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TeamSelig
12-16-2007, 03:33 PM
I'm doing the student thing, and its not so bad. I'm thinking about going ahead and getting my Masters degree. I think it would be worth the hassle of continuing the student life.

Anyways, how far have you gone? For the most part this is a really intelligent board (especially compared to other forums), and I was curious to see how far alot of you have gone?

Edit - I have my two year degree, finishing up my bachelors ATM.

joshnky
12-16-2007, 03:39 PM
Depending on the monetary situation I would get the masters. IMO, a master's is becoming increasingly essential to compete for top jobs in business. I just completed a second masters (MBA) which worked out well because my employer paid for everything. Because graduate programs are very expensive, I would recommend getting on with a company that does tuition reimbursement (many do) and work on the master's through that route.

Joseph
12-16-2007, 05:21 PM
I've got the 4 year deal, but also have considerable additional class work and training courses as well.

If you can get the MBA, go for it. The 4 year degree in this day and age is like the high school diploma was 25 years ago. IE its expected, and you need something to set you apart.

HumnHilghtFreel
12-16-2007, 05:52 PM
I'm currently in school, going for a 2 year degree(AA) and seeing where I go from there. I like to think I'm a fairly intelligent person, but the whole school thing isn't for me. I get bored very easily, but I realize that more than likely... I'm going to need it at some point.

westofyou
12-16-2007, 06:02 PM
I've got the 4 year deal, but also have considerable additional class work and training courses as well.

If you can get the MBA, go for it. The 4 year degree in this day and age is like the high school diploma was 25 years ago. IE its expected, and you need something to set you apart.

Not 25... more like 50.. but point taken, MBA's get a bigger piece of the corporate pie.

SunDeck
12-16-2007, 07:00 PM
I'm currently in school, going for a 2 year degree(AA) and seeing where I go from there. I like to think I'm a fairly intelligent person, but the whole school thing isn't for me. I get bored very easily, but I realize that more than likely... I'm going to need it at some point.
Try interning or a co-op program. I think that makes a lot of difference for some people.
Personally, I was way too lazy in undergrad to do something like that, having spent the better part of my free time at Kilgores and in the Rhine Room.
But it sure sounds like a good idea.

paintmered
12-16-2007, 07:18 PM
Try interning or a co-op program. I think that makes a lot of difference for some people.
Personally, I was way too lazy in undergrad to do something like that, having spent the better part of my free time at Kilgores and in the Rhine Room.
But it sure sounds like a good idea.

My co-op employer (and now full-time employer) provided tuition reimbursement. At least with engineering, it's nearly impossible to find an entry-level position without co-op experience. On the flip side, if you have a good co-op experience, employers will be breaking down the door to try and hire you.

Caveat Emperor
12-16-2007, 09:01 PM
Law degree here.

Best advice I can ever give anyone is to figure out how to get someone to pay for your advanced degree for you. If you can get the degree through a night program while you're working, so much the better.

Educational debt absolutely blows.

oneupper
12-16-2007, 09:18 PM
A Master's degree today is what a Bachelor's Degree was 30 years ago. You'll be increasingly competing for jobs against people who have one.

Get it if you can. In the absolutely WORST case scenario, you'll still pick up some pretty good contacts.

(I have an MBA - class of 1986.)

Hoosier Red
12-16-2007, 09:29 PM
I have a 4 year degree with a worthless major(how as an 18 year old I couldn't see the folly in Kinesiology-Sports Communication, I'll never know.)

I am currently working on my MBA.

AmarilloRed
12-16-2007, 09:57 PM
I went through college and got a 2 year degree(AS) in Business Administration.

pahster
12-16-2007, 10:03 PM
I have a BA in political science and will be starting on my PhD next fall.

15fan
12-16-2007, 10:09 PM
Best advice I can ever give anyone is to figure out how to get someone to pay for your advanced degree for you. If you can get the degree through a night program while you're working, so much the better.

Educational debt absolutely blows.

Word.

MBA in 2000. Hope to have my M.A. in Political Science this summer. Both are/were part-time while working full-time.

For giggles, I may keep it up and apply to the PhD program.

Mr.MojoRisin
12-16-2007, 10:10 PM
Went to college for about 3 years majoring in journalism. Never finished my degree but I've always planned to go back.

marcshoe
12-16-2007, 10:11 PM
I finnished my Master's program on the seventh.

Mr.MojoRisin
12-16-2007, 10:19 PM
I finnished my Master's program on the seventh.

Wow, congrats. A Masters is a big deal.

TeamSelig
12-16-2007, 11:54 PM
A lot more degrees than I thought. Three doctorates? Nice.

My associates is in Law Enforcement, Bachelors will be in Homeland Security, and I think the Masters is called Homeland Security Management.

For those with Masters and above, was it still hard finding a good job or just hard picking which job you wanted?

marcshoe
12-17-2007, 06:20 AM
Wow, congrats. A Masters is a big deal.


thanks.

919191
12-17-2007, 08:27 AM
Noone mentioned clown school.

remdog
12-17-2007, 08:48 AM
My 40th college reunion will be coming up in '08. Were I simply graduating with my BS in '08 I would immediately find a way to at least start my Masters, even if it required going to school part-time while I worked. As others have said, a BS today is simply the equivilent of what a HS degree was when I graduated from college.

In a way, I've earned my Masters, PhD and any other degree you can think of with 40 years of significant management positions and starting and being successful in several businesses of my own. And, frankly, classroom training, no matter how good it is, can't fully substitute for having real life experience IMO---but it sure can give you a big push forward.

Rem

SunDeck
12-17-2007, 08:55 AM
A lot more degrees than I thought. Three doctorates? Nice.

My associates is in Law Enforcement, Bachelors will be in Homeland Security, and I think the Masters is called Homeland Security Management.

For those with Masters and above, was it still hard finding a good job or just hard picking which job you wanted?

It depends on the program, the person and their particular situation. I think for those of us in the public sector, an MPA is about the best idea out there because it is a great way to elevate your earning potential rather quickly. That's not to say one absolutely needs a management degree, though. I am earning about the same as I would after getting an MPA; the difference however is that I got here after 15 years rather than two. I would say that such a degree is a smart idea sooner than later, but that it may not be necessary if you are able to put yourself into positions where you can always create opportunities to move up. I have been fortunate to have had situations like that, myself.

Another example; I have a friend who is an executive for a major corporation. He has a bachelor's in business and is surrounded by MBAs. The difference between him and them is basically work ethic, attitude (and he adds, vocabulary). He's been an absolute hammer for twenty years, working 60 hour weeks, moving steadily up the chain.

As far as finding a job goes, my own particular situation is a little unique- it's a relatively specialized field. I didn't have a hard time finding a job, but it did require that I had a willingness to move to another city.

15fan
12-17-2007, 09:11 AM
I finnished my Master's program on the seventh.

English?

;)

redsmetz
12-17-2007, 09:12 AM
I completed two years of college back at two schools in the 70's, plus a little bit of night school. As I understand it, I was what they termed a "pre-junior", but I might have a little bit more than that.

A couple of years ago, I talked to UC about what it would take for me to finish a degree. They looked at my ancient transcripts (they had to dig them out of storage, but hey, they still had them!) and he noted that none of the credits seemed "fragile" - i.e. all would still be bonafide credits now if I were to return to school).

In 1979, my dad shut down part of his business and I took over that bit of it and I've been at it since. Overall I've been reasonably successful, but I'm not looking forward to going through probably my third or fourth recession in the past 28 years. I recently had dinner with my 30 year old nephew (my godson and my late brother's son) who has been dillydallying around with college. He dropped out recently and I wanted the opportunity to talk with him about it. I mentioned that while I might look like I've succeeded, I now find myself at age 53 with far fewer employment options should I ever decide to do something else. We talked about why he's dropped out and he mentioned he would schedule an appt with an advisor at his college to review what he needed to get back on track with his degree and he gave me permission to dog him about it.

Once my kids finish college, I may explore again how to complete a degree [who knows in what! - I'm told I'm on my way towards a German degree :-)]. I love learning and it could be fun to go back to college. I wonder if anyone has scholarships for old guys like me.

15fan
12-17-2007, 09:23 AM
For those with Masters and above, was it still hard finding a good job or just hard picking which job you wanted?

My experience and observation has been that with a Masters, more doors open sooner than they do w/o the advanced degree. Long term, it also opens up more doors at higher levels of an organization. The specifics vary depending on the field, discipline, etc.

Growing up, I watched my dad languish as he never earned a degree. Doors never opened for him. It was always easy for a potential employer to pick someone else because even though my dad had experience, he didn't have a degree on his resume. Right or wrong, that's the way the world works. Thus, I've done (and am doing) everything I can to ensure that no one can ever disqualify me from an opportunity because I lack the education credentials that another candidate might have.

Of course, I'm also in an environment where a premium is placed on graduate degrees.

westofyou
12-17-2007, 10:07 AM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071217/ap_on_fe_st/odd_elder_grad;_ylt=As7ayymTeqxT2Y1BQDLjUfyhOrgF


MILWAUKEE - A 50-year gap in his higher education didn't stop Clarence Garrett.

After returning to college in spring of 2006 as a full-time student, Garrett completed course work at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and was awarded his bachelor's degree at commencement ceremonies Sunday — at the age of 87.

"We are not sure if Clarence Garrett is the oldest to ever graduate from UWM, but we do know that there had not been a graduate for some time who was born when the president was Woodrow Wilson," Chancellor Carlos Santiago said.

On hand were Garrett's wife, Mary, his children and grandchildren.

He was chosen to lead the graduates from the College of Letters and Science into the U.S. Cellular Arena, and he earned a standing ovation when awarded his degree.

The Baltimore native served as a civilian at a U.S. Navy facility in Virginia before World War II. Once the war began, Garrett, who is black, served with the segregated Army in Europe.

He later settled in Milwaukee and took courses at the college that later became UWM, but he gave up college to raise a family.

"After all my children went to college ... I said, 'Why shouldn't I?'" Garrett said. "And I have loved it ever since."

marcshoe
12-17-2007, 12:28 PM
English?

;)

Believe it or not, by bachelor's was in English....:p:

Unfortunately they didn't teach about the dangers of Typing While Medicated. :)

Raisor
12-17-2007, 12:52 PM
I have 18 doctorates, the first three is in lovin'

Handofdeath
12-17-2007, 01:06 PM
I have 18 doctorates, the first three is in lovin'

vaticanplum
12-18-2007, 11:17 PM
Noone mentioned clown school.

Clown school grad right here. Physical theater school, technically, but clowning was part of it and people have better reactions to "clown school".

It was by turns exhilarating and maddening. But I can, among other things, walk exactly like a penguin, and I cannot describe how spectacularly this goes over at parties. That alone may have been worth it.

And for those of you who complain about school debt (myself included at times), I respond: a lack of an education would have cost you far more.

deltachi8
12-18-2007, 11:20 PM
It was by turns exhilarating and maddening. But I can, among other things, walk exactly like a penguin, and I cannot describe how spectacularly this goes over at parties. That alone may have been worth it.




Ya, but can you walk like an Egyptian?

SandyD
12-18-2007, 11:27 PM
pre-Katrina, Univ of New Orleans had a senior program allowing anyone over 65 to take classes free. I completed my BA at night ... and there was an 80+ year old woman working on her degree who wheeled in to class with an oxygen tank.

Really cool program. Not sure if they're still doing that now, but if they don't, I hope they bring it back.

vaticanplum
12-18-2007, 11:29 PM
pre-Katrina, Univ of New Orleans had a senior program allowing anyone over 65 to take classes free. I completed my BA at night ... and there was an 80+ year old woman working on her degree who wheeled in to class with an oxygen tank.

Really cool program. Not sure if they're still doing that now, but if they don't, I hope they bring it back.

That's awesome. I wonder if that's the case anywhere else?

SandyD
12-18-2007, 11:42 PM
Mature minds mingling with young minds made the classroom experience all the more rewarding.

joshnky
12-19-2007, 06:56 AM
That's awesome. I wonder if that's the case anywhere else?

I think thats the case at many universities. I know Louisville allows senior citizens to take classes free.

RichRed
12-19-2007, 11:05 AM
Got my BBA in Economics. Strongly considering going for an MBA some (gulp) 17 years later.

15fan
12-19-2007, 11:17 AM
That's awesome. I wonder if that's the case anywhere else?

Most likely it's a state-by-state situation with the public higher ed system.

LawFive
12-19-2007, 10:23 PM
Next poll: How long did it actually take you to complete the (2,3,4,or 6) year program? My BA in Poli Sci (or, as I speak of it today, a BA in BS) took 6, off and on.

cincinnati chili
12-19-2007, 10:42 PM
For those with Masters and above, was it still hard finding a good job or just hard picking which job you wanted?

I think it depends what type of job you want and expect, and what the degree is.

If you want to be GM of a baseball team (as I did) then having a Masters Degree is certainly no guarantee. If you're less picky, then having a Master's degree, particularly from a good program in your chosen field, helps.

Since you have a specific area of interest, see if you can talk to alums of the program, and see how they're doing. Also, see how much debt you'll rack up, compared to how much you'll likely get paid. Not that money is everything, but it's better not to be surprised.

Good luck.

gonelong
12-19-2007, 11:37 PM
Next poll: How long did it actually take you to complete the (2,3,4,or 6) year program? My BA in Poli Sci (or, as I speak of it today, a BA in BS) took 6, off and on.

It took me 8 years to get my bachelors degree. I had fun in college. :)

GL

Red Heeler
12-19-2007, 11:55 PM
Next poll: How long did it actually take you to complete the (2,3,4,or 6) year program? My BA in Poli Sci (or, as I speak of it today, a BA in BS) took 6, off and on.

8 years, two universities, 3 changes of majors, and a couple of extended vacations to get my B.S. Three years off, then another year to finish the prerequisite classes for vet school. 4 years for my DVM (35 at graduation).

cincinnati chili
12-20-2007, 01:17 AM
3 1/2 years to finish my B.A. That was a mistake. I missed out on senior spring slide, despite saving $10K in tuition. I'll never get those few months back. I'm jealous of the final semester that Westofyou described, supra.

2 years to complete my M.S.

I'm in year four of my J.D. (working full time, school at night).

I'll be 36 when I graduate. I've aged more in my last four years, than I did in my first 32.

SunDeck
12-20-2007, 06:55 AM
Next poll: How long did it actually take you to complete the (2,3,4,or 6) year program? My BA in Poli Sci (or, as I speak of it today, a BA in BS) took 6, off and on.

It took me one false start, flunking out after a semester, a half year at CTC (now Cincy State), time off to earn enough money to get back into UC, one change of major after getting to within two classes of graduating and a lot of other time lost to mind altering substances.
Eight years, total.

bucksfan2
12-20-2007, 10:48 AM
4 years 3 majors. Majored in Business Operations Management, Marketing, and Transportation Logistics. Got to my senior year in college and realized that if I took an extra class a quarter I could walk out of there with a tirple major.

15fan
12-20-2007, 11:01 AM
I was on the 8 semester plan. Mom & Dad covered tuition & fees for the first 8 semesters of college. I covered room, board, books, etc. Starting with semester #9, it was all my responsibility.

Thus, I was out of undergrad in 8 semesters.

Super_Barry11
12-20-2007, 12:28 PM
I got my BA in four years and didn't make it easy on myself, since I changed my major twice and played a varsity sport. I took classes in the summers after my sophomore and junior years to make up what I had missed during softball season.

Now I'm one year and a quarter through a five year program, which will give me an MA in sport psychology and a doctoral degree in clinical psychology once it's all said and done. Right now I'm doing the best I can to enjoy classes and learn everything I can, even though it's not quite as fun as college. ;)

I'm really hoping that it's all worth it, since I'm going to have a GIGANTIC financial debt after I complete the program. Plus, I'm giving up love to continue my education and pursue my career dreams, so I better be a darn good sport psychologist. :D

Caveat Emperor
12-20-2007, 12:57 PM
Next poll: How long did it actually take you to complete the (2,3,4,or 6) year program? My BA in Poli Sci (or, as I speak of it today, a BA in BS) took 6, off and on.

3 years to get my undergrad, 3 years to get my law degree.

I'm with chili -- if I could go back in time, I'd smack myself in the face for graduating early. I was having a great time in college, but had this stupid obsession with getting into law school.

I missed a great chance to pad my GPA, have a good time, and pursue opportunties that will never come again.

RichRed
12-20-2007, 01:02 PM
4 years to get my BBA. Fastest 4 years of my life. What a great time that was, and it went by in a blink.

paintmered
12-20-2007, 10:20 PM
5 years for a 5 year program. The plan is to start my MS electrical engineering part-time in the fall. I have no idea how long it will take.