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Sea Ray
01-03-2008, 10:18 AM
West Virginia ran the spread offense to perfection last night. Made Oklahoma look slow and made you wonder how did they lose to the likes of Pittsburgh? Texas with Vince Young ran it to a national championship. Is this the way to a national championship in college football? Well W Va and Oregon can attest to its achilles heel. The entire offense depends upon a very athletic QB and it leaves that QB very exposed to injury. When your QB gets hurt you lose to Pittsburgh. Oregon's season also went down the drain when Dennis Dixon got hurt. The spread depends on the QB being both the RB and the passer. There's often no RB behind him and there's never a TE. This leaves the QB open to taking a beating which is why we don't see much of this in the NFL. Mobile QBs spend a lot of time on the injury list. See Vince Young, Donovan McNabb and Michael Vick.

I think Michigan is making a bold move by going to a spread. I think you're asking for trouble running it for an entire season in the smash mouth Big Ten. After Rich Rodriquez gets his system in place, I think Michigan will look unbeatable in some games but they'll be vulnerable to everything coming crashing down with every hit their QB takes from a powerful Big Ten defender.

What do you think? Do you think this is the way to go in college football or is the risk too great?

Yachtzee
01-03-2008, 10:39 AM
West Virginia ran the spread offense to perfection last night. Made Oklahoma look slow and made you wonder how did they lose to the likes of Pittsburgh? Texas with Vince Young ran it to a national championship. Is this the way to a national championship in college football? Well W Va and Oregon can attest to its achilles heel. The entire offense depends upon a very athletic QB and it leaves that QB very exposed to injury. When your QB gets hurt you lose to Pittsburgh. Oregon's season also went down the drain when Dennis Dixon got hurt. The spread depends on the QB being both the RB and the passer. There's often no RB behind him and there's never a TE. This leaves the QB open to taking a beating which is why we don't see much of this in the NFL. Mobile QBs spend a lot of time on the injury list. See Vince Young, Donovan McNabb and Michael Vick.

I think Michigan is making a bold move by going to a spread. I think you're asking for trouble running it for an entire season in the smash mouth Big Ten. After Rich Rodriquez gets his system in place, I think Michigan will look unbeatable in some games but they'll be vulnerable to everything coming crashing down with every hit their QB takes from a powerful Big Ten defender.

What do you think? Do you think this is the way to go in college football or is the risk too great?

I think you're focusing on one format of the spread offense, which is more of a spread option in which the QB is also a runner. There are plenty of teams that use different varieties of spread offense that don't require a running QB and would actually use an RB for standard running plays. Don't the Bengals run spread formations? We all know Carson Palmer is no running QB. :)

It should be interesting with Rodriquez at Michigan. From what I gather, he did run a spread-option type offense at WV.

bucksfan2
01-03-2008, 10:51 AM
The spread option has brough an interseting dymanic to college football. I think the whole success of the spread depends upon the key players (QB, RB) staying healthy. WVU ran more of a spread running attack but they didn't survive the season with their top two players staying healthy in White and Slaton. I think the one key to a great spread running attack is being able to keep the D honest by throwing the ball down the field. I also agree with the fact that the spread doesn't have to be a running attack. Many teams are successful in spreading the field with 4 or 5 wide and throwing the ball or using an agile QB to run the ball for 5-10 yards per carry. Tressel did this with Krenzel over the two years he ran the offense. He would spread the field wide and let Krenzel QB sneak it for 5 years at a time. Krenzel wasn't a running QB but he was agile enough to break through the line and using his downhill plain he could pick up 5 yards at a time. The problem was he didn't make it through the 03-04 season healthy.

I really think it will be difficult for Michigan to run a WVU type spread. You really take a pounding and even though you may finish the game you may not be playing fully healthy.

Sea Ray
01-03-2008, 11:29 AM
To me I consider a spread what we saw in W Va which probably more accurately has been dubbed the spread option. I consider what June Jones runs in Hawaii a run and shoot but you don't hear that term so much anymore. A run and shoot means no TE, a fluid pocket and hopefully a nifty RB like Barry Sanders to dart through the spread out defense. But it doesn't have set plays for the QB to carry the ball.

I've got to figure that RR will run the spead option at Mich since that's what he had success with at W Va. I suggest he recruit more than one athletic QB 'cause he's going to need a pretty good backup.

It's also significant that the OSU-Mi game is always late in the year. That when your QB will tend to be the most beat up. MI can probably beat most of the Big Ten teams with a beat up spread-QB but will that be a factor vs OSU?

Handofdeath
01-03-2008, 03:51 PM
Texas Tech runs another another form of the spread in which the offense is almost totally geared towards passing. I believe their average TD drive this season is about 2:30. And truth be told, they are probably as responsible as anybody for the spread becoming as prevalent as it is. The key to stopping them is to disrupt the timing of the patterns but like UVA found out, you can only do that for so long.

WVRed
01-03-2008, 04:48 PM
West Virginia ran the spread offense to perfection last night. Made Oklahoma look slow and made you wonder how did they lose to the likes of Pittsburgh? Texas with Vince Young ran it to a national championship. Is this the way to a national championship in college football? Well W Va and Oregon can attest to its achilles heel. The entire offense depends upon a very athletic QB and it leaves that QB very exposed to injury. When your QB gets hurt you lose to Pittsburgh. Oregon's season also went down the drain when Dennis Dixon got hurt. The spread depends on the QB being both the RB and the passer. There's often no RB behind him and there's never a TE. This leaves the QB open to taking a beating which is why we don't see much of this in the NFL. Mobile QBs spend a lot of time on the injury list. See Vince Young, Donovan McNabb and Michael Vick.

I think Michigan is making a bold move by going to a spread. I think you're asking for trouble running it for an entire season in the smash mouth Big Ten. After Rich Rodriquez gets his system in place, I think Michigan will look unbeatable in some games but they'll be vulnerable to everything coming crashing down with every hit their QB takes from a powerful Big Ten defender.

What do you think? Do you think this is the way to go in college football or is the risk too great?

Depends on which tale you want to hear in these woods. Some people have even started to speculate that Rodriguez was talking before the Pitt game and threw it. My take is that they went into the game thinking they had it won and come out looking like fools. The latter is not the most popular suggestion in this area.

Either way, the spread option has one benefit in that you can put up scoring in bunches. Michigan didn't falter and was able to keep up and come back and win the game against Florida. Once Ohio St got behind against Florida, there was no catching up, no matter how much offense they could put on the board.

The key to stopping the spread option is turnovers, not so much knocking out the star cast. Force a team like WVU to turn the ball over, stop them from scoring, then capitalize on the turnovers and you will win.

The reason teams shy away from drafting QB's who run in the spread option is because most are not NFL caliber QB's. Yes, they can run, but what most QB's such as Chris Leak and Rasheed Marshall(or in this instance, Dennis Dixon and Pat White) lack is a cannon arm. The three you mentioned are at least above average in that department.

bucksfan2
01-03-2008, 05:41 PM
This may sound stupid but I wonder if the cold weather has an effect on the spread option. It seems like the spread type offenses work well early in the season, down south, and in the bowl games. However it also seems like when the weather gets cold, the hits sting a little more, the ground hardens, and the ball gets a little tougher to handle, the spread teams struggle.