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WVRed
01-03-2008, 09:26 PM
This has trainwreck written all over it.

http://news.aol.com/entertainment/music/music-news-story/ar/_a/simpson-going-country-on-new-album/20080102101609990001


NEW YORK (Jan. 2) - Jessica Simpson is in the early stages of recording a country album in Nashville, a project slated for a 2008 release via Columbia Records.

Simpson said she had always wanted to make a country album, but was waiting until the right time.

"I think there is a strength in female country artists," Simpson said, citing Martina McBride, Shania Twain , Faith Hill and Reba McEntire as some of her inspirations.

She said she would be involved in the creative process.

"Writing is a release for me," she said. "It's a way for me to tell my story. That's not to say I wouldn't record a song that I didn't write."

Her last album, "A Public Affair," spent just nine weeks on the Billboard 200 in 2006. Her most recent movie, "Blonde Ambition," was recently released in a handful of theaters in her native Texas en route to DVD stores.

Matt700wlw
01-03-2008, 09:28 PM
As long as she wears the Daisy Dukes outfit in the videos...

:)

RedFanAlways1966
01-03-2008, 09:54 PM
As long as she wears the Daisy Dukes outfit in the videos...

:)

That is a great time to have the video, but kill the audio with the MUTE button.

919191
01-04-2008, 03:00 AM
After seeing the artists she named, I think she has never heard country music.

savafan
01-04-2008, 08:17 AM
After seeing the artists she named, I think she has never heard country music.

True that.

This kinda reminds me of when Garth Brooks became Chris Gaines...

durl
01-04-2008, 09:32 AM
After seeing the artists she named, I think she has never heard country music.

Why do you say that?

Highlifeman21
01-04-2008, 11:52 AM
After seeing the artists she named, I think she has never heard country music.

So she named Pop Country artists.

And the shock or surprise there would be.......?

919191
01-04-2008, 11:56 AM
Why do you say that?

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51PJ6HDY28L._AA280_.jpg

Chip R
01-04-2008, 11:58 AM
Well, I certainly didn't expect her to mention Patsy Cline and Loretta Lynn. Although I thought she might have mentioned Dolly Parton since they have a couple of things in common. ;)

WMR
01-04-2008, 12:01 PM
Wake me when she's in Playboy.

Her last movie made $978. Literally.

Joseph
01-04-2008, 12:04 PM
To quote the infamous Hank Williams III....

'and if you know what I'm thinking, you'll know that pop country really sucks!'

westofyou
01-04-2008, 12:33 PM
Ok kids...


This is your brain on country

http://kittra.com/images/leon/LeonErnestTubb.jpg


This is your brain on crappy country

http://www.mtv.com/news/photos/n/nick_jessica_retrospective_051005/02.jpg

CrackerJack
01-04-2008, 01:37 PM
To quote the infamous Hank Williams III....

'and if you know what I'm thinking, you'll know that pop country really sucks!'

Or pretty much any country since Waylon and Johnny died.

919191
01-04-2008, 02:02 PM
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=Y-qdQ2AI2H0


Hank 3 doing The Pills I Took.

savafan
01-04-2008, 02:12 PM
Ok kids...


This is your brain on country

http://kittra.com/images/leon/LeonErnestTubb.jpg


This is your brain on crappy country

http://www.mtv.com/news/photos/n/nick_jessica_retrospective_051005/02.jpg

There's no reason to drag Nick into this. FWIW, I kinda admire that guy, if for no other reason than the fact that he suffers as a fan of the same team that I do.

westofyou
01-04-2008, 02:15 PM
There's no reason to drag Nick into this. FWIW, I kinda admire that guy, if for no other reason than the fact that he suffers as a fan of the same team that I do.

Nick sang this, it's called Farmers Blues



who'll buy my wheat who'll buy my corn
to feed my babies when they're born
seeds and dirt a prayer for rain
that I could use
I work the land I watch the sky

Cheese is cheese is cheese.

IslandRed
01-04-2008, 02:50 PM
I'm somewhere in the middle, I guess. I live in the Nashville area, so I get to hear all the complaints about the corporate-filtered, committee-written songs that are sung by pretty kids who would have no hope of a career if it wasn't for Pro Tools. But there are still some people with actual talent, it's just unfortunate that too many aren't being played on the mainstream country stations. Here, I at least get to hear some of them that don't hit it big nationwide.

The sad thing is, some of those singers are hurt just as much as helped by the digital manipulation. It sucks the character out of the singing. Go listen to some old Cash or Nelson or any number of old-timers, be it rock or country, and hear how many notes aren't exactly on key. Perfect pitch has never been a requirement (within reason). It's what they sing and how they sing it. Stuff that comes out of Pro Tools sounds sterile in comparison.

Chip R
01-04-2008, 03:13 PM
I'm somewhere in the middle, I guess. I live in the Nashville area, so I get to hear all the complaints about the corporate-filtered, committee-written songs that are sung by pretty kids who would have no hope of a career if it wasn't for Pro Tools. But there are still some people with actual talent, it's just unfortunate that too many aren't being played on the mainstream country stations. Here, I at least get to hear some of them that don't hit it big nationwide.


While the old time country music may have been better and more down to earth than the modern-day stuff, the modern-day stuff has increased the popularity and drawn more attention to country music as a whole. Sometimes people will listen to the morden day music and eventually will wonder where that came from and get into the old-timers and start to enjoy that music as well. Just like some people who were brought up on rock and roll went back to its origins and discovered the blues.

Joseph
01-04-2008, 03:19 PM
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=Y-qdQ2AI2H0


Hank 3 doing The Pills I Took.

You a fan 91?

That songs originally by a band called 'Those Poor Bastards' who bill themselves as Gothic Country. They are a unique experience to say the least. I really dig their last record called "Hellfire Hymns" and in fact featured its cover as an avatar for a few weeks recently. They have another coming out early next year.

Hank III however is just tops in my book as far as 'real' country music goes. I saw him down in Nashville at the Cannery a month or so ago along with Reverend Horton Heat and another band I won't list due to the graphic nature of thier name lol. Great great show, great musician.

919191
01-04-2008, 04:09 PM
A little. I downloaded a couple of shows and the quality was awful. I got a CD of his for Christmas and I really like it.

Joseph
01-04-2008, 05:25 PM
Straight to Hell?

919191
01-04-2008, 06:19 PM
Yes, I like CD 1 a whole lot, but I don't know what to make of CD2, but then, I never liked Revolution #9, either.

Joseph
01-04-2008, 06:50 PM
CD two is weird at least through the whole slowed down song. But I could listen to disc one all day.

savafan
01-05-2008, 01:04 PM
While the old time country music may have been better and more down to earth than the modern-day stuff, the modern-day stuff has increased the popularity and drawn more attention to country music as a whole. Sometimes people will listen to the morden day music and eventually will wonder where that came from and get into the old-timers and start to enjoy that music as well. Just like some people who were brought up on rock and roll went back to its origins and discovered the blues.

That was my experience with country music back in the early to mid-90's. I have a great appreciation now for the classic country artists.

Reds Freak
01-05-2008, 03:15 PM
Or pretty much any country since Waylon and Johnny died.

I'd be interested in hearing some definitions of both traditional country and pop country. I love the classic country artists like Waylon, Johnny, Merle, George Jones, etc. but I love a lot of current country artists too. I certainly wouldn't put everything today in the category of pop country, for example, I wouldn't have guys like Josh Turner and Brad Paisley in the same category as Rascal Flatts and Kenny Chesney...

WVRed
01-05-2008, 03:47 PM
I'd be interested in hearing some definitions of both traditional country and pop country. I love the classic country artists like Waylon, Johnny, Merle, George Jones, etc. but I love a lot of current country artists too. I certainly wouldn't put everything today in the category of pop country, for example, I wouldn't have guys like Josh Turner and Brad Paisley in the same category as Rascal Flatts and Kenny Chesney...

I'd put Brad Paisley in the pop-country section.

I've always said that Rascal Flatts is the country music version of N'Sync. They are more talented, but they definitely define the pop-country label.

westofyou
01-05-2008, 03:56 PM
I'd put Brad Paisley in the pop-country section.

I've always said that Rascal Flatts is the country music version of N'Sync. They are more talented, but they definitely define the pop-country label.

Here's a barometer to use at the start.

It was not the perfect country and western song
Because he hadn't said anything at all about mama
Or trains or trucks or prison or getting' drunk

Reds Freak
01-05-2008, 06:33 PM
Here's a barometer to use at the start.

It was not the perfect country and western song
Because he hadn't said anything at all about mama
Or trains or trucks or prison or getting' drunk

David Allan Coe's definition is the perfect definition of his style of country, I guess what you would call "outlaw" country. But just because an artist doesn't talk about mama, trains, or gettin' drunk doesn't make the artist "pop" country.

BoydsOfSummer
01-06-2008, 02:37 AM
Just downed some great examples of the anti-Jessica.

John Prine--Anthology (okay, so it's "folky")
Merle Haggard--40 Greatest (If he aint country you can kiss my ass)
Jack Ingram--Wherever You Are (If he aint country,kiss a Texans ass)
Marty Stuart--The Pilgrim (If he aint country, kiss Flatt and Scruggs ass)
Dwight Yoakum--Reprise (If he aint country, kiss Buck Owen's ass)
Delbert McClinton--Room to Breathe. (Okay, so it's country-blues, kiss Jerry Jeff Walker's ass)
Steve Earle--11 Albulms (not sure if Steve cares who's ass you kiss, just kiss somebody):D

westofyou
01-06-2008, 10:52 AM
Steve Earle--11 Albulms (not sure if Steve cares who's ass you kiss, just kiss somebody)

Townes Van Zandt would be the man that Steve would lead you to do that kissing.

MWM
01-06-2008, 01:28 PM
corporate-filtered, committee-written songs that are sung by pretty kids who would have no hope of a career if it wasn't for Pro Tools.

GReat description of current country music. It irritates me to all end. Carrie Underwood is a perfect example. Her songs are more generic than any other artist out there.

RANDY IN INDY
01-06-2008, 01:51 PM
I'd put Brad Paisley in the pop-country section.

I've always said that Rascal Flatts is the country music version of N'Sync. They are more talented, but they definitely define the pop-country label.

Agree about Rascal Flatts. Certainly not Flatt and Scruggs.

Disagree on Paisley. I think that he is pretty close to classic country. Pretty good musician, as well. I've heard him do quite a few of the old classics, and he has, on most of his CD's, included an old classic hymn. His rendition of the "The Old Rugged Cross" at the Grand Ole Opry, is enough to bring tears to my eyes.

IslandRed
01-06-2008, 03:40 PM
Disagree on Paisley. I think that he is pretty close to classic country. Pretty good musician, as well. I've heard him do quite a few of the old classics, and he has, on most of his CD's, included an old classic hymn. His rendition of the "The Old Rugged Cross" at the Grand Ole Opry, is enough to bring tears to my eyes.

Same here. He has some songs that are kitschy (e.g. "Online", which I like but isn't exactly classic country) but his body of work is on solid ground and he certainly has the respect of the old guard. He's probably my favorite in the genre right now, one of the few write/sing/play frontmen going anymore.

Dom Heffner
01-06-2008, 03:46 PM
I just like music. New country, old country, classic rock, the new stuff.

If it has a nice hook, I'm in.

bucksfan
01-07-2008, 12:13 AM
That was my experience with country music back in the early to mid-90's. I have a great appreciation now for the classic country artists.

Mine as well. I grew up in the country, about 500 yards (across our field) from a bar that had live country bands on the weekends. I kinda laughed about the music back then but never hated it. However I grew up kind of a headbanger and then gradually morphed back in to the country/folky thing also. Some of the current artists and songs commonly joked about did honestly get my attention back. I have nothing against the "cheesier" country stuff at all, and own some of that in my catalog as well as the more classic stuff.

IslandRed
01-07-2008, 12:31 PM
A Tennessean columnist had asked readers which song they thought Jessica should cover. The preference of many was "Harper Valley PTA." But:


Not reader Lionel Johnson, who suggests that Jessica cover Alan Jackson's "Gone Country," "because 'Gone Country' is about phony people who have no real business singing country music. In her case, she's not made much of a mark singing at all and wants to sing country simply because she thinks it's easy and the industry will kiss up to her because she's already a name."

Ouch.

WVRed
01-07-2008, 01:20 PM
It worked for Kid Rock I guess.

Then again, he pretty much went back to rock on his new album.

Will M
01-07-2008, 04:55 PM
I'm somewhere in the middle, I guess. I live in the Nashville area, so I get to hear all the complaints about the corporate-filtered, committee-written songs that are sung by pretty kids who would have no hope of a career if it wasn't for Pro Tools. But there are still some people with actual talent, it's just unfortunate that too many aren't being played on the mainstream country stations. Here, I at least get to hear some of them that don't hit it big nationwide.

The sad thing is, some of those singers are hurt just as much as helped by the digital manipulation. It sucks the character out of the singing. Go listen to some old Cash or Nelson or any number of old-timers, be it rock or country, and hear how many notes aren't exactly on key. Perfect pitch has never been a requirement (within reason). It's what they sing and how they sing it. Stuff that comes out of Pro Tools sounds sterile in comparison.

Van Morrison has the same complaint about a lot of modern music. Way too much tweeking in the studio and not enough spontaneity of the artists.

westofyou
01-07-2008, 05:02 PM
Van Morrison has the same complaint about a lot of modern music. Way too much tweeking in the studio and not enough spontaneity of the artists.

Yeah, it's a common theme.. I believe Greg Brady faced it with Johnny Bravo.

Not exactly Neil Young and David Briggs was it.

M2
01-07-2008, 05:34 PM
Seems to me Jessica Simpson's got some shrewd management. Find a low bar to clear. Mainstream country music is pure pablum. It's easy listening with a twang (the same twang repeated endlessly). Even the stuff that's supposed to be up tempo or "loud" is easy listening. It's musical metamucil, perfect for Jessica Simpson.

She needs to be somewhere her work won't be judged on its quality.

RANDY IN INDY
01-07-2008, 06:02 PM
Originally posted by M2

Seems to me Jessica Simpson's got some shrewd management. Find a low bar to clear. Mainstream country music is pure pablum. It's easy listening with a twang (the same twang repeated endlessly). Even the stuff that's supposed to be up tempo or "loud" is easy listening. It's musical metamucil, perfect for Jessica Simpson.

She needs to be somewhere her work won't be judged on its quality.



I think you could say that about a large majority of the people that are trying to make music these days, and that doesn't only pertain to country music.

Handofdeath
01-07-2008, 06:22 PM
It is really interesting to see the names that are mentioned as
"Classic Country" here. Johnny Cash, Waylon, Merle, and the immortal Buck Owens are my 4 favorite country singers, which is my favorite kind of music to listen to. But at the same time, country music and those gentlemen were not always on the same page in their heyday. Johnny Cash made as much money and did as much for country music as anybody. On his successful televison show he had guests across the musical spectrum appearing on his show and this was during the late 60's. He was a real trailblazer doing that when it would have been easy to bring out the likes of Ray Price. But in time, his record company Columbia, who he'd been with forever and made a ton of money for, dropped him. When he did his American Recordings later in life and started earning awards an ad was put in Billboard magazine that said the following:

"American Recordings and Johnny Cash would like to acknowledge the Nashville music establishment and country radio for your support."

Above those words is a picture of Johnny Cash during a visit to Folsom Prison giving the middle finger to the camera.

Then there is Merle and Buck, architects of the Bakersfield sound. So called that because it was an answer to the Nashville sound which was a much more slickly produced type of music. Buck Owens caught absolute hell in the beginning of his career because he was such a rebel that he actually used drums on his recordings and live. Countless other battles were fought by him and Merle Haggard against the "traditionalists" in country music because they dared to think and do outside the box. The best country music in the 60's did not come out of Nashvile, it came out of Bakersfield, California. And don't let the cornball humor on Hee Haw fool you, Buck Owens and the Buckaroos (featuring Don Rich on Lead Guitar and Harmony Vocals) were absolute studs as musicians long before that show came along. They were good enough that this one rock band on Buck Owens label Capitol asked for copies of every new recording he and the Buckaroos put out. The group? The Beatles.

And then there is Waylon. Every sucessful singer in country music today owes him an incredible amount of gratitude, even those prepackaged ones like Faith Hill. Before he came along a singer was told where to sing, when to sing, and what to sing. They had zero influence creatively. They wouldn't even let a singer's band record with them. Waylon changed the Nasville establishment in so many ways that space doesn't permit to describe it but he, above all other deserves the term "outlaw."

What we call "Classic Country" now or often classic anything was not thought of that way when it was first conceived. It was seen as dangerous and disrespectful to the past and their traditions but in time things changed. They always do. Maybe what we see now as bad will be looked as good in 20 or so years. I doubt it but you never know. Times change.

M2
01-07-2008, 07:49 PM
I think you could say that about a large majority of the people that are trying to make music these days, and that doesn't only pertain to country music.

Agreed, though I find country an egregious violator. I've done a fair amount of travelling over the past decade for business and I usually like to flip around the radio dial in each city. First off, radio has become awful. It's hard to find anything but dreck (far as I can tell Maine's got the best radio selection in the nation). Yet throughout a lot of the country it's impossible to find much country other than mainstream country. I remember being down in Dallas thinking that even Tejano sucks these days (then again I had a hard time finding anyone who direct me to a respectable mom and pop Texas BBQ joint in Dallas too, got sent to a chain place that was wholly inferior to what I can get two stops down the T). Forget about finding any Joe Ely.

Anyway, I get the sense that a guy like John Doe, who's made some really good country music over the past decade, mostly has to gain attention from aging rock 'n' roll fans with broadening tastes while a pop princess like Simpson should have a willing audience with country fans.

westofyou
01-07-2008, 07:59 PM
Agreed, though I find country an egregious violator. I've done a fair amount of travelling over the past decade for business and I usually like to flip around the radio dial in each city. First off, radio has become awful. It's hard to find anything but dreck (far as I can tell Maine's got the best radio selection in the nation). Yet throughout a lot of the country it's impossible to find much country other than mainstream country. I remember being down in Dallas thinking that even Tejano sucks these days (then again I had a hard time finding anyone who direct me to a respectable mom and pop Texas BBQ joint in Dallas too, got sent to a chain place that was wholly inferior to what I can get two stops down the T). Forget about finding any Joe Ely.

Anyway, I get the sense that a guy like John Doe, who's made some really good country music over the past decade, mostly has to gain attention from aging rock 'n' roll fans with broadening tastes while a pop princess like Simpson should have a willing audience with country fans.

Radio is at an all time low, I could go on but we all know it.

Good country is found on the AM radio when the sun goes down in Texas.

CrackerJack
01-07-2008, 08:02 PM
It is really interesting to see the names that are mentioned as
"Classic Country" here. Johnny Cash, Waylon, Merle, and the immortal Buck Owens are my 4 favorite country singers, which is my favorite kind of music to listen to. But at the same time, country music and those gentlemen were not always on the same page in their heyday.

It was seen as dangerous and disrespectful to the past and their traditions but in time things changed. They always do. Maybe what we see now as bad will be looked as good in 20 or so years. I doubt it but you never know. Times change.



Good post, thanks for typing it up. My comments were more along the lines of where things have gone since guys like Waylon, Pride, and Cash's careers basically ended, even Hank Jr., who is now just a shell of his former self. I respected all of the country musicians in the 50's, 60's and 70's, just as I would have more admiration/respect for Motown, than I do "Snoop Dogg records." I am a musician and I appreciate good musicianship. Singing's great, but it gets boring to listen to "just" vocal ability (i.e. today's young female pop star soloist singers).

I listen to new bands/music all the time and it's not snobbery or traditionalistic nonsense for the sake of being that way.

Country's just a packaged, familiar sound now, Clearchannel, dinosaur record label fluff, just like hip hop or jock rock, the image and the "visual package" is more important than just the music or songs. Everything's made for TV first.

TV came to Johnny Cash. :)

BoydsOfSummer
01-08-2008, 05:43 AM
Townes Van Zandt would be the man that Steve would lead you to do that kissing.

Noted and investigating...

klw
01-08-2008, 08:05 AM
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=hEfe80Ty8KY

919191
01-08-2008, 09:10 AM
Noted and investigating...

I downloaded a TVZ show this weekend, and it has Ray Wylie Hubbard on it, too! Looking forward to giving it a listen.

IslandRed
01-08-2008, 11:11 AM
Seems to me Jessica Simpson's got some shrewd management. Find a low bar to clear.

Reading the papers day in and day out, I've heard plenty of "names" talk about making a country record, and most often that's the last you hear of it. The musical bar may not be particularly high on mainstream radio, but there's a sincerity bar to clear with country listeners. Carpetbagging is nowhere near as easy as people think. The core buying public these days is more suburban than rural, they know exactly who Jessica Simpson is, and they're not particularly impressed. Especially anyone who heard about the Kennedy Center honors show. She might get some airplay, but unless the album is unexpectedly good, I doubt seriously it'll move many units.

Not saying pop-country princesses don't exist, but... well, let's use Carrie Underwood as an example. She won a pop-star reality show, but she claimed all along she wanted to be a country singer and she went straight to the genre for her first album, so she wasn't viewed as a carpetbagger by the audience. Had she released a pop album or two first and watched it bomb, and then "gone country," she wouldn't be nearly so popular.

Handofdeath
01-08-2008, 12:08 PM
Radio is at an all time low, I could go on but we all know it.

Good country is found on the AM radio when the sun goes down in Texas.

You are so right. The Lubbock, Texas area is the home of Buddy Holly, Waylon, Joe Ely, and Mac Davis and we have absolutely horrible radio stations here including the oldies station.

BoydsOfSummer
01-08-2008, 06:23 PM
One of those Steve Earle albums I downed was "Together at the Bluebird Cafe". Earle, Townes and Guy Clark...jackpot!

michst
01-08-2008, 10:40 PM
I don't have a problem with pop country. No its not the same as Johnny Cash or Waylon but its still enjoyable to hear on the radio or in car on a sunny day. I would much rather listen to Robert Earl Keen Jr or Pat Greene but Carrie Underwood sure is purty.