PDA

View Full Version : Selig extended through 2012



AmarilloRed
01-17-2008, 07:30 PM
Selig's contract extended through 2012
By Tom Haudricourt
Thursday, Jan 17 2008, 11:16 AM

Bud Selig, who insisted in the past that he planned to leave his post as baseball commissioner when his current term expired in 2009, was extended for three more years this morning in a unanimous vote of team owners in Phoenix.

Selig, who will be 78 when the new extension expires, will have served as commissioner for 20 years at that point, including six in an interim capacity. His contract was extended through 2009 on August 21, 2004, and the Milwaukee native said at the time that he planned to retire at the end of that term.

In December 2006, Selig reiterated his plans to retire in 2009. But owners continued to prod him to leave the door open to an extension.

The timing of the extension is the owners' way of showing their support for Selig despite the recent scandal involving use of performance-enhancing drugs in baseball. Selig appeared before Congress on Tuesday to testify about the Mitchell Report, which he commissioned to investigate past use of steroids and other banned substances in baseball.

Selig and players union chief Don Fehr both accepted responsibility at that hearing for their roles as the game's leaders during what is now know as "The Steroid Era."

The former owner of the Brewers was named interim commissioner on Sept. 9, 1992, two days after Fay Vincent resigned under pressure from ownership. He served in that capacity until being elected on a full-time basis on July 9, 1998, officially becoming the game's ninth commissioner.

Under Selig's guidance, Major League Baseball moved past the disastrous labor strike that resulted in the cancellation of the 1994 World Series into its most prosperous era in history. Selig helped initiate important changes in the game such as revenue sharing, divisional play, the wild-card playoff format, interleague play and awarding home-field advantage in the World Series to the league that wins the All-Star Game.

Selig also presided over a building boom of new ballparks throughout the major leagues, including the opening of Miller Park in Milwaukee in 2001. MLB also has pushed to become a global sport, including the first World Baseball Classic being played in the spring of 2006.

Selig also helped lead the game into an unprecedented period of labor peace. On Oct. 24, 2006, owners and the players union agreed on a five-year extension of the Basic Agreement, the longest deal in the game's history. By the end of that deal on Dec. 11, 2011, baseball will have gone 16 years without a strike or lock-out.

With the backing of Congress, Selig also prodded the players union to accept a more-comprehensive drug-testing program in January 2005, including year-round testing and immediate penalties. That policy was further strengthened 10 months later, with amphetamines added to the list of banned substances and suspensions of 50 games, 100 games and a lifetime ban for first, second and third offenses.

MLB has set attendance records in each of the past three seasons, drawing 79.5 million fans in 2007. Total revenue for the sport exceeded $6 billion in 2007, up from $1.2 billion when Selig became interim commissioner in 1992, putting baseball in the same financial stratosphere as the NFL.


I am now convinced he will be Commissioner through 2020.:)

Bip Roberts
01-17-2008, 07:43 PM
Best news ever

Vada Pinson Fan
01-17-2008, 07:44 PM
Just what Pete Rose wanted to hear. NOT!

HalMorrisRules
01-17-2008, 08:14 PM
I wanted to cry when I saw it on ESPNews this afternoon. Jayson Stark basically said he decided to stay on because he needed to clean up steroids to preserve his "legacy." What a crock, like he was going to have a good legacy anyway. Canceled World Series, tie All-Star game, etc had pretty much ruined that.

GoReds33
01-17-2008, 08:37 PM
I agree with HalMorris. It's not like he can fix his legacy. No matter what he does, short of banning anybody remotly associated with steroids from baseball, he will never have a good legacy. He sets a precedent by keeping arguibly one of the greatest players in baseball history out of baseball, but so far has made no effort to keep these cheaters out. Now I'm not saying that what Pete did was good, but it isn't as bad as steroids.

I can't wait until we get a fresh face. Look at all the good things Roger Goodell has done with the NFL. I hope we get a similar result.

Vada Pinson Fan
01-17-2008, 09:25 PM
I agree with HalMorris. It's not like he can fix his legacy. No matter what he does, short of banning anybody remotly associated with steroids from baseball, he will never have a good legacy. He sets a precedent by keeping arguibly one of the greatest players in baseball history out of baseball, but so far has made no effort to keep these cheaters out. Now I'm not saying that what Pete did was good, but it isn't as bad as steroids.

Unfortunately, GoReds33, it is THE Ultimate sin in baseball (betting on baseball).

What are the owners thinking? I thought Bowie Kuhn was bad until Bud Selig came along. Although Kuhn really screwed the Reds over in the Vida Blue for Dave Revering +cash trade and followed the whims to a fault of Walter O'Malley (my opinion), Kuhn is top notch compared to Selig. Donald Fehr has had Bud Selig wrapped around his little finger since the time they first met and that has been awful for the game of baseball. Bud Selig comes off as not being all that bright and Fehr: a genius.

Hank Aaron would have made a great Commissioner as would have Bob Costas. I'm sure there are countless others. As HalMorris pointed out, so many negative things under the watch of Bud Selig has happened to the Grand Ole Game. Bud Selig isn't, at all, what's right with baseball. And what's right with baseball continues to dwindle...

gedred69
01-17-2008, 09:38 PM
Halmorris/goreds, I agree. This guy couldn't clear up his legacy if the "Sale of Indulgences" was re-instated by God himself! He blind-eyed steroids, altered tradition, and went into an Alzheimer's act rather than actually "act" anytime he should have. His only reason for being in his position, is how well MLB has done financially in the last several years. To which we, the Fans are paying the tune for, in every ticket, licensed item, parking place, hotdog, beer, box of popcorn, bag of peanuts, program, and everything else we pay $$ for. (Sometimes I think, Damn this addiction)!!

mlbfan30
01-17-2008, 10:33 PM
I really don't understand the hate for Selig...
He's helped dramatically increase the popularity and economic growth in baseball. Isn't that the main job of the commissioner?
Do you guys really hate him because he wouldn't allow Pete to be in the HOF. Or was it the strike? As much as you like Rose, he did break strick MLB rules. It wasn't as if there were no offical rules against betting at the time he did it. Everyone knew betting will lead to a lifetime ban from baseball, way before Pete ever existed. The steroids thing is very different. There were no rules against it at the time. He then implemented the harshest penalties out of the major sports. You can't blame steroids on him, he didn't tell players to do it or anything. They've been around before Selig was commish. Also to knock him on amphetamine use is just stupid. What about when they were widely used in the 60s,70s,80s. Why not blame commishes before his time. I really don't know much about the strike season in 1994, but again it's not anything new. Just give him credit for the overall picture. As a whole baseball has benefited from Selig.

Bip Roberts
01-17-2008, 10:48 PM
I dont understand whats selig has personally done to help baseball grow, seems like he was in the right place at the right time

mlbfan30
01-18-2008, 12:56 AM
The Wild Card has helped a lot. It allows more teams to get into the playoffs, which means increased interest when teams would have been out of it before. Do you think 1999 would have been the same had the WC not existed? There have been many many teams that are now able to compete because of the WC system. With up to 14-16 teams that are still in the race until late Sept every year, that's a huge boost to attendance and interest in baseball.

Interleague has also greatly boosted attendence and has been very good for clubs. I'm getting tired of it, but just about any Reds/Indians is nearly sold out. Along with all the other typical matchups, and any team facing the Yanks/Sox.

Bip Roberts
01-18-2008, 02:36 AM
I feel it was just a matter of time before those changes were made anyways. Its just the natural progression of any sport.

Z-Fly
01-18-2008, 07:49 AM
I really don't understand the hate for Selig...
He's helped dramatically increase the popularity and economic growth in baseball. Isn't that the main job of the commissioner?
Do you guys really hate him because he wouldn't allow Pete to be in the HOF. Or was it the strike? As much as you like Rose, he did break strick MLB rules. It wasn't as if there were no offical rules against betting at the time he did it. Everyone knew betting will lead to a lifetime ban from baseball, way before Pete ever existed. The steroids thing is very different. There were no rules against it at the time. He then implemented the harshest penalties out of the major sports. You can't blame steroids on him, he didn't tell players to do it or anything. They've been around before Selig was commish. Also to knock him on amphetamine use is just stupid. What about when they were widely used in the 60s,70s,80s. Why not blame commishes before his time. I really don't know much about the strike season in 1994, but again it's not anything new. Just give him credit for the overall picture. As a whole baseball has benefited from Selig.

I hate him because Baseball is now the only major sport that doesn't have a salary cap! He let roids run rampid for a number of years and didn't do anything about it. Im sure your right, he didn't tell anyone to use roids. He might as well have though. Don't you remember in 99' when Big Mac and Sosa were pimped on every MLB commercial.

Baseball has grown in spite of him not because of him. He is a yes man to the owners, and that is why he has been the commish for so many years. Please don't give me the wild card example! Im sure he was not the first person to ever think of that. He has not been a bad commish. He has been a TERRIBLE one. My life will be much better when he is not in charge anymore.

bounty37h
01-18-2008, 11:51 AM
I really don't understand the hate for Selig...
He's helped dramatically increase the popularity and economic growth in baseball. Isn't that the main job of the commissioner?
Do you guys really hate him because he wouldn't allow Pete to be in the HOF. Or was it the strike? As much as you like Rose, he did break strick MLB rules. It wasn't as if there were no offical rules against betting at the time he did it. Everyone knew betting will lead to a lifetime ban from baseball, way before Pete ever existed. The steroids thing is very different. There were no rules against it at the time. He then implemented the harshest penalties out of the major sports. You can't blame steroids on him, he didn't tell players to do it or anything. They've been around before Selig was commish. Also to knock him on amphetamine use is just stupid. What about when they were widely used in the 60s,70s,80s. Why not blame commishes before his time. I really don't know much about the strike season in 1994, but again it's not anything new. Just give him credit for the overall picture. As a whole baseball has benefited from Selig.

That is the most tired arguement in the steroids issue to me, no, there wasnt a MLB rule, cause they were fricking illegal for everyone, no need for a specific rule for it!!!! There is no specific rule for murder in the MLB rules, cause it is illegal, shouldnt need to be restated. And yes, he does deserve some of the blame for the steroid era, as he had to know it was going on, and turned a blind eye to it. And if he didnt know, he needs to go for not having a clue of what was going on under his watch.

mlbfan30
01-18-2008, 12:09 PM
I'm not saying it was right about roids or anything. All I'm saying is that there was no precedent set before Seligs time about roids. There was with betting an Rose. That's the difference. Now MLB has set up a system, which is much better than the NFL.

chettt
01-18-2008, 12:10 PM
but he promised!!!!! He said he would retire after next season. Maybe this should be the first investigation for his Investigation Department. I totally agree with Z-Fly. :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:

reds2221
01-18-2008, 12:55 PM
I wanted to cry when I saw it on ESPNews this afternoon. Jayson Stark basically said he decided to stay on because he needed to clean up steroids to preserve his "legacy." What a crock, like he was going to have a good legacy anyway. Canceled World Series, tie All-Star game, etc had pretty much ruined that.

exactly, no matter what good he does now he will always be remembered for what went wrong