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Tom Servo
12-18-2007, 12:18 PM
I just found out the other day I was accepted to William Paterson University and UNC Charlotte. I am still waiting on word from my number one choice of UNLV as well as a couple of other schools I have some degree of interest in. Gotta say that this to me is an exciting time.


So since I know I'm younger than the average Redszoner I ask what college you attended and if anyone has some fond memories of the times of SATs, mulitple applications, and number crunching.

pedro
12-18-2007, 12:19 PM
I attended Ohio University in Athens.

Best 7 years of my life.

RedsManRick
12-18-2007, 12:40 PM
I was a lazy bum. I applied to 3 schools (Wisconsin, OSU, and PSU) and got in to each. Nobody offered me much money since I got screwed over by PSU re: National Merit Scholarship and UW offered reciprocity with the state of Minnesota (where I went to high school), so there it was.

In retrospect, I wish I had done a bit more homework on the academic programs of each. It wasn't until Freshman orientation that I learned Wisconsin didn't offer an undergraduate program for my intended major, architecture... oops.

Caseyfan21
12-18-2007, 12:45 PM
Oh man, the whole college application time was very annoying, so much mail and stupid things to deal with. But don't let it stress you out too much....unless your needs/wants in a college are very specific I'm sure you can have a great time and get a great education wherever you decide to go. My best recommendation would be that if you're wavering between two schools just go with what your gut tells you. I couldn't decide between Purdue and Ohio State but my gut just kept telling me OSU because I grew up my whole life in Ohio and was always a Buckeye fan. As long as you go to a school with a good name and good tradition then all the silly academic ranks and what not won't matter a bit. I've found it's more important to have the paper (degree) than the name of the school on the degree (as long as it's a good name). Do you think people will care that when I applied Purdue had a slightly better ranked engineering program than Ohio State?

SunDeck
12-18-2007, 12:46 PM
I went to UC.
Because they would take me without SAT scores. Back then, if you signed with an X you were in. These are different times, my boy.

RichRed
12-18-2007, 12:59 PM
I attended Ohio University in Athens.

Best 7 years of my life.

I attended James Madison University in Harrisonburg, VA.

Best 4 years of my life that I WISH had been 7 years. :)

Looking back, I was woefully uninformed about the whole application process. That was also before you could learn everything in the world about a school from the internet (1987).

Still, JMU was, and is, a great school and I wouldn't change my choice even if I could.

I also applied to U. of Richmond, UVA and William & Mary.

NorrisHopper30
12-18-2007, 01:00 PM
I just found out the other day I was accepted to William Paterson University and UNC Charlotte. I am still waiting on word from my number one choice of UNLV as well as a couple of other schools I have some degree of interest in. Gotta say that this to me is an exciting time.


So since I know I'm younger than the average Redszoner I ask what college you attended and if anyone has some fond memories of the times of SATs, mulitple applications, and number crunching.

Waiting on my response from Ohio University, University of Cincinnati and Xavier University.

UC is my number one choice, congrats on getting accepted!

westofyou
12-18-2007, 01:03 PM
I went to UC.
Because they would take me without SAT scores. Back then, if you signed with an X you were in. These are different times, my boy.

I had the Goldilocks experience when it came to higher education.

I went to OU... Hated it dropped out

I then went to UC.... Hated it more then OU, so I dropped out

I went to San Francisco State University hated it so I transfered

Went to UC Santa Cruz and it was justtttttt right.

pahster
12-18-2007, 01:07 PM
I applied to and got into the University of Missouri, Washington University, and Harvard. I went to Mizzou and graduated last May. I'm currently waiting to receive admissions decisions for political science PhD programs at Stanford, Berkeley, UCSD, Ohio State, Illinois, Texas, Texas A&M, Duke, UNC-Chapel Hill, and Wisconsin.

MWM
12-18-2007, 01:20 PM
RMR, what high school, in Minny did you go to?

dabvu2498
12-18-2007, 01:20 PM
I applied to Vanderbilt, Cornell, Northwestern, Syracuse, and Yale. Got into all but Yale. Went to Vanderbilt, and I won't lie, weather was truly the deciding factor in that decision.

The first acceptance letter I got was from Vanderbilt. My mom brought it to me as I was warming up to pitch before a high school baseball game.

Heath
12-18-2007, 01:24 PM
Unlike the smarter people in this room, I went to THE University of Akron, followed by alternating quarters at Wright State & Sinclair & Jobs, followed by a year at Xavier.

And I'm 36 months away from paying it all off.

redsmetz
12-18-2007, 01:46 PM
I applied to St. Louis University and the University of Dayton and was accepted by both, but ended up going to Duns Scotus College (a Franciscan seminary) in Southfield, MI for my freshman year. Returned to Cincinnati after that and went to UC for my sophomore year and some subsequent night school (when they had the full flown Evening College). Last class I took was a German class about 1979 or 1980. As I mentioned in the education thread, I've examined going back, but haven't really taken any real action; but that 87 year old guy inspired me!

I hardly remember the entrance tests. I know I took one or the other, but can't remember what I got on them.

Unassisted
12-18-2007, 01:51 PM
I applied and was accepted early decision to Kenyon College in Gambier. Took less than 4 weeks to figure out that I didn't fit in, so I withdrew. Early decision seems like a simple approach to the process (only have to complete 1 application!), but the simplicity lulled me into the wrong choice.

Then I attended Ohio State at Newark for 2 years until I ran out of classes to take in my major.

I transferred to Otterbein College in Westerville and stayed a third year to finish coursework on a second major.

Then I decided to go on for a Master's degree. Having learned my lesson from the undergrad early-decision fiasco, I thoroughly checked out USC and U of Florida before settling on Syracuse. It was a good choice, but I was glad to have finished the program within a year. The Lake Superior snowbelt was not a place I enjoyed spending the winter!

WMR
12-18-2007, 01:54 PM
I applied to UK, Georgetown College, Vandy, and Brown.

I got accepted to all four, but chose Georgetown b/c they gave me virtually a full scholarship.

Joined a frat, lived on campus... it was a great four years. Could roll out of bed and be at class in 2 minutes.

American Studies and History double-major and minored in English. Would have had a triple major except for a fellow known as Chaucer. :laugh: Still keep in touch with a few of my profs... the intimate atmosphere at Georgetown was exactly what I wanted out of my collegiate experience. I had friends at the University of Kentucky and I couldn't imagine going through what they went through to even get to class! And being in a class of hundreds of people once you got there!

pedro
12-18-2007, 01:58 PM
I applied to University of Colorado, San Diego State, Michigan State, University of Texas and Ohio University. It came down to Colorado or OU and I chose OU.

bucksfan2
12-18-2007, 02:03 PM
Applied and accepted into OSU, Tennessee, and Purdue. Chose OSU and loved it. Whatever you do live in the dorms. You will have countless stories from the year you spend there, as well as meeting quite a few people.

westofyou
12-18-2007, 02:13 PM
Whatever you do live in the dorms. You will have countless stories from the year you spend there, as well as meeting quite a few people.

I HATED the dorms, I went from my own bedroom to three roommates, in two 8 by 12 rooms an endless stream of noise and testosterone that addled me to the point of not being able to study or care that I didn't study.

RedsManRick
12-18-2007, 02:22 PM
RMR, what high school, in Minny did you go to?

Wayzata High School in Plymouth.

Caveat Emperor
12-18-2007, 02:37 PM
I got rejected from every college I applied to. All my rejection letters came on the same day -- not that I've ever seriously contemplated suicide, but I was probably pretty close that day.

I applied "late" to Boston College, Tulane, Ohio University and Purdue. I got into all 4, decided to go to Tulane based solely on the weather and city. Had a great 3 year run before graduating.

Went to the University of Toledo for law school (AN Ohio State University College of Law) -- not as much fun.

Joseph
12-18-2007, 02:42 PM
I was a lazy bum. I applied to 3 schools (Wisconsin, OSU, and PSU) and got in to each. Nobody offered me much money since I got screwed over by PSU re: National Merit Scholarship and UW offered reciprocity with the state of Minnesota (where I went to high school), so there it was.

In retrospect, I wish I had done a bit more homework on the academic programs of each. It wasn't until Freshman orientation that I learned Wisconsin didn't offer an undergraduate program for my intended major, architecture... oops.

Rick, sounds like we had the same experience.

I attended Murray State Uni. I went to orientations and everything and continued to fill out my intended major as Architecture. Every advisor and department chair complimented me and said it would be a great choice....up until I was enrolled and was in my Freshmen Orientation course when I learned I'd have to major in Design Drafting, then go to UK or elsewhere to obtain the Architecture Degree.

D'oh!

MWM
12-18-2007, 02:49 PM
Wayzata High School in Plymouth.

Ah, very nice. The cream of the crop around here. I believe James Lauranitis went there. We looked in the Wayzata sschool system, but learned very quickly it was not in our price range. So we settled for St. Michael - Albertville. We're out in the sticks.

RichRed
12-18-2007, 02:56 PM
I HATED the dorms, I went from my own bedroom to three roommates, in two 8 by 12 rooms an endless stream of noise and testosterone that addled me to the point of not being able to study or care that I didn't study.

It's not for everyone and a lot of it is luck of the draw. I was very lucky and got thrown into a suite my freshman year with some great guys. Two of them remain among my best friends to this day.

BuckWoody
12-18-2007, 03:01 PM
The story goes that I wanted to go to the University of Dayton, my mom wanted me to go to Miami University, so I went to THE Ohio Northern University. No real logic there...that's just how it happened. It turned out to be a good choice.

15fan
12-18-2007, 03:01 PM
One of the hardest days of my life was when I was 18 years old and got called into a meeting. Found out that if I wanted it, there was a Joyce Scholarship (http://www.osu.edu/osu/newsrel/Archive/95-09-12_Joyce_Scholarship_Benefits_Ohio_State_and_Notre _Dame) to Notre Dame with my name on it.

The problem is that I didn't really want to go to Notre Dame.

The good folks in charge of administering the scholarship let me have a few days. I slept on it. Thought about it. Sought out advice from a variety of people.

In the end, I declined the scholarship and went here (http://www.wfu.edu/).

Haven't regretted that decision a single day in the 17 years since I made it.

RichRed
12-18-2007, 03:11 PM
I have a friend who's something of a free spirit. She chose her college by opening up a catalog to a random page and pointing at a spot on the page with her eyes closed. That's how she ended up going to Iowa State even though she grew up in Maine.

The most amazing part of the story to me is that evidently her parents were fine with it. Just kind of shrugged their shoulders and said ok.

The apple really doesn't fall far from the tree.

MWM
12-18-2007, 03:40 PM
The story goes that I wanted to go to the University of Dayton, my mom wanted me to go to Miami University, so I went to THE Ohio Northern University. No real logic there...that's just how it happened. It turned out to be a good choice.

I had a good friend who went there and loved it. He played basketball there (around 94-98) and now has his den full of Polar Bears stuff. They also have an excellent Pharmacy program.

Falls City Beer
12-18-2007, 03:48 PM
Applied to UW-Madison, U of Louisville, Michigan, UPenn, and Yale (for the hell of it). Got accepted to everywhere but Yale. Got a free ride to Louisville, so I took it. Loved it.

RedsManRick
12-18-2007, 03:48 PM
Ah, very nice. The cream of the crop around here. I believe James Lauranitis went there. We looked in the Wayzata sschool system, but learned very quickly it was not in our price range. So we settled for St. Michael - Albertville. We're out in the sticks.

Yeah, really yuppie. There were more than a few kids living the good life on their parents dime, driving the beamer, etc. A lot of actual middle class in there too who lived in the area longer. Definitely a booming area.

I used to work with James' older brother, Joe, at the local grocery. The whole family is nuts. You could sort of see the whole "dad was a professional wrestler" thing. Marion Barber is also a Wayzata grad. Was in a the compulsory health class with him. Talk about a sore thumb; a quiet, intense black kid among all those white, pretentious, yuppies. Never surprised when I see him play on Sundays how hard he runs.

The housing market in the Wazyata district went nuts in the early 2000's. Our house went up almost 80% in value while I was at college from Fall '00 to spring '04.

westofyou
12-18-2007, 04:12 PM
My last quarter I had no classes, just had to make a film and meet with my department chair.

And my wife lived a block away from this bench.

http://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/00/19/16/12/santa-cruz.jpg

BuckeyeRedleg
12-18-2007, 04:24 PM
Applied to OU, UC, BGSU, Alabama, and OSU and accepted to all.

Applying to Alabama was simply to keep a girlfriend happy who was going there. I had no intention of going.

BGSU and UC were for baseball. I was recruited by both and eventually offered to play at BGSU.

OU and OSU were actually back up plans. Weird how it worked out. My buddy was a senior at OSU and asked if I'd room with him and three other seniors. The temptation to party A LOT and have alcohol bought for me at a moments notice was too great to pass up. So, I told the university I was commuting, avoided the dorms by moving into the apartment, and partied my arse off.

It was the best six years of my life and I somehow walked away with a degree.

Even so, if I could do it all over again I would have gone to play ball at BGSU. I hate wondering what if.

redsmetz
12-18-2007, 04:25 PM
The story goes that I wanted to go to the University of Dayton, my mom wanted me to go to Miami University, so I went to THE Ohio Northern University. No real logic there...that's just how it happened. It turned out to be a good choice.

Ah, beautiful Ada, Ohio! My brother in law went to the pharmacy school there and way back in the day, I spent a week there one summer for an Ohio Student Government association week. Actually I enjoyed the week quite a lot, very good memories from then.

BuckWoody
12-18-2007, 04:32 PM
I had a good friend who went there and loved it. He played basketball there (around 94-98) and now has his den full of Polar Bears stuff. They also have an excellent Pharmacy program.
Good basketball program too. 1992-93 Division 3 National Champs. Go Bears!

We all had a good time there. It's pretty much out in the middle of nowhere. We drank a lot. And studied.

BuckeyeRed27
12-18-2007, 04:33 PM
I applied to UNC, UCLA, OSU and Michigan State. I got rejected from UNC which is where I really wanted to go. Decided UCLA was too far away and went with OSU.
The worst part of the whole process is UCLA required the SAT II. So I had to drive to St. X on a Saturday morning to take that test.

MWM
12-18-2007, 04:40 PM
The housing market in the Wazyata district went nuts in the early 2000's. Our house went up almost 80% in value while I was at college from Fall '00 to spring '04.

Yep, pretty similar to most of the Twin Cities, but not the same extreme. Unfortunately, I bought in Spring 2006 and haven't seen one ounce of appreciation.

Blimpie
12-18-2007, 04:48 PM
I was accepted at: Florida, Florida-Atlantic, Miami (FL), UK, Alabama, and Michigan. I was wait-listed at Vanderbilt.

I ended up attending the University of Florida. After completing the Star Trek plan (five year mission), I received a Bachelor's in Business (minor in Marketing Research).

Never lived in a dorm...never joined a fraternity.

Absolutely the best years of my pre-25 year old life, hands down.

redhawkfish
12-18-2007, 05:28 PM
I went to small little christian college in Grayson, Kentucky called Kentucky Christian College my freshman year. I transferred to Miami University for the rest of my undergrad life.:thumbup:

paintmered
12-18-2007, 07:21 PM
Do you think people will care that when I applied Purdue had a slightly better ranked engineering program than Ohio State?

Actually, yes. The reputation of engineering school combined with undergrad work experience has a big effect on who will hire you.

The engineers in my family told me to go to Purdue if I wanted debt or UC if I wanted to graduate debt free (they were UD and OSU alumni). UC was the only school I applied to. Ohio State, Purdue and UC were the schools I was looking at at the time.

WVRed
12-18-2007, 07:32 PM
I went to small little christian college in Grayson, Kentucky called Kentucky Christian College my freshman year. I transferred to Miami University for the rest of my undergrad life.:thumbup:

Used to live close to Grayson, so I know a little about KCU(just enough to know its there).

I am currently attending WVU @ Parkersburg going for a four year degree in Business Administration with a focus in Management and Marketing. I am seriously considering going for a masters that focuses in economic development.

NoCalRed
12-18-2007, 08:09 PM
I went to San Francisco State University hated it so I transfered

You hated being a SFSU Golden Gator? Turn in your Doc Martins ;)

I liked it ok all though it wasn't probably the best school for what I wanted to study, but when on limited funds you do the best you can. The only real problem I had with it at the time was the first year I stayed in those tall funny looking apartments in the back of the campus that were pricey, cramped and the appliances looked like toys. Also Petrini's was the closest grocery store and they were quite expensive, but the good thing about the city is the public transportation system. I was able to find a nice cheap place in Daly city and commute into school.

westofyou
12-18-2007, 08:28 PM
You hated being a SFSU Golden Gator? Turn in your Doc Martins ;)

I liked it ok all though it wasn't probably the best school for what I wanted to study, but when on limited funds you do the best you can. The only real problem I had with it at the time was the first year I stayed in those tall funny looking apartments in the back of the campus that were pricey, cramped and the appliances looked like toys. Also Petrini's was the closest grocery store and they were quite expensive, but the good thing about the city is the public transportation system. I was able to find a nice cheap place in Daly city and commute into school.


I really hated the commute the most, I lived in Berkley and was a TV major, plus I didn't like the weather ... and yes I know those buildings and man I forgot about Petrinis.

Not a bad school, just not a good long drive commuter school (plus I had friends at Santa Cruz)

Screwball
12-18-2007, 08:41 PM
I filled out one application early decision. Got into Washington University in St. Louis. Still not sure how...

My parents didn't much like the bill, but a partial scholarship really helped to offset the cost. Needless to say, I took it and ran.

edabbs44
12-18-2007, 09:00 PM
I just found out the other day I was accepted to William Paterson University and UNC Charlotte. I am still waiting on word from my number one choice of UNLV as well as a couple of other schools I have some degree of interest in. Gotta say that this to me is an exciting time.


So since I know I'm younger than the average Redszoner I ask what college you attended and if anyone has some fond memories of the times of SATs, mulitple applications, and number crunching.

Willie P! My wife is a proud grad from William Paterson. I am a grad of The College of NJ (or Trenton State College), whichever you prefer.

Went to TCNJ mostly for the solid in-state rep and to save my parents a few bucks. I got into most of the schools I applied to, with Johns Hopkins being the best of the bunch. Got swatted from Columbia, GTown and Richmond. Still curious how I didn't get into Richmond.

I really wanted to go to University of Miami and got a 50% ride there for academics, but my father wouldn't let me go. He doubted I would have made it past Thanksgiving and he was totally right. I almost didn't make it at TCNJ...Miami would have been a joke. I may not have made it to Columbus Day.

What I did realize is that the diploma is what matters most, not the name on it. Then, once you use the diploma to get your foot in the door, it's all up to you. I've seen "genius" Ivy Leaguers suck at what they do and I've seen hard working kids from no-name colleges be monsters in their industry.

A few pointers:


Make a ton of contacts
Try and be friendly with as many people as possible (you never know when you'll need one of your contacts down the road)
Just go to class and pay attention...that is 90% of the battle to getting a good GPA


Good luck!

M2
12-18-2007, 09:15 PM
I got into every school which didn't require a recommendation from my high school guidance counselor (long story). I got wait listed by UNC, Georgetown and Penn. Got offered a full ride to U. Miami Fla., but never mentioned it to my parents because I figured I'd have blown that after one real good year of partying and beachgoing. Went to Villanova and then transferred after a semester to Boston University (nothing against Villanova, I just discovered I wanted to be IN a city).

Lived in dorms my freshman year and then campus apartments after that. I didn't want to deal with scraping to make rent every month.

My one recommendation to college students is to do more. There's a ridiculous amount of stuff to do at your standard campus - plays, concerts, movies, lectures, social events, sporting events. And more than see things, do things. I'm still kicking myself 20 years later for not taking up a DJ gig at the campus radio station. Now it's something I didn't get to do.

Go places. Find something to care about. Join a club. Start your own thing.

Just don't spend four years hanging around drinking beer, playing video games and waiting to collect a piece of paper. There's a ton you can get out of college, but you've got to go after it.

IslandRed
12-18-2007, 09:27 PM
In a way, I was lucky... it was 25 years ago and I lived in Nowhere In Particular, KY. The obsession over college applications hadn't reached there yet. Maybe still hasn't. If I was doing it today with the Internet cluing me in on things, I'd have done a lot more research and applied a lot more places. But like RMR, I had the National Merit thing working for me, so I was more concerned about what kind of scholarship I'd get rather than if I'd be admitted. My dad was starting a business and my older sister was already in college, and I didn't want to crush myself in student loans, so if I went out of state it had to be affordable on par with in-state schools.

I already knew I wanted to go to college in Florida if I could. I'm an unabashed warm-weather person. My grandparents had a winter residence around Lake Wales, I always looked forward to the every-other-year visits.

The list quickly evolved to: Florida State, Florida, Western Kentucky, Louisville, UK. Louisville gave me a very nice scholly offer. I went to a summer-scholar program at WKU before my senior year of high school, it was a blast. UK, I'd grown up with the Big Blue. FSU and UF, I had no particular preference. I was just hoping one or the other would come through with a scholarship good enough that I could afford to go.

FSU did -- not only with the good scholarship, but waiving out-of-state tuition -- and that was that.

If I was doing it today, I'd have tried harder to see what a few other schools could have done for me. Living around here now, I think I would have liked Vanderbilt a lot, or maybe UNC or UVA. Back then, though, I was obsessed over going to school in the Sunshine State. And I can't complain about how it all turned out.

SunDeck
12-18-2007, 09:28 PM
I got into every school which didn't require a recommendation from my high school guidance counselor (long story).

My guidance counselor recommended that I enlist in the Navy.

M2
12-18-2007, 09:48 PM
My guidance counselor recommended that I enlist in the Navy.

Mine was a military recruiter. I spoke to him four times before my senior year. Each time he asked me the same question, "Mark (not my name), have you thought about the military?"

I wrote an editorial about how woefully unprepared our school was in terms of helping students with college admissions my senior year and that's when the guy remembered my name.

Falls City Beer
12-18-2007, 09:58 PM
I filled out one application early decision. Got into Washington University in St. Louis. Still not sure how...

My parents didn't much like the bill, but a partial scholarship really helped to offset the cost. Needless to say, I took it and ran.

I'm a Washington University alum myself. MFA Writing after 5 years finishing a Ph.D at UChicago. Before I went to Wash U, I had vowed to stop being a professional student--you know, test the job market. However, I couldn't resist the siren song of two basically undisturbed (tuition-waiver plus healthy stipend) years of putting together a creative manuscript.

Two of the most rewarding years of my life, honestly.

vaticanplum
12-18-2007, 10:34 PM
I have a friend who's something of a free spirit. She chose her college by opening up a catalog to a random page and pointing at a spot on the page with her eyes closed. That's how she ended up going to Iowa State even though she grew up in Maine.

The most amazing part of the story to me is that evidently her parents were fine with it. Just kind of shrugged their shoulders and said ok.

The apple really doesn't fall far from the tree.

That's kind of what I did. The top schools on my list were Georgetown and the University of Virginia, because of the foreign service school and a deep love of Thomas Jefferson respectively. Georgetown rejected me and UVA gave me a full scholarship. A great school for free, I thought there was no decision to be made. Then I visited, almost killed myself, and realized I needed to go somewhere else. As backups, I had applied to OU (because it was in Ohio), University of Delaware (because it had an ice skating rink), and Drew University, a little liberal arts school in New Jersey (because the catalog featured lots of pictures of beautiful trees). UDel was a dump. OU's Ohioness turned out to be exactly the thing I decided I wanted to avoid. So that left Drew, so that's where I went. The only school on my list that I never even visited before I went up there for college.

And it was the most perfect choice for me; it suited the person I became even better than the person I was at 18 (chicken and egg, I suppose). Looking back now I wonder how different my life would be now with a UVA education and no school debt to my name, but I see no differences there that would have made my life better. And I give my mother endless credit for having the strength to say, if the full ride isn't going to make you happy, then don't do it. It was never even a consideration otherwise for her.

I think there's an awful lot of chance involved in these things.

I would just add one more thing to M2's excellent advice -- "do more" not just in terms of college life, but in terms of your classes. Don't ignore your life, which is kinda why you're there, but don't ignore your education either (it's surprisingly easy to do). Take classes that sound fascinating to you no matter how out there they may be, and really do the reading and push yourself to participate and learn. Organized learning is so much harder to do on your own than you ever imagine it will be. I guess that's why you pay for it. You strike me as a really bright kid, Tom. I'm sure you're going to have a great ride.

Heath
12-18-2007, 10:35 PM
I nailed a clerical portion of the ASVAB Military test and for about 5 years, the Navy Recruiter called me non-stop.

Anyway, when I lived in upstate NY, you could join the reserve, and get free in-state tuition towards a Master's degree. What a deal. Except one minor thing. I failed the physical. It was the summer I blew out my knee.

Oh well.

And even though I went to numerous colleges, I never really visited or applied to many. Mostly local stuff like Ball State, NKU, or UD. Back then, I didn't know, nor my parents, that the private colleges were passing out need-based grant money like Halloween candy that effectively would have given me a lot less bills at the end.

Anyway, Akron, Wright State, & Sinclair did offer stuff that I could do and enjoy. I majored in softball and partying one semester, worked at the WSU Radio Station as Sports Director, and worked with RHI at Akron & WSU.

Screwball
12-18-2007, 10:38 PM
I'm a Washington University alum myself. MFA Writing after 5 years finishing a Ph.D at UChicago.

Ah, that explains the big words and the love for the Cardinals. :thumbup:

Caveat Emperor
12-18-2007, 10:40 PM
My one recommendation to college students is to do more. There's a ridiculous amount of stuff to do at your standard campus - plays, concerts, movies, lectures, social events, sporting events. And more than see things, do things. I'm still kicking myself 20 years later for not taking up a DJ gig at the campus radio station. Now it's something I didn't get to do.

Go places. Find something to care about. Join a club. Start your own thing.

Just don't spend four years hanging around drinking beer, playing video games and waiting to collect a piece of paper. There's a ton you can get out of college, but you've got to go after it.

This is possibly the best advice about college I've ever read.

Servo (and anyone else off to college soon) -- take this to heart. You'll have opportunities to do things in college that will never be presented again. Take full advantage of as many opportunities as possible.

Falls City Beer
12-18-2007, 10:40 PM
Yeah, do stuff at college--but don't be a swot. In prodigal and excessive behavior, there's a wisdom that can't be taught. (Couplet entirely accidental).

I find that my niece and nephew are sweet kids, but booked to death--piano, bands, swimming, this club, that club; no time to reflect for those two, and there's something of the automaton about them.

Caseyfan21
12-18-2007, 11:09 PM
Actually, yes. The reputation of engineering school combined with undergrad work experience has a big effect on who will hire you.

The engineers in my family told me to go to Purdue if I wanted debt or UC if I wanted to graduate debt free (they were UD and OSU alumni). UC was the only school I applied to. Ohio State, Purdue and UC were the schools I was looking at at the time.

Yeah, that was my line of thinking as well. I figured I could go to Purdue and have tons of loans to look forward to or OSU and have very little (not to even mention OSU offered me nice scholarship money and Purdue nothing).

Purdue may be a slightly better engineering school according to rankings but OSU is still very solid. Having OSU on my degree makes me extremely employable and having Purdue instead isn't worth $15K more per year. Like you mentioned, it really all comes down to grades and experiences. You have to have good enough grades to make the initial cut and then having a lot of co-op/intern experience helps you stand out compared to others.

westofyou
12-18-2007, 11:19 PM
You'll have opportunities to do things in college that will never be presented again.

Like learning how to spell Chautauqua.

deltachi8
12-18-2007, 11:23 PM
Like learning how to spell Chautauqua.

I went to college in Chautaqua County, NY.

cincinnati chili
12-19-2007, 01:25 AM
my wife lived a block away from this bench.

http://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/00/19/16/12/santa-cruz.jpg


One could get the wrong impression from that photo. Like that your wife was a bag lady living under the bush a block away.

Lovely picture, btw.

I got rejected by Rice and Brown, wait listed at Carleton.

I got into Indiana and Vassar (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yABU2xlS8NY), and attended the latter. Best years of my life so far, hands down.

Stephenk29
12-19-2007, 02:00 AM
Finishing up at Greenville College in Greenville, IL. Its about 45 minutes from ST. Louis in the middle of the cornfields. Can't say I've liked the place all that much. Teaching degree should land me some millions though. Playing baseball keeps me occupied to I guess.

pedro
12-19-2007, 06:22 AM
That's kind of what I did. The top schools on my list were Georgetown and the University of Virginia, because of the foreign service school and a deep love of Thomas Jefferson respectively. Georgetown rejected me and UVA gave me a full scholarship. A great school for free, I thought there was no decision to be made. Then I visited, almost killed myself, and realized I needed to go somewhere else. As backups, I had applied to OU (because it was in Ohio), University of Delaware (because it had an ice skating rink), and Drew University, a little liberal arts school in New Jersey (because the catalog featured lots of pictures of beautiful trees). UDel was a dump. OU's Ohioness turned out to be exactly the thing I decided I wanted to avoid. So that left Drew, so that's where I went. The only school on my list that I never even visited before I went up there for college.

And it was the most perfect choice for me; it suited the person I became even better than the person I was at 18 (chicken and egg, I suppose). Looking back now I wonder how different my life would be now with a UVA education and no school debt to my name, but I see no differences there that would have made my life better. And I give my mother endless credit for having the strength to say, if the full ride isn't going to make you happy, then don't do it. It was never even a consideration otherwise for her.

I think there's an awful lot of chance involved in these things.

I would just add one more thing to M2's excellent advice -- "do more" not just in terms of college life, but in terms of your classes. Don't ignore your life, which is kinda why you're there, but don't ignore your education either (it's surprisingly easy to do). Take classes that sound fascinating to you no matter how out there they may be, and really do the reading and push yourself to participate and learn. Organized learning is so much harder to do on your own than you ever imagine it will be. I guess that's why you pay for it. You strike me as a really bright kid, Tom. I'm sure you're going to have a great ride.

When I was a senior in high school in Summit, NJ, my friend Henning and I went to the Drew University Library several times. Good place to meet girls from Bernardsville. ;)

pedro
12-19-2007, 06:34 AM
I got into every school which didn't require a recommendation from my high school guidance counselor (long story). I got wait listed by UNC, Georgetown and Penn. Got offered a full ride to U. Miami Fla., but never mentioned it to my parents because I figured I'd have blown that after one real good year of partying and beachgoing. Went to Villanova and then transferred after a semester to Boston University (nothing against Villanova, I just discovered I wanted to be IN a city).

Lived in dorms my freshman year and then campus apartments after that. I didn't want to deal with scraping to make rent every month.

My one recommendation to college students is to do more. There's a ridiculous amount of stuff to do at your standard campus - plays, concerts, movies, lectures, social events, sporting events. And more than see things, do things. I'm still kicking myself 20 years later for not taking up a DJ gig at the campus radio station. Now it's something I didn't get to do.

Go places. Find something to care about. Join a club. Start your own thing.

Just don't spend four years hanging around drinking beer, playing video games and waiting to collect a piece of paper. There's a ton you can get out of college, but you've got to go after it.

Don't stop learning about things that interest you just because the professor moved on to the next chapter.

SunDeck
12-19-2007, 07:14 AM
I wrote an editorial about how woefully unprepared our school was in terms of helping students with college admissions my senior year and that's when the guy remembered my name.

When I decided to go to college there was no help whatsoever. My parents were not college grads and unfortunately were not really able to help me understand much about the process of applying to school. I don't blame them really because I thought that's what the counselors were for. In my case, they had definitely gotten the idea from my H.S. grades and my lack of interest in anything but soccer that I was probably destined for the tool and die industry.

So I had to figure a lot out on my own, which taught me a lot. It taught me especially the value of taking one's college education by the horns. I echo M2's advice about soaking up everything you can in your college experience. Me? I went to Europe, joined a few crazy pinko organizations, befriended a group of wonderful Palestinian students, hung out with theater majors, met Donald Woods and Ralph Nadar. Great stuff, which changed me forever.

Cyclone792
12-19-2007, 08:15 AM
I graduated from the University of Cincinnati back in 2005, and while I really enjoyed it, by my last two quarters I was ready to get out and move on. And I'll add that the advice and suggestions already posted in this thread are very valuable. Get out and do as much interesting stuff as you can, but as FCB noted, just don't do so much that it may be overbearing.

I'm not sure I can speak for anybody else, and this should be self-explanatory, but my number one priority and goal with college was to enable myself to pursue and enjoy a career afterward that would be fun, interesting, and provide some serious earning potential.

You may know exactly what you want to do, or you may have no clue, but I'd stress that it's never too early to start networking, researching careers, researching actual workforce applicable careers, and gathering as much information as possible. I know plenty of people who went through college, and by the time they graduated realized their major wasn't too terribly applicable to the real-world workforce. And when it came time to employ themselves full-time after graduating, they really struggled finding that employment.

In my experience, high school guidance counselors were rather useless when it came to analyzing the job market for applicable workforce strategies when pursuing a college path. There are some majors where you'll graduate college and you'll be placed immediately in the workforce doing what you actually went to school for. There are other majors where you may search for years and never find a job doing what you actually went to school for.

SunDeck
12-19-2007, 09:03 AM
Good advice Cyclone.
I would also suggest that new college students should focus on the foundations. Make sure to take the sciences and math seriously. If you feel they are too tough, then get help with them. Plenty is available.

The reason I make this suggestion is because I didn't do it. I would love to have pursued a graduate career in Horticulture, but my experience with chemistry and algebra in H.S. led me to believe I wasn't cut out for the sciences. Later, much later I found out that it had less to do with my innate abilities than with my attitude and my approach towards learning. If I had not shied away from the classes that would have at least allowed me to graduate with a B.S. instead of a B.A. and I would have been ready to attend a different kind of graduate program than I did.
Things worked out- I'm doing relatively well and I'm not bitter about it. At the same time, it is the reason I sit with my 7 year old helping him to understand his math. Luckily, he has the mind of his mom's side of the family, which happens to include a few biologists and physicists.

vaticanplum
12-19-2007, 09:12 AM
I'm not sure I can speak for anybody else, and this should be self-explanatory, but my number one priority and goal with college was to enable myself to pursue and enjoy a career afterward that would be fun, interesting, and provide some serious earning potential.

You may know exactly what you want to do, or you may have no clue, but I'd stress that it's never too early to start networking, researching careers, researching actual workforce applicable careers, and gathering as much information as possible. I know plenty of people who went through college, and by the time they graduated realized their major wasn't too terribly applicable to the real-world workforce. And when it came time to employ themselves full-time after graduating, they really struggled finding that employment.

In my experience, high school guidance counselors were rather useless when it came to analyzing the job market for applicable workforce strategies when pursuing a college path. There are some majors where you'll graduate college and you'll be placed immediately in the workforce doing what you actually went to school for. There are other majors where you may search for years and never find a job doing what you actually went to school for.

And, just as FCB presented a counterpoint to the "do stuff" argument, I would present the counterargument here not to overdo the career stuff during college. You'll be dealing with networking and career stuff for the rest of your life. College may well be your last chance to have the luxury of learning alone and living on someone else's dime (be it your parents' or a grant's or the government's). Do things because you want to and because they interest you, not because they'll help you in your career. There's a reason you're going to college rather than straight into the job market. A good, well-rounded education, in and out of the classroom, IS the best thing you can do for your career in my opinion.

I think we're going to cover every piece of advice there is :) To a great degree, you just have to find your own way. Everybody's different.

SunDeck
12-19-2007, 09:23 AM
And, just as FCB presented a counterpoint to the "do stuff" argument, I would present the counterargument here not to overdo the career stuff during college. You'll be dealing with networking and career stuff for the rest of your life. College may well be your last chance to have the luxury of learning alone and living on someone else's dime (be it your parents' or a grant's or the government's). Do things because you want to and because they interest you, not because they'll help you in your career. There's a reason you're going to college rather than straight into the job market. A good, well-rounded education, in and out of the classroom, IS the best thing you can do for your career in my opinion.

I think we're going to cover every piece of advice there is :) To a great degree, you just have to find your own way. Everybody's different.

Yeah, if they listen to us, they won't have any time to post on RZ. :D

15fan
12-19-2007, 09:43 AM
Sage advice from a variety of posters. I'll add mine.

At some point during college, get to know some folks in the administration. Pick up a job answering phones and delivering mail in an office on campus for a few hours a week. Be a volunteer for a presidential group, orientation, prospective students, etc. Get up early one day a week to exercise with all of the administrators in the gym before the workday starts - you'll be amazed who you'll see in the gym at the "ungodly" hour of 7:30 am. Take time to chat up that same custodian that you see at the same time every day when you're waiting for your class. Find a way to interact with some faculty and staff members outside the classroom.

This is particularly helpful if you're going away to school - some place where you don't know a whole lot of folks. These are the kind of people who can do things like recommend doctors, auto mechanics, good restaurants in the area for impressing someone in whom you have taken an interest, etc. They can also be invaluable if you find yourself in a quandry - there's a screw-up with your financial aid, you're having problems registering for a class, etc. They probably can't help you directly, but will likely be able to get you in touch with the right person to assist you with your dilemma rather than having to figure out the bureaucracy all on your own.

Knowing these types of people can also come in handy if you need a recommendation for a grad school application or a reference for your first job out of college. It will also help you to see that students are not on one island, faculty on a second island, and staff on a third island. Though that can and does happen, there are also a lot of intersections among the three that are the product of hard work by many people, resulting in the once-in-a-lifetime opportunities that are before you in college. If you have a sense of that hard work, you'll appreciate (and hopefully seize) those opportunities a little more.

Dom Heffner
12-20-2007, 08:59 PM
University of South Florida here. Political Science Honors degree.

Even though I was an old man when I started (31), it was still the most wonderful experience of my life.

Instead of partying, I actually paid attention and learned things.

Just an incredible experience.

My only regret: I dropped a few classes to put myself a quarter behind, which made my father miss seeing me graduate (he died the last week of my final quarter).

My best advice to you: Study something you love. I don't care if the field of study pays you squat, taking classes you are interested in will make your life so much easier.

*BaseClogger*
12-20-2007, 09:16 PM
I'm a senior in high school and decided to apply to Miami U., OSU, and MSU. I did Early Decision to Miami, and was recently accepted. Great advice from everyone. Thanks :)

cincinnati chili
12-21-2007, 02:43 AM
I did Early Decision to Miami, and was recently accepted. Great advice from everyone. Thanks :)

Congrats. Enjoy yourself at Oxford.

Highlifeman21
12-21-2007, 10:34 PM
Drink in moderation.

Use streets outside your apartment as a personal driving range. The tighter the street the better. I find these help the greatest in gaining accuracy to all aspects of your game.

Find out which teachers/professors take attendence and factor it into your grade. Try to not schedule classes with those faculty at all costs.

Pick a major that will actually help you get a career post graduation.

Don't commit floorcest, if you ever live in a dorm.

Don't be afraid to exploit your talents for financial gain. If you feel you're a good writer, and don't mind writing papers, then write papers for money. If you have extra time on your hands, sign up for every experiment/focus group, etc on campus. Good coin with those.

Learn to cook.

Benihana
12-22-2007, 03:14 PM
University of Michigan alum myself, although that will come as no surprise to most of you. Four of the greatest years of my life, no question. I'd advise you to enjoy college as much as you can, and don't worry about the proverbial career stuff until later. Most of the interesting people I went to school with had no idea what they wanted to do when they graduated, and a lot of them still don't five years later. I wouldn't worry too much about it- most of that stuff you can't learn without experience anyway. Enjoy yourself!

Matt700wlw
12-22-2007, 08:09 PM
I went to Bowling Green State University. I had a blast. Wish I could go back sometimes.

There were classes too...