment with him.

Well, my tech was excellent, employed by BestBuy, and well worth the money. The picture is perfect.

TeamBoone
10-23-2007, 03:06 PM
I have a question that hopefully someone can help me with.

About a month after I purchased my LG, Little Team Griffey and I were playing with one of those light-weight balsam airplanes.... very very stupid on my part. Anyway, at one point, the plane hit the TV screen and the metal tip left a white, pinprick on the screen.

It's small, and not even noticeable unless a black image comes up beneath it. But I notice it all the time because I know it's there.

Is there anything I can buy to "touch-up" the spot without damaging the surface? I'm sure I'm not the only person to have something like this happen so I'm relatively sure there's something out there, I just don't know what it is.

Thanks to anyone with suggestions.

Sea Ray
10-23-2007, 04:31 PM
Well, my tech was excellent, employed by BestBuy, and well worth the money. The picture is perfect.

BestBuy contracted out for the tech they sent to my house. He was not empoyed by Best Buy. I wonder if they do that differently now. Sounds like your TV was pretty simple to calibrate. Actually I don't see why they don't come calibrated for what we pay for them.

The actual profesional calibration usually includes equipment like an HDTV test pattern signal generator, a color analyzer and do things like set the red push in the color decoder and set gray scale to 6500K.